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Lots related to Original%20Production%20cel%20background%20featuring for sale at auction

(68 lots returned )

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Profiles in History (68)
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[Aviation]. Lockheed T2V-1 Naval Air Training Command vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 180. [Aviation]. Lockheed T2V-1 Naval Air Training Command vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model has a 10 in. (254 mm.) wingspan and features the original Lucite and plastic base featuring an inset silver-toned resin medallion stating “Naval Air Training Command / Lockheed T2V-1” surrounding an aircraft carrier and naval air wings below. In fine vintage condition with slight decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Douglass Skyraider vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 169. [Aviation]. Douglass Skyraider vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of plastic, the model has a 12.25 in. (311 mm.) wingspan and features the original clear plastic base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Grumman S2F-1 Sub Killer vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 170. [Aviation]. Grumman S2F-1 Sub Killer vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model has a wingspan of 20.5 in. (521 mm.) and features the original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Grumman Albatross vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 171. [Aviation]. Grumman Albatross vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model has a 12 in. (305 mm.) wingspan and features original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with minor decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. North American A-5C Vigilante vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 174. [Aviation]. North American A-5C Vigilante vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 14 in. (356 mm.) long and features original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Chance Vought F7U-3 Cutlass vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 175. [Aviation]. Chance Vought F7U-3 Cutlass vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 10.5 in. (267 mm.) long and features original Lucite and plastic base. Silver finish has yellowed; all decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Douglass F4D Skyray vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 176. [Aviation]. Douglass F4D Skyray vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of plastic, the model measures 13 in. (330 mm.) long and features the original clear plastic base. In fine vintage condition with slight decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Grumman Cougar vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 177. [Aviation]. Grumman Cougar vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 12.5 in. (318 mm.) long and features the original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact; edge of base exhibits adhesive remnants. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Chance Vought F8U-2N Crusader vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 178. [Aviation]. Chance Vought F8U-2N Crusader vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 13.75 in. (349 mm.) long and features the original Lucite and plastic base. In fine vintage condition with slight decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. McDonnell F3H Demon vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 181. [Aviation]. McDonnell F3H Demon vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 9.75 in. (248 mm.) long and features the original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Pair of Grumman A2F Intruder vintage prime contractor desk display models.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 182. [Aviation]. Pair of Grumman A2F Intruder vintage prime contractor desk display models. Crafted of resin, each model measures 13.25 in. (337 mm.) long and features the original Lucite base. In fine vintage condition with decals intact. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Lockheed ASW P3V-1 vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 172. [Aviation]. Lockheed ASW P3V-1 vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 16.5 in. (419 mm.) long and features the original base with metallic Lockheed badge. Minor scratches in black paint on the nose; some of the decals have flaked off in areas; small tip of single propeller blade has broken off with its internal shaft replaced with wood. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. North American T2J-1 Buckeye Jet Trainer vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 173. [Aviation]. North American T2J-1 Buckeye Jet Trainer vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of resin, the model measures 11.75 in. (298 mm.) long and features original Lucite and faux-wood plastic base. In fine vintage condition with some decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Pair of Lockheed TV-2 Shooting Star vintage prime contractor desk display models.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $500

Description: 179. [Aviation]. Pair of Lockheed TV-2 Shooting Star vintage prime contractor desk display models. Crafted of resin, each model has an 8.5 in. (216 mm.) wingspan and features the original resin base with flocked texture and central Lockheed badging. Metallic finish has become slightly uneven with age; overall, in fine vintage condition with decals intact. $300 - $500

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[Aviation]. Grumman F-14 vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 183. [Aviation]. Grumman F-14 vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of plastic, the model measures 10.5 in. (267 mm.) long and features the original clear plastic base. The wings articulate to swing forward or back (for sub- and super-sonic flight as on the real aircraft). In very good vintage condition; uppermost edge of starboard vertical stabilizer is missing, with minor decal flaking. $150 - $250

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[Aviation]. Hughes Aircraft U.S. Navy AIM-54A Phoenix Missile vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $150 - $250

Description: 185. [Aviation]. Hughes Aircraft U.S. Navy AIM-54A Phoenix Missile vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of plastic, the model measures 8 in. (203 mm.) long and features the original clear and black plastic. Dymo label reading “9-27-74” has been affixed to the front of base. In fine vintage condition with slight decal flaking. $150 - $250

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Heisenberg, Werner. Typed letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 69. Heisenberg, Werner. Typed letter signed (“W. Heisenberg”), 3 pages (8.25 x 11.5 in.; 210 x 292 mm.), on separate leaves, in German, on “Max Planck Institute for Physics” letterhead, Göttingen, 3 October 1948, written to Professor Samuel A. Goudsmit, Brookhaven National Laboratory. Usual folds with staple holes at left corner.Werner Heisenberg defends his fellow German physicists in a letter written to Samuel Goudsmit, Dutch-American physicist and critic of the German scientists of World War II.“After the lecture General Fieldmarshal Milch asked me how large the bomb might be and whether it would be powerful enough to destroy a big city. I then answered that the bomb, that is its active part, would have the approximate size of a pineapple. Of course this statement attracted attention especially among the non-physicists, who remembered it well.”Heisenberg writes in full: Dear Goudsmit, Many thanks for your letter. Of course it is always easier to discuss facts than it is to talk about motives. Therefore, I was happy to hear that, after reading the secret reports, you have come to the conclusion that, indeed, we knew since 1940 that one can produce atomic explosives from a pile (Weizsäcker, Houtermans) and that we also knew since 1942 that the decisive ingredient was 94 (Pu). I am concerned with these facts mainly because they touch upon the crucial contentions in your book and with which, as far as I can see, you establish the comprehensive view of your book. As the text of your book shows (p. 138/139) in the following sentences: “It was not until a full day after the first announcement of Hiroshima that Heisenberg began to understand how he and his colleagues had completely missed the basic principle of the atom bomb. It was only then that he finally came to understand that we had used uranium pile merely to produce material – plutonium – and out of this new substance had made the bomb. The pile itself was never intended to be a bomb. Heisenberg called his colleagues together and explained to them what it was all about. They were amazed, and crestfallen. It was all so simple. How could they ever have missed it? And how could they ever survive such a blow to German scientific prestige? … Heisenberg spoke to an Associated Press reporter about “Germany’s uranium pile, which I was building up to create energy for machines and not for bombs … As the world knows, the explosive, plutonium, is produced in such a uranium pile. Heisenberg’s statement is a beautiful example of how to use half-truths. It is true that the German scientists were working on a uranium machine and not the bomb, but it is true only because they failed to understand the difference between the machine and the bomb. The bomb was what they were after. And what the whole world knows about plutonium the German scientists did not know – until they were told about it after Hiroshima.” The underlined sentences are also emphasized in print and will therefore be perceived by the readers of your book as the most important statements; they are also cited in the newspapers. As I have mentioned, it is important to me that you realize that those sentences are false. The correct formulation should have been something like this: “The German physicists knew the difference between an uranium machine and an atom bomb. They also knew since 1940 that it was possible to obtain atomic explosives from the uranium burner and, since 1942, they knew that the element 94 (Pu) was involved. In any case, they knew enough about the production and manufacture of atom bombs to realize, that such a production of bombs could not succeed in Germany during the war. For this reason they were spared the moral decision of whether they should begin making atom bombs, and so they worked only with uranium machines.” You admitted in your last letter that the formulation concerning the question of plutonium was correct. But regarding the fast neutrons and, therefore, the difference between uranium burner and bomb, you seem to have reservations. In order for you to realize that you were mistaken in your book, I would like to ask you to study a secret report by Houtermans (pertaining to the issue of triggering of nuclear chain reactions, parag. III: chain reactions through nuclear fission with fast neutrons, especially Fig. I) which you might have missed; in those days I discussed the original research about this quite regularly with Houtermans. I must also repeat my question, voiced in my last letter, namely, what in your opinion was meant by our remark concerning the use of protactinium as an explosive and by my diagrams in my Luftwaffe report, if it was not the fact that we certainly knew about chain reactions with fast neutrons. I have also asked some of the people who were present at the meeting with Speer on June 6, 1942 which details they could still remember being discussed regarding the atom bomb issue. It turned out that some of the participants of that meeting, especially Miss Bollmann, a secretary from the Max Planck association, and Dr. Telschow, recalled the following incident: After the lecture General Fieldmarshal Milch asked me how large the bomb might be and whether it would be powerful enough to destroy a big city. I then answered that the bomb, that is its active part, would have the approximate size of a pineapple. Of course this statement attracted attention especially among the non-physicists, who remembered it well. Since you probably have the list of participants of that meeting there in America, you could ask some of the gentlemen in question. Finally I would like to mention that, prior to the publication of my report in Science, I naturally showed it to the involved members of the “Uranium Club” and that only after all of those people at the “Uranium Club” agreed with its contents, was it published. Because there really can not remain any doubts about this entire matter, I would like to ask if you couldn’t publish a rectification of the statements made on pp. 138/139 of your book, perhaps in one of the “Atomic Bulletins”; just those assertions in your book have been repeatedly picked up and cited by the press and have led to a broad proliferation of wrong impressions about German atomic physicists, which can really be of no interest to anyone. For the time being I would like to refrain from dealing with some of the other statements in your letter, because I feel that many of the formulations are incorrect, but I want to avoid the deepening of our differences by continuing a critical discussion. I had hoped that, after agreeing about the facts, we could also come to terms with the motives, and I am loath to relinquish that hope. One last comment: according to the latest information, Thüring and Stuart do not hold a position at a university any longer. So far, I do not know anything about Schenk. None of us would insist that the de-nazification was accomplished correctly in every instance. Many people lost their positions unjustly, and many others kept their posts equally unjustly. This problem is so hopelessly complicated that I wouldn’t know how to solve it justly. I will be happy to discuss the uranium questions with Mr. White. For the rest I agree, of course, with you and with your book that a totalitarian regime of a country harms science tremendously. I have said and written before, that I share this opinion. But in your book this notion is substantiated with false arguments and I regret that very much. With best regards, yoursW. Heisenberg.On 4 June 1942, Heisenberg, then director of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Physics, met with Albert Speer, Reichminister for Armaments and Munitions, and his top civilian and military advisors. Discussion turned to nuclear research and the atomic bomb. Heisenberg acknowledged that it would be possible to build atomic reactors (“uranium machines”). Speer then asked how nuclear physics could be used to build an atomic bomb. Heisenberg replied that the theoretical knowledge was in place but that it would take at least two years, due to the great expense and lack of such crucial resources as a cyclotron. $10,000 - $15,000

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Gershwin, George. Autograph inscription signed

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $7,000

Description: 62. Gershwin, George. Autograph inscription signed, on the front flyleaf of Art in America in Modern Times edited by Holger Cahill and Alfred H. Barr, Jr., New York, 1934: vertical crease on inscription page; dust-jacket browned with marginal fraying.A charming inscription to Dorothy Heyward boldly signed by George Gershwin. The inscription reads: “To Lovely Dorothy In admiration & with best wishes, George Gershwin Dec. 16, 1934.” Gershwin presented this book as a gift to Heyward at the time they were working on Porgy and Bess together. In addition to several works of her own, Dorothy Heyward co-authored the play Porgy (1927) with her husband DuBose Heyward, adapting it from his novel of the same name. Their work is now best known in its adaptation as the opera Porgy and Bess (1935), with music by George Gershwin. Originally conceived by Gershwin as an “American folk opera” Porgy and Bess premiered in New York in the autumn of 1935 and featured an entire cast of classically trained African-American singers—a daring choice at the time. $5,000 - $7,000

