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Lots related to bartlett josiah letter signed chairman for sale at auction

(462 lots returned of approx. 23,073 available)

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Speech of Shlomo Zalman Schocken, Chairman of the Executive Council of Hebrew University. Jerusalem, 1939; The Jewish Heritage, London, 1923

Lot 29: Speech of Shlomo Zalman Schocken, Chairman of the Executive Council of Hebrew University. Jerusalem, 1939; The Jewish Heritage, London, 1923

by Winner's Auctions & Exhibitions

July 9, 2014

Jerusalem, Israel

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 1. Salaman Schocken Chairman of the executive council of the Hebrew University broadcast from Jerusalem 29/10/1939, on the occasion of the opening of the new academic year. Jerusalem, [1939]. Summarizes five active years of the Hebrew University, in the shadow of the Nazi rise to power and the start of the Second World War. Hebrew, English. 23.5 cm. 6, [2], 8 pages. Two jackets, in Hebrew and English, detached. Tears with loss in the blank margins of the jackets. Aging stains on the jackets, but the booklet itself is in very fine condition. 2. The Jewish Heritage. By Bertram B. Benas. London, 1923. Article regarding the Jewish heritage. Printed from "The Jewish Chronicle Supplements" 28.12.1923, 1.2.1924, 29.2.1924. English. 24.5 cm. 12 pages. Quality paper. Jacket. Tear without loss in spine. Very fine condition. Not in the National Library.

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Official Letter Signed by the Admor of Ger, Rabbi Pinchas Menachem Alter. [1978]

Lot 81: Official Letter Signed by the Admor of Ger, Rabbi Pinchas Menachem Alter. [1978]

by Winner's Auctions & Exhibitions

July 9, 2014

Jerusalem, Israel

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Description: Official letter signed by the Admor of Ger, Rabbi Pinchas Menachem Alter. 21st of Adar, [1978]. [1] letterhead of "Torah V'Yehadut L'Am". 28x21 cm. Addressed to the Ministry of Education and Culture. Report regarding the number of lectures, activities and expenses of the "Torah V'Yehadut L'Am", and a request that the remaining budget be transferred to the organization's bank account. Very fine condition. Rabbi Pinchas Menachem Alter was born in 1926, to his father, the Imrei Emes of Ger. He was Rosh Yeshiva in Yeshivat Sefas Emes, a member of the Moetzes Gedolei HaTorah of Agudat Yisrael and president of Agudat Yisrael. He succeeded his brother, Rabbi Simcha Bunim, as Admor of Ger in 1992 until his death in 1996. He is known as the "Pnei Menachem" after the title of the book he authored.

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Leonard Matsoso (1949 -) - Letter to Mother Nature 52.5 x 36.5cm

Lot 555: Leonard Matsoso (1949 -) - Letter to Mother Nature 52.5 x 36.5cm

by Lawsons

July 10, 2014, 11:00 AM AEST

Leichhardt, Australia

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Description: Leonard Matsoso (1949 -) Letter to Mother Nature pencil & pen 52.5 x 36.5cm signed & dated '72 lower centre

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[Love Letters] Celia Romana, Lettere, 1572

Lot 35: [Love Letters] Celia Romana, Lettere, 1572

by Bibliopathos

July 10, 2014, 7:00 AM PST

Verona, Italy

Estimated Price: €1,000 - €1,200

Description: EXCESSIVELY SCARCE EDITION OF RENAISSANCE LOVE LETTERSCelia Romana. Lettere amorose di madonna Celia gentildonna romana scritte al suo amante. In Venetia : appresso Iacomo Simbeni, 1572. 8vo, 19th century stiff paperboards, ff. 70. Printer's device on title-page; woodcut initials. Italic type. Excessively scarce edition of this collection of love letters, written by Celia, a noble woman from Rome, to his lover.The letters, written by a not identified «Madonna Celia» from Rome (fl. 16th century), were published for the first time in 1562 and represent a rare sample of feminine literature in the Renaissance: but, according to Adams, the author could be Girolamo Parabosco. References: CNCE 10729 (only four copies). OCLC, 8071369.

Condition Report: A very fine and crisp copy.

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An electro-plated chairman's mallet, the circular head engraved with a Latin...

Lot 8: An electro-plated chairman's mallet, the circular head engraved with a Latin...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

July 11, 2014, 1:00 PM GMT

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £80 - £120

Description: An electro-plated chairman's mallet, the circular head engraved with a Latin inscription, 18.5cm (7 1/4in) long, on a mahogany stand with a plaque inscribed from the Duke of Northumberland to the Council of the RASE, 1975, in a mahogany box

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Autograph Letter signed to the Council of the Royal Agricultural Society, 2pp

Lot 317: Autograph Letter signed to the Council of the Royal Agricultural Society, 2pp

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

July 11, 2014, 1:00 PM GMT

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £200 - £300

Description: ( Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India ) Autograph Letter signed to the Council of the Royal Agricultural Society, 2pp., 8vo, Windsor Castle, 8th July 1889, "It gave me very great pleasure to visit the show of the Agricultural Society of which I am this year the President and I can assure you that I was extremely gratified with this magnificent Exhibition", mounted in a purple velvet stand, rubbed and faded ; and 4 others, including, a vol. relating to Allied Committee of relief for Belgian farmers, 1919, and a plaque from The Rural Society of Argentina to the Royal Agricultural Society, 1925, v.s., v.d. (5).

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Sybil Thorndike signed hand written letter

Lot 93: Sybil Thorndike signed hand written letter

by Chaucer Covers & Auctions

July 11, 2014, 5:00 PM GMT

Folkestone, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £15 - £20

Description: Sybil Thorndike signed hand written letter

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Ronnie Corbett signed typed letter

Lot 94: Ronnie Corbett signed typed letter

by Chaucer Covers & Auctions

July 11, 2014, 5:00 PM GMT

Folkestone, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £15 - £20

Description: Ronnie Corbett signed typed letter

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Eric Sykes signed typed letter. Good condition

Lot 364: Eric Sykes signed typed letter. Good condition

by Chaucer Covers & Auctions

July 11, 2014, 5:00 PM GMT

Folkestone, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £5 - £10

Description: Eric Sykes signed typed letter. Good condition

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Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed (

Lot 1: Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed ("J. Adams"), 3 pages, 12 April 1807.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $20,000

Description: 1. Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed (“J. Adams”), 3 pages (9 x 7.25 in.; 229 x 184 mm). Quincy, 12 April 1807 to Benjamin Rush regarding the fate of Pennsylvania amid all the political turmoil of the times; with integral address leaf addressed to: “Dr. Benjamin Rush, Philadelphia” and red wax seal remnant on third page, with Adams’ free frank, docketed by Rush “Quincy, Apl. 13th. 1807  Free” and “J. Adams”. Former President John Adams worries about the fate of Pennsylvania, particularly in light of the enormous political influence of men such as Adams’ enemy, former Vice President Aaron Burr.Benjamin Rush had served as a member of the Continental Congress (1776, 1777) and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.  At the time of this letter, he was serving as Treasurer of the U.S. Mint (1797-1813), appointed by President John Adams; it was Adams who mediated the reconciliation between Rush and Thomas Jefferson after both had retired from active politics.  A reflective Adams, now retired in Quincy after years of public service, writes freely to his close friend.  Adams writes in full: Dear Sir,  Your favour of the third is received.  I am willing to allow your Philosophers your Opinion of the universal Gravitation of Matter, if you will allow mine that there is in Some Souls a principle of absolute Levity that buoys them irres[is]tably into the Clouds.  Whether you call it etherial [sic] Spirit or inflammable air it has an uncontrollable Tendency to ascend, and has no capacity to ascertain the height at which it aims or the means by which it is to rise.  This I take to be precisely the Genius of Burr, Miranda and Hamilton, among a thousand others of less or more Note.  These Creatures have no Prudence.  If a Man is once So disarranged in his Intellect as to deliberate upon a Project of ascending to the Seven Starrs, it is natural enough that he should first attempt to Seize the two Horns of the New Moon and make her his first Stage. Burr’s project of making himself V.P. of U.S. to a reasonable Man would have appeared an high degree of Extravagance, for there were ten thousand Men in the United States, who were as well qualified for it and had merited it by much greater Services, Sufferings and Sacrifices.  Yet in this he succeeded.  Buoyed up by the flattery of the Presbyterians in Connecticutt, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and all the Southern States, from the Veneration in which they held his Father and Grandfather, the Factions of Clintons and Livingstons alternately employed him as their Instrument, till the Virginians conceived the Project of engaging him to corrupt the State of New York from the Federal Interest.  In this They and he succeeded: but all the rest of his Projects have been whimsical and without Success.  What could have inspired Burr with hopes of being an Ambassador, a Chief Justice of Pensilvania [sic] or a Governor of New York or Vice P. of U.S.? Omnia Numina Absunt, Sui absit Prudentia.  Prudence is the first of Virtues and the root of all others.  Without Prudence, there may be abstinence but not Temperance; there may be rashness but not Fortitude; there may be insensibility or obstinancy but not Patience. Without Prudence, to weigh and deliberate on the Nature and consequences of an Enterprise, and to consider his means and his End, a Man who engages in it, commits himself to Chance, and not Seldom when a thousand Chances are against him to one in his favour. I pity my old Friend, [Thomas] McKean [(1734-1817) - signer of the Declaration of Independence, Chief Justice of Pennsylvania (served 1777-99) and Governor of Pennsylvania (served 1799-1808)].  Like many others of our Antedeluvian Patriarchs he was carried away into Error by the French Revolution and delivered himself into the hands of a Party with whom he never could cordially cooperate.  In the Time of Robespierre [(1758-1794) - French revolutionary leader responsible for much of the Reign of Terror] and his bloodyest Cruelties I dined once in Company with McKean, [Albert] Gallatin [(1761-1849) - Secretary of the Treasury (served 1801-14)] and Burr and they were all very loud in praise of Robespierre.  ‘He was honest, and the Savior of France.’  Some of the Company presumed to censure their Patriot and Hero, and all three of these Gentlemen cried out Robespierre’s Crime is his Honesty.  How many Instances do We See every day which prove that Honesty is not the best Policy.  They have all of them tried a different Policy, but I believe they will all come to a sad End and find at last that Honesty would havebeen a better Policy.I now come to a Mystery in your Letter.  I have but four Grandsons; two of them are Boys under Seven Years of Age [George Washington Adams (1801-1829) and John Adams II (1803-1834)] and have been at my House and in Boston all Winter.  They are the Children of my son John [Quincy Adams (1767-1848)]; the two others are Sons of my Daughter [Abigail - or Nabby] Smith [(1765-1813)], the youngest of whom whose name is John [Adams Smith (1788-1854)] is now with me, and has not been in Philadelphia since last May; the oldest is William [Steuben Smith (1787-1850)] Now to my great grief in Trinidad.  No Letter therefore can have been left at your House from any Grandson of mine.  I cannot unriddle this Mystery but by Supposing that some adventurer has forgot a Letter: but for what End I know not.  I thank you with all my heart for your kind Intentions towards my Supposed Grandson.  They are as authentic proofs of Friendship, as if it had been my real Grandson. Pennsylvania can fall down on one broadside and then roll over to the other Broadside, and then turn Mast upwards and then right her self up again.  She is a Ship however so violently addicted to pitching and rolling that I should not wonder if she dismasted herself. To quit the figure and Speak plain English I have long thought that the first Serious civil War in America will commence in Pensilvania [sic].  The two Nations of Irish and Germans who compose the principal Part of the People, are so entirely governed by their Passions, have So little reason and less Knowledge that it will be impossible to keep them steady in any just System of Policy.  They will one day repent in Sac[k]cloth [a coarse cloth, made of goats› hair, worn as a symbol of penitence] the ascendency they have given to the Transaleganian [Trans-Alleghanian, i.e., the states containing the Allegheny Mountains - Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia] and Southern Atlantic States [North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia] and So will New York.  But So contagious is Folly that we in the Mass[achusetts]. are running the Same Course.  I do not believe how even that Sullivan, if he should be chosen, will harmonize long with his Party.  Not half so long as McKean has.  He is in heart and in head no more of a Democrat than McKean.  I have known him not much less than forty years.  He has never been a steady nor a [obscured by wax seal] Man.  But he is not malevolent Enough for his Party nor ignorant.  His general aim has been to be of the Strongest Side and consequently has often offended all Parties at times. I should be glad to receive your explication of the Strange Story of my Grandson.  You do not say that the Letter was from Col. Smith.  What can the Tenet be? My Family reciprocate the friendly Sentiments of yours and none of them more heartily than J. Adams The election of 1800 turned into a contentious drawn out affair and weighed upon Adam enormously. Little wonder that years after the election of 1800, Adams continued to harbor great resentment at the powers wielded by Burr in influencing the outcome of the New York elections.Provenance: Christie’s New York, 19 May 1995, lot 2. $15,000 - $20,000

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Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush.