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Ledbetter, Huddie (

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $12,000 - $15,000

Description: 90. Ledbetter, Huddie (“Lead Belly”). An archive of (5) pieces featuring a rare autograph letter signed (“H Ledbetter”), 1 page (7.75 x 9.75 in.; 197 x 248 mm.), New York, 28 March 1949, in pencil, written to one of his managers, Austen C. Fairbanks; Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter autograph manuscript, 1 page (8.5 x 4 in.; 216 x 102 mm.), [no place, no date, but ca. late 1948 to early 1949], being a set list of 12 songs used in a live performance kept in blue pencil; Martha Promise Ledbetter autograph letter signed (“Martha Ledbetter”), 2 pages (5.75 x 8.75 in.; 146 x 222 mm.), New York, 10 May 1949, in green ink, written to Ledbetter's other manager, Marjorie Fairbanks (and Austen's mother); an original promotional flyer for a “‘High-Cost-of-Living' Hootenanny” featuring Ledbetter, Woody Guthrie and other folk singers, (7 x 11 in.; 178 x 279 mm.), [New York, December 1947]; and a superb (possibly unpublished) (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) black and white photograph showing Ledbetter in a suit, strumming his guitar surrounded by a crowd of adoring schoolchildren. Altogether five pieces, most of which are in fine condition. Flyer bears some moderate, uneven toning, photograph is creased at edges and corners.  A rare handwritten letter and set list by the legendary Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter together with a superb letter from his wife, Martha Promise.Of particular interest is Ledbetter's letter to his manager, Austen Fairbanks, whom, together with his mother, Marjorie Fairbanks, took over his management in early 1948. Ledbetter's letter reads in most part [with original spellings retained]: i rec[eived] a Check for $150 was ok But we did not rec[eive] no money order for $25 so if you got the Stub Keep it we waundered what was the mat[t]er so far the moth of mar[ch] we Have at this time rec[eived] $175 that['s] all. So the mein time Don[']t for get april Pleas[e.] your Letter was fine the Harvard Concert they Call agon say it was fro the 21 of april so if they call agon I [k]no[w] what to do it was from the order of Rudie Blosh…H Ledbetter. By the time he composed this letter, Ledbetter was already cognizant that he was losing control of his muscles, though he lacked an accurate diagnosis. He had been recently released from the hospital after finding himself unable to walk. Writing that he had a doctor who was “fixing” him up, he announced he was “walking near perfect now.” According to his most authoritative biography to date, he composed the song “Walk Around My Bedside” in celebration. (Charles K. Wolfe, et al, The Life and Legend of Leadbelly, 1992, p.254) Following his recovery, Ledbetter remained in New York performing mainly in jazz clubs and on the radio preparing for his trip to Europe in May. Martha Promise's letter was written soon after Ledbetter's departure for Europe, his only time ever spent outside of the United States. She writes in most part [with original spellings retained]: How goes every Thing Well I hope as that's leaves me ok felling much better Since I read your letters and also I got the check and thank[s] a million I am not worried about Huddie as longs I know he is with you and Aussten becurse I know he will be Taking Care of and I Am Sure any kind of care he needs you will see to that I am a[w]full Thrilled to here every thing is going fine. Any kind of clippings you can send me will be very Thankfull of Them[.] I were very surprised how Quick they made the trip I couldn['t] believe my eyes when I got the telegram he were there already every thing is very lonesome and Quiet here Thursday were ladys day at the Ball game and I enjoyed it very much ladys can always go for 50¢ That[']s one thing grand about it 'ha ha' Well this here to be a very short letter becourse There is no news give Clayton my love and also the rest of the Boys… Ledbetter's trip would be cut short due to his deteriorating health. While in France, a Paris physician diagnosed him with ALS (or Lou Gehrig's Disease) and Ledbetter returned to the United States at the end of May. He played only two more shows, one with Woody Guthrie in Chicago, and then a tribute to the late John A. Lomax in Austin, Texas on 15 June 1949. By July he was admitted to Bellevue and would be in and out of the hospital after that. For some time, Lead Belly would sing and play his guitar. The day he found himself unable to play, he cried. Huddie Ledbetter died on 6 December 1949. The set list, which appears to date from 1948, features thirteen songs, including [with original spellings retained]: ”They Hung Him on the Cross”, “work song”, “July on Johnson”, “Bring me Little Water Silvie”, “The Gray goos[e]”, “Bushwhase [i.e. Bourgeois] Blues”, “mid night on the see”, “Tell me where did Sleep Las night”, “Mory don’t you weep”, “459 Blues”, “Com[e] Long all you Cow Boys”, and ”One a Little Boy walking Down the Road.” Perhaps the most profound among these great songs is Lead Belly's 1939 song, “Bourgeois Blues.” Following a recording session with Alan Lomax at the Library of Congress in Washington, Lomax, Ledbetter and their wives decided to celebrate over dinner, but they found it difficult to find a restaurant willing to seat blacks and whites together. It became a favorite among left-wing groups: Lead Belly was invited to sing it at Camp Unity, the Communist Party U.S.A.'s summer retreat. The song was also a popular favorite among other singers, and would be recorded also by Pete Seeger and Ry Cooder.  The flyer advertises “The Hootenanny”, held at Town Hall in New York on the evening of 27 September 1947 (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 27 September 1947, p. 12). The program featured not only Ledbetter closing the show, but other greats including Woodie Guthrie. Interestingly, the listing of the various artists on the bill also list the songs they planned to perform save for Lead Belly, who intended to “announce his own numbers” during the program.  The period (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) photograph shows Ledbetter, dressed in a suit and bow tie, singing amidst a throng of adoring school children, one of which, a little girl, gleefully rests her ear upon his guitar, eyes shut with a huge smile on her face. Apparently unpublished, we have yet to discover another example of this photograph. The photograph contradicts one of the great myths of Lead Belly—the image of a rough, ex-convict (the wild-eyed “murderous minstrel”, a label that Time bestowed upon him in 1935). In actuality, Ledbetter enjoyed a wonderful rapport with children, many of whom sensed something special about the man (Wolfe, 265). Extremely Rare. Ledbetter’s writing in any form is exceptionally rare. Besides this letter, no known fully signed letters are known outside of a few institutions. $12,000 - $15,000

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Gandhi, Mohandas. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $3,000 - $5,000

Description: 58. Gandhi, Mohandas. Autograph letter signed (“Bapu”), 1 page (4.25 x 6.5 in.; 108 x 165 mm.), written in English using pencil, no place, 19 June 1934, written to “My dear Shanta”. Gandhi signs the letter “Bapu”, the endearing name for “father” or “papa” in India. Usual folds with scattered spotting.Gandhi writes in full: My dear Shanta I have your letter. When Manilal has talked to me I shall write further if necessary. Love BapuIn 1934 Gandhi resigned from the Indian National Congress over his differences with other leaders on the purity of ends and means. He established the “All India Village Industries Association” at Wardha and devoted most of his time towards the reorganization of Indian villages. Gandhi was responsible for reviving village crafts and agricultural processing industries, and improving village cleanliness so that villages could be developed as ideal living surroundings. Gandhi promoted the production of homespun khadi cloth which quickly became a symbol of independence, breaking the British monopoly on clothing production. $3,000 - $5,000

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Einstein, Albert. A large archive.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $25,000 - $30,000

Description: 46. Einstein, Albert. A large archive of material featuring ten letters and a short note by Einstein featuring an autograph letter signed (“A Einstein”), 1 page (4.75 x 7 in.; 121 x 178 mm.), Port Chester, New York, no date (ca. 1939), together with (9) typed letters signed (“A Einstein”), 11 pages total (8.5 x 10.75 in.; 216 x 273 mm.), Princeton, New Jersey; Peconic, New York and Saranac Lake, New York, 1 July 1939 to 18 February 1948, in German, written to Wsevolode Grünberg (also spelled by Einstein “Grunberg” and “Gruenberg”), concerning a complex inheritance matter. Grünberg, who later in life changed his name to Waldemar A. Craig, was an aeronautical engineer who developed an important design for the hydrofoil. The archive also includes a three word note in Einstein's hand on a 4 x 6 in. (102 x 152 mm.) sheet: ”Einstein Teconic Long Island” as well as an autograph letter signed by Elsa Einstein, 2 pages (5.5 x 8.5 in.; 140 x 216 mm.), ”Haberlandstr[aße] 5”, [Berlin], 20 July, no year (1932 or before), in German, to ”Lieber Herr Grünberg!” and (2) typed letters signed by Einstein's secretary, Helene Dukas, in Princeton, New Jersey & Nassau Point, New York, 1 page each (6.25 x 8.5 in. & 8.5 x 11 in.; 159 x 216 mm. & 216 x 279 mm.), Princeton, New Jersey, 7 & 21 July 1939, in German, to Grünberg. The letters accompany a large archive of Grünberg's papers, consisting of well over 1,000 pages of material including some of his original drawings for his hydrofoil improvements, copies of his patents (including a large dossier of declassified tests performed in the years immediately following the Second World War), photographs, correspondence, and other related documents and ephemera. Expected mailing folds and creases and some light toning toward margins. Albert Einstein assists a fellow émigré and engineer, who made important contributions to the development of the hydrofoil, by introducing him to members of the U.S. scientific community: an enormous archive of well over 1,000 pages featuring ten signed letters and a handwritten note from Einstein.Grünberg, the nephew of a close friend of Einstein, appears to have become acquainted with Albert and his second wife Elsa sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s, if not personally, by correspondence. In an undated letter from Berlin, written sometime before 1932, Elsa Einstein commented to Grünberg, ”I am assuming you are just as kind and clever as your uncle, our dear friend. My husband and I were so glad having been able doing this small favor for you. Mr. Dunne wrote a most gracious note to us from Florida. In particular I want to thank you for the delicious grapefruits…” and adding ”Feel free to call on me anytime, if you think I could be of help! Please be sure and do.” Apparently Grünberg took her advice, and travelling to the United States in 1939 approached Einstein for an introduction to fellow engineers in the U.S. in order to demonstrate his hydrofoil designs. The two met in June 1939 at the home of Irving Lehman in Port Chester, New York. According to a contemporary mimeographed copy of a letter from Einstein to Dr. George W. Lewis, Director of Research for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in Washington, Einstein introduced Gruenberg as ”the nephew of a dear friend of mine who died in Berlin several years ago. Mr. Gruenberg has worked in Paris with good success theoretically as well as practically in the field of aeronautics and practical hydrodynamics. He visited me a few weeks ago and discussed several problems in those fields with me. I convinced myself of his ability and experience. I am taking the liberty to address to you this letter knowing that Mr. Gruenberg is not known in this country and has no connection with his American colleagues.” Einstein's introduction to the NACA resulted in extensive practical tests of Grünberg's designs at Langley, Virginia. However, because he was a foreign national (at the time he was a French citizen), wartime security rules prohibited him from learning the results until many years following the Second World War. In addition to the introduction to the American engineering community, Einstein also agreed to handle a complex inheritance matter for Grünberg. On 1 July 1939, the same day he recommended Grünberg to his American associates, he wrote to him that he had written, ”a most insistent letter to Mr. Plesch in which I suggested to name an arbitrator in the inheritance matter who would be agreeable to you as well as to me and who could personally communicate with Mr. Plesch and yourself.” Enclosing the letter to Dr. Lewis, Einstein advised, ”I cannot understand though, how you could succeed to find a position here without a valid residence permit. I urge you to carefully investigate this subject prior to making use of the enclosed letter.” Einstein continued to assist Grünberg with the inheritance issue, acting as a go-between Grünberg in the U.S. and Mr. Plesch in France. On 3 August, Einstein reported some progress, writing, ”Through my intervention, a dear old friend of mine shall be arriving in England in the near future for permanent residence there. He has my fullest confidence, and will also have time on his hands to devote to this matter. He is prepared to do this favor for me and I am certain Mr. Plesch will accept him likewise.” At that point, Einstein begged off further involvement and advised that “At this time, another visit with me would not be of much use either, without the necessary confrontation with the other party.”Apparently Grünberg continued to contact Einstein further, in particular regarding a letter concerning the matter that had been lost in the mail. Einstein, normally an affable and agreeable correspondent, lashed out: ”You don’t seem to comprehend that I do have other things to do than to deal with your matters. I am asking you to immediately stop the investigation for the lost letter, since you did receive a copy of it and this situation is causing major complications for me as well as for the Postal Authorities. The letters that you sent to me shall be used by your trustee in England, provided he will still able to get there. In case it should turn out impossible for him to get there (because of impending war) I shall make an effort finding another trustee to take care of the matter. It appears unseemly to involve myself from here with the details of an inheritance, and I therefore see no reason to constantly being bombarded with letters in that connection.” The “impending war” broke out only a day later when Germany invaded Poland and, of course, complicated matters further. Despite the annoyances, Einstein did what he could for Grünberg both for his inheritance and his scientific pursuits. On 2 February 1940, Einstein advised him to send details of his invention, “to my friend, Professor Karman at the California Institute of Technology for evaluation and assessment. This man is a first rate expert who has influential connections for practical applications.” Apparently Karman was not interested and rebuffed Grünberg. Writing in August 1940, Einstein apologized for his colleague: “I am very sorry that Prof. Karman displayed such an unsatisfactory attitude towards you. Please be assured that this was nothing more than a peculiarity of his; you don’t have to be concerned that he would in any way betray your confidence by using your ideas behind your back. He most likely was just not particularly interested in the whole thing.” Einstein concluded his letter asking that Grünberg continue to use him as a reference, but the pair did not correspond again until 1944 when the subject of the inheritance once again surfaced. This time Einstein refused to help, noting that the war had been enormously disruptive: “…After all, in the meantime our world fell apart and it is difficult to judge a person's financial obligations from the past.” Einstein's involvement in the matter ended at this point, though he did correspond again in 1947 and 1948 noting that he had not heard any news from Mr. Plesch. Grünberg's personal papers concern his research on his hydrofoil designs which he first developed in France. The archive includes some of Grünberg's original drawings demonstrating applications for his design as well as some manuscript calculations in his hand. The archive also includes his original U.S. patent certificates for several inventions including “APPARATUS FOR INSTRUCTING AND TRAINING STUDENT OPERATORS” (No. 2350351, 1944), as well as four patents for watercraft using his hydrofoil design (Nos. 3124096, 1964; 3168067, 1965; 3247821, 1966; and 3232261, 1966). In addition the archive includes a German patent awarded to Grünberg in 1930 for “Verfahren zum Registrieren der Bewegungen und der Steuervorgüange, inbesondrer von Luftfahrzeugen (A method for registering the movements and the control operations, particularly aircraft.)” Also of interest are original photographs, likely from the early 1930s, of his foil design engaged in water tests. His papers include several magazines including Popular Science and others discussing Grünberg's work and designs. Special shipping arrangements will apply. $25,000 - $30,000