Lot 2: Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $12,000 - $15,000

Description: 2. Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (8.85 x 7.15 in.; 225 x 181mm), Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush; red wax seal remnant on verso of third page.John Adams continues his running argument with Benjamin Rush over the need to include Greek and Latin in the curriculum of American schools and gloomily comments on American politics.Adams writes in part: Mrs Adams says she is willing you should discredit Greek and Latin, because it will destroy the foundation of all the Pretensions of the Gentlemen to Superiority over the Ladies, and restore Liberty, Equality and fraternity between the Sexes. What does Mrs Rush think of this? . . .Suppose we should agree to study the original languages especially the Arabic, instead of Greek and Latin. This would not please the Ladies so well, but it would gratify Hobbes much better. According to many present appearances in the world many useful lessons and deep maxims might be learned from the Asiatic writers. There are great Models of Heroes and Conquerors fit for the Imitation of the Emperors of Britain and France. Adams proceeds to quote from the Life of Timur-Bec, volume 1 page 202: . . . “He has been often heard to say, that it was neither agreeable or decent, that the habitable world should be governed by two Kings: according to the words of the Poet, ‘as there is but one God, there ought to be but one King, all the Earth being very small in comparison of the Ambition of a great Prince.’” Where can you find in any Greek or Roman writer a sentiment so sublime and edifying for George and Napoleon. There are some faint traces of it in the conduct of Alexander and Caesar but far less frank and noble, and these have been imprudently branded with Infamy by Greek and Roman orators and Historians. There is an abundance more of such profound Instruction in the Life of this Tamerlane as well as in that of Gengizcan [Genghis Kahn], both of which I believe Napoleon has closely studied. With Homer in one Pocket, Caesar’s Commentaries in the other Quintus Curtius under his pillow and the Lives of Mahomet Gengizcan and Tamerlane in his Port Folio . . . this Man has formed himself: but the Classics among them have damped his ardor and prevented his rising as yet to the lofty Heights of the Asiatic Emperors. Would it not be better that George and Napoleon should forget all their Classicks mount at once to all sublimities of Mahomet Gengizcan and Tamerlane? In that case one or the other must soon succumb and would it not be better that one such should govern the globe than two?Adams continues his letter with great wit to Dr. Rush on 15 October with mention of his invention, a tranquilizing chair, designed to be a replacement for a straightjacket: The Tranquilliser is a very ingenuious Mechanical Invention and I hope will be beneficial to that most deplorable Portion of our Species. But to be serious, if I were possessed of Sovereign Power over your Hospital, (provided I could do it secretly so that no Mortal should know it, but you and I), I would put you into your own Tranquilliser, till I cured you of you Fanaticism against Greek and Latin.Adams sums up Rush’s position on the Classics: My friend you will labour in vain. As the Love of Science and the Taste for the fine Arts increases in the World, the Admiration of Greek and Roman Science and Litterature [sic] will increase. Both are increasing very fast. Your Labours will be as useless as those of Tom Paine against the Bible, which are already fallen dead and almost forgotten.Adams then turns to political topics in his letter. On American finance, he succinctly states: Our Financial System and our Banks are a Species of fraudulent opposition upon the Community. But you would think me mad enough for your Tranquillising Chair if I should say there is no remedy but to return to a circulating Medium of Gold and Silver only. Commerce has in all times made wild work with elections, but it never invented so artful a scheme of corruption for that purpose as our American Banks. With more than a bit of gloom, Adams closes his letter: At times I see nothing to prevent our country both North and South America from becoming in another century if not this, a Theatre for Gengizcans, Mahomets, Tamerlanes, Charlemagnes, Napoleons, Burrs and Hamiltons. Our People are the shrewdest and most sagacious, that I know: but yet they are so easily deceived; and are in fact so universally deceived in many essential Points, that they afford no certain Resource for honest and able Men: and for what I see, they will not open their eyes till they themselves will be obliged to have recourse to the Ratio Ultima Popularum Rerum Publicarum et Regum. We know how this always ends ...An extraordinary letter that clearly reveals Adams’ candor, wit, brilliance and prescience.Provenance: Sotheby’s New York, 31 October 1985, lot 46. $12,000 - $15,000

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Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont.

Lot 3: Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 3. Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (10 x 8 in.; 254 x 203 mm.), Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont, Esqr., President of the Agricultural Society of Jefferson County, New York; some splitting along vertical and horizontal folds, crude repair to verso not affecting any characters.President John Adams reveals his love of agriculture and contrasts the industry of agriculture with the indolent lifestyle of fellow diplomat Benjamin Franklin forty years ago.Adams writes in full:I have received and read with pleasure an Address to the Agricultural Society of Jefferson County in the State of New York, and as I know not from whom it came who should I thank for it, but its author. I rejoice in every new Society which has Agriculture for its object, and see with delight that the spirit is spreading through the United States. If I could worship any of the heathen Gods it would be old Saturn because I believe him to be only an Allegorical Personification of Agriculture, and the Children he devoured to be only his own Grapes & Figs, Apples & Pears, Wheat and Barley . I agree with you, in the main, in every Sentiment, particularly relative to Grapes and Corn. Yet we cannot have perfect Roast Beef nor perfect Roast Spareribs nor perfect Poultry without Maise. We must therefore sacrifice a little Luxury to a great deal of public good. From the style of this address I should not have suspected it to have been written by any other than a Native of this country. Thirty nine years ago, I little thought I should live to see the Heir apparent to the Princely Palaces and Gardens of Passy my Fellow Citizen in the Republican Wilderness of America laying the Foundation of more ample domains and perhaps more splendid Palaces. I observed the Motto of the Hotel de Valentinois which I had then the honor to inhabit “Se sta bene non se move” - ‘If you stand well, stand still.’ But you have proved the Maxim not to be infallible. And I rejoice in it. The Civilities I received from Your Family interest me so much in their Happiness that any Information of it would in­ crease that of your Sincere Well Wisher and most humble servant. Without calling him by name, Adams has made a snide reference to Benjamin Franklin, his companion and fellow negotiator almost four decades earlier, calling him ...the Heir apparent to the Princely Palaces and Gardens of Passy. Franklin, who stayed at the Hotel de Valentino was at Passy for nine years––from 1776-1785 and was joined there by John Adams in April, 1778. The two also served as commissioners negotiating peace with Great Britain in 1781. With his biased retrospective viewpoint, the aging Adams has contrasted the industriousness of agricultural concerns with his recollections of the indolent and lazy Franklin feasting at the dinner table at Passy. He has only praise for the new Agricultural Society, and harbors little fondness, even forty years later, for Franklin. Adams, in further mentioning Franklin as ...my Fellow Citizen in the Republican Wilderness of America laying the Foundation of more ample domains and perhaps more splendid Palaces, is probably referring to Franklin’s unrealistic hope, still voiced in 1778-79, that Congress would honor land claims of the Vandalia Company in the Ohio River territory. $8,000 - $12,000

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Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 4: Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed ("J.Q. Adams"), 1 page, Boston, 26 November 1841.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 4. Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (“J.Q. Adams”), 1 page (10 x 7.87 in.; 254 x 200 mm.), Boston, 26 November 1841, to William Hayden, Editor of the Atlas Boston.Commenting on the current war between Great Britain and China––a conflict with elements similar to those of the American Revolutionary War, John Quincy Adams involes the hallowed words of the Declaration of Independence as he sides with the Chinese.Adams writes in full: Dear Sir I pray you to accept my thanks, for your obliging offer to publish in the Atlas, the lecture recently delivered by me, on the War between Great Britain and China. Previous engagements have taken from me the disposal of the manuscript which I should otherwise cheerfully place at yours -As to the precise grounds assumed by the Lecturer, for the cornerstone of his argument with regard to the justice of the cause, they are contained in the following words––“We hold these truths to be self evident - that all men are created equal - that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights - that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”- If the Lecturer has failed in showing the application of these principles to the vitals of the present issue between Great Britain and China, he has failed to accomplish his task, but the fault is neither in the premises, nor in the link of adamant between them and his conclusion. Very respectfully, your obed Serv’ J Q. Adams.First the British War with China (1841-42), erupted over the monopolistic system of maritime trade employed by the Cantonese government in an effort to stave off further British imperialism in the area, and to curtail the spread of mercantilism. The conflict began with British occupation of Chusan and the Canton River forts, followed by the seizure of several coastal ports and Chinkiang on the Grand Canal. On 29 August 1842, the Treaty of Nanking was signed, reversing the former protectionist trade policies and ceding control of Hong Kong to the British.During this time, Adams was serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives––the only former President to do so. As a seasoned statesman, he was in great demand as a speaker and lecturer in his native state of Massachusetts, and throughout New England as well. $5,000 - $8,000

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Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong.

Lot 11: Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 11. Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong inscribed and signed accompanying one of the letters.Quintessential Satchmo. Included in the group: Autograph letter signed (“RED BEANS & RICELY, Louis Armstrong”), 1 page octavo, Chicago, Illinois, 29 May 1949, to John B. Elwood, Jackson, Michigan; with integral blank leaf attached and original envelope. He writes in full: Man, -- I’ve just finished reading your Script concerning the Crosby Cavalcade -­ I’m tellin’ yooo you really came on. You sure ought to see that my Boy Pappa Bing Crosby get one of these Scripts. That would really Gas him no End. And I wanna thank ‘ya too. Regards to your wife and your staff. Thanks again.Typed letter signed (“Louis Armstrong Satchmo”), in green ink, 1 page large quarto, in green typewriter ink, Corona, New York, 21 December 1957, to Midori Tsuji in New York City, on the verso of a printed diet plan entitled “Lose Weight the Satchmo Way”; with several handwritten corrections and with the original envelope. He writes in full: Before I say another word, please allow me to wish you the best Merry Christmas that you’ve ever had in your fine life. I hope that the Lord will keep you -Ernie Anderson -Lucille and Joe Glaser- for ever ‘n’ ever. Thanks, very much for keeping your promise to send Mr Todd’s Book (around the world in a ‘gang of’ days) to me. Although I saw the picture, I immediately started reading it all over again, just like I’d never seen it before. Thanks again. Well, our dear boy, Breir Anderson has cutout from these shores of our’s. I hope, it won’t be for too long. Ernie is my man. His heart is as big as my trumpet case. I miss him just like a brother. I hope that I never have to travel anywheres, abroad without him. He and I speak’s the same language. And also speaks’ the same words of the Hot Clubs -all over the world. Thats, WHY we both appreciate the same music and the fans (no matter how big- they come) appreciate us along with the music that we dish out. Thats, why -when ever we’re on tour through the Foreign Countries I usually meet Presidents, Ambassadors, etc, who’s also, ‘Cats, who ‘Digs’ life and music (our music) the same as we. . . And, as for you, you are one of the ‘Hippiest ‘Chicks’ that I’ve met, in a ‘Hollywood Long Time.’ Tee Hee. . . .I am sitting here at home after one of those big nights at the Copa. Recording some of the fine recordings that I picked up in Europe, and all points, South America. Great kicks. And thats, for sure. It’s now eight o’clock in the morning. Lucille has an appointment with her hair dresser. They think -it best to get in the shop before the mad customer’s rush starts. The same way that my dentist used to do for me. I’d always get into his chair before the mad rush of his clients. And it would give us chance to have a few good laughs, -while he’d be standing on my Chops. Wow. My dentist Dr Gottleib would tell me –‘You’re the Damdest Patient that I’ve ever had.’ After finishing work at Bop City three thirty & four o’clock in the mornings, I’d be so ‘beat for my youth’ until I’d fall asleep while he would be working on me. He’d be justa gri[n]ding in my chops­ and would have to awaken me in order to have me tum my jaw over so he could grind on the other side. [I]’d do just that and return back to sleep, just like a ‘Mall Tees Kitten . . . . Cute? P.S. Now why would I say all of this? I only wanted to thank you. But since I’ve started, I’m happy...I am very happy to have met you. You are real fine people. Lucille ‘sez’ the same thing. Goodluck and don’t make yourself a total stranger to us. You’re always welcome anywheres ‘you should see the sign saying Louis Armstrong. You Hear?Typed document (mimeograph copy) signed, in green ink, 26 pages quarto, 24 September 1958 being a contract between Paramount Pictures Corporation and Associated Booking Corporation (Armstrong’s agent), concerning the trumpeter’s performance in the role of himself in the motion picture photoplay, The Five Pennies. Terms of the contract include the period of employment (beginning on 30 September 1958), cancellation and obligation clauses, Armstrong’s commitments to render his services outside of Paramount, compensation, breaches and damages, transportation and living expenses, Armstrong’s appearances at the studio for various purposes, rights, royalties on phonograph records, and various other provisions.Autograph letter signed, 3 pages quarto, Corona, New York, 16 June 1970, to Chris Clifton; with hand-addressed transmittal envelope. Louis Armstrong’s words of wisdom for a budding trumpeter who played with the Tuxedo Brass Band, the same band Satchmo played with 50 years earlier: Dear Chris Man. I received your letter and as usual very happy to get it. The presents were beautiful. The photo of you blowing with the Tuxedo Brass Band is very good of you. I see that you really enjoyed playing with them. That’s the Brass Band that I was playing with [when] I left New Orleans in 1922 to join King Oliver in Chicago and met Lil [Lillian Hardin, Armstrong’s second wife, of four. It was she who was credited with getting Louis out from under Oliver’s shadow]. She was blowing/PLAYING with the King -Johnny -Baby Dodds Outrey - and Bill [William K.] Johnson. Man what a Band. They live my memories.I haven’t seen or heard from our boy Jack Bradley since he was here with you. Guess he’s a busy man these days. I am coming on better each day. Soon as my legs strengthen up a little more, I’ll be straight and I can put the cane aside. I am glad to hear about you doing so well with your horn. That’s right. Blow with everybody. And see for yourself you’ll be glad you did. Nowadays you just can’t depend on one certain bunch of musicians to back you up. And good musicians will be very glad to Blow behind a good Trumpet Man that plays like you. Because there aren’t too many, if any at all playing the way that you play. Understand? So keep it up - playing with Lil will do you some good. She’s from the Old School and can do wonders for you, don’t you think so? I am looking to hearing you playing with your own Band some day. You have everything to work with. You are young & strong and knows your Horn, so there you are. Take advantage of it Gate, and you know that I am with you all the way. Lucille sent regards. Thanks again for everything from your Boy. Satch LouisArmstrong.Accompanied by a photograph signed being a publicity photograph (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm) of Armstrong in a half-figure portrait. He is dressed in a white suit and holds his trumpet in his right hand. Boldly inscribed in green ink on the image: To Chris Clifton Oh those Duets on Tape were wonderful Louis Armstrong Satchmo. $5,000 - $8,000

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Burr, Aaron. A group of 3 autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States

Lot 13: Burr, Aaron. A group of 3 autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 13. Burr, Aaron. A fine group of three autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States, including: Autograph letter signed (“A Burr”), 1 page quarto, New York, 4 January 1797, to Peter Van Gaasbeck of Kingston, New York; integral address leaf; seal hole repaired, light spotting.In the present letter, Burr comments on the election of both Adams and Jefferson. He writes in part: . . . It is now known that Adams is chosen President and Jeferson [sic] Vice President. It is doubtful whether the latter will serve––I think he will . . . As Burr predicted here, Jefferson did interrupt his retirement from public life to hold the office of Vice President and successfully ran against Burr for the office of President in the election of 1800. Provenance: The Estelle Doheny Collection, Christie’s New York, 21 February 1989.Autograph letter signed (“AB”), 1 page folio, February [1804]. To David Gelston, Collector of the Port of New York. With the integral docketed leaf attached. An interesting letter, written only two days before his fateful nomination for New York governor. During that unsuccessful campaign, Burr’s simmering quarrel with Alexander Hamilton culminated in their fatal duel, on 11 July: By the Letter of Mr Astor herewith enclosed you will see that be offers not quite 2500 dolrs. for the lots - but with the deduction of 500 & odd dolrs. which I owe him. This debt was created by an error in our accounts of his own creating. He convinced me of the error; but the money had been paid to me & was appropriated. It was therefore left as a debt. Those lots are really worth 300 Drs. apiece & will sell for that in the Course of the summer. What now prevents a fair Sale is that they are included in a mortgage with other lots which were sold to Mr Astor & the money left in his hands to pay the whole mortgage for doing which I have h.is Covenant; but all this could not be explained at auction. If you choose to take the lots yourself, you may have them for 2500 Drs. if not you may sell them at the offer of Astor in case nothing better offers. Dr Browne will execute the Deed I shall then owe you 7 or 800 Drs. which I will pay as soon as possible... In July, Burr’s duel with Hamilton effectively ended his career in politics. John Jacob Astor, having made substantial sums in the fur-factoring trade, began at this period to make large purchases of city real estate which later formed the bulk of the Astor family fortune. Provenance: David Gelston (1733-1828) of Long Island, delegate to the Provincial Congress in New York and to the Constitutional Convention, appointed Collector of the Port of New York by Jefferson in 1801 - A direct descendant of the above (sale, Christie’s New York, 19 December 1986, lot 24)––to the present owner (sale Christie’s New York, 14 May 1992, lot 43.Autograph letter signed (“A Burr”), 1 page quarto, 1 June 1798, to the Honorable John Laurance U.S. Senate, regarding controversies between Samuel Bayard and Moses and Joseph Hunt of Ulster County over payment claims; paper loss at margin of horizontal fold and on the integral address leaf. $5,000 - $8,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 25: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed ("Mark"), 3 pages octavo, [14 Febrary] 1869