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Chevalier, Maurice. Extraordinary archive.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 18. Chevalier, Maurice. Extraordinary archive of (13) autograph manuscript diaries and (8) typescripts with extensive emendations, in French, as used for his ten-volume memoir, entitled Ma route et mes chansons published by Julliard in Paris from 1947-1968, includes leather bound volumes 1-7 of Ma route et mes chansons volume 7 inscribed by the author.Maurice Chevalier’s reflections on his charmed life in his own hand.The epitome of the worldly French song-and-dance man, Maurice Chevalier was one of the twentieth century’s most beloved entertainers, delighting audiences the world over in a five-decade career that encompassed vaudeville, light opera, motion pictures and concerts. Perennially decked out in tuxedo tails and a rakish straw boater, Chevalier crooned love songs in a honeyed Gallic accent that endeared him to theatergoers in the teens and early 1920s before entering silent features. Hollywood beckoned in the early 1930s, and he enjoyed a string of musical hits, including Love Me Tonight (1932) before returning to France prior to World War II. Allegations of collaborations with the Nazis dogged his career during the 1940s, but he returned more popular than ever in the late 1950s, thanks to Gigi (1958), which earned him a special Oscar. Chevalier would go on to essay courtly grandfathers until his retirement in 1968. Chevalier’s archive herewith provides over eighteen years worth of personal reflections and reports on his life, important events and all the people with whom he crossed paths. The richness of the content of the archive is nothing short of staggering ––from memories of his pre-war and war years, to the reporting of the dispirited atmosphere in post-war France, to the re-establishment of his reputation and career after being marred with accusations of collaboration with the Nazi occupiers, to his professionally and artistically explosive successes in Europe and the Americas to personal and professional relationships to his friendships and loves to his maturing and aging––all is recorded with candor and charm. A “Who’s Who” of the great performers of his time, Chevalier’s diaries include mention of Edith Piaf, Marlene Dietrich, Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, Audrey Hepburn, Frank Sinatra and many, many others. The archive includes:I. Thirteen autograph manuscript diaries with extensive emendations, in French, being leather-bound notebooks of varying colors and textures [Cannes and Paris] 28 August 1945 - January 1950, corresponding to volume II, page 127 through volume V, page 48 of the published memoirs.II. Typescript with extensive emendations of his Ma route et mes chansons, bound in two volumes (pages 1-120; 121-237), corresponding to volume III of the published memoirs.III. Carbon copy typescript with extensive emendations, 310 pages, bound in one volume being a transcript of the memoirs from August 1945 to July 1947.IV. Carbon copy typescript with some emendations, paginated 1-242, bound in two volumes from the summer of 1946.V. Carbon copy typescript with emendations, paginated 121-348, bound in one volume.VI. Typescript of Par ci-Par la bound in two volumes, paginated 1-100 and 101-197, corresponding to volume V of the memoirs.VII. Typescript with emendations bound in one volume, 120 pages, corresponding to the first half of volume V of the published memoirs.VIII. Carbon copy typescript with corrections in the hand of Chevalier, the loose pages contained in a folder, 342 pages corresponding to the last volumes of the memoirs.IX. Typescript entitled A Propos bound in one volume, 124 pages.X. Ma route et mes chansons. Volumes 1-7, Paris, Julliard, 1949-57, uniform leather bindings, original front wrappers bound in, Volume VII boldly inscribed in ink on half title by the author: “To Odette Bonne Année Maurice 1957.” $8,000 - $12,000

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Lincoln, Abraham. A Proclamation, January 1863

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $40,000 - $60,000

Description: 97. Lincoln, Abraham. Printed circular,  By the President of the United States of America, a Proclamation. [Washington: Government Printing Office, ca. 5 January 1863] 2 printed pages (8.25 x 13 in.; 209 x 330 mm.) on one folding sheet. First page of sheet bears a printed letter of transmittal dated Washington, 3 January 1863. Small infill at left margin not affecting text, a few insignificant and tiny toned spots. One of the first obtainable printed editions of Abraham Lincoln's final Emancipation Proclamation, January 1863, issued by the State Department, together with two additional anti-slavery imprints collected by a prominent abolitionist in the Lincoln Administration. The letter of transmittal, composed by Secretary of State William Seward, reads in full: You will receive herewith a copy of a proclamation which was issued by the President on the first day of January instant, in which he designates the States and parts of States which yet remain in insurrection against the United States, and gives effect to the proclamation which he issued on the 22d day of September last, and in which it was announced that the slaves within such States and districts would, as a measure of military necessity, on the said first day of January, be declared forever free. Through this great act, slavery will practically be brought to an end in eight of the States of this Union and in the greater portions of two other States. The number of slaves thus restored to freedom is about three and one=half millions. The President entertains no doubt that this transaction will commend itself to the enlightened judgment and moral approbation of not only all Christian States, but of mankind.The second page features a one-page printing of Lincoln's final Emancipation Proclamation signed in type by Seward and Abraham Lincoln. This is the fourth separately printed edition of the final Emancipation Proclamation, preceded only by a virtually unobtainable preliminary printing, a newspaper broadside, and a nearly identical State Department printing lacking the attached transmittal letter. Eberstadt located 4 copies of this printing, but only one still retained the attached transmittal letter, which is dated 3 January 1863. He describes it as “a circular printed for dissemination to the foreign service posts of the Department of State,” and hypothesizes that it was printed on or about 5 January 1863, four days after the proclamation was first issued (See Eberstadt, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, No. 11).  Eberstadt located only four examples of this imprint, of which only the copy at the Library of Congress still had the transmittal letter attached. Only one other example has appeared at auction in the past forty years.Offered together with two additional imprints, including Abraham Lincoln, Gradual Abolishment of Slavery. Message from the President of the United States in Relation to Co-operating with any State for the gradual abolishment of slavery.(Washington, 6 March 1862), 2 pages 8vo.  Minor creases and light soiling, else very good; Additionally offered together with, Liberty or Slavery? Daniel O'Connell on American Slavery. Reply to O'Connell by Hon. S.P. Chase ([Cincinnati]: Chronicle Print, 1863) 15 pages 8vo. bound in pink titled paper wraps. Marginal tears and soiling, covers partly detached, some dampstains, else good condition overall.Originally the property of abolitionist Delano T. Smith (1830-1905). Born in Litchfield, NY, and educated at the Clinton Liberal Institute, Smith studied law and was admitted to the bar in Albany in 1852. He then traveled west to Dixon, IL, where he briefly practiced law. Within three years, Smith moved to Minnesota and became a prominent political figure in the Republican party, representing the state in both the House and Senate. He specialized in financial matters, and as a result was highly recommended to serve as auditor for the US Treasury Department under Salmon Chase during Lincoln's first administration. Although he lost out on this position, Smith was later appointed to the office of US Direct Tax Commissioner of the state of Tennessee, which involved collecting taxes from the rebel states. Smith held this position from 1863-1865, when he resigned and moved to New York to work in real estate. Smith also worked with his brother to promote the first subway in New York City, known as the Arcade Railway. However, in 1869, he decided to move west to Marshalltown, IA, where he again worked in real estate and engaged in farming and stock raising at his farm known as Highland Home. Smith remained in Marshalltown until his death on 10 May 1905.  $40,000 - $60,000

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[Aviation]. McDonnell NASA Project Mercury Manned Satellite Capsule vintage prime contractor desk display model.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $600 - $800

Description: 184. [Aviation]. McDonnell NASA Project Mercury Manned Satellite Capsule vintage prime contractor desk display model. Crafted of plastic with weighted bottom, the model measures 5.75 in. (146 mm.) tall, featuring round porthole windows. Slight scuffing to paint on bottom edge; in fine vintage condition. $600 - $800

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Hemingway, Ernest. Signature.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $800 - $1,200

Description: 71. Hemingway, Ernest. Signature (“Ernest Hemingway”), penned on a (4 x 2.5 in.; 102 x 64 mm.) card imprinted with the CBS logo in the upper left. Hemingway has signed in blue ink, with sentiment, “Best always Ernest Hemingway”. Affixed to the front free endpaper of For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway, 471 pages (5.5 x 8.25 in.; 140 x 210 mm.), New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, copyright 1940. Later edition. Fine condition. With dust jacket exhibiting flaws at spine.Hemingway signs his autograph on a CBS card affixed to a copy of For Whom the Bell Tolls, one of seven of his works produced by CBS television.From 1952-1960, seven works by Ernest Hemingway were produced by CBS: “Fifty Grand” on the “Schlitz Playhouse of Stars” (15 February 1952), “The Capital of the World” on “Omnibus” (6 December 1953), “A Farewell to Arms” on “Climax!” (26 May 1955), “The World of Nick Adams” on “The Seven Lively Arts” (10 November 1957), “For Whom the Bell Tolls” on “Playhouse 90” (12 & 19 March 1959), and “The Fifth Column” (29 February 1960) and “The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio” (19 May 1960) on the “Buick Electra Playhouse.” He undoubtedly signed this autograph while at CBS either when a contract was signed or during the production of one of his works adapted for television. $800 - $1,200

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Ginsberg, Allen.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $4,000 - $6,000

Description: 63. Ginsberg, Allen. Photograph of Timothy Leary and Neal Cassady signed (“Allen Ginsberg”) with lengthy commentary, accomplished on the blank portion of a (11 x 14 in.; 279 x 356 mm.) The photograph was taken by Ginsburg in 1964 in Millbrook, New York at the initial meeting of Timothy Leary and Ken Kesey's “Merry Pranksters.” Photograph printed by Sid Kaplan. Horizontal crease at lower margin, minor wear at corners, small sticker bearing the notation ”52%” in blank margin. A superb double portrait of LSD pioneer Timothy Leary with major Beat Generation figure Neal Cassady aboard Ken Kesey's Merry Prankster bus during their historic 1964 meeting, photographed and signed by Allen Ginsburg, with commentary. In the lower margin, Ginsberg adds some background: Timothy Leary, psychedelic research pioneer, and Neal Cassady first meeting at Millbrook, N.Y., in Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters’ 'Further' bus which Neal’d driven cross-country S.F. to N.Y. via Texas before Fall 1964 Presidentiad, with 'A Vote For Goldwater is a Vote for Fun' logo painted along bus side, L.S.D. Cool-Aid pitcher in icebox. Allen Ginsberg  The meeting between Ken Kesey's “Merry Pranksters” and Timothy Leary is described at length in Tom Wolfe's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968).  Provenance: Gift of Allen Ginsburg to the previous owner, 1991. $4,000 - $6,000

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[World War II].

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $800 - $1,200

Description: 157. [World War II]. Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes’ postwar briefing notes for General Eisenhower.General Geoffrey Keyes’ postwar “Briefing Notes” for General Dwight D. Eisenhower including the mission of the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section: Location, protection, identification and return to owner nations of all property illegally acquired from countries occupied by the German Reich …Included in the lot:(1) ”Economics Division Briefing Notes for General Eisenhower”, retained carbon, 8 pages (8 x 10.5 in.; 203 x 267 mm.), separate lightweight sheets. Not signed. Title page and first page are on sheets of printed stationery headed “Office of Military Government for Bavaria Economics Division APO 170.” In part: At no time in the near future does it appear that Bavaria will be able to get away from rationing and strict control of all food projects. Even before the war with a population of seven million food had to be imported. Now the same area with less fertilizer, fewer farm implements and less transportation, nine million people must be fed … The 1947 Production Plan was formulated in an attempt to exploit all possible means to alleviate the situation …The end of the war resulted in complete disruption of trade and distribution, and the ensuance [sic] of theft and plundering by the civilian population … The Restitution Branch, consisting of the Restitution Section and the Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section, has two principle [sic] missions: a. Location, protection, identification and return to owner nations of all property illegally acquired from countries occupied by the German Reich. b. Supervision of the Bavarian State Government’s responsibility in preserving, protecting and using, all of Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives, belonging to Germany, and existing in Bavaria … There are roughly 150,000 cultural objects in the Munich Central Collecting Point at the moment, estimated to be worth about 150 millions of dollars. In terms of work required, the return of cultural objects is estimated to be about one half completed … (2) Third Army “Industries in Bavaria” hardcover book, 85 pages (8.25 x 11.25 in.; 210 x 286 mm.), “Prepared by Industry Branch Office of Military Government for Bavaria A.P.O. 403 U.S. Army December 1945.” Copiously illustrated with product maps and charts. (3) Typed letter signed (“Leonard R. Moyer”) as 1st Lt., Inf., Athletic Officer, 1 page (7.75 x 11 in.; 197 x 279 mm.), on colorful pictorial letterhead “Seventh Army Alpine Chalet, Bavaria,” 20 February 1946, written to Lt. General Geoffrey Keyes, Hq., Seventh US Army, APO 758, US Army. In part: The cooperation which you have given the Seventh Army Ski Team since i’ts [sic] inception has been so magnanimous I’m not certain where to start thanking you … This past weekend it was very gracious of you to be here in Oberjoch for the Giant Slalom and to award the prizes to the winners … the members of the other teams jealously commented on the cooperation and backing which the Seventh Army Ski Team has had …During World War II, Major General Geoffrey Keyes was Deputy Commanding General Western Task Force [North Africa] under Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. (1942-1943), Deputy Commanding General I Armored Corps [North Africa] under Gen. Patton (1943), Deputy Commanding General 7th Army [Sicily] under Gen. Patton (1943), Commanding General Provisional Corps [Sicily] appointed by Gen. Patton (1943), and Commanding General II Corps [Italy] (1943-1946). Lieutenant General Keyes was Commanding General 7th Army [Germany] (1945-1946), Commanding General 3rd Army [Germany] (1946-1947). and Deputy Commanding General U.S. Forces in Austria under Gen. Mark Clark (1947). He was Commanding General U.S. Forces in Austria and U.S. High Commissioner in Austria from 1947 to 1950. Provenance: From the Estate of Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes. $800 - $1,200