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $7,000

Description: 25. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“Mark”), 3 pages octavo, Ravenna, Ohio, [14 February] 1869, on Gillette House letterhead stationery to Dear J. H. & Tribe.Happiness abounds as Clemens declares to good friends Rev. and Mrs. Twichell that he is engaged to be married. Clemens writes in part: Dear J.H. & Tribe—I greet you with all the great accession of love that naturally comes to one on the feast day of St. Valentine. And you can just rise up & blow your horn, too, & blow it loud because the subscriber is engaged to be married!--hip, hip, hip—[now, all together!] On bended knees, in the presence of God only, we devoted our lives to each other & to the service of God. And let this writing be a witness of it, to you.And so, as soon as I am permanently settled in life, we shall be married. [I don’t sigh, & groan & howl so much, now, as I used to—no, I feel serene, & arrogant, & stuck up--& I feel such pity for the world & every body in it but just us two.] I have suddenly grown to be prodigiously important to the world’s welfare, somehow—though it didn’t use[d] to seem to me that my existence was such a very extraordinary matter…The recipient of the letter, Rev. Joseph H. Twichell was the pastor of the Asylum Hill Congregational Church in Hartford. He and his wife, Julia, became Clemens’ closest personal friends. Samuel Clemens and Olivia were provisionally engaged in November 1868; the engagement was formalized on 4 February 1869. According to Clemens’ recounting to Twichell, the moment was filled with intense religious emotion. Clemens’ plan was to live in Cleveland after their marriage—if he could buy a share of Abel Fairbanks’ “Herald”. By the spring of 1869, other possibilities appeared—the “New York Tribune” and “The Hartford Courant”—the latter owned by partners Gen. Joseph Hawley and Charles Dudley Warner. Cleveland soon lost its attractiveness, replaced by the quiet and moral atmosphere of Hartford. In the end, however, Hawley and Warner turned down Clemens. Instead, Clemens bought a third interest in the “Express” in Buffalo, taking possession on 14 August 1869. He was determined to support his wife without any help from her father and made the purchase of a newspaper a prerequisite to his marriage.Approximately a year after this letter, on 2 February 1870, Clemens married Olivia Langdon. Reverend Twichell performed their marriage service. The day after their marriage, they set off for Buffalo in a private railroad car. Their sojourn in Buffalo was short lived. Clemens soon sold his interest in the “Express” and his journalism career ended. He and Livy moved back to Hartford, where his three daughters were born and they lived their lives out actively and happily. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 29: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed ("S L Clemens"), 2 pages, 15 December 1905.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $7,000

Description: 29. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“S L Clemens”), 2 pages (6.12 x 3.87 in.; 156 x 98 mm.), 15 December 1905, to an unnamed recipient in Vienna; on his 21 Fifth Avenue engraved mourning stationery. Clemens explains his pseudoynym, “Mark Twain” with great detail. Clemens writes in full: My Dear Sir: I am very glad indeed to have a copy of that cordial and complimentary appreciation, & I thank you for sending it. Coming from anywhere it would be gratifying: coming from Vienna, where I spent so many pleasant months & knew so many delightful people, it is peculiarly & especially welcome. I have been writing for the history of the “Mark Twain,” & at last I have found it in chapter 50 of my book called “Old Times on The Mississippi.” It is all set down there & rather lengthily: but to state it in a word, I took the name from the leadsman’s cry: it means 2 fathoms, 12 feet. Very sincerely yours SL. Clemens. $5,000 - $7,000

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Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 34: Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed ("Ty" and "TRC"), 26 pages quarto, 26 January 1955.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 34. Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed (“Ty” and “TRC”), 26 pages quarto, Menlo Park, California, 26 January 1955 on personal letterhead stationery in green ink to his step-daughter, Gerry.Ty Cobb writes a heartfelt yet salacious letter to his step-daughter, Gerry, expressing his love for her and her mother even though a divorce is pending because of his abuse and his infidelity.Cobb writes in part: Dear Gerry: No doubt you are surprised my writing really should not be on account and basis of my appraisal of you, what you think of me, I cannot say or even guess. You are the daughter of the woman I happen to have loved and do even now and often what’s happened in the several circumstances and happening as you will know and I feel I need not come out in words, then this last one worse than all, I still have a love for her, now coming from a man of my age, experience and maturity to say such, you know quite well that is really something to say and admit for instance to you her daughter and so much my junior also hers.There are so very, very many in this world who marry, many of course for gain or other ‘phoney’ impulses and reasons, I have observed many such cases in my life and travels also resultant endings, strife etc. And if one has a brain in their head and half way uses it they by equasions see what such classes of so called love brings in divorces tragedies etc. So again I say I have and do yet really love your mother and I hasten to say one with such love, never, never, never can in any way mistreat or be rough with the one they love, every desire or wish is a pleasure to grant, and I say and she will tell and assure you personally if she has not already and at all times told you this for it is the truth.He continues to talk of Gerry’s grandfather and how venomous he was acting heinous and inexcusable however, it didn’t change his love for his wife. All this affects me yes, but I love your mother and I did not marry him.Your mother freely on her own tells me all and that’s as it should be. I am truly sorry for you, your position as a grand daughter also as a daughter of your mother, the position you have been ruthlessly placed in. I feel so deeply, because of my love for your mother, that you would think I feel as if you and your brother was my own children. I must say my feelings toward you are far more than your brother, this I must say all caused by him. With the poisonings from his grandfather and his make up within himself what experience I have had, inflicting I should say with him as of what I have experienced in the time I have known Bill up to the last seeing of him, I confess I don’t feel the same to him as I do to you, think you would know that is quite understandable, I have seen him quite difficult towards you and others, not counting me in on it.Further in the letter, he expresses that he only hopes for the best for his wife, Frances Cass. He continues to say that neither of them is to blame for this outcome. Without mentioning explicitly, he seems to forgive her for infidelity: I have forgiven her for each time including this last time, though it was rough and gained the public’s attention through the papers. Now the public knows. This is destroying the real foundation of a home, of our name as people it’s a common subject. I will tell you on the grounds I have forgiven this. First your mother has been a wonderful person to me in the home in what she does for me personally. She has to have something finer within her to do what she has for me. After speaking of Gerry’s father and his infidelities, he seems to suggest that Frances had a mental break down and accused Ty Cobb of abuse: My daughter came. She saw lots and heard lots. I never had seen or heard your mother before in this way. She was not herself. I forgave her, my daughter also. She asked my daughter to take her to plane. I tried to have her sit down and compose herself before acting, let me explain what it means in what you want to do, calm her. She refused. I cannot hold her even if my daughter was not there. Your mother cannot and I know would not ever say I even put my hands on her in such a way. So she went, she got a lawyer also instituted action, but under a number. Cobb continues to discuss their relationship cryptically, not stating explicitly issues yet explaining that she was anxious and did such things that he tried to forgive and help mend. Concluding the letter he states: So Gerry here it is for you only her daughter one that I have learned to think much of. The letter is long, no doubt the longest letter, even taking in Hoover that you have ever received. Well at least I hold that record with this your longest letter—ha!ha! If you should have impulse to write me about my desire and outpourings in this as I felt you her daughter should know all that happened and then you would not be thinking of things, influences etc. that did not happen and with me could never happen in my treatment of your mother, my wife. For proof of my honesty of all this also sincerity I give you my permission to send this letter to your mother. If you should not want to do this then I do ask that you destroy it at any time you elect after reading and rereading to your satisfaction… His postscripts, which are numerous, go on to mention how wonderful his soon-to-be ex-wife is.While Ty Cobb professes his innocence in the relationship and forgiveness for his wife’s behavior, he can’t be held without contempt. Cobb was known as an abrasive personality who was abusive and an alcoholic later in life, while married to Frances Cass as well as before and after. This letter, to Gerry, seems to be a public declaration of innocence for his behavior during their marriage. $8,000 - $12,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925.

Lot 41: Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 41. Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925 to his American publisher, [Horace] Liveright, concerning the progress of his forthcoming book, In Our Time; overall browning.It was seeing son of a bitch in the proofs of Harold Loeb’s book that prompted my original remark about it. Since then I have noticed it in Scott Fitzgerald’s last book and imagined it was getting so people did not mind seeing it in print.Hemingway writes in full:Thanks so much for your letter of May 1st and for the check. I was worried when I heard nothing from you and wrote the note you doubtless received a few days ago. It was seeing son of a bitch in the proofs of Harold Loeb’s book that prompted my original remark about it. Since then I have noticed it in Scott Fitzgerald’s last book and imagined it was getting so people did not mind seeing it in print. I am awfully glad you like the story and I’m anxious to see the galley proofs. There is no use talking about changes till I see what they are. I dont want it suppressed any more than you do. I have great admiration and confidence in you as a property builder. That goes without saying. Sherwood Anderson writes me he has gone over to you and am very happy about it. He deserves it. We are going off to Spain the latter part of next month and I would like very much to get the first proofs boxed up before then. Stamp collectors in the government service are always liable to steal your letters there. I remember one time finding where the post office had opened up some magazines and cut a lot of the pictures out and pasted them up on the walls over the telegraph ticker. You’ll have to go down there with us sometime. [Robert] Benchley and Don[ald Ogden] Stewart and a good gang are going down this year. After I get to be a property I’ll take you on a grand tour of Spain to keep down my income tax. Thanks again for the letter and check. Yours always, Ernest Hemingway. $6,000 - $8,000

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Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes.

Lot 47: Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 47. Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes spanning from February 1918 to June 1964, no less than 46 years.An economic and policy wonk, Hoover enjoyed a successful career as businessman. He took to the details and inner workings of economics like few other politicians would or could then or now. Trusted by many future Presidents, both Republican and Democrat, Hoover may indeed have been one of the most honest and hardest working Presidents of the modern era. Some letters reflect his view that the press did not always treat him fairly or complain of mudslinging by political operatives, but it seems to be well tempered and he did not fixate on it. A substantial portion of the archive centers on Hoover’s correspondence to Lewis Strauss. Strauss’s rise to prominence in American politics and nuclear science began with his years as Hoover’s private secretary. Strauss proceeded to enjoy many highly successful years as an investment banker in New York. World War II brought Strauss to public service in the Navy Department where he attained the rank of Rear Admiral. In 1946, Harry Truman appointed Strauss to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). In 1953, Dwight D. Eisenhower made Strauss chairman of the AEC. As a result of his achievements, in his successive positions, Strauss counted among his friends and colleagues many of the leading politicians and scientists of his time. As evidenced by this archive, Strauss’s friendship with Hoover was a strong one that endured for almost a half century. The archive consists of mostly letters from Hoover to Strauss with other associated correspondence. The vast majority are typed letters, but many have handwritten emendations, notes and postscripts by Hoover himself. Most have his full signature, but there are some signed with just initials. Some of the correspondence to Mr. & Mrs. Strauss and a few of a lighter tone to just Strauss are signed (“Herbert”) demonstrating the deepening of their friendship, generally after the 1940s. Although many of the letters are on policy and political matters, the correspondence over the decades clearly shows a growing, deep friendship between, at first, Hoover and Strauss and then to include both spouses. It becomes apparent there is deep loyalty between the two men right to the end.Highlights of the archive include:A long series of letters relating to the gold standard and economic recovery during the Depression. Includes a long 1933 memorandum proposing the restoration of the gold standard as a means of recovery. Excerpts from these letters include:Typed letter signed, 27 November 1933. In part: …The holding up of the bond market by government purchases only means they will have to issue that many more securities later on, and if I recollect the tradition of the stock exchange correctly, the one thing that people naturally do in a supported market is to sell against it…Typed letter signed 5 December 1933. In part:…So far as the commodity dollar or any other form of unstable currency is adhered to we will have a prolongation of large-scale unemployment by just that length of time…Typed letter signed, 25 August 1933. In part:… I am enclosing herewith a memorandum of a tentative proposal of mine for restoration of the gold standard. I have no gold experts here to check up with me on this proposal. I am wondering if you would check it up (with yourself and [in Hoover’s hand]) with some of the experts around New York and if you find that they agree with it I think it might be a good idea to take it to Mr. Ochs and ask him if he would run it in the Times as a letter from a subscriber…The four-page memorandum accompanying the 25 August letter has several handwritten emendations by Hoover.Typed letter signed, 4 October 1933. In part:I also have a statistical department, consisting of the leading brokerage houses in San Francisco who out of patriotism (they certainly get no income) send me this data every morning, often by telephone. They seem to have a desire to keep me in economic trend and I read all of the personal dispatches that come over their private wires feel at times that I sit in with the New York Stock Exchange. I recognize the validity of part of the criticism which you found on my gold scheme [see 25 August 1933]. I am wondering if it could be made workable if we added to it the provision that the American government should sell gold at the rate of $25,000,000 a month for two years in the open market and if possible that the French government should do the same?Two detailed, apparently unpublished Hoover memoranda on the state of the American economy.Typed letter signed, 4 March 1937The other day in order to save myself a lot of conversation, I dictated some views on the immediate economic situation. This is not intended for publication, a speech, or anything much, but just to give a little relief to the safety valve. I thought you might be interested in it.Excerpts from the accompanying 12-page document:…There are eleven inflationary policies of the Roosevelt Administration in action…Prices of most stocks are at ranges unwarranted by their earnings. They are being purchased in some degree out of fear of inflation. Prices of bonds are artificially high as the result or artificially low interest rates and some day will fall 20 or 30%. For the first time in American history there is no island of safety for investment or savings…Again, there is a flood of foreign investment in American securities. The total is new estimated as high as $7,500,000,000. This arises partly from the belief abroad that we are headed for inflation, partly because of our business recovery, and partly because of the debacle in currency ratios. These investments comprise a great danger for any attempt to realize on a large scale and will produce a debacle in the American markets. The capapcity [sic] of the New York market to absorb selling is probably not one-third of that of 1929…Hoover concludes:…The practical question is when is the smash coming? Nobody knows. One practical suggestion can be made. The Roosevelt Administration will try to stave it off with more inflation. If they administer enough inflation to stave off all these destructive forces, it may take us down the German alley. In the meantime, we are likely to be artificially happy during 1937.Indeed, the American economy and stock market took a sharp downturn in mid-1937, lasting for 13 months through most of 1938. Typed letter signed, 31 July 1933. In part:…as I am the sole occupant of this industry of being and Ex-President…The memorandum which I gave to Wiley was part of the enclosed memorandum. The basis of it was prepared by a former employee in the Budget Bureau…Excerpts from the accompanying 4-page document:President Roosevelt’s method of balancing the budget is finally made clear by the provisions in the Industries Control Bill by which all public works are to be charged to bond issues and only the interest thereon charge to the current account…It has also been provided that the cost of agricultural relief will be met by a sales or “processor” tax on food payable to the Secretary of Agriculture and not to the treasury so that agricultural relief will not be a charge on the budget. Furthermore, the statutory retirement of the capital of the national debt is to be suspended. Whether the budget will be balanced after this, which the New York Times calls “painless arithmetic,” remains to be seen. It is interesting to note what the effect of this sort of bookkeeping would have been had it been pursued by the Hoover Administration…After a listing of expenditures for fiscal years under Hoover and the probable results for Roosevelt’s first year under the new rules Hoover concludes that …On this basis of accounting, the Hoover Administration would have shown not only a balance budget but a surplus of about one billion. Such are the wonders of bookkeeping.Typed letter signed, 11 May 1943. In part: I receive constant demand or expression of hope for the formulation of more adequate, more realistic and more definite bases of peace policies…Some twelve months ago Mr. Gibson and I published a book advancing some new ideas upon the subject…We proposed wholly new approaches to the machinery for making lasting peace so as to avoid another debacle like Versailles. And we proposed new approaches to the long-view peace settlements…The road to lasting peace is one of harsh realism with foundations of experience and ideals…An autograph letter signed being a cover note accompanying a four-page memo dated 5 June 1919 discussing issues of the draft treaty. Hoover was part of the American Delegation to the Paris Peace Conference because of his role as Director General of Relief he was one of seven technical advisors to the American Commission to Negotiate Peace. Hoover’s central role in every economic issue made him, after Wilson and House, the most important American at Paris and a major figure at the peace conference. As Hoover established the Hoover War Collection at Stanford University and donated all the documents from the Commission for Relief in Belgium, the US Food Administration and the American Relief Administration, there are few documents outside institutions available to collectors.A signed draft copy of his 23 January 1919 letter of resignation from the US Food Administration to President Woodrow Wilson while Wilson was staying at the Hotel Murat in Paris. The Paris Peace Conference opened on 18 January 1919. In part: …It is an impossible conception that the personality of any one man should be allowed to retard measures of this character upon which such a mass of human life and the hope of peace depends. This work must be done for the honor of the United States and I have no wish to show so little patriotism as to embarrass you or your supporters…An autograph letter signed to Hoover from John Maynard Keynes announcing his resignation from the British Delegation in Paris in June of 1919 negotiating the Paris Peace Conference leading to the Treaty of Versailles and accompanied by a typed copy of Hoover’s response of the same day. Keynes writes in part: You are the only man in Paris in my judgment who has come through this tragedy without discredit and has accomplished some part at least of his aims. The rest has been all wickedness, greed, meanness, smallness and failings…There is nothing but shame behind and misfortune in front. How it will all end God knows…A large group of 78 typed letters signed to Lawrence Richey from 1933 to 1955. Richey was the closest, personally, to the President, and his tasks were the most diverse, sometimes confidential. A former detective and Secret Service agent, he managed the Secret Service, supervised the office, answered Hoover’s personal correspondence, and provided instant information. He was on call for any task. Richey had Hoover’s complete confidence; and serving Hoover was his purpose in life.A typed letter signed from General John (Blackjack) Pershing to Lewis Strauss. 8 letters from Edgar Rickard and others to Hoover and to Rickard related to the American Relief Administration (ARA).A letter signed from Hoover as President on 8 March 1930, thanking a group for their support and noting a tragic event of that very day: the death of former President Howard Taft.4 signed pamphlets2 signed imagesA typed letter signed to Lewis informing him of a copy of the Congressional Act establishing the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government, the so-called “Hoover Commission”, and a memorandum as to the method of work which has been adopted by the Commission as well as a recent statement of the organization of this Commission.Later letters show his continued involvement with the Republican Party up to 1960. Hoover actually spoke at the Republican National Convention on 25 July 1960. A copy of his speech is included in the archive with a letter to Strauss and his wife.Even at 88, Hoover remained active in public life. Hoover sends Strauss a copy of his letter to William F. Buckley, Jr. He writes in part: I am still a trustee, director or chairman of nine educational, scientific, or charitable institutions, and have definite responsibilities to them…I have the personal responsibility to raise constant financial support for five institutions of which I had a part in founding or reorganizing in years gone by…Every time I lend my name to some righteous movement, the public holds me responsible – even if my associates have guaranteed that I do not need to think about the organization again. And they load my days with letters about it…I have two little books on the stove…and they require constant attention while cooking…A rich archive providing extraordinary insights into the public life and the private life of America’s 31st President. $20,000 - $30,000

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Jefferson, Thomas. Letter signed (

Lot 54: Jefferson, Thomas. Letter signed ("Th: Jefferson"), 2 pages, Philadelphia, 21 March 1793.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 54. Jefferson, Thomas. Letter signed (“Th: Jefferson”), 2 pages (9.12 x 7.5 in.; 232 x 191 mm.), Philadelphia, 21 March 1793, to Edward Fox, with the integral blank leaf attached.The beginning of a sensitive and critical period of foreign affairs.Jefferson writes in full: Present appearances in Europe rendering a general war there probable, I am to desire your particular attention to all the indications of it, and on the first imminent symptoms of rupture among the maritime powers, to put our vessels on their guard. In the same event the patronage of our Consuls will be particularly requisite to secure to our vessels the rights of neutrality, and protect them against all invasions of it. You will be pleased also in the same case to give no countenance to the usurpation of our flag by foreign vessels, but rather indeed to aid in detecting it, as without bringing to us any advantage, the usurpation will tend to commit us with the belligerant powers, and to subject those vessels which are truly ours to harrassing scrutinies in order to distinguish them from the counterfeits. The law requiring the consuls of the United States to give bond with two or more good sureties for the faithful performance of their duties, I enclose you a blank bond for that purpose. According to a standing regulation which places our Consuls in Europe in relation with the Minister of the United States in the same country with them, if there be one, and if none, then with their Minister in Paris, and our Consuls in America in immediate relation with the Secretary of State, you will be pleased to have your sureties approved by the person to whom you stand thus referred, and to send the bond when executed, by a safe conveyance, to the Secretary of State, to be disposed of according to law; and this with all the expedition the case will admit: provided this should not have been done before.A copy of the laws of the last Session of Congress will be sent to Mr. Pinckney, Minr. Pleny. of the United States in London to be forwarded to you. You will be pleased to address your letters always to ‘The Secretary of State for the United States of America at Philadelphia,’ without adding the name, in order to prevent the casualties to them which changes in the office might otherwise occasion...Jefferson, who served as Secretary of State throughout 1793, wrote this letter at the beginning of a critical period of foreign affairs. When the French Revolution broke out on 1 February 1793, public opinion toward the French was still favorable, though the conservative groups in America had followed the course of the Revolution in France with growing concern. Jefferson was determined that his country should take no action that would imply opposition to the principles of the French Revolution, but he fully shared the feeling of President Washington and Secretary of Treasury Hamilton that American neutrality was imperative. He successfully urged the avoidance of the word ‘neutrality’ in Washington’s proclamation. However, in order to offend the French as little as possible and in the hope of gaining from the British some concessions in the definition of contraband, he protested vigorously against British infringements of American neutral rights during the war. Yet, Jefferson was unable as Secretary of State to solve the problem of British relations, and he regarded Jay’s Treaty, which was negotiated under the influence of Hamilton as an ignominious surrender of American claims. His tangible achievements as Secretary of State were not commensurate with his devoted labors, but he had fully justified Washington’s confidence in him. Thomas Pinckney was the U.S. Minister to Great Britain from 1792 to 1794. $10,000 - $15,000

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Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed.

Lot 58: Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 58. Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed (“Lafayette”), in French, 3 pages (7.37 x 5.37 in.; 187 x 137 mm.), Le Havre, 4 August 1779, most likely to the Comte de Vergennes, Louis XVI’s Minister of Foreign Affairs. An impatient Lafayette waits on the coast of France to invade England lamenting on what he might be doing in America: If I had remained in America I would in all likelihood have been in command of the army of the South.Lafayette writes in full: You ask me for news, count, but we have none, we do not hear news of anyone and there is nothing to distract us from the most monotonous idleness. However today there is a very annoying rumor being put about.... That is the arrival of one hundred and thirty sails from Jamaica, which, under the escort of two frigates, have entered an English port. I hope this may be the fleet detained in the North Sea by contrary winds, and my news would be so sad that I try not to believe it. We know nothing of Mr. D’Orvilliers. The politicians argue among themselves and send him by turns to all corners of the globe: what is certain is that we know he is not where he could meet Admiral Hardy. The latter has passed with his army abreast of Cherbourg and seems to want to return to the English Channel. Thanks to the activities of Mr. de Lambert we are ready to leave; there is not much faith here in the expedition, and, moreover, I do not see as much enthusiasm as I would like for it. I would say that certain people do not seem to me to be up to their task; as for myself I am entirely redundant here, and up to the present we have had nothing to do. I should much have preferred to be leading troops; it is a job, which I have had the good fortune to do, and when one is successful all the glory is for oneself. I have been told that the King regarded me as a man who was useful to the State; this does me great honor, but were it true, I do not know at what point they would want me to tum out again. For the rest, if I can serve my country I shall be content, and that is the first object of all my desires. If I had remained in America I would in all likelihood have been in command of the army of the South. But I do not repent at having returned to serve under the French flag; I would go back there with great pleasure if it were thought that I could be of use in that country. I have even offered to go there without expecting any recognition, and although it would not be costly, they do not take to the idea. Lafayette. In a postscript, Lafayette adds in part: . . .Do you still believe in this raid, or at least in some kind of attempt on the English or Irish coast?In the fall of 1778 Lafayette returned to France for what was to be a year’s stay. Finding himself well-received at Versailles, he was frequently consulted on American affairs. The Marquis in his turn urged several schemes for the successful prosecution of the war; among these were an invasion of England and a large expedition to America. At this time a movement against “that insolent nation” across the Channel -­ as Lafayette called it -- was uppermost in the ministry’s mind. The plan called for the occupation of the Isle of Wight, an event which would draw British troops away from the key garrisons in order to protect the southern coast. The French would then strike to the north, perhaps at Bristol. In preparation for this grand maneuver, French troops were concentrated during the summer of 1779 in Le Havre and St. Malo. Lafayette, at Le Havre, was in the beginning wildly enthusiastic about the plan, recognizing in it the opportunity of humiliating the enemy and advancing his own career; but as time passed, the Marquis began to fret. It is at this point, waiting in Le Havre for the invasion of England that Lafayette wrote the present letter: During the long, tedious weeks in Le Havre, Lafayette was in daily communication with Vergennes, for whom he was preparing a memoir on an expedition to America. In the end, it was this scheme -- the plan for invading England having been abandoned in October -- which brought Lafayette back to America and eventual triumph. $5,000 - $8,000

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Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Moitier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed.

Lot 59: Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Moitier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 59. Lafayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roche Gilbert du Moitier, Marquis de. Autograph letter signed (“Lafayette”), in English, 1 page (10 x 7.87 in.; 254 x 200 mm.), La Grange, 26 October 1823, to Sen. James Brown (1776-1835); with integral address leaf, addressed in La Fayette’s hand to James Brown Esquire, transmitted via the ship “Cadmus.”The Marquis de Lafayette compares the true representative Congress of the United States with the sham assemblies of Europe which pretend to the name of representation there.Lafayette writes in full: My dear sir While you are sitting in a true Representative Congress, devising on the means to increase the Happiness of the more Civilized part of Mankind, the name of Congress, is sullied in Europe by a coalition of Aristocrats and despots, and in the sham assemblies which pretend lo the name of representation there is still more appearance of freedom than counter revolutionary plans and men can bear. our advanture [sic] of the late session you have known: what it means for the next one I cannot say, nor do I think is of much importance: as to the affairs of the peninsula you will be informed By the newspapers of several parties: far am I from lessening the Blame incurred by the Absolute triumvirate, and their acting ally, the Cabinet of Tuileries; But a great share in that work of wikedness [sic] is due to the insidious Conduct of the British Government. It is feared Greece may be served By these four powers in the same way.I don’t know whether you have heard at New Orleans of my Louisiana concerns but suppose you shall hear of them in Washington, as the president who knows your kindness to me, and has received from me some late documents on the subject will probably ask your opinion on the localities of the place so as to determine, the business being left to His good Care, which can best now be done.Be pleased, my dear sir, to provide my respects to Mr Brown: Remember me being affectionately to Mr. Clay and believe me I am with all my Heart your Sincere friend LafayetteJames Brown was a Senator from Louisiana (served 1813-17 and 1819-23). On 10 December 1823, Brown resigned, having been appointed Minister to France. He served in that capacity until 28 June 1829. $5,000 - $8,000

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Lee, Robert E. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Old Point [Virginia], 15 June 1831.