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Anderson, Robert. Autograph statement on the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $800 - $1,200

Description: 3. Anderson, Robert. Autograph statement on the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter signed (“Robert Anderson”), 1 page (4.5 x 7.1 in.; 114 x 180 mm.), no place or date. Extended margins with soiling on edges and mounting remnants on verso. Major Robert Anderson discusses the bombardment of Fort Sumter – triggering the beginning of the Civil War.Anderson writes in full: The bombardment of Fort Sumter commenced at 3 ½ am. Apl. 12. 1861 & that work was evacuated in the afternoon of Apl. 14th / 61 Yours Respectfully Robert Anderson U.S. Army Accompanied by a Robert Anderson autograph letter signed, 1 page (5 x 7.5 in.; 127 x 190 mm.), “Fort Sumter, S.C.”, 24 January 1861, to John M. Burt. Fine. Anderson writes in full: Sir. Thanking you for the compliment, you pay me, in your favor of the 17th inst. I am very truly yours Robert Anderson Major USA.On 20 November 1860, at the request of Southern members of Congress, Secretary of War Floyd sent Robert Anderson (then a Major, having been promoted in 1857) to take over the command of the three forts in Charleston Harbor, S.C. (only one of which - Fort Moultrie - was garrisoned) when secession became imminent. Evidently, Floyd supposed that Anderson’s Kentucky background would render him faithful to the Southern cause. However, Anderson’s fidelity to the Union resulted in one of the most dramatic episodes of the entire Civil War - the defense of Fort Sumter during its lengthy bombardment. For five weeks after his appointment, Anderson called upon the War Department for reinforcements, but no assistance in men or munitions was provided. After South Carolina passed the ordinance of secession (20 December 1857), Anderson secretly spiked the guns at Fort Moultrie and shifted its garrison to Fort Sumter, which (due to its location on a shoal in the harbor) could not be approached by land. Reinforcements arrived on the Star of the West (9 January 1861), but enemy gunfire (without support from Anderson’s garrison in Fort Sumter) forced it to turn back. Confronted with a formal demand to surrender his post, he defended the fort against a bombardment that lasted nearly 34 hours until surrender was his only available course of action (14 April 1861). $800 - $1,200

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[White House]. Original steel bolt.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $3,000 - $5,000

Description: 186. [White House]. Original steel bolt measuring 17 in. (432 mm.) long and 3 in. (76 mm.) wide at its thickest point, with the words ”White House 1792-1902” etched onto the bolt itself. Display stand included with color photocopy of the original tag included, on which reads, ”Smithso… Was…” On the verso, it has the list of previous owners, beginning with ”Mrs. Charles Walcott,” and including ”Mrs. Cole Younger,” and ”CJ Younger.” Fine condition. An original Smithsonian artifact and exceptional piece of American history – a steel bolt that was part of the original White House, removed during Teddy Roosevelt’s 1902 renovation.Charles Walcott was a famous American paleontologist who served as the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution from 1907 until his death, twenty years later. A staunch conservationist, Walcott served as an advisor to Teddy Roosevelt during his presidency, and thus developed a relationship which resulted in Roosevelt giving Walcott this piece of the original White House.Construction began on the White House in 1792, directed by the Irish-born architect James Hoban. However, it was burned in 1814 during the War of 1812. Hoban was selected to rebuild the Executive Mansion and in 1817 James Monroe moved in. During Monroe’s tenure, the South Portico was constructed, and Andrew Jackson added the North Portico in 1829. Although there were many plans and designs to expand or even construct a new White House, none of these were realized until it was renovated by Theodore Roosevelt in 1902, when this piece was removed, thus setting the age of the piece between 186 and 223 and years old.Roosevelt’s renovation relocated the president’s offices from the second floor to the new, but temporary, Executive Office Building, which is now known as the West Wing. The world-renowned New York architectural firm, McKim, Meade and White, executed Roosevelt’s renovation. Charles McKim personally oversaw the project, and, in an effort to move away from Victorian architecture towards Federal, stripped the Mansion of the majority of its original floors as well as covered the old walls with new plaster. McKim also removed the original grand stair in Cross Hall – which in the modern era is the north part of the State Dining Room. To keep up with technology, he added bathrooms on the second floor as well as an elevator and electric lights to replace the ancient gas lamps. Relics gathered from the Truman administration’s renovation are relatively common and are likely of materials produced far later than this bolt, which was removed during Teddy Roosevelt’s renovations, forty-eight years earlier. This is the only artifact from Roosevelt’s renovation that we have encountered. $3,000 - $5,000

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Heisenberg, Werner. Typed letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 67. Heisenberg, Werner. Typed letter signed (“W. Heisenberg”), 2 pages (8.25 x 11.5 in.; 210 x 292 mm.), on separate leaves, in German, on “Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute for Physics” letterhead, Göttingen, 23 September 1947, written to Professor Samuel A. Goudsmit, Northwestern University Department of Physics. Usual folds with some chipping on upper and lower borders; staple holes at left corner.Werner Heisenberg defends his fellow German physicists in a letter written to Samuel Goudsmit, Dutch-American physicist and critic of the German scientists of World War II.“There is especially one item in your statements which, no doubt, is due to a misunderstanding, namely the supposition that we in Germany looked upon the research of the problems with atoms as a sort of race with America, somewhat like the idea that, if we couldn’t win the war, at least we could win the peace.”Heisenberg writes in full: Dear Goudsmit, I am sending you with the same mail some special publications, among them also the one relating to our work with atoms during the war. In connection with this article I want to write a few words to you. In recent times I have read several of your articles in which you report about the uranium research performed in Germany during the war. From these articles I get the impression that perhaps you didn’t know enough about the details of our research and especially, that you were not aware of the psychological situation during the war for those of us who lived in Germany. Not long ago I discussed this matter at length with [Niels] Bohr and he suggested that I should personally write to you about it. As I told you that time in Heidelberg the mood among us was entirely different. From the very beginning we were convinced (as I vigorously emphasized during official meetings in Germany during the war) that America would be able to resolve the uranium problem much faster and better because of its incomparably superior equipment (for instance, 24 cyclotrons versus none in Germany) – as long as it was officially decided to do so. Therefore we never considered a serious competition. We just thought it possible that this problem might perhaps not be tackled at all in America because we imagined that it would be of little importance to the war effort. And so, when you told me in Heidelberg that the American physicists had worked mainly for the war effort and that they didn’t pursue the questions pertaining to atoms (naturally, you had to give me such an answer then) I felt that this was plausible, and to that extent we rejoiced that we apparently had done reasonably good work for peace. Your portrayal of a “race among scientists” therefore, does not correctly describe the atmosphere of our research, but I understand quite clearly that it has to be very difficult for you to imagine our psychological situation during the war. The problem was that, after all, we knew only too well what terrible consequences a victory of National Socialism in Europe would entail but that, on the other hand, we had no illusions about the results of a total German defeat because of the hate National Socialism had sown. Such a proposition leads naturally to a more passive and modest attitude, and one would be happy to be content with saving, wherever possible, that which can be salvaged in a small circle of influence, and to hope that later, perhaps some useful work can be done again. – Maybe there will be an opportunity, not too far in the future, when we can talk about these issues more thoroughly than was possible at that time in Heidelberg. Regarding the details of the uranium research in Germany, I think the article in Science contains the essentials, in some places even more precise than what you had learned in that by-gone time. If you have additional questions or doubts in connection with this, I would welcome it if you wrote to me about them. In August I visited Bohr for eight days in Tisvilde and I was very happy about the chance to be in touch with Bohr and the other physicists in Copenhagen and to learn more about the progress that had been made in physics, for instance in the area of cosmic radiation. With best regards, also from the other physicists of our group, yours W. HeisenbergBy the 1930s, Heisenberg was recognized as the leading spokesman for physics in Germany. Yet, like many, he found himself in an increasingly awkward position, as Nazi attacks on the academic professions forced the remaining Germans and German institutions into acquiescence with, if not overt support of, the dictatorship. Heisenberg’s response was perhaps typical of many educated Germans. There was little chance that he would emigrate voluntarily, despite numerous opportunities and invitations to do so…nation and politics were separable for Heisenberg and, like many, he believed the Nazis would not be in power for long. With the outbreak of war, Heisenberg was dispatched to the Army Weapons Bureau in Berlin to investigate the application of nuclear fission to large-scale energy production. In just two months, Heisenberg had completed an analysis of chain reactions and stated their possible use in the construction of an atomic bomb. The report propelled him to the forefront of specialists in nuclear energy in Germany. During his Berlin years, he directed fission research at the Kaiser-Wilhelm Institute for Physics and supervised reactor experiments in Leipzig. Earning the enmity of those colleagues and friends who were opposed to the Nazi regime, Heisenberg continued his efforts until captured by the secret allied ALSOS mission in late spring 1945.Among Heisenberg’s harshest critics was Goudsmit, whose parents had died in the holocaust, yet perhaps another factor was a degree of scientific rivalry dating to the 1920s, when Heisenberg managed to resolve a problem concerning helium which had stumped Goudsmit. “Heisenberg’s solution was way beyond me,” Goudsmit conceded, but at the same time he felt eclipsed. Heisenberg’s role in the German bomb program gave Goudsmit a license to attack – not the simple fact that Heisenberg had a role, but Goudsmit’s conviction that he was lying about it. In the summer of 1947, Heisenberg published two articles on the failure of the German bomb project in the journals Die Naturwissenschaften and Nature, and Goudsmit was outraged by Heisenberg’s thesis. According to Heisenberg, it was the lack of resources and technical support – not knowledge – which stymied the German effort. German physicists were investigating the peaceful uses of nuclear energy; they had no moral desire to construct a bomb and were even trying to stall its production. Goudsmit maintained that Heisenberg and his colleagues wanted to build a bomb, but simply did not know how. According to David Cassidy’s Uncertainty: The Life and Science of Werner Heisenberg, the bitter controversy “raged through the pages of The New York Times and in an exchange of long and fascinating letters. In 1948, the American occupation authorities requested that Heisenberg and his colleague Karl Wirtz publish an account of the German effort. The report enabled Heisenberg to reexamine available research reports, and at Heisenberg’s insistence, Goudsmit reexamined copies of captured reports in Washington. As a result of this exercise, Goudsmit corrected his most obvious errors (his book on ALSOS had appeared the previous year). Despite a partial reconciliation and Goudsmit’s apologies to Heisenberg at their final meeting in 1973, the quarrel was never satisfactorily resolved. $8,000 - $12,000

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Cody, William F. (

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $400 - $600

Description: 27. Cody, William F. (“Buffalo Bill”). Autograph quotation signed, in ink, on a leaf (4.75 x 2.75 in.; 121 x 70 mm.) Cody writes, “True to friend & foe W.F. Cody ‘Buffalo Bill’”. An unknown hand has written “Oct 1897” at the lower left. Light toning around edges.Buffalo Bill writes out and signs his famous Wild West motto: “True to friend and foe.”American scout and showman, William F. Cody (“Buffalo Bill”) was a rider for the Pony Express (1860), and, during the Civil War, a scout for the Kansas cavalry (1863) against the Indians and for the Union Army in Tennessee and Missouri. “Buffalo Bill” claimed to have killed 4,280 buffalo to feed the builders of the Kansas Pacific Railway (1867-68). In 1883, he organized, managed, and toured both the U.S. and Europe with his Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, featuring sharpshooter Annie Oakley and, for a short while, Sioux Indian chief Sitting Bull. Prior to Buffalo Bill’s grand entrance in his Wild West Show, the announcer would declare, “True to friend and foe”. $400 - $600

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Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $2,500 - $3,500

Description: 42. Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed (“A. Einstein”), 1 page (5.75 x 7.4 in.; 146 x 188 mm.), on “Prof. Dr. Albert Einstein” letterhead stationery, Berlin, 27 May 1929, written to “Mr. Kohut”. Horizontal fold with minor wrinkles.Einstein sends heartfelt thanks.Einstein writes in full: Dear Mr. Kohut!Heartfelt thanks for your generous praise and kind regards.YourA. EinsteinThere is no way to determine the source of Mr. Kohut’s praise on Einstein. In all, Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers and over 150 non-scientific works. He received honorary doctorate degrees in science, medicine, and philosophy from many European and American Universities. Just three months prior to this letter, Einstein was featured on the cover of Time Magazine (8 February 1929). $2,500 - $3,500

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[World War II]. German U-Boat Radio Set

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 167. [World War II]. German U-Boat Radio Set, complete with Morse Code Tapping Key and radio communications headset marked with the eagle-atop-swastika emblem, ca. 1940. The set consists of the transmitter with frequency gauge, including headset- and tap-jacks (22 x 8.75 x 10.5 in.; 559 x 222 x 267 mm.), a voltage regulator, with plugs and terminal connectors (14.5 x 7.5 x 8.5 in.; 368 x 191 x 216 mm.) Radio communications headset features stamp with the Nazi party eagle-atop-swastika with “WaA 376” on each side. The Morse Code tapping key is marked “Ta.P. vor dem Offnen Stecker herausziehen” (3.25 x 6 in.; 83 x 152 mm.) Special shipping arrangements will apply.Provenance: Time-Life Collection; The War Museum. $20,000 - $30,000