Lot 61: Lee, Robert E. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Old Point [Virginia], 15 June 1831.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 61. Lee, Robert E. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (9.62 x 7.87 in.; 244 x 200 mm.), Old Point [Virginia], 15 June 1831, to Mary Lee Fitzhugh Custis; with attached address overleaf addressed in R.E. Lee’s hand.Fresh out of West Point, the young and poor Robert E. Lee writes to his future mother-in-law just two weeks before he is to marry Mary Custis.Lee writes in full: I have but little time before the Boat passes, my dear cousin Molly, to answer your letter which I last night received. I am truly & sincerely distressed to find that your sickness, which I had supposed was a but a slight attack of the Ague & fever, has been so great. Should you wish to try the effect of the air at Old Point, I have no doubt we could make some arrangement to enable you to do so. But those ‘two little rooms’ must be thrown entirely out of the question, for they would not answer as you would see at a glance, still less would they accomodate Anne who of course would bring her boy & servant & we should all be brought into such close contact that we should not be able to distinguish one from each other. The month of August too is the time that Genl [Charles] Gratiot [Chief of Engineers], who commenced this work & still has the normal superintendance of it, has been in the habit of making his inspection & as he brings down his family & occupies these quarters (not ‘the rooms’) I fear with so many you would have little pleasure. Perhaps the best arrangement would be for me to take separate quarters & as from my last visit to Norfolk, I found I could not even get the most common articles, except at an exorbitant price. I had determined to follow the example of others, & procure them in Alexandria & send them down in the Potomac, a week or two before we came. And you know all & everything could be got at the same time & sent by the same conveyance. The Quarters I could get on this side would not be very comfortable in comparison with these, but such as are occupied by others & about on a par perhaps with those of other Watering places in Va. I thought that I ought to tell you the ‘whole truth’ - And any plan you may adopt I shall be equally & willingly ready further as far as I am able, which I hope you already know & will believe without any stronger asseverations.I was entirely unprepared to hear of Anne’s sickness, as I had learned from Uncle Wms, I have seen, that her health was better than usual. I hope that it does not proceed from the cause you mentioned & that at any rate she may be enabled to desire the benefit she generally received from Sea Bathing here or elsewhere. Of all these things we will talk when we meet, when I hope & trust you may be well & I shall have more time. There is nothing I covet so much as the power of benefitting those I love, though I fear it will be many years, if ever, before my means will equal my desires.The orderly has just come to tell me that the Boat is in sight, which cuts me short. Tell Miss Mary [Mary Custis - Lee’s future wife] I cannot answer her Postscript, but I believe it is unnecessary as respecting what she has asked has been discharged in a former letter. Excuse this hasty illegible & unsatisfactory scroll & Believe me Yours most truly & sincerely R. E. LeeLee adds in a postscript: I will write to Anne Mrs. M[arshall]. which will be about the sixtieth time without her taking the least notice of it- Mildred [Mildred (1811-1856), Lee’s younger sister] since her marriage has been as bad.On 11 August 1829, Robert E. Lee was breveted 2nd Lieutenant, and was ordered, by the middle of November, to report to Major Samuel Babcock of the Corps of Engineers for duty at Cockspur Island, in the Savannah River, Georgia. It was a god-forsaken place near Savannah, the largest city and the principal port in the state. Lee’s post, at Cockspur Island, was 12 miles downstream, and most of it was flooded marshland. In the summer, it had to be abandoned because of mosquitoes, heat, and fever. It was Lee’s training school in military engineering. Day after day, in his task of constructing a heavy fort, he spent in mud and water up to his armpits.In this early letter, Lee writes to Mrs. Custis, the mother of Mary Custis, the young woman Lee was courting, despite her mother’s opposition. At the time, the Lee family had experienced financial tragedy, and Mrs. Custis did not want her daughter to marry Lee, who was earning very little money as a second lieutenant.Lee’s first commander at Cockspur, Major Babcock, was succeeded by J. K. F. Mansfield, who concluded that the original plan was unsuitable; work would have to be suspended for at least a season. Lee was reassigned to Old Point Comfort, Virginia. He reported at Hampton Roads on 7 May 1831. Lee’s new duties were to finalize the construction of Fort Monroe, later known as Fort Wool,–computing costs, ordering supplies, and directing men in hauling earth, in grading, and in excavating the ditch that was to surround the fort. Continuing his courtship of Miss Custis, he asked her to be his bride. Reluctantly, Mrs. Custis consented to the marriage. They were married at Arlington on 30 June 1831.Provenance: Christie’s New York, 18 November 1988, lot 210. $5,000 - $8,000

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Madison, James. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Washington, 14 February 1802, to Governor Mercer.

Lot 62: Madison, James. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Washington, 14 February 1802, to Governor Mercer.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 62. Madison, James. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (10.25 x 8.12 in.; 260 x 206 mm.), Washington, 14 February 1802, to Governor Mercer in Annapolis, Maryland; with the integral address leaf; mounted on cardstock frame.As Secretary of State, Madison writes to the Governor of Maryland dismayed to observe the critical attitude in which he represents the politics of his own State.Madison writes in full: I have written a public acknowledgment of your public letter endorsing the observations of Mr. Chase on the Maryland Bank stock. This answers your private letter and at the same time I am sorry to observe the critical attitude in which you represent the politics of your State -of this I do not pretend to judge -others I find indulge better hopes. Be this as it may, be assured that no ground has been given or is likely to be given by the present administration for just censure in relation to the matter in question. Mr. King appears to be well informed of the nature of the claim & to have pursued it down to the latest dates, with due attention. The sudden change in the prospect is chargeable wholly on the British Ministry, and if they prove inflexible, which I hope will not happen, in declining a diplomatic settlement, nothing more can be required of the Executive than that the proper means be used in the proper manner for obtaining satisfaction, all which I trust will endure. A voluntary abandonment of this claim is equally foreign to policy and to duty. At the same time it does not follow that the payment of one claim ought to be so coupled with a distinct & more important one, that the latter cannot go into effect without the former. When in the adjustment of separate objects one of them be most desirable to one of the parties, & the other to the other of the parties, the adjustment of both may be made a condition of that of either. But when both the objects are more desirable to one than to the other of the parties, nothing better can be done than to secure the object that can be attained and to pursue the other by the means most proper & likely to attain that also. I anxiously wish that our next information from Mr. King may supersede those reflections, and be satisfactory to all who have an interest in complete success of these negotiations.I thank you for your kind wishes for my health. It experienced a short, but pretty severe interruption lately but I find myself as well as before the attack. I wish you sincerely the enjoyment of yours without interruption... $6,000 - $8,000

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Pound, Ezra. A collection of twelve typed and autograph letters signed.

Lot 66: Pound, Ezra. A collection of twelve typed and autograph letters signed.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 66. Pound, Ezra. A collection of twelve typed and autograph letters signed capturing his insanity that lead to his arrest for treason and his containment in a mental facility. In his cryptic hand, expatriate Ezra Pound, vehemently discusses politics and literature.Renowned poet, Ezra Pound, is remembered for inventing imagism, a type of poetry that embodied Japanese and Chinese poetry forms. Pound wrote with sharp precision and astute detail using minimal words. Pound became an avid political renegade after World War I, when he fled to Italy from the United States because he was so distraught over the horror of the war. His dear friend Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, who designed the imprint profile on Pound’s stationery, was killed in the war. It was shortly after this, Pound’s profound depression took over and his efforts lie in criticizing governments and politics while working on epic poems. In a letter dated 20 December 1916 and addressed to the poetess, C.F.G. Masterman, Pound asks for change: In this Mornings Chronicle, page 3 there is an article headed ‘Rankers Rise leads to Downfall’ in the course of which it states that the accused was sentenced to 3 years penal servitude before the age of 18 for the theft of 5d. I have written to the Chronicle to ask if the statement is correct. In any case it must be officially contradicted and the victim compensated. I dont even know that my letter should be printed. A single statement of this sort is enough to undo months of pro-ally work in America. (Percentage on non P---is still considered despite Wilson). One CANT defend a ‘civilization’ where such things occur. All one can do is to pray that for the present it will escape the eye of the pro-german propagandist. If it is not a printer’s error, one asks if the judge who gave sentence is still on the bench or whether he has been sent to a lunatic asylum. This is not a time for publicity, but something should be done very quickly and quietly… While some of the letters are undated, probably in an effort to stay private, the archive becomes increasingly more political. It was also around this time period that Pound became friends with T.S. Eliot. Through Pound’s power of persuasion, he was able to coax Poetry magazine to publish Eliot’s The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. Pound mentions Eliot in a typed letter signed and undated: Speakin of YOUNG bridson’s choice of langqwidg/ ‘echos’ p. echos/ Me AZSE!!!=E.P. ‘echos’ Mr. Eliot!! In March 1913, I printed a ijee as follows: ‘Pay no attention to the criticism of men who have never themselves written a notable work’. Mr. Eliot was then an undergrad/I think..so I doubt if I have recently ‘echo’d’ him. These/air/but trifles yet they goze ter show—I don’t care to take up so small a chip. But the edtr/is at libruty to quote the remark WITH the date. The letter continues with prattle but seems to mention George Bernard Shaw, whom he entered a tiff with regarding the publication of James Joyce’s masterpiece, Ulysses: Shaw!! Entering on a new period (say menstruation)..?? Deepest phenomena of G.B.S. (apart concave jaw bone visible in early photos in relation the back of his neck) were a thight foreshin, and going to Morocco fer stone in thr bladder. 30 Dec. Have just signed a contrakk fer a TEX Book/: alas only lichershooz and not the more dangerous subjekk///but ‘ere zopin’. This present archive shows Pound’s downfall into depression and psychosis. On a typed letter, he hand writes private and confiding as usual and hush around paragraphs that are particularly difficult to understand through his gibberish prose. Pound eventually turned to fascism and became an admirer of Benito Mussolini, even meeting with him and providing him a copy of his Cantos XXX. Pound attempted to discuss his own ideas on economics, which Mussolini dismissed. Pound was eventually arrested for treason, shipped back to the United States where he was admitted into a mental hospital. Upon his release, he maintained his political view in private and continued to publish his poetics. This extraordinary archive delves into the fragile mind of a highly unstable poet and captures a fascinating period of political unrest and war as well as a renaissance of great literary figures. The rich array of topics includes references to leaders of the United States such as Herbert Hoover and Calvin Coolidge and the literary greats D.H. Lawrence, George Bernard Shaw and T.S. Eliot. $20,000 - $30,000

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[Sons of Liberty]. Letter signed with secretarial signatures of Thomas Chase, William Lux, and more.

Lot 70: [Sons of Liberty]. Letter signed with secretarial signatures of Thomas Chase, William Lux, and more.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 70. [Sons of Liberty]. Letter signed with secretarial signatures of Thomas Chase, William Lux, D. Chamier, Rob[er]t Alexander, and Rob[er]t Adair, one page, (13 x 8.25 in.; 330 x 210 mm.), Baltimore, [Maryland], 8 March 1766, to unnamed gentlemen; edges frayed, some dampstaining and repair to folds.We firmly Unite with you for the Preservation of our Constitutional Rights and Liberties.The letter, in full: Your letter of the 14th ult[imate] our W[illia]m Lux was Laid before the Society of the Sons of Liberty here who have appointed us ye Subscribers A Committee of Correspondence to receive and answer all Letters as well as to assure you that we firmly Unite with you for the Preservation of our Constitutional Rights and Liberties. To this end our Society at their Meeting made the following Resolve: That we will Cheerfully Cooperate with and second all just endeavours made by our fellow Subjects in the Neighbouring Colinis to prevent the execution of that most unconstitutional Act commonly called the Stamp Act, and that we will Pursue every necessary method to oppose the Introduction of that or any other oppressive Arbitrary and illegal measure amongst them or ourselves, which we hope will convince you of their Steady adherence to the Cause. Our Society have also endeavoured to form a union of the Countys in this Province and from our Intelligence since rec[eiv]ed we find it succeed as we could wish as the whole Province seem unanimous in prosecuting the Sam[e] design. We have also forwarded Copies of our Procedings to our neighbouring Colony of Virginia & from our latest Acct find the people there animated with the Sam[e] Sentiments of liberty and therefore doubt not it will produce the desired affectConsidering the great inconveniencys arising from the Occlusion of the publick officers, we endeavoured lately to have open’d that Business might be Carried on as usual agreable to this undertaking. We proceded to Annapolis having previously invited our Bretheren in the neighbouring Counties to meet us there, but the warning being so stron[g] few could attend. However we made trial and for our success we refer you to the Inclosed Gazette painted Acct of our Proceedings. Our Society order us in a particular manner to return thanks to yo[ur] Sons of Liberty for obliging fugitive Stamp master to resign his Odious office he having fled from the just Resentment of his injured Country...On the verso of the letter is another letter with secretarial signatures of David Edgar, Mynd Roseboom, J. V. Remsselair and Thomas Young, Albany, 3 March 1766, to Thomas Robinson, Isaac Sears, John Lamb, William Willy and Gershom Mott, confirming the Sons of Liberty in Albany have fully adopted the resolves published in Holt’s Gazette of 7 January 1766.The Sons of Liberty were groups formed in the American colonies in the summer of 1765 to oppose the Stamp Act, which was the first British parliamentary attempt to raise revenue through direct taxation of all colonial commercial and legal papers, newspapers, pamphlets, cards, almanacs, and dice. Completely unexpected was the avalanche of protest from the colonists who effectively nullified the Stamp Act by outright refusal to use the stamps as well as by riots, stamp burning, and intimidation of colonial stamp distributors. Colonists passionately upheld their rights as Englishmen to be taxed only by their own consent through their own representative assemblies, as had been the practice for a century and a half. The protest through the Colonies against the Stamp Act contributed much to the spirit and organization of unity that was a necessary prelude to the struggle for independence a decade later. A rare and important document that provides a remarkable record of the seeds of unrest planted by the Stamp Act. $10,000 - $15,000

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Steinbeck, John. A comprehensive archive of fourteen typed and autograph letters signed.

Lot 71: Steinbeck, John. A comprehensive archive of fourteen typed and autograph letters signed.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $12,000 - $18,000

Description: 71. Steinbeck, John. A comprehensive archive of fourteen typed and autograph letters signed in which John Steinbeck reflectively documents important life events such as his son leaving for Vietnam and his thoughts upon winning the Nobel Prize in literature. Written in his pensive prose, this archive provides highly important insight into the most significant moments in John Steinbeck’s personal and professional life.Author of The Grapes of Wrath, which is celebrating its 75th year, John Steinbeck’s archive of letters is an intimate portrait of his life. In his first letter, Steinbeck discusses his novel, Tortilla Flat, which paved his way to becoming a famous writer. In a typed letter signed to Moore, most likely Harry Thronton Moore who wrote a critical analysis of John Steinbeck novels in 1939, he states: Your forwarded letter arrived some days ago. I find I want to answer it and yet am at a loss how to do so. I am very happy at your reaction to my work, a reaction which is very, very rare. Indeed the week before, a committee of citizens asked that my books be removed from the shelves of the local library. There was a reaction anyway. He continues to discuss how his background is littered throughout his stories. He calls upon a professor from Stanford University that has been kind enough to help me at various times. Perhaps he would this time. I am working now on the last chapters of another book which should be all done by the end of February. At the end of the letter, Steinbeck is unsure of the book will be published, but hopes it will in London. The “last chapters” he mentions is from Tortilla Flat.Steinbeck’s novels, such as The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men, center on social issues of the time including employment and economics. Through his letters, one can see that Steinbeck was very passionate about the state of America during the Great Depression and beyond. In a postcard to Mahlon Blaine postmarked 11 March 1938, he states: I’ve been over in the valley for some time. …10,000 people starving, really starving. It will take some time to recuperate financially. I’m a pushover for a guy who hasn’t eaten for four days and I’m a pushover for hungry kids. At the time of this important letter, Steinbeck was writing The Grapes of Wrath, a novel about Dust Bowl migrants and their exploitation by a ruthless system of agricultural economics. During this time, Steinbeck made trips to the Valley for Life magazine to report on the desperate situation in the flooded area around Visalia. While the article did not make publication due to its liberal language, photographs of the issue were published a year later as well as a short article on the novel. In 1951, Steinbeck spent the year working on his epic novel, East of Eden, a work that demonstrates his technical prowess in the method of syncretic allegory. He mentions its progress in an autograph letter signed, John, to friends, Joyce and Jules Buck: We have a house on the beach and I am to get some exercise. Haven’t heard from Gary so I judge things go well with him—or not. But I think I would hear if not. My book moves along. It is going to be awfully long but I still find it interesting. I guess a long one has to be interesting. It is on schedule any way and should be done by November. The novel took over his life as he immersed himself in its prose. It is believed that the novel affected Steinbeck deeply and seemed to be a vessel for him to put himself together after some difficult times in life. “With the successful completion of the novel, he became a whole man again. It was what might be called a ‘healing’ [Jackson J. Benson, John Steinbeck, Writer]. An important letter, written in his hand, to his son, John Steinbeck IV, speaks in metaphor that offers protection to his war-bound son. Days before shipping for Vietnam, the letter dates 8 May 1966 and Steinbeck writes: The ugly looking monkey enclosed can be your mascot. There is no question that she is eternal—at least in human history. Ishtar, she was and Ashtoreth and Astarte. She was always the moon and she made people crazy. This particular example is from a Caananite city named Hazor. She was one of their baals, which seems to mean a god or goddess. She was Ishtar and the Jews were always having trouble with her. She made them do what the bible calls ‘commit abominations.’ In the digging of her temple, they found a stone mould for the pouring of votive figures and this lady is modern bronze but she was not one for fruitfulness. Her nose is atrocious. Maybe they one did some sharpening. Any way she’s yours. Her head dress is of course, the new moon She’ll bring you luck but whether good or bad luck is the question. To make her friendly to you I am enclosing a little abomination money. Ill call you when I have anything to report. Two weeks after this letter was written, Steinbeck and his son had lunch with President Lyndon Johnson. Steinbeck wrote a letter to Johnson expressing how proud his son was to wear uniform and stand for his country. However, Steinbeck Junior was quickly disheartened while in Vietnam and vigorously opposed the war, joining the peace movement and becoming an alternative media underground journalist. Continuing on a political vein, Steinbeck expresses his fear about the direction of where the country is going. In a letter written to a Dear Bill on 19 September 1958, he writes: The Maine elections seem to prove what the California elections indicated—that the Democrats are going to be swept back into office. This trend (and how I hate that word) has nothing to do with virtue on the part of the Democrats…I guess the reason I care about this is that I love my country and I know it cannot possibly survive without virtue, honesty, intelligence and dignity. It hasn’t a chance. The recipient is most likely Bill Dekker, his sister’s husband, with whom Steinbeck became great friends. On a more personal note, in an autograph letter signed to his contemporary, Ed Sheehan, on 1 August 1963, he remarks on his feeling of receiving the Nobel Prize for literature: You say you felt when you had got the prize. That’s exactly what I felt when Ernest Hemingway got it. It was completely unreal when I got it—a kind of fantasy. In a second autograph letter signed to Lawrence Langner, principal founder of the Theatre Guild, his modesty regarding his prize win can be seen: Your lovely wire made the whole thing better. I think one of the very nicest things we have found out is that our friends care. I don’t know whether I deserve the prize or not. That’s for the cut-glass critics to growl and grumble about. But I do know I am glad to get it. And wouldn’t I be a fool if I weren’t. Steinbeck received two Nobel Prizes: One for The Grapes of Wrath and a second prize, thirty-two years later, in Literature. This important archive is a complete narrative of Steinbeck’s extraordinary life as a fiction writer and reporter. He mentions views on politics and criticisms of his works. He also continues personal correspondences, one of which touches on his trip around the world after marrying his second wife, Elaine. $12,000 - $18,000

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Stuart, James Ewell Brown. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 72: Stuart, James Ewell Brown. Autograph letter signed ("J.E.B. S"), in pencil, 20 June 1863.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 72. Stuart, James Ewell Brown. Autograph letter signed (“J.E.B. S”), in pencil, 3 pages (8 x 4.87 in.; 203 x 124 mm.), Near Middleburg [Virginia], 20 June 1863, to his wife Flora; with autograph envelope.In a candid letter to his wife, J.E.B. Stuart defends his controversial performance at Brandy Station: The newspapers are false in every statement except as to the victory . . . The papers ought to apologise. I pleasure myself on my vigilance & the Yankee accounts show I was not surprised.My Dear Flora, Your letter of 14th enclosing newspaper slips was recd yesterday – The newspapers are false in every statement except as to the victory. Gen Lee wrote me a very handsome letter after reading my report which of the large number of the kind I have received from him is the only one I ever allowed to be published. All the papers are to publish it. Dr. Brewer [Dr. Charles Brewer, Stuart’s brother-in-law] will attend to it as I sent him the letter. The papers ought to apologise. I pleasure myself on my vigilance & the Yankee accounts show I was not surprised. The story about my Hd. Qrs. amounts to this - the high hill on which I slept the night before called Fleetwood was a fine military position and about noon we had a fight for it & there we captured the Yankee Arty [artillery] - My Hd Qrs were transferred to the saddle at daylight - & when the enemy was advancing on the hill, I was leading my squadron against them to victory, the greatest triumph I ever had -Not a vestige of my Hd Qrs was left - all the baggage having been sent to the rear in the morning. We have had several fights up here, always successful & have captured over 500 Yankee cavalry in battle, horses, & c. Yesterday in a fight with the enemy near Middleburg, my gallant Major von Borcke was very severly wounded by a Minie Ball through the neck. He is doing well, but the wound is a very serious one. I pray he may recover. He was near me at the time the ball passed me to hit him. He is at Dr. Eliason’s at Upperville - & is well nursed. May God bless you & oursEver yours JEB SBrandy Station was the largest cavalry battle of the Civil War, involving some 20,000 men. Commencing with a surprise Union attack on the Confederate cavalrymen [as Stuart was preparing for a campaign up the Shenandoah Valley, which culminated in the Battle of Gettysburg], Stuart fought courageously and managed to salvage a marginal Rebel victory. It was a bloody battle, the men fighting primarily with sword and sabre. Stuart’s horse artillerymen, out of ammunition, resorted to using their sponge staffs as weapons. Union losses were 936; for Stuart, 523–but neither side could boast of a tactical advantage over the other. The only apparent lesson learned from this clash was the realization that the Union cavalry, up to that point far inferior to the Confederate troops, now had attained at least equal footing with their counterparts. To the southern citizen, this turn of events was alarming. Until this battle, their cavalry was considered invincible. Southern papers uncharacteristically criticized Stuart, focusing on his lack of preparedness. From the Mobile Daily Advertiser and Register, to the Memphis Appeal [by this time operating out of Atlanta], Charleston Mercury and Richmond Examiner, the consensus was clear: Stuart was surprised, and the Confederate cavalry performed poorly. The Richmond Enquirer scathingly editorialized that “if [Stuart] is to be the ‘eyes and ears of the army,’ we would advise him to see more and be seen less.” On the 5th of June Stuart staged a grand review to boost morale and show off his troops. General Lee could not attend so another review was staged on the 8th of June. Unknown to Stuart, there were others who observed this second pompous demonstration…Union General Alfred Pleasonton, with 8,000 cavalry and 3,000 supporting infantry was just across the Rappahannock River.Stuart was obviously shaken by such harsh criticism. Mounting a counter-­propaganda campaign of his own, he ostensibly had some of his officers write letters to these same papers in his defense, providing his own interpretation of the battle. But it was too late––despite victory, the proud image of the Confederate cavalry had been tarnished. The resilient Major General now turned his attention toward the march into Pennsylvania, and the hunt for the Army of the Potomac.Together with:Autograph endorsement signed (“J.E.B . Stuart, Major Gen/ Comdg”) on the verso of an Autograph Letter Signed, 2 pages (12.5 x 7.62 in.; 318 x 194 mm.), Hd . Qrs. Cavalry Division, 3 February 1863. The letter, written by Private B.O. Maldin of the Signal Corps, requests a furlough to briefly return home to Columbia, South Carolina, which was subsequently granted for thirty days. On the verso, Stuart has written his endorsement. Approved and Resp.forwarded. Two other officers have also endorsed their approval: R.E. Frayser, Captain of the Signal Corps, and W.H. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant General to General Lee. $6,000 - $8,000

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Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed (

Lot 74: Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed ("Go: Washington"), as Commander-in­ Chief.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $25,000

Description: 74. Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed (“Go: Washington”), as Commander-in­ Chief of the Continental Army, 1 page (12.37 x 7.62 in.; 314 x 194 mm.), Head Qrs., 26 January 1780, the body of the letter in the hand of Washington’s secretary, Robert Hanson Harrison, to Major Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Cogswell; marginal splits to horizontal folds, some creasing and spotting, traces of mounting remnants on verso. Rank disputes plague the Continental Army.Washington writes in full: Sir About [blank] days ago I received your letter of the 27th of last month. In answer I must take occasion to assure you, that you are mistaken if you suppose, either a predilection for Major Hull or the circumstance of his having served of late more immediately under my command than you have done, influenced me in any degree in the opinion which you saw. Considerations like those had no part in the business. I viewed the matter in question between you and that Gentleman on a more liberal and extensive ground, and I see no reason to alter in the least, the sentiments I then delivered; and were you to examine the subject dispassionately, I think, you would find the reasonings were right and that you have no just claim to your present pretentions. At the same time I repeat, that I had no intention in what I said to detract from your merit as an officer, or to give a preference to Major Hull on that score. I am Sir Your Most Obed. Servt. Go: WashingtonWashington writes Cogswell explaining the circumstances surrounding his disputed promotion of Lieutenant Colonel William Hull, of the Third Massachusetts Regiment, who was promoted from Major in August of 1779 by Washington himself. Washington’s addressee, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Cogswell, of the Fifteenth Massachusetts Regiment, was promoted from Major in November of 1779 by the State of Massachusetts. Apparently, the timing of the promotions was a cause of concern to Cogswell, who felt slighted, pointing to the fact that he had been appointed a Captain by the State before Hull in 1775. Washington is quick to respond that his reasons were justified, due to the existence of two conflicting methods of promotion: (1) the appointment of officers by the governments of the several states by Congress’ Resolution of 16 September 1776; and (2) the appointment of Officers by Washington himself, who was supplied blank commissions to be filled in by him with the names of officers he felt were qualified by Congress’ Resolution of 27 December 1776. Washington had previously written, at length, about the incident to Major General William Heath from 13-17 December 1779, noting the delicacy of the matter and the fact the Cogswell-Hull case will result in a multitude of similar claims. Washington then provides ample detail of rank dispute, and the overall ramifications of a reversal of his action in appointing Major Hull rather than Major Cogswell to Jackson’s Regiment: “In a word, policy at least, required a strict adherence to the arrangement and the principles of promotion established, and there has been no injustice done Major Cogswell...I am sure you can scarcely render any more essential service than prevailing on the Honourable Assembly to preserve the Arrangement inviolate and to pursue the Rules of promotion which have been established.” Washington sums up the situation: “Our Commission system unfortunately, is very complex, and unless the States will be accurate and adhere to the principles of promotion, which is enjoined and explicitly required by the Act of the 28th.of June Last, we shall always be in troubled water and the service embarrassed with unhappy feuds.” A fascinating letter, which exhibits the kind of petty and embarrassing feuds within the Continental Army, that often consumed George Washington ‘s time, requiring his participation and mediation skills. $15,000 - $25,000

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Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed as Commander-in­-Chief (

Lot 75: Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed as Commander-in­-Chief (" Go Washington").