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[Eisenhower, Dwight D.] White China dinner plate.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $2,500 - $3,500

Description: 187. [Eisenhower, Dwight D.] White China dinner plate, 10 in. (254 mm.) diameter, made for President Eisenhower’s presidential jet, “Columbine.” The dinner plate, designed by Castleton China, Shenango Pottery Company, Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, features a border in gilt with the blue columbine flower at one edge and a gilt-lettered “D.D.E.” beneath the flower. The plate’s underside is gilt-lettered “The Presidential Plane Columbine” and is stamped with the company’s logo and “Shenango China, New Castle, Pa., U.S.A. Rimrol Welroc K18.” Fine condition.Dinner Plate used aboard “Columbine,” President Eisenhower’s presidential jet.The jet was named by First Lady Mamie Doud Eisenhower after the columbine, the official state flower of her adopted home state, Colorado. In 1953, Shenango was asked by Mrs. Eisenhower to design a plate commemorating President Eisenhower’s first birthday in the White House (14 October) and in 1955 was commissioned by Mrs. Eisenhower to create a formal design of gold service plates for the state dining room at the White House. $2,500 - $3,500

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Ronson Lighter Collection.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 192. Ronson Lighter Collection. The world-renowned brand name Ronson is derived from its owner and inventor, Louis V. Aronson. There was a time before disposable lighters that American-brand Ronson was as dominant as Coca-Cola and found in department stores, mom and pops, tobacco shops and newspaper stands and seen in magazines and on posters, in every city across America. Ronson lighters appeared more than all other lighters combined in movies from the 1930s (Humphrey Bogart lighting up in The Maltese Falcon) until the outbreak of World War II and on television during the 1950s-60s (Johnny Carson’s desktop usually had the round rosewood Ronson Varaflame “Oslo”) and thus, was the most popular and stylish lighter for over 20 years during the heyday of cigarette smoking, including the very fashionable Art Deco period in the 1930s. Today these lighters are highly sought after by collectors because they were exquisitely made using an amazing variety of unusual and innovative designs. This offering boasts over 200 lighters. There is a fantastic assortment of all lighter types Ronson produced using both lighter fluid and butane. These include strike lighters, pocket lighters, touch-tips, cigarette cases, combination cigarette cases with lighters and table lighters. Ronson was the first company to patent the one-motion “press and release” lighter in 1928 which revolutionized the industry and made Ronson world famous. All of these wick lighters starting in 1913 used lighter fluid with the last model made in 1966. However, starting in 1952, Ronson introduced another method of lighting a cigarette or cigar using butane gas instead of lighter fluid. The big advantage was that a butane lighter lasted close to a year before it needed to be re-filled. The definitive reference book on Ronson lighters is Ronson, the World’s Greatest Lighter: Wick Lighters, 1913-2000 by Urban K. Cummings (first published in 1992) in which 365 lighters were identified as being made by Ronson. An update last published in 2000 raised that number to 417. The following are highlights in the lot offered using the associated reference # used in the Ronson book:  TOUCH-TIPS:#181-Bartender-first mfg. 1936-2 cigarette compartments chromium plated and enameled in grain walnut effect. Black gun-metal base. Probably the most famous and coveted lighter from Ronson; #160-Octette-first mfg. 1935. Probably the best known of all Touch-Tips. Uncommon-rare; #185-Oval-first mfg. 1937. Streamlined lines, curved flint wheel box. Uncommon-rare; #208-Classic-first mfg. 1938.STRIKER LIGHTERS:#114-Tank World War I-first mfg. 1920.Tank replica in olive drab enamel. Ronson name is found at the bottom rear panel. Extremely rare; #112-Dog with pipe and vest-first mfg. 1920. Very rare; #128-Elephant-first mfg. 1935 Animal series all chrome plated; #129-Bear-first mfg. 1935; #130-Donkey-first mfg. 1935; #131-Bull-first mfg. 1935; #127-Bulldog-first mfg. 1935.POCKET LIGHTERS:#4 Wonderlighter Midget-first mfg. 1914. Marked “Wonderlighter Midget” on one side and “A.M.W. Newark, N.J.” on the other (A.M.W. stood for Art Metal Works, Aronson's name for his company before it was called Ronson). This was the fourth lighter issued by Ronson. Very rare; #5 Ronson Lighter-first mfg. 1919. The first model marked as a Ronson and is nickel-plated. Very rare; #17-Princess-first mfg. 1929. The longest lasting model that Ronson made for over 30 years with at least 78 different versions made. CASES & LIGHTER COMBINATIONS:#77-Mastercase-first mfg. 1933. Held 14 regular size cigarettes - in production for over 20 years;#78-Twentycase-first mfg. 1935. Held 20 cigarettes. Ronson’s first case/lighter combination to carry the cigarettes horizontally on both sides of the case; #79-Ten-A-Case-first mfg. 1935 and was the thinnest of any case; #93-Escort-first mfg. 1954. This was the last known cigarette case and wick lighter combination made by Ronson. TABLE LIGHTERS & OTHERS:#278-Crown- & #283 -Queen Anne-first mfg. 1936. Best known of all Ronson table lighters with millions sold until the end of their heyday in the 1950s; #279 “Decanter” first mfg. 1936#326-Fantasy-first mfg. 1954; Tabourette-servacig dispenser with jewel detail. First mfg. 1929; Robot-Liter-mfg. 1966, a dispenser of lighted cigarettes for the automobile or boat which operates on 12 volts. Holds 20 cigarettes. Very rare; Electric Shavers-Ronson in the 1950’s became one of the 3 top makers in the U.S. and England. A woman’s model, the “Lady Ronson” was also introduced. Both male and female shavers are included in this lot; the Ronson Repeater-toy pistol that “shoots and flashes” just like a real gun (1920s).BUTANE:Ronson’s first butane lighters all appeared in the time period of 1950-1952. There was one pocket model, “Maximus” and 5 table models called the "V" series: Viceroy, Vernon, Victor, Vera and Viola. All were fueled from a small compressed gas bottle called a Bu-Tank. The “Varaflame” pocket and table lighters added in the late 1950s revolutionized the butane lighter industry and pushed aside the wick models in popularity forever. All 7 of these lighters listed above are included in this lot. $6,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War]. 500+ piece collection.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $40,000 - $60,000

Description: 25. [Civil War]. Extraordinary collection of Civil War era field hospital equipment, Soldier and Officer’s personally used artifacts, and battle-used weapons and equipment. One doesn’t have to be a Civil War collector to appreciate the historical artifacts that make up this rare 500+ piece collection, which are not military or weapon-dominated as most conventional auction offerings often are. Through these artifacts, in their totality, one gets an inside look at how men and women, civilians, soldiers, officers, doctors and nurses lived over 150 years ago. It is a visual banquet of examples of early American craftsmanship and ingenuity at their finest in so many handmade items. Parts of this collection were exhibited at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum for a 4-month period (June-Sept. 2013) as part of the Museum’s highly successful exhibit on Abraham Lincoln entitled, “A. Lincoln: From Railsplitter to Rushmore”, which enlightened over 183,000 visitors during its run. This collection represents an extensive and balanced visual, historic and educational offering. Massive collection of (500+) Civil War era field hospital equipment, Soldier and Officer’s personally used artifacts, and battle-used weapons and equipment – displayed at the Reagan Library museum for the exhibit entitled “A. Lincoln: From Railsplitter to Rushmore”.Field Hospital display itemsThe Civil War was a unique situation for both Northern and Southern doctors. Never before had they dealt with such catastrophic injuries upon their victims. The introduction of the “Minie ball”, which enlarged entry wounds and shattered bones on impact, created devastating results. Consequently, amputation of arms and legs was by far the number one surgical operation performed on soldiers during the war. There were very few hospitals accessible, so field hospitals were set up to treat incoming casualties from the field. A large barrel and two planks of wood often had to suffice as makeshift operating tables. Included in this collection is a very rare example of a collapsible surgical operating table from the Civil War, consisting of a wooden sawhorse with two planks of wood sitting atop crossed wooden legs. Also included is an IMP printed 1826 fabric sheet as well as 2 pillowcases; 1 heavily bloodstained. Also a man’s muslin tunic with his initials inside. The grouping includes 3 handmade wooden crutches, a complete doctor’s surgical kit containing an amputation bone saw, 7 various amputation knives and a tourniquet. There is also an extremely rare, doctor’s medical box containing 30 small medicinal bottles used to treat injured soldiers on the battlefield. There are 2 wooden amputation pegboards used by doctors to keep records of soldiers who’d had limbs amputated - one marked numerically and one bearing the letters “A” and “D” at the top. “A” stood for either “alive” or “amputated” and “D” for “dead”. There are more than 10 vintage, glass medical bottles with actual glass labels that were used to treat soldiers. Also included are small bottles of morphine, opium and laudanum that were used to treat pain. There are finely made, tortoiseshell-handled safety-locked bistouries as well as 5 amputation saws and 6 amputation knives that were used for battlefield surgery. There are 3 weight scales (1 brass and 2 wooden) for measuring and doling out medicine. There is a nurse’s bloodstained skirt, cape, shawl and bonnet and a bloodstained belt buckle cut off of a soldier’s trousers during amputation. There’s also a 2-piece grooved wooden pill maker, a suppository mold and various ceramic invalid feeders that were used in assisting injured soldiers. There are also 2 stethoscopes and syringes as well as fleams that were used in medicinal bloodletting. Also a beautiful white milk glass medicine feeder with ornate brass casing, used to administer drugs. There are several oversize porcelain plates that doctors used to hold their instruments. Also a fantastic leather, brass-studded doctor’s box that includes over 50 various surgical and personal accessories including his glasses and possibly a picture of his wife. Also includes a rare surgeon’s gutta-percha 10 in. bullet-probe instrument, “DAY” patent wooden arm splint, scarce surgeon’s surgical instrument grouping-folding and locking tenaculum, hatchet scalpel, locking bistouri, straight scalpel, surgical scissors, locking forceps, suturing needles, silk thread and wire, with sliding wooden box. Doctor or Nurse’s lamp (to warm medicine, hot water) or coffee pot-used to check on patients at night, surgeon’s eye glasses and hard case for over-the-nose wearing without stems to hook behind ears, 10 in. dental tooth extractor and dental elevator with gold band near tip, 11 in. surgical ribcage cutter, Enfield bayonet used with a candle to light the entrance to surgeon’s amputation area with a 25 in. tall large pewter candle stand for use next to the operating table for extra light, nurses purple velvet bag or purse and more. After viewing this medical grouping, one can’t help but imagine what it was like to survive this war with these types of catastrophic injuries. It helps to educate people today of the real life brutality of warfare.Camp display of Soldier and Officer’s personally used artifactsHighlights of the collection include a transportable 11-foot wooden camp table comprised of 2 slat ends and 7 interlocking wooden poles for quick and easy setup, breakdown and transport. The table was used at campsites as a surface to hold coffee pots, plates and silverware, etc. This grouping is amazing in its overall condition, patina and craftsmanship, which take us back to a time when ingenuity came in handy for soldiers on the run. Other highlights include a rare officer’s hot water footrest warmer, in a wooden frame, with heavy carpet surface to the top of the footrest. Inside is a tin container that would be filled with hot water. After a long day’s march, an officer would take his boots off in his tent and enjoy a few minutes of warm comfort. There are a wide assortment of coffee pots and brass and tin lamps, a multitude of pots and pans and everything used by soldiers in eating, drinking and preparing their meals. There are original officer’s wooden chairs with carpet seats, as well as an original officer’s “carpet bag”; a carrying bag made of actual carpet. There is a pair of leather boots - and it’s interesting to note that at this period there were no left or right boots, they were both shaped the same. There are 6 fantastic quilts and coverlets that were used as blankets for soldiers or invalids that are all hand sewn from individual looms of fabric. There is also a 10-foot rainbow rug that would have been used in an officer’s tent. These are all beautiful examples of American craftsmanship that were invariably donated by women of the North who participated in supplying their husbands and sons with many of the basic necessities of clothing and shelter that the army could not supply, particularly in the early part of the war. After a day of killing, soldiers came back to the camp and amazingly partook in diversionary things such as smoking and playing games with each other. There are various tobacco tins and handmade corn cob pipes as well as a handmade, complete Domino set in its original wooden box, a Cribbage board, several small dice with holders and various playing cards. There is a very interesting voting or polling piece, from which the term “blackball” was derived. Consisting of a wooden box with vintage original black and white marbles, when soldiers were asked their input on certain camp decisions, they voted with a white ball for “yes” or a black ball for “no”. Hence, when proposals were turned down, the term “blackballed’ came into being. There are also 2 wooden bellows, 1 heavily detailed with rich ornamentation, for use in fanning the campfires, as well as a beautiful brass ash container that would be used to transport embers to start other fires or, with holes on top, they could be brought back to an officer’s tent for heat. Also includes officer’s domed wood camp trunk with dovetail wood joint made from a single width wide boards-bottom made also from one plank-with key, officer’s porcelain shaving mug set, blacksmith-made razor and wood gutta-percha hair shaving brush ring with wooden handle, large camp whiskey barrel, soldier’s coin purse with “1857” and “1862” one cent coins, brass-weighted officer’s spittoon, officer’s day to day writing tablet with locking clip, officer’s “sharkskin” directional navigational set with instruments, 11 in. wood turned one-piece water container exhibiting rings from lathe, officer’s quality lap desk with mother of pearl inlay on top and inscription “1850 Stephenson” also around keyhole-inside one ink bottle, writing pen, blotter with overall beautiful wood grain and patina, officer’s fine black “basalt” tea set, wooden handled metal toaster to put bread near fire, rosewood fife, rare confederate brass-weighted drumsticks with cross belt plate, pewter frame Jew’s harp, and officers money purse with ornate Japanese mother of pearl carving inlay that opens up accordion style.Battle-used Weapons and EquipmentHighlights of the military grouping include an original 34 star, pre-1863 fabric American flag (with 32 original stars and an additional 2 stars hand sewn into the flag at some point before the 35th state’s admission in June of 1863). Weapon highlights include an 1861 Enfield “Tower” rifle/musket (named for the Tower of London), untouched, with nipple protector and original ramrod. The 1861 Enfield rifle was used by both the North and the South and was a very reliable rifle up to 300 yards. There is also a .58-caliber original arsenal-issued, paper-wrapped cartridge bullet, which could have been used for this rifle. There is also a marked 1862 “Springfield”, U.S.” Musketoon; a sawed off Carbine rifle the Springfield was one of the most often used rifles by the North in the Civil War. There is also a model 1860 Colt Army .44-caliber pistol with original leather holster. This was an officer’s pistol and it has matching numbers in the various interlocking parts, in original and untouched condition. There are also 2 rare, .44-caliber original paper cartridge bullets and brass powder flask that would have been used for this pistol. There’s also an “1862” Cavalry sword “Mansfield and Lamb” “U.S.” with the initials of the officer’s name, “J.H.” on the sword. Also included is the original scabbard, the sword holder, which was used by officers to lead their men, on horse. There is also a rare marked 1858 sabre bayonet that was used by the infantry and recovered from the Antietam battlefield. There is also a rare wooden, brass-strapped powder keg that was used to arm artillery guns and a small wooden grease bucket that was used to lubricate the wheels on artillery guns. There are 2 pairs of battle-used, made in Paris binoculars with accompanying cases as well as a soldier’s brass camp bugle. There are several rare sniper sunglasses in tin carrying cases. The lenses blocked out the sun’s rays with just enough room for the sniper’s pupils to see his target. There are multiple brass and pewter powder flasks in which soldiers kept their gunpowder as they had to load and reload their rifles, as well as a rare 12 in. black powder canteen with its original tin top and cord sling, used to supply soldiers with gunpowder necessary for the type of rifles used during this period. There are also various bayonets and knives used by soldiers and officers in warfare. This remarkable historical archive was acquired by noted collector Ronnie Paloger from a family in Maryland who originally purchased it in the 1960’s from an individual who had assembled the materials over the course of many years. The bulk of this collection was gathered from battle sites and personalities involved in the Civil War in and around the Maryland area. Comes with a signed letter from Andrew Wulf, Curator of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, thanking the consignor for participating in the Lincoln exhibit. Special shipping arrangements will apply. $40,000 - $60,000

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Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $4,000 - $6,000

Description: 29. Darwin, Charles. Autograph letter signed (“Ch. Darwin”), 1 page (5 x 8 in.; 127 x 203 mm.), on “Down, Beckenham, Kent” letterhead, 31 May 1879, written to “Dr. F. Albin Gärtner” in Vienna. With original transmittal envelope. Minor toning along edges; mounting remnants on verso of blank conjoined leaf.Charles Darwin thanks a Viennese doctor for a curious case of inheritance…Darwin writes in full: Dear Sir I am much obliged for your courteous note & for the curious case of inheritance. I remain Dear Sir Yours faithfully Ch. DarwinDarwin published his theory of evolution with compelling evidence in his 1859 book On the Origin of Species, overcoming scientific rejection of earlier concepts of transmutation of species. Darwin’s theory is simply stated in the introduction: “As many more individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and is, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected. From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.” By the 1870s, the scientific community and much of the general public had accepted evolution as a fact. In modified form, Darwin’s scientific discovery is the unifying theory of the life sciences, explaining the diversity of life. $4,000 - $6,000

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by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 168. “Horrors of War” Trading Card Collection. The 1938 Horrors of War is one of the most famous trading card sets of all time. They were produced by Philadelphia-based Gum Inc., which later became Bowman. Bubble-gum was a new craze among the nation’s youth in the 1930s and card companies offered a stick of gum packaged in wax packs of cards. The Horrors of War cards were controversial from their first release and remain today the most famous and valuable of all non-sport sets. Several years ago a complete set in overall near-mint to mint condition sold for over $700,000. The cards depict graphic and unspeakable scenes of horror associated with the wars and conflicts going on in the world during this time frame. These include scenes from the brutal Japanese invasion of China, the Spanish Civil War, the Italian invasion of Ethiopia, the Russian and Japanese conflict in Manchuria and Germany's annexation of the Sudentenland from Czechoslovakia in 1938 that was the beginning of World War II in Europe. Gum, Inc. became like a news organization and hired a staff of artists (George Moll Agency), designers, copywriters, and researchers who reported on these conflicts as journalists and presented factual reporting on the backs of the cards. The company's slogan, “To know the HORRORS OF WAR is to want PEACE”, was printed on the back of each card. President Franklin D. Roosevelt referenced these cards to explain the horror of what actually went on in war-ravished countries and some Senator’s resented his “bubblegum diplomacy.” Life magazine also featured this card set in their 9 May 1938 issue (a copy of this issue is included with the lot). The cards offered in this lot are in very good condition considering they are now 77 years old. This lot features 196 cards (out of the total issue of 288). 111 of the 196 cards being offered are encapsulated and graded by PSA (Professional Sports Authenticator), the gold standard and #1 third-party authenticator in the world for card grading. Of these, there are (40) “high grade” cards: (1) card is PSA 9 or mint condition; (10) cards are PSA 8 or near mint-mint; and (29) are PSA 7 or near-mint. The balance of the graded cards are mostly PSA 6 or Excellent. The ungraded cards are mostly clean in both fronts and backs. Specific card highlights include: card #1 Marco Polo Bridge, first skirmish between the Japanese and Chinese – a very rare card to find in any condition; #88 Human Hands and #99 Ghoulish Dogs are 2 of the most famous cards; #283 Hitler Threatens and #286 Chamberlain meets Hitler are 2 of the 3 Hitler cards in the set and are highly sought after by collectors who don’t even collect this set. Also included are (7) rare promotional cards which were randomly placed in packs, that were either printed at the factory or hand-stamped (rarer) offering either a “Free” pack of cards or a chance to win one of “1000 cash prizes to the 1000 children who send us the neatest lists of 240 correct titles.” $8,000 - $12,000

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Jefferson, Thomas.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 78. Jefferson, Thomas. Memoires de Maximilien de Bethune, Duc de Sully, Principal Ministre de Henri le Grand;… Nouvelle Edition… (Londres,  1767).  Vol. 1, 12mo, [lixi], [415, final page misprinted “115”] pp. Signed with his ownership initial, “T” beside the printed binder's signature mark (“I”) at the bottom of page 133 and again on page 373 where Jefferson adds an “I” to the signature mark “T” (Jefferson's typical style of ownership signature used in books from his library in which he substituted “I” for “J”). This volume was originally sold as a set of eight volumes by Hammer Galleries in 1941 as part of the sale of books from William Randolph Hearst’s library. Jefferson’s initials, as here, are found in most of his own books, which are rarely ever seen on the market. Binding worn, occasional foxing, some light tanning. Overall, very good condition, in unrestored contemporary French calf-gilt with morocco spine labels.Rare volume from Thomas Jefferson’s personal library – The Memoirs of the Duke of Sully – signed with his secret mark. Thomas Jefferson never used a bookplate to distinguish the more than 8,000 volumes he assembled during a lifetime of avid book collecting. Instead, he employed other identifying devices, such as the initials “T.I.”, so that even today a cursory glance at a volume marked by Jefferson will enable one to distinguish it not only as Jefferson’s, but probably to assign it to one of three distinct collecting periods. The initials “T.I.” with the block letter “I”, identifies this volume as one from Jefferson’s third personal library, the Poor Library (1815-26).Sowerby notes that Sully’s Memoires “are usually included in Jefferson’s lists of recommended historical reading.” Sowerby further notes that the first set that Jefferson owned, the set that was part of the library he sold to the Library of Congress, was the 1778 edition, purchased from Frullé in September, 1788, and noted as “8 vol. in 12, br. 16.” The set from which this volume originated, was almost certainly purchased by Jefferson to replace the set sold to the Library of Congress in 1815. This set is listed in the 1829 auction catalogue of Jefferson’s third personal library (item 75: 8 volumes, 12mo), but it was apparently kept by Thomas Jefferson Randolph.It is not surprising that Jefferson would recommend Sully’s memoirs as part of a course of historical reading, or that he would be sure to have a set at hand for himself—the two men shared several common notions. Maximilien de Bethune, duc de Sully (1560-1641) served King Henry IV of France in several capacities, as an army officer, engineer, Superintendent of Finances, and as a confidential advisor. As did Jefferson, Sully strongly favored agriculture over industry as an economic base, and encouraged its expansion. He also encouraged stock raising and forbade the destruction of forests. In order to facilitate trade, Sully encouraged internal improvements, sponsoring canals, roads, and bridges, and he abolished export fees on grains and wine. The first portion of Sully’s memoirs were originally published in 1638, and the work was translated into several languages and reprinted often.Provenance: 1. Thomas Jefferson2. Thomas Jefferson Randolph as was noted in a separate volume from the original set “Th:J/Edge Hill? Virginia”3. Sarah N. Randolph penciled signature on slip, also unidentified floor plan separate volume 4. William Randolf Hearst sold at auction: 5. Hammer Galleries, Gimbel Bros. Feb 1941 p. 226 item 750, purchased by:6. Dr. Alice Watson 1941 by descent to7. An Heir of Dr. Watson $20,000 - $30,000

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[Revolutionary War].