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $25,000

Description: 75. Washington, George. Revolutionary War-Date letter signed as Commander-in­-Chief (“ Go Washington”), 2 pages (13.12 x 8.25 in.; 333 x 210 mm.), Head Quarters, Valley Forge, [1 May] 1778, the body of the letter in the hand of his secretary, Tench Tilghman, to Colonel George Baylor who had served, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, as Washington’s aide-de-camp (15 August 1775 – 9 January 1777); silked, paper loss at the top center of the letter affect the month and date of the letter.Reprecussions from the cruel winter at Valley Forge.Washington writes in full: Dear Sir: I am favd. with yours of the 5th. of last Month. I have not the least doubt but your time and attention have been both fully applied to the Business upon which you were sent, and in which I hope you will have the desired success. I wrote to Colo. [Theodorick] Bland [Colonel of the 1st Continental Dragoons] about ten days ago and directed him to send forward the Horses and Recruits in squads, as they could be got ready, those men who have not had the small pox may be sent on and inoculated with their Regiments. I repeat this to you, lest you should not have been informed of it by Colo. Bland. By a letter from Colo. Moylan a few days ago, I find that his Regiment and Sheldon’s will want Arms, swords and pistols in particular, and as they are not to be obtained to the Northward, I beg you will engage all that you possibly can from [James Hunter] Hunter [at Fredericksburg, Virginia]. I approve of your employing Officers to purchase Horses &ca. in preference to the common dealers in that way, and as you seem to think that Capn. [George] Lewis can be particularly useful to you, I shall send him back to Virginia. Capn. Lewis informs me that you have been appointing Cornets [a color-bearing troop] to your Regiment, upon a presumption I suppose that the plan for augmenting the Cavalry is actually adopted. You must remember that this was only a recommendation of the Committee, but whether Congress have confirmed it I do not yet know. If any young Gentlemen apply for admission into your Regiment, I would have you take an account of them, but make no absolute promise of a Commission, as I am not clear that the powers, formerly vested in me by Congress to appoint Officers have not expired. If there is a vacant Cornetcy in your Regiment, I should wish it reserved for Mr. Peregrine Fitzhugh Son of Colo. Fitzhugh of Patuxent in Maryland, a young Gentleman strongly recommended to me by his father. He is now here, but will go over to Major [Alexander] Clough [of the Third Continental Dragoons, who was to be killed at Tappan (17 September 1778)] and receive proper instructions from him, to fit him for command. Should your Regiment be full, be pleased to speak to Colo. Bland and desire him to receive a Cornetcy in his, for Mr. Fitzhugh, I am dear Sir, yr. most obt. Sert. Go: WashingtonOn 19 December 1777, George Washington took up winter quarters at Valley Forge, located on the south side of the Schuylkill River (a location between British-held Philadelphia and the Continental Congress at York) just 18 miles northwest of Philadelphia (where Washington could keep an eye on British troops under Sir William Howe). There was no effort made by the British to disperse Washington’s camp, consisting of his rapidly shrinking Continental Army (consisting of about 15,000 officers and men, though 2,500 were considered ineffective due to sickness and lack of clothing). His troops were desperately short of food, clothing and military supplies. They lacked outer coats and half the men had no blankets. Almost a third were without shoes or breeches. No medicine was available for the sick, and many had contracted small pox. The worst problem that confronted Washington and his men at Valley Forge was not the cold or the snow. It was military mismanagement, causing severe shortages of provisions and forage. Commissary General John Trumbull, who was responsible for obtaining food, became sick and returned to Connecticut; the job was left to an ineffective deputy. As well, Quartermaster General Thomas Mifflin, who was in charge of procuring military supplies and blankets, was incompetent in his duties. Clothing was not properly ordered, and grain and flour supplied by civilian contractors wound up being sold to the British and loyalists in New York and New England, rather than to the troops. The crisis continued throughout January, February and March. The spring of 1778 was a tortured one for Washington, who had suffered through both the frightful winter at Valley Forge and the Conway Cabal [an effort by Major General Thomas Conway, dissatisfied with Commander-in-Chief George Washington’s direction of the war, to replace Washington]. Washington’s beleaguered army had endured neglect, despair and incompetent direction through many bitter winter months. At the end of April, Washington’s uncertainty about the future led him to write, almost despairingly, to Henry Laurens, President of the Continental Congress (30 April 1778): I do not to this hour know whether (putting half-pay out of the question) the old or new establishment of the Regiments is to take place; how to dispose of the officers in consequence; whether the instituting of the several other corps, as agreed to by the committee, and referred by them to Congress, is adopted or not; in a word, I have no ground to form a single arrangement upon; nor do I know whether the augmentation of the Cavalry is to take place, or was rejected, in order that I may govern myself thereby...In short, our present situation (now the first of May) is beyond description irksome and dangerous ... It is at the same time that he wrote to Congress that he wrote to Colonel Baylor, putting aside his despair and bitterness as he sought to direct the successful reinforcement of his Continental Army for the campaigns ahead. Despite his Army’s frailty, despite the derelictions of malcontents, despite his doubts about the upcoming campaigns, Washington still found hope for America. On 5 May 1778, he officially informed the Army: “It having pleased the Almighty ruler of the Universe propitiously to defend the Cause of the United American-States and finally by raising us up a powerful Friend [France] among the Princes of the Earth to establish our liberty and Independence up[on] lasting foundations, it becomes us to set apart a day for gratefully acknowledging the divine Goodness and celebrating the important Event which we owe to his benign Interposition.” [Note: on 6 February 1778, at Versailles, a treaty of alliance was signed by which France recognized the independence of the United States.]Despite the squalor at Valley Forge, improvement in the Continental Army was discernible. The American Army that emerged in the spring of 1778 was stronger and more tightly knit than it had been before. Washington was eager to cross swords with the British. On 19 June 1778, Washington broke camp and started in pursuit of Sir Henry Clinton, who had just evacuated Philadelphia (after relieving Howe on June 18th) and was headed across New Jersey for New York. Washington was anxious to engage in battle with Clinton before he reached the safety of New York. The Battle of Monmouth took place on 28 June; it ended the agony of Valley Forge. Though technically a draw, the battle was tremendously significant for it demonstrated the new professionalism of Washington’s Army who stood face-to-face with British regulars. $15,000 - $25,000

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Washington, George. Revolutionary War-date letter signed (

Lot 76: Washington, George. Revolutionary War-date letter signed ("G. Washington") as Commander-in-Chief.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $12,000 - $18,000

Description: 76. Washington, George. Revolutionary War-date letter signed (“G. Washington”) as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, 2 pages (12.37 x 7.5 in.; 314 x 191 mm.) Hqts. Morris Town, N.J., 27 May 1780 to Colonel Clement Biddle; toning and chipping to edges; skillful repair to horizontal split; bleed-through of ink that does not obscure content.Washington expects the imminent arrival of French Land and Sea forces to cooperate with us against the common enemy. Washington writes in full: From the opinion I entertained of your services I was sorry to hear in the first instance when the matter was communicated to me, that you were about to take leave of the army & had actually resigned your Commission to the Quarter Master General. An event is soon to take place which will still increase my concern on this head. We have every reason to expect that an armament composed of Land & Sea forces will soon arrive from France in these States, to cooperate with us against the common Enemy. The department you filled is a very important one, and, on a proper discharge of its duties, our abilities to move in case of active operations will greatly depend. I should therefore be happy if you would remain in it, as from your experience, activity and entire knowledge of our resources in the line of it, I am persuaded, the public service would derive many great advantages at this interesting juncture. But I find on recurring to your Letter of the 16th instant, by which you communicated your resignation, that you are to be in Philadelphia on the call of the Honble. The Board of Treasury by the 1st of June. If you consent to remain, and on which point I request your answer, I will take occasion to write by you to the Board and inform them of my wishes for your earliest return. In this event I shall consider your stay at Philadelphia as rather unlucky however short, as we have not a moment to spare in concerting our arrangements.Expecting help against the enemy soon, having not a moment to spare, anticipating active operations, seeing great advantages, calling this an interesting juncture; for Washington, these were unusually vibrant terms. Washington was right to be excited about the coming of the French, though he would have to wait over a year to reap the benefits, as it developed that no campaign could be implemented in 1780. In due time, no longer imminently needing Biddle’s services, he allowed him to resign. At the letter’s conclusion, Biddle has written a note explaining his response to Washington’s appeal. In consequence of the foregoing, I continued to serve til the latter end of September when a successor was appointed to fill my office. $12,000 - $18,000

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Washington, George. Letter signed (

Lot 77: Washington, George. Letter signed ("Go: Washington"), 1 page, Newport, Rhode Island, 12 March 1781.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $25,000

Description: 77. Washington, George. Letter signed (“Go: Washington”), 1 page (13.25 x 8.25 in.; 337 x 210 mm.), Newport, Rhode Island, 12 March 1781 to Meshech Weare, then serving as President of the State Council of New Hampshire and also as State Chief Justice. The body of the letter is in the hand of Washington’s trusted aide and secretary, Tench Tilghman; marginal chipping some water staining, tape reinforcement to horizontal folds on verso.Facing the continued attrition of his ragged force and the depletion of resources, General Washington asks the State of New Hampshire to send additional troops to support operations in New York. Washington writes in full: Sir Having lately been obliged to make a very considerable detachment from the troops in the vicinity of Westpoint, I have been under the necessity of calling upon the neighbouring States to send forward the new Levies which have been raised, and of urging them to compleat their Quotas as expeditiously as possible. The same reasons urge me to make the same requests of your State, and to desire that the Recruits may, if possible, be sent forward cloathed, for such have been our repeated disappointments in the Cloathing expected from Europe, that our Magazines are nearly exhausted If the proper Uniform for the troops of the State could be procured, it would be a very desirable circumstance, for we are more deficient in Coats that any other Article. I shall be glad to hear from you on the subject of the foregoing. Your letter will find me at New Windsor, for which I set out tomorrow. I have the Honor to be Sir Yr most obt. and hble Servt. Go: Washington Continental fortunes were at a particularly low point during the spring of 1781. Finances had completely collapsed, a British force led by Benedict Arnold was ravaging the Virginia countryside, and the French alliance, now in its third year, had been a huge disappointment. At the writing of this letter, Washington had traveled to Newport, Rhode Island, to hasten the departure of the French fleet [under Rochambeau and Destouches] to Virginia in order to support Lafayette, who had been sent to present at least token resistance to Arnold. This is the force to which Washington above refers as the considerable detachment from his Army. As it then stood, conditions had become so desperate in New York that Washington faced the possibility of having to disband his Army in order to search for food. The new enlistments from New England would provide welcome relief to his exhausted Army, and give him the option of either sending a more cohesive expedition to Virginia, or making a more intensive effort against New York. Just two months later, however, Washington received some encouraging news: Admiral de Barras had arrived from France to take command of the fleet at Newport, and Admiral de Grasse was headed for the West Indies with a powerful fleet, along with 600 troops for reinforcements, and orders to eventually make his way to American waters. The strategic possibilities for Washington then became endless, opening the door for the famous Yorktown campaign of I781. $15,000 - $25,000

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Washington, George. Letter signed (

Lot 78: Washington, George. Letter signed ("Go: Washington"), as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $25,000

Description: 78. Washington, George. Letter signed (“Go: Washington”), as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, 2 pages, (9.25 x 7.5 in.; 235 x 191 mm.), Mount Vernon, 11 September 1781, to His Excellency Gov [Thomas Sim] Lee, Governor of Maryland; detached address leaf completely rebacked and attached by cloth tape.Less than a month before Cornwallis’ surrender at Yorktown on 19 October 1781, George Washington marches south from New York to meet him, and requests supplies for his Continental Army from the Governor of Maryland. Washington writes in full: Sir, I intended on passing thro’ Maryland, to have done myself the Pleasure to have seen your Excellency; but circumstances pressing upon me as I advanced on my March, and Time slipping from me too fast, I found a Necessity of getting on with such Rapidity that I have been obliged to proceed without calling at Anapolis [sic]. I am exceedingly pleased to find, as I passed thro’ your State, that a Spirit for Exertion prevails universally in such Manner, as gives me the happiest Prospects of receiving very Effectual Support from you. Great Attention is necessary to be given to the Article of Supplies. I mention this Circumstance, as I am just informed from below, that the Army is in Distress at this moment for Want of Provisions, particularly Flour; let me intreat your Excellency to give every the most expeditious Relief on this Head that is within your Power. With very great Regard & Esteem - I have the Honor to be Your Excellency Most Obedient & most humble Servt Go: WashingtonGeorge Washington’s Continental Army of 3,500 troops maintained its camp in the Hudson River highlands for nearly two years, opposed by Clinton’s overwhelming army of 14,500 veterans on Manhattan Island. Washington’s men were without real uniforms, and lacked rations. As well, they were unpaid. By the spring of 1781, it appeared as though the Revolutionary War was to be over with a whimper.Then, on 22 May, Washington learned that Admiral de Grasse planned to bring his French fleet from the Caribbean to American waters in the fall. The news inspired Washington to reassess his plans as he hoped to take New York away from the British, with the assistance of Count Jean ­Baptiste de Rochambeau, Commander of the French garrison of 4,000 men at Newport, Rhode Island. Rochambeau began marching southward toward New York during the first week of July, and, by the end of July, had assembled (with Washington’s troops) an army of over 9,000 men (half French and half American) on the Hudson.Finding no weak spot in the British defenses, Washington and Rochambeau decided that a combined operation on the Yorktown peninsula with Admiral de Grasse, who was sailing for the Chesapeake Bay, was feasible. On 21 August, the allied army (2,000 Americans and 4,000 French) began a secret march south, leaving only Major General William Heath with 2,500 men on the Hudson to watch Clinton. De Grasse arrived in the Chesapeake Bay on 30 August, encountering no resistance from the British Caribbean squadron under Admiral Sir Samuel Hood, who had sailed on to New York. Cornwallis was held in place until the main allied army arrived.Washington wrote the present letter from Mount Vernon during his travels southward through New Brunswick, Princeton, Trenton, Philadelphia, Chester, Wilmington, Baltimore, and Annapolis. All along his route, he implored governors, legislators, and businessmen for food, clothing and equipment for his army. The French, in contrast, could pay hard money for their supplies. On 9 September, in the company of only two aides, Washington left Baltimore in pursuit of a dream that had haunted him for the past seven years. Two days later, Washington was at his own familiar gates at Mount Vernon. There, he encountered four new faces, those of his step-grandchildren, who had been born in his absence. After his brief three day visit to Mount Vernon, his first since the war began, Washington continued on to Williamsburg, where the decisive confrontation with Cornwallis took place. Cornwallis being trapped and his condition hopeless, opened negotiations on 17 October for the surrender of his army. The capitulation was signed on 18 October and on 19 October the British force of almost 8,000 men laid down their arms. $15,000 - $25,000

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Washington, George. Highly important Revolutionary War-date letter signed, 3 pages, 3 August 1782.