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 124. [Revolutionary War]. The 24-31 August 1775 edition of The New-England Chronicle, or The Essex Gazette (Cambridge: Samuel and Ebenezer Hall) 4 pages (10 x 15.5 in.; 254 x 394 mm.), the front page featuring the text of The Olive Branch Petition. The issue also features General Thomas Gage’s official report on the Battles of Lexington and Concord on page two. Expected folds, contemporary subscriber name in ink at top left, light scattered foxing and soiling, ragged margins with minor tears and losses not affecting text.The first front page printing of the Olive Branch Petition in Massachusetts (and the first report in Boston), as well as an early appearance of Lord Dartmouth's official report on the Battles of Lexington and Concord.The Olive Branch Petition. Despite the outbreak of hostilities at Lexington and Concord the previous month, the prevailing mood at the Second Continental Congress, convened in Philadelphia in May 1775, was one of reconciliation. A minority, led by John Adams, believed that armed conflict was inevitable, but resolved to remain silent on the issue for the time, awaiting a more opportune moment to rally Americans toward a more militant course. Adams' position allowed John Dickinson and other moderates to pursue a policy of reconciliation and the assembled delegates approved the idea of a petition to George III. Thomas Jefferson composed the first draft, but Dickinson found the language too offensive and revised a large portion of it. Congress approved the text on July 5 and sent two signed and engrossed copies to London on 8 July 1775 under the care of Arthur Lee and Richard Penn. The petition declared that the American colonies did not desire independence, but simply desired a more fair and equitable position within the British Empire. The petition made great pains to demonstrate that the King's colonists in America were “loyal” and “dutiful” to their sovereign, and instead cast the blame on his ministers for the late troubles: Your Majestys [sic] ministers persevering in their measures and proceeding to open hostilities for enforcing them, have compelled us to arm in our own defence [sic], and have engaged us in a controversy so peculiarly abhorrent to the affection of your still faithful colonists, that when we consider whom we must oppose in this contest, and if it continues, what may be the consequences, our own particular misfortunes are accounted by us, only as parts of our distress. Knowing, to what violent resentments and incurable animosities, civil discords are apt to exasperate and inflame the contending parties, we think ourselves required by indispensable obligations to Almighty God, to your Majesty, to our fellow subjects, and to ourselves, immediately to use all the means in our power not incompatible with our safety, for stopping the further effusion of blood, and for averting the impending calamities that threaten the British Empire.” The petition proposed a renegotiation of the relationship between Great Britain and her colonies and begged the king “to procure us releif [sic] from our afflicting fears and jealousies occasioned by the system before mentioned, and to settle peace through every part of your dominions, with all humility submitting to your Majesty's wise consideration, whether it may not be expedient for facilitating those important purposes, that your Majesty be pleased to direct some mode by which the united applications of your faithful colonists to the throne, in pursuance of their common councils, may be improved into a happy and permanent reconciliation; and that in the meantime measures be taken for preventing the further destruction of the lives of your Majesty's subjects; and that such statutes as more immediately distress any of your Majesty[']s colonies be repealed: For by such arrangements as your Majesty's wisdom can form for collecting the united sense of your American people, we are convinced, your Majesty would receive such satisfactory proofs of the disposition of the colonists towards their sovereign and the parent state, that the wished for opportunity would soon be restored to them, of evincing the sincerity of their professions by every testimony of devotion becoming the most dutiful subjects and the most affectionate colonists.Upon their arrival in London, Penn and Lee presented the petition to Lord Dartmouth, the Secretary of State for the Colonies on 21 August. However, the King declined to grant Lee and Penn an audience and refused to receive the petition. Reports of the Battle of Bunker Hill had just reached London, and that news, combined with an intercepted letter from John Adams in which he wrote of his discontent with the Olive Branch Petition and his opinion that war was inevitable, eroded whatever good will George III had left for the colonies. On 23 August 1775, the King issued his Proclamation for Suppressing Rebellion and Sedition which declared the colonies in a state of rebellion and urged all loyal subjects “to use their utmost endeavours [sic] to withstand and suppress such rebellion.” The king’s reaction and the royal proclamation declaring the colonies in rebellion strengthened John Adams’ arguments favoring independence. It now was clear that London had no interest in reconciliation, and was determined to assert its authority by force. Although George's proclamation was issued before the arrival of the Olive Branch Petition, colonists perceived it as a direct answer to it. George’s rejection of Congress’ entreaties, the news of which arrived in America in early November 1775, together with Thomas Paine’s landmark book, Common Sense (appearing in January 1776) precipitated a seismic shift in popular opinion among the patriots toward outright independence. Ironically, this copy was printed just as the petition was declared a “dead letter” in London.This is one of the earliest printings of The Olive Branch Petition – no broadsides of this document appear to have been printed at the time. The first separately-published edition was published by the New York Council of Safety in January 1776 under the title: “To the Inhabitants of the Colony of New-York & The following is a Copy of the Petition of the Honourable Continental Congress, sitting at Philadelphia, July 8, 1775, to his Majesty” (Evans 15146). Evans sources only copies at the Library of Congress, New York Historical Society and the New York Public Library (OCLC notes additional copies at Yale, Williams, and Clements. Only one example of that edition has sold at auction in the past twenty years. Lexington and Concord. Page two features the text of Lord Dartmouth’s official report on the Battles of Lexington and Concord as they appeared in The London Gazette of 10 June 1775 and constitutes the first printing near Boston. The British account offers a valuable alternative perspective on the events of 19 April 1775. The report, based on dispatches and reports from General Thomas Gage, Lord Percy, and Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, describe Parker’s men assembled on Lexington Green as simply “a body of the country people drawn up under arms...” The description of the regulars’ long return march to Concord also merits quoting: “On the return of the troops from Concord, they were very much annoyed, and had several men killed and wounded, by the rebels firing from behind walls, ditches, trees, and other ambushes... and kept up in that manner a scattering fire during the whole of their march of fifteen miles,...such was the cruelty and barbarity of the rebels, that they scalped and cut off the ears of some of the wounded men, who fell into their hands.”The owner of this paper was Capt. Jonathan Judd, Jr. of Southampton, Massachusetts. The son of the town's first minister (Jonathan Judd, Sr.), he graduated Yale in 1765. After spending several years as a schoolteacher in nearby Hatfield, he settled in Southampton as a merchant. Although he accepted a captain’s commission in the militia, he resisted joining any of the minutemen companies organizing in the area, as he was uncomfortable with the more radical Whigs and their penchant for mob violence. On a visit to Boston in 1769, he warily noted in his diary that “No Man may speak his Mind unless he thinks as the populace Say…Last Saturday Night an Informer was tar[re]d and feather[e]d and carried through the streets for three hours” Despite his abhorrence of street intimidation, he supported the revolutionary cause and was a member of Southampton’s Committee of Correspondence. Still, when a mob surrounded the county courthouse in August 1774 to block a royal takeover of the court, he wrote: “All opposition was in vain every Body submitted to our Sovereign Lord the Mob Now we are reduced to a State of Anarchy have neither Law nor any other rule except the Law of Nature.” Still, Judd remained supportive of the cause and during the war served the town by recruiting soldiers for the Continental Army and meting out punishment to deserters. In 1786, Judd took a similarly dim view of the mob violence instigated by Daniel Shays and actively marched against him “to support the government.” Following Shay’s Rebellion, Judd remained a respected member of the community, serving in several town offices before his death in 1818. $10,000 - $15,000

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[Political Cartoon].

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $1,000 - $1,500

Description: 120. [Political Cartoon]. Rare broadside etching on wove paper, image being (8.5 x 6 in.; 216 x 152 mm.) (overall 9.5 x 7 in.; 241 x 178 mm.), First Edition, Third State. Titled “Congressional Pugilists”. Pinhole at “gi”; minor flaws. Rare vintage 18th Century Political Cartoon depicting two New England Congressmen, a Federalist with a cane and a Republican with fireplace tongs, battling on the floor of the House of Representatives.Early American political cartoon depicting the famous fight on the floor of the House of Representatives on 15 February 1798 which was started when Federalist Representative from Connecticut, Roger Griswold, attacked Republican Representative from Vermont, Matthew Lyon with a cane; Lyon retaliated with fireplace tongs. The story instantly became legend and soon poems and other satires appeared celebrating the nonsense in Congress, one of which is etched in the lower margin of this print: “He in a trice struck Lyon thrice, Upon is head, enrag’d Sir, Who seiz’d the tongs to ease his wrongs, and Griswold thus engag’d, Sir.”E. McSherry Fowble, in Two Centuries of Prints in America, 1680-1880, notes that “to make this event among statesmen appear even more outrageous, the design of this version so distorted the features of other congressmen, who had stooped to cheering the combatants or, at least, to enjoying the fracas, that he had to rework the copperplate by adding the names of key figures in the margins” in the Second State. This is the Third State with “17” in the top margin. See Edgar P. Richardson, The Birth of Political Caricature, p.87; Martin P. Snyder, City of Independence, pp. 212-223; Frank Weitenkampf, Political Caricature in the United States in Separately Published Cartoons, p.12; William Murrell, A History of American Graphic Humor, I: 42-44. $1,000 - $1,500

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Christie, Agatha. Typed letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $2,000 - $3,000

Description: 20. Christie, Agatha. Typed letter signed (“Agatha Christie”), 3 pages (5.5 x 7 in.; 140 x 178 mm.), on two conjoined leaves, front and back on second leaf, Winterbrook House, Wallingford, Berks., England, 19 February 1966, written to Miss Evelyn B. Byrne, The Bronx, New York. With original envelope. Fine condition. Christie writes in part: I would say that I much enjoyed the historical novels of Stanley Wayman – “Under the Red Robe”, “The Abbess of Veaye”, “The Castle Inn” (this I read again with much pleasure only a year ago), etc. All the Sherlock Holmes stories were enthusiasms of mine. Maurice Hewletts’ “The Forest Lovers”. Practically all of Dickens, though I did skip some of the more sentimental bits, but much relished Mrs. Nickleby, for example, especially the mad old gentleman who was courting her by throwing vegetable marrows over his garden wall! Charlotte M. Young’s “Unknown to History” was very good. Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre” I found wildly exciting. The early Hugh Walpole were his best – I enjoyed “Mr. Perrin and Mr. Trail” and “Prelude to Adventure” attracted me, when I was rather elder, by their intense originality. P.G. Wodehouse I enjoyed enormously…I had a brief passion for Maeterlink’s “Bluebird”. Nobody forced me on to Shakespeare, which I consider very lucky, as I was able to approach him from seeing him first on a stage! This is the way that I think all teenagers should meet Shakespeare first, since that is the purpose for which they were meant…The short stories of H.G. Wells also made a great impression on me, especially “The Crystal Egg” and the “Country of the Blind”…Sincerely yours, Agatha ChristieFrom 1966 to 1970, Evelyn Byrne ran a program at New York City's Elizabeth Barrett Browning Junior High School where she asked major literary and artistic figures of the time to write back with their recollections of what books inspired them while they were teenagers. An assortment of their responses were published in the book Attacks of Taste, printed in 1971 by Gotham Book Mart.  $2,000 - $3,000

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[Key, Francis Scott.] “The Star Spangled Banner.”

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $40,000 - $60,000

Description: 137. [Key, Francis Scott.] “The Star Spangled Banner.” New York : Geib & Co. No. 23 Maiden Lane [1816-1817], 2 pages quarto; leather and cloth presentation binding in red white and blue flag motif. The first New York edition and third printing of “The Star Spangled Banner.”Francis Scott Key conceived the text of “The Star Spangled Banner” during the critical battle of Fort McHenry on 14 September 1814, during the War of 1812. Key, moved by what he saw, was simply recalling a popular melody to which he could set his now famous words, an act of appropriation that was by and large practiced freely during that time. The melody that Key chose for his stirring words was the English tune “The Anacreonic Song,” or “To Anacreon in Heaven,” composed by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreonic Society, whose President, Ralph Tomlinson provided the song’s original words. The Society was formed around 1766 and met regularly, first at The London Coffeehouse on Ludgate Hill, then in larger quarters at the Crown and Anchor Tavern in the Strand until the Society’s demise in 1792. Considered by history to be a drinking song, it was originally intended as the Society’s signature ballad whose qualities elicited both cultivation and entertainment, thus arising henceforth as a popular tune that was certainly known and sung by many. While it is hardly possible that the tune would be reminiscent as a drinking song in Key’s mind under those horrific war-time circumstances, the melody served as a perfect means of conveyance for Key’s vivid description of the battle and its resultant victory. Key immediately had broadsides of the words printed up, and because the tune was already well known, the song quickly became popular. Key had the first sheet music produced in Baltimore by Carr’s Music Store sometime in October, 1814. A. Bacon printed the second edition, also dating from late 1814, in Philadelphia. The third edition was the first to be printed in New York by Geib of Maiden Lane. Interesting to note the firm of Geib & Company started their business as organ makers in 1797. All early editions of the “The Star Spangled Banner” are extremely rare. The present third printing is one of the very few in private hands.References: Muller page 64, Sonneck, Plate XXV, Wolfe 8346 (listing ten copies, all in institutional collections), Filby and Howard page 135. $40,000 - $60,000

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[Sports]. Muhammad Ali Hall of Fame Trophy

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 194. [Sports]. Muhammad Ali’s 1993 World Boxing Council Hall of Fame Trophy. Muhammad Ali’s World Boxing Council Hall of Fame Trophy.World Boxing Council trophy honoring Muhammad Ali’s selection into the WBC Hall of Fame. This event coincided with the 30-year celebration of the WBC’s birth as the most prestigious council in boxing and the preferred title to own as a champion. The award is composed of a large metal boxing glove resting on a black wooden and glass base standing 14 in. (355 mm.) There is a small WBC emblem at the top and a larger WBC emblem with color flags of participating countries that recognize the WBC and its boxing champions. Beneath is a silver plaque inscribed engraved, “WBC Hall of Fame Thirty Years – 1993” and one beneath inscribed “Muhammad Ali”. This trophy was exhibited in 1995 at the Muhammad Ali Center, Louisville, Kentucky. Excellent condition. This Trophy was originally offered in the 1997 Christies sale of the legendary Paloger Collection of Muhammad Ali Memorabilia. Items from this sale rarely surface and when they do are highly sought after by collectors. In February 2015 one such item from this auction, Ali’s 1966 draft board letter, sold for $334,000 at auction. $8,000 - $12,000

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[World War II]. Patton, George S., Jr. Colt .45 single-action Revolver

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $60,000 - $80,000

Description: 164. [World War II]. Patton, George S., Jr. General George Patton’s personally owned Colt .45 revolver with original stag horn grips, Pat. Sept.19.1871,. July2.72, Jan.19 75. Serial # is 351427, ca. 1928, with the vast majority of the blue finish fully intact. Excellent condition. General George S. Patton, Jr.’s Colt .45 single-action revolver – directly from Patton’s grandson, Robert H. Patton.This Colt .45 Model 1871 single-action revolver (Serial No. 351427) was acquired by George S. Patton, Jr. around 1928 and owned by him throughout the remainder of his life, along with his famous ivory-handled Colt .45 revolver that is today on display at The General George Patton Museum and Center of Leadership in Fort Knox, Kentucky. Patton was photographed carrying this weapon at least once - while dressed as Rhett Butler at a “Gone With the Wind” costume party which he attended with his wife, Beatrice (ca. 1941). The event is referenced on page 314 in the personal memoir, The Button Box, written by Patton’s daughter, Ruth Ellen Patton Totten. The photograph is included in Patton: The Man Behind the Legend, by Martin Blumenson (p. 148). The weapon was positively identified in the photograph by matching the original stag horn grip (the natural texture of which being absolutely unique), visible above Patton’s belt at the 1941 costume party. A Colt .45 single-action revolver (ca. 1928) in this condition, with original stag horn grips – without the Patton ownership heritage – has an appraised value of $16,200 (Blue Book of Gun Values, 17 March 2015). To the best of our knowledge, no other Patton personal Colt revolver with documentation from the Patton family has ever come to market. Interested bidders should note that this is a working firearm and must be shipped through a Federal Firearms Licensed dealer.Provenance: This Colt revolver comes directly from Robert H. Patton, grandson of the legendary WWII General, and includes a signed letter of authenticity stating in part: “…the Colt .45 model single-action revolver shown below, serial number 351427, belonged to my grandfather, General George S. Patton, Jr…The pistol was given to me by my father, General George S. Patton IV, nearly 30 years ago. It was purchased by his father, the General of WWII fame, in 1928. This pistol, with the fancy stag horn grip, was undoubtedly a version of his more famous ivory-handled Colt .45 now on exhibit at the Patton Museum and West Point. Patton owned and used this gun for about 17 years.” $60,000 - $80,000

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Caruso, Enrico. Self-caricature signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $400 - $600

Description: 15. Caruso, Enrico. Self-caricature signed (“Enrico Caruso”) on a postcard (5.5 x 3.5 in.; 140 x 89 mm.), being a profile caricature of the opera star, below which he has signed, “Enrico Caruso Oct. 1920”. Beside Caruso’s signature, soprano Alice Miriam has signed along with two other unidentified signatures. Stamped “Wilson Collection” at the right. Currently matted for framing. Exhibits 1.5-in. tear at upper right margin with chip out of lower left corner. Together with: Enrico Caruso autograph greeting signed (“Caruso”), 1 page (5 x 6.25 in.; 127 x 159 mm.), in Italian, on “Hotel Knickerbocker, New York” stationery, [1914], to “Mrs. S.G. Schubart, 1211 Madison Ave. City”. Caruso writes in full: “Thank you Lara! Cordial greetings Caruso”. With original autograph transmittal envelope postmarked in New York, 4 January 1914. Note in fine condition; envelope is torn in several areas.The great Caruso!Enrico Caruso is probably the most famous operatic tenor of all time, and considered by some to be the greatest tenor of the century. Caruso fused a natural baritone timbre with a tenor's smooth, silken finish. He came to fame singing at New York's Metropolitan Opera for 18 seasons (1903-20), where he was loved and admired. A notable interpreter of Verdi and grand opéra, he was the first leading singer to recognize the possibilities of the phonograph, and made many recordings (beginning in 1902) which brought him international fame. $400 - $600

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Koch, Robert. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $2,500 - $3,500

Description: 86. Koch, Robert. Autograph letter signed (“R. Koch”), 2 pages (4.5 x 7 in.; 114 x 178 mm.), in German, front and back, “Berlin C. Klosterstrasse 36”, 26 October 1888, written to “Dear Sir (City Planning Commissioner)” in Frankfurt, Germany. With original autograph transmittal envelope. Minor ink smudges; small separation on vertical fold of address overleaf.Nobel Prize-winning founder of modern bacteriology, Robert Koch, writes a city planning commissioner about his report on river pollution.Koch writes in full: Dear Sir (City Planning Commissioner), I presented H. E. Sydow, Director of the Scientific Deputation, with your request regarding my report on river pollution that I prepared for that deputation. H. E., however, denied your request, quoting that it was in conflict with the regulations of said Deputation, to let you have the report. In private, however, he lets you know herewith that if the minister will give his consent, the report as well as the decisions made on this subject by the meeting of the Scientific Deputation, will be published soon in the Quarterly Journal for Judicial Medicine and Public Healthcare (published by Enlenberg). R. KochRobert Koch was a celebrated German physician and pioneering microbiologist, known for his role in identifying the specific and causative agents of tuberculosis, cholera and anthrax and for giving experimental support for the concept of infectious disease. His research led to the creation of Koch’s postulates, a series of four generalized principles linking specific microorganisms to specific diseases that remain today the “gold standard” in medical microbiology. $2,500 - $3,500

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Roosevelt, Franklin D. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 127. Roosevelt, Franklin D. Rare autograph letter signed (“F.D.R.”) as President, 2 pages (5.25 x 8.25 in.; 133 x 210 mm.), on White House letterhead, 26 February [1934], to Secretary of Labor, Frances Perkins (the first female member of a Presidential cabinet) concerning appointments to the National Labor Relations Board. Expected folds; light uneven toning; mounting remnants on verso. Franklin D. Roosevelt writes to Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins concerning the re-origination of the fledgling National Labor Relations Board as the President prepared to make the board independent of the National Recovery Administration.Roosevelt writes in full: I suggest after talking with Sen. Wagner or others that we ask Clay Williams & Frank Walsh to act as Vice-Chairmen of Nat. Labor B[oar]d— When a Vice Chairman sits on a new case it is my thought he should carry it through to final decision & that Bob & the 2 V.C.’s should consult frequently as to the general policy. Will you talk this over with Bob & then I can make appointments. — Bob also suggests Grant, Draper, Dennison, Walter A Draper as additional members to represent industry  An important letter from a pivotal period early in the history of the National Labor Relations Board (N.L.R.B.) as he sought to give the board independence from the National Recovery Administration following its first tumultuous year of existence. Roosevelt’s suggestion that prominent labor attorney Frank P. Walsh serve as a co-chair with Samuel Clay Williams was dropped. However, Roosevelt did agree Senator Wagner’s suggestions of Ernest Draper of Hill Brothers Company, New York, and Henry Dennison of the Dennison Manufacturing Company, Framingham, Massachusetts to serve as additional vice-chairmen of the N.L.R.B. $10,000 - $15,000

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[World War II].

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $12,000 - $15,000

Description: 154. [World War II]. Three-Star Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes’ uniform, cap, army officer’s overcoat, appointment document signed by Woodrow Wilson and related items.Highly decorated Lieutenant Colonel Geoffrey Keyes (1888-1967) was promoted to Colonel on 26 June 1941, Brigadier General on 15 January 1942, Major General on 22 June 1942, and Lieutenant General on 17 April 1945 (the same day that Lieutenant General George S. Patton, Jr. was promoted to four-star General). Among his military decorations and awards are the Army Distinguished Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters, the Silver Star with oak leaf cluster, the Legion of Merit, the Bronze Star, the World War I and World War II Victory Medals, the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with one silver and two bronze service stars, and numerous awards from other countries including, from the U.K. (Honorary Companion of the Order of the Bath), France (Croix de Guerre with palm, Legion of Honour), Italy (Silver Medal of Military Valor), Czechoslovakia (Grand Officer of the Military Order of the White Lion), and the Vatican (Papal Lateran Cross). Three-Star World War II Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes’ uniform, cap, and wool army officer’s overcoat – with many related letters and documents including his appointments signed by Woodrow Wilson and others and original photographs of him in uniform with Dwight D. Eisenhower and Harry S. Truman.During World War II, Keyes was Chief of Staff, 2nd Armored Division (1940-1942), Commanding General 9th Armored Division (1942), Deputy Commanding General Western Task Force [North Africa] under Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. (1942-1943), Deputy Commanding General I Armored Corps [North Africa] under Gen. Patton (1943), Deputy Commanding General 7th Army [Sicily] under Gen. Patton (1943), Commanding General Provisional Corps [Sicily] appointed by Gen. Patton (1943), Commanding General II Corps [Italy] (1943-1946). He accepted the surrender of Palermo, Sicily, on 22 July 1943. Keyes then served as Commanding General 7th Army [Germany] (1945-1946), Commanding General 3rd Army [Germany] (1946-1947) and Deputy Commanding General U.S. Forces in Austria under Gen. Mark Clark (1947) – he had served under Gen. Clark at Anzio beach, Monte Cassino, and before Rome. Keyes was Commanding General U.S. Forces in Austria and U.S. High Commissioner in Austria from 1947 to 1950, retiring from the Army in 1950. Included in the lot are:(1) Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes' two piece three-star uniform: light brown wool jacket, partly lined, with II Corps patch on left shoulder, a bar of three silver stars attached to each shoulder epaulet. Keyes' brass “U.S.” lapel insignia are also present, only the snaps for his ribbon bar remain. Shows normal usage. The jacket bears a brown cloth tag sewn on inside pocket, with Seal of the United States, and “Regulation Army Officer's Uniform.” A few moth nips to the jacket. The matching pants, at the waist inside, bear the tag “Regulation Army Officers’ Trousers” and “Keyes”, in unknown hand, is written in blue ink on one pocket next to a hand-numbered tag. Fine condition.(2) Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes’ three-star khaki overseas cap, gold piping, with three white stars embroidered on the left side. Tag inside: “M. Banks Post Tailor Fort Knox, Ky.” This cap was also worn by Keyes as two-star Major General (1942-1945); under the flap, one can see that the third star was added after the first two stars were embroidered. Fine condition. (3) Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes' wool overcoat, double-breasted with three buttons, two black bands at the end of each sleeve. The coat bears a brown cloth tag sewn on inside pocket, with Seal of the United States, and “Regulation Army Officer's Overcoat.” ”II Corps” patch on right shoulder, U.S. Forces Headquarters Austria patch on left shoulder. Fine condition. Included is a 4.5 x 3.75 in. (114 x 95 mm.) black & white photograph showing Keyes wearing this overcoat as he greets troops at Christmas.(4) President Woodrow Wilson appoints Geoffrey Keyes “First Lieutenant of Cavalry.” Partly-printed document signed (“Woodrow Wilson”) as President, 1 page (15.75 x 19.5 in.; 400 x 495 mm.), Washington, 17 August 1916. Countersigned ”Newton D. Baker” as Secretary of War. Wilson’s signature shows usual shade that exists on parchment. Blue War Office seal affixed at lower left. Minor flaws. • Ceremonial Tassel. Ornately-braided red, white, and blue tassel which may have been a uniform accessory. The tassel at each end is 7 in. (178 mm.) long. • Various documents appointing Keyes: “Captain of Cavalry” (25 August 1917); “temporarily, a Lieutenant General” (17 April 1945); “Brigadier General in the Regular Army” (18 July 1946) and Major Keyes 10 July 1925 Diploma from The Cavalry School at Fort Riley, Kansas.• Special Orders No. 17, War Department, 20 January 1942, 20 pages (5.75 x 9 in.; 146 x 229 mm.), “For immediate delivery to Brig Gen Geoffrey Keyes, GSC referred to in par. 1 or prompt return to A.G.O., W.D.” Slight tears at upper margin of last page which states: “By Order of the Secretary of War: G.C. MARSHALL, Chief of Staff.” Penciled at upper right of first page in red: “Combat Commander 3 Armored Div.” Paragraph 1 (of 74), in part, “1. Announcement is made of the temporary appointment on 20 January 1942, of the following-named officers … To brigadier general with rank from 15 January 1942 … COLONEL GEOFFREY KEYES (O-3561), General Staff Corps…”• Five original V-MAILS from Keyes to his wife, “Mrs. Geoffrey Keyes, U.S. Hotel Thayer, West Point, New York,” each 1 page (4.25 x 5 in.; 108 x 127 mm.) Excerpts: (13 April 1945) ”We still don’t know what the Pres. death will mean…” [FDR died April 12th]; (15 April 1945) ”Was all set to give Prince Umberto a treat to day but he postponed his visit…”[Umberto became King of Italy in 1946]; (30 April 1945) ”Hope I can find time soon to acknowledge the notes or telegrams on my promotion…” [to Lieutenant General]; (8 August 1945) ”boat ride up the Danube … the boat which had been a present from Hitler to Admiral Horthy…” – (11 August 1945) ”I am sure the news of the past two days from Japan should cheer her up … I’m sure it will be settled very shortly…” [atomic bombs dropped August 6th & 9th].• Three-quarter length photograph of Major General Geoffrey Keyes as Commanding General II Corps, wearing the overseas cap here offered. Sepia tone, (7 x 9.5 in.; 178 x 241 mm.) • Bust photograph of Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes in uniform wearing the three-star overseas cap here offered. Black & white, (6.75 x 9.25 in.; 171 x 235 mm.)• Original Photograph of General of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower and Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes. Black & white, (7.5 x 9.5 in.; 191 x 241 mm.) Keyes is wearing his Third Army patch on his sleeve; he was Commanding General of the Third Army in Germany from April 1946 until January 1947.• Original U.S. Army Photograph of President Harry S. Truman presenting a letter expressing congratulations and gratitude to Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes as General J. Lawton Collins, Army Chief of Staff (standing) looks on. Black & white, (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) Taken in the White House on 30 October 1950, a day before Keyes retired from the Army. Keyes is wearing his U.S. Forces Headquarters Austria patch on his left shoulder. Special shipping arrangements will apply.Provenance: From the Estate of Lieutenant General Geoffrey Keyes. $12,000 - $15,000

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Mantle, Mickey.

by Profiles in History

June 11, 2015, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 197. Mantle, Mickey. Gold American Express and American Airlines Admiral’s Club cards each signed (“Mickey Mantle”) accompanied with a signed photograph.Mickey Mantle’s Gold American Express Card, valid from “09/85 THRU 11/87”. The card is issued to “Mickey Mantle” by “Mercantile National Bank”. On the white strip on verso, Mantle has signed, “Mickey Mantle” in blue ink. Comes with an American Airlines Admiral’s Club card issued to “Mickey Mantle” and signed “Mickey Mantle” in blue felt tip pen on the front. Both cards measure (3.25 x 2.13 in.; 83 x 54 mm.) Mantle’s cards come with a color (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) photograph of Mantle in Yankee pinstripes signed across the image in blue felt tip, “Mickey Mantle”. All items are in fine condition and housed in an (11 x 18 in.; 279 x 457 mm.) acrylic display case. Celebrity credit cards have have risen sharply in popularity among collector’s over the past years, with Mantle amoung the most desirable of all sports stars. These Mantle cards were originally obtained at the 2003 Mickey Mantle Estate Sale held at Madison Square Garden on 8 December 2003. They are accompanied by a COA signed by Mantle’s widow and two sons. LOA from James Spence and Steve Grad/PSA/DNA also included. $10,000 - $15,000

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