Lot 79: Washington, George. Highly important Revolutionary War-date letter signed, 3 pages, 3 August 1782.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 79. Washington, George. Highly important Revolutionary War-date letter signed, 3 pages (11.75 x 7 in.; 295 x 183mm), 3 August 1782, Head-Quarters, Newburgh, to John Moylan Esquire, Clothier General; overall browning, separations at folds skillfully repaired.George Washington still faces rampant shortages of clothing and essential supplies for his threadbare troops as the Revolutionary War comes to a close.Washington writes in full: Sir, By the last Inspections Returns of the Army, I find that the men in general are possessed of but one Shirt each, and that in a Short time they will be totally destitute of that necesary Article, unless a supply is immediately provided. I wish, therefore, to point and fix your attention immovably to this subject. Let every exertion be used, and every Resource be tried, for procuring such a supply of Sharts that two may be issued to every Soldier at the next Delivery, which must be as early as possible. Thisis not only essentially necessary for the Comfort of the Troops, but will be found eventually the most substantial and best Economy. The Difficulty of attaining Supplies and the Embarrassments of the Publick for Want of Money are generally known and considered; but Should it notwithstanding be discovered by the Army that any of the States had in Possession a Quantity of Linen suitable for Shirts, an that no Efforts were made to obtain it for the Publick, it will probably excite great uneasiness and may be attended with very pernicious Effects, especially when the Men find themselves exceedingly distressed for Want of a single shirt. This you will represent to those who are competent to have the Business put in a Train of Negociation, if they should judge proper and you will inform me of the result. I must again urge that the Remainder of the Hunting Shirts should be sent on without Delay, if possible, or the season proper for wearing them will have elapsed. I am Sir, Your most humble servt. Go:WashingtonWashington’s letter attests that the problem of clothing his troops was still pervasive, even five years after the harsh lessons learned at Valley Forge. The present letter beautifully illustrates Washington’s uncompromising efforts on behalf of his men––some of whom had served with Washington for over seven years and well remember the brutal winter of 1777-78. Clearly, Washington is incensed to learn that most of his men, then in camp on the Hudson, still had only a single shirt to wear and wanted the matter rectified at all costs. Washington’s worries came to fruition in March 1783, when a sizeable number of Army Officers, aggrieved at ongoing shortages and unpaid salaries, circulated the infamous Newburgh Addresses. Only Washington’s personal intervention at the final hour averted outright mutiny. $20,000 - $30,000

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Washington, George. Letter signed (

Lot 80: Washington, George. Letter signed ("Go: Washington"), 2 pages, Rocky Hill, 16 October 1783.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 80. Washington, George. Letter signed (“Go: Washington”), 2 pages (9 x 7.5 in.; 229 x 191 mm.), Rocky Hill, 16 October 1783, to Marinus Willett in Poughkeepsie, with Willett’s autograph draft reply, Poughkeepsie, 31 October 1783, inscribed on the recto and verso of the integral blank; light overall browning.Peace arrangements and the Mohawk frontier.Marinus Willett, a famed New York City Son of Liberty, had displayed unexpected talents as an Indian fighter on the New York frontier in the Revolution. As the time approached for the British to evacuate New York City, troops in the state were rapidly disbanded, and Willett’s own military career was drawing to a close. Still, he could not forget the men who had served him so well, and he wrote Washington to make sure that any state troops left on frontier duty would receive proper clothing, shelter, and food.Washington replies herewith on 16 October, in part: …Whether the whole, or what part of the five Companies of State troops are to be retained in service during the Winter, being a matter wholly dependant on the determination of Congress in their Peace Arrangements, it is impossible to give any directions respecting them… Sharing Willett’s concern for the soldiers who may be left to guard the Mohawk Valley, he asks the New Yorker to tell him what steps have been taken in consequence of the orders I gave when I last saw you—by the time I receive this information, ‘tis probable that Congress will have come to some determination, which will enable me to give the necessary directions on the subject…Willett drafts his reply to Washington on 31 October, frugally using the integral blank of his Commander’s letter as notepaper. He reports that Immediately after receiving tents and other necessaries for executing the orders… from Washington, all able-bodied New York troops were called together at Fort Herkimer and marched without loss of time to the Head of the communication between the Mohawk & the waters of Ontario… Tardy shipments of rations and heavy rains slowed them, But notwithstanding these difficulties the day before I left Albany last which was five days ago, I received Advice…That the Stone house & the two Block houses were almost Completed that wood Creek was Intirely cleared out that the Roads were repaired & Intire New Bridges made from German flats to Fort Schuyler… His closing makes clear Willett’s devotion to his wartime commander: Notwithstanding that by the reform which is now going to take place in our State troops I shall be mustered out of Service I beg leave to mention to your Excellency that I shall esteem myself happy in obliging any Commands your excellency may think proper to direct to your most Obedt & very humble Servt. M.W. Even this is not enough for Willett. Haunted by fears that the frontier troop will be neglected, he adds a hasty postscript: Permit me to remind your Excellency that if our State troops are to be continued in Service they will Stand in real need of a speedy supply of Clothing. And that if they are to be continued in the Mohawk river New Measures for having them Victualed will be requisite. It was no wonder that Willett’s men had followed him so bravely to St. Leger’s camp and Johnstown: they merely repaid his unswerving loyalty.References: Fitzpatrick. Washington, Vol. 27:196-197.Provenance: Sotheby’s New York, 30 October 1990, lot 106. $20,000 - $30,000

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Wright, Orville. Highly important typed letter signed (

Lot 83: Wright, Orville. Highly important typed letter signed ("Wilbur and Orville Wright per O. Wright").

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $15,000 - $25,000

Description: 83. Wright, Orville. Highly important typed letter signed (“Wilbur and Orville Wright per O. Wright”) (Orville signs for both brothers), 2 pages (11 x 8.5 in.; 279 x 216 mm.), Dayton, Ohio, 17 November 1905, to Carl Dienstbach, a New York City musician and the U.S. correspondent for the German journal “Illustrierte Aeronautische Mitteilungen,” on “Wright Cycle Company, 1127 West Third Street, Dayton, Ohio” letterhead stationery, with Orville’s handwritten postscript added at the end of the letter. Orville Wright writes in full: Dear Mr. Diensbach:- A good deal of doubt seems to exist in Europe as to whether there is any truth in the reports that have been made concerning our flights of 1903 and 1904; and it is not at all surprising, under the circumstances, since there has never been any account of any one having seen them, except the inventors themselves. There have been a number of witnesses to every flight we have made in the last three years. The flights near Kitty Hawk were seen by nearly all the men at the U.S. Kill Devil Life Saving Station, who were present, and by the Captain of the Kitty Hawk Station, who viewed the flights through a glass. The flights in 1904 were witnessed by the farmers on the surrounding farms, besides a number of citizens of Dayton, whom we had invited. Mr. A. I Root, of Medina, Ohio, was also present a number of times, and wrote an account of what he saw for his journal, ‘Gleanings in Bee Culture’, for January 1st, 1905.The longer flights this year were witnessed by a number of citizens of Dayton, among whom were Mr. Torrence Huffman, President Fourth National Bank; Mr. C. S. Billman, Secretary West Side Building & Loan Company; and Mr. Edgar W. Ellis, Assistant Auditor of City of Dayton. If you or the Editor of your journal wish to make a personal investigation of the matter, we have no doubt any of these gentlemen would take pleasure corroborating the fact that they were present when flights of fifteen to twenty-four miles were made. We would not want their names published, as they would no doubt be flooded with inquiries. None of these gentlemen have any financial interest in our machine, either directly or indirectly. Respectfully yours, Wilbur and Orville Wright per O. Wright We are sending you under separate cover copy of Gleaning of June 1st 1905 (postscript entirely in Orville Wright’s hand).The first reports of the Wright brothers’ historic 17 December 1903 flight were grossly distorted in the European press, where pioneer aviators had been frantically trying to catch up with the Wrights’ accomplishments. In 1903, the Wright Brothers had made the first sustained powered flights. In 1904, a new aeroplane enabled them to accomplish turns and closed circuits. Then, in 1905, they exceeded the flying time of half an hour. The Wright brothers were at the forefront of aviation.On Tuesday, 3 October 1905, Orville flew 15 miles around and around the field at Huffman Prairie, landing after 25 minutes. The next day, he flew for 33 minutes. Then, on the afternoon of 5 October 1905, Wilbur Wright took the controls and made a sensational record-breaking 24 1/5 mile, 38-minute flight at an average speed of 38 miles per hour. At first, witnesses to the flights at Huffman Prairie included only a few friends, Bishop Milton Wright, Lorin Wright and his family, and banker Torrence Huffman. Until the 3rd flight, the trials were held in absolute secrecy, attended only by invited guests (a few influential civil leaders and local merchants and businessmen). Each day after that, more witnesses appeared; Wilbur’s record-breaking flight was witnessed by at least fifteen individuals. Wilbur was able to identify only three of them by name. After a news item appeared in the Dayton Daily News on 5 October, there were so many men and women lining the fences at Huffman Prairie that flights had to be discontinued until the excitement died down.The press had been kept in ignorance of the experiments at Huffman Prairie to avoid the extreme distortions of fact that followed the flights at Kill Devil Hills in 1903. After Wilbur’s record flight of 38 minutes, they decided to send out accounts of what they had accomplished in 1905. Three journalists were chosen to receive the Wright brothers’ announcement in the form of a letter sent on 17 November 1905: Georges Besanton, Editor of the French monthly “L’Aérophile”; Carl Dienstbach, New York representative of the German journal “Illustrierte Aeronautische Mitteilungen”; and Patrick Alexander, a member of the Aeronautical Society of Great Britain.The present letter is the actual letter the brothers sent to Dienstbach. It was printed in the February 1906 issue of Dienstbach’s German journal , with observations by the editor which questioned the credibility of the Wrights’ letter and informed readers that the Wright brothers had referred to Kaiser Wilhelm as a disturber of the peace in Europe. The attack came as a result of the publication in the French journal “L’Aérophile” (December, 1905) of two letters written by the Wrights to Captain Ferdinand Ferber. In one, a reference to Kaiser Wilhelm had been translated into French in such a way that it could be construed as an insult. As a result of the damning article in Dienstbach’s publication, the Wright brothers’ claims were widely disbelieved in Germany. In contrast, the claims were just as widely believed in England, where their letter had been read to the Aeronautical Society at the Society’s 15 December meeting in London. In France, where their letter was published in advance in the 30 November issue of “L’Auto,” a daily for sports fans published in Paris, the reaction was one of utter disbelief. The French had found it hard to believe that Wright had made four flights of less than a minute in 1903. Now, they found it even harder to believe that they were now making flights of more than half an hour in 1905.Provenance: Christie’s, New York, 5 December 1991, lot140. $15,000 - $25,000

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Dodgson, Charles L. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 84: Dodgson, Charles L. Autograph letter signed ("C. L. Dodgson"), 3 pages, 12 January 1885.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 84. Dodgson, Charles L. Autograph letter signed (“C. L. Dodgson”), 3 pages (7 x 4.5 in.; 178 x 114 mm.), 12 January 1885, to the editor of Vanity Fair, Thomas Gibson Bowles; discoloration along top margins, a pencil and ink notation at top of first page. I have such a quantity of irons in the fire that I see little or no chance of being of any use to you as a writer . . .Better known by his pen name, Lewis Carroll, the English author writes in part: Forgive my delay in writing about your newly-projected Journal [The Lady]...I have such a quantity of irons in the fire that I see little or no chance of being of any use to you as a writer: still, if some ‘happy thoughts’ should occur, on a subject germane to your scheme, I will try to set it down for you...I would suggest the omission of the dogma ‘to look beautiful is one of the first duties of a lady,’ which excited the scornful criticism of the first two ladies to whom I showed it. I don’t think ladies care to be told that––at least, not publicly. To the newly-married wife you might usefully suggest, in some article on ‘the Home’ that she must make it one of her chief objects to make her husband’s home pleasant and beautiful: and that one chief element in the picture is herself: so that it becomes her duty ‘still to be neat, still to be dressed’ in whatever fashion best becomes the face and figure God has given her. But the maid does not need to be thus counselled: and to the elderly, whose charms are matters of history, such words are a mockery. So I would not put it as an axiom in the forefront of your scheme… $5,000 - $8,000

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[Economists.] Important group of seven letters by prominent English and French economists.

Lot 85: [Economists.] Important group of seven letters by prominent English and French economists.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 85. [Economists.] Important group of seven letters by prominent English and French economists of the 19th and 20th centuries including:Angell, Sir Norman. Typed letter signed one page quarto, London, 29 September 1933, on his imprinted stationery, to the Reverend Robert Bartlett of the First Church of Christ, Longmeadow, Massachusetts.The inventor of The Money Game, a series of card games designed to teach elements of economics who won the 1933 Nobel peace prize writes in full: I was so sorry not to see you while you were in London, but unfortunately I had to stay in the country longer than I expected, and did not return until after you had left. I am hoping very much that I may have the pleasure of seeing you when I am in New York or Boston. I am leaving for the States early in October.Cobden, Richard. Two autograph letter signed(“Richd Cobden”), two pages and three pages octavo, Manchester, 19 October 1847 and Pencarrow, 19 July 1848, to W. M. Christy and the photographer Edmund Fry, concerning currency reform and defending Robert Peel’s Bank Charter Act of 1844: I dare not attempt in a letter to enter upon the question of the currency but must reserve it for a topic of conversation when we meet. But with regard to Peels late bill for regulating the Bank, & the paper issues of the country, I do not see that it has been proved to be too stringent in its operations. On the contrary, the late gambling excitement in railways occurred after the passing of that measure-and the present depression arises more from the want of confidence & other causes than a deficiency of circulation and declaring: the nations of the Continent are groaning under the cost of their warlike establishments, which are everywhere unpopular, not only with the tax payers, but with those who have to serve as conscripts in the army.Keynes, John Maynard. Autograph letter signed (“JM Keynes), one page quarto, [London,] 25 April 1918 to his close friend and colleague at the Treasury, Rupert Trouton: You are a scoundrel of the worst order and shall have no sympathy from me however large you may swell. Get well quick and some back to us. You are the one member of A.D.[the Treasury’s famous “A” Division] who is indispensable and I do not know how many thousands of dollar reimbursement we shall lose. Typed letter signed (“Keynes”), one and a half pages, quarto, Washington, D.C., 16 November 1945. On imprinted stationery of the United Kingdom Treasury Delegation , to the Secretary of the Treasury, Fred M. Vinson:After you had mentioned last week the high importance you attached to the Bretton Woods Plan being brought before Parliament as soon as possible, I cabled to the Chancellor of the Exchequer to ask him whether his arrangements were now sufficiently clear for me to be able to tell you anything about them. . . The Chancellor’s present intention is to present the Bretton Woods Agreement to Parliament for approval as soon as possible. The procedure will probably take the form of the presentation of a Bill in which the House is asked to signify its approval of the signing of the Agreement. The Government will recommend to Parliament the approval of the Final Act. But the Chancellor of the Exchequer asks me to let you know that he must expect considerable criticism and opposition from both sides of the House . . .The Bretton Woods Plan evolved from the Bretton Woods Conference, formally called the United Nations Monetary and Financial Conference, which met at Bretton Woods, New Hampshire, during World War II (July 1-22, 1944). The Conference had met to make financial arrangements for the post-war world after the expected defeat of Germany and Japan. Experts non-committally attended the Conference representing 44 states or governments, including the Soviet Union. It drew up a project for the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) to make long-term capital available to states urgently needing such foreign aid, and a project for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to finance short-term imbalances in international payments in order to stabilize exchange rates. Although the Conference recognized that exchange control and discriminatory tariffs would probably be necessary for some time after the war, it prescribed that such measures should be ended as soon as possible. After governmental ratifications the IBRD was constituted late in 1945 and the IMF in 1946, to become operative, respectively, in the two following years.La Farge, Joachim. Document signed (“Lafarge”),in French, one page quarto, Paris, 24 February 1796. La Farge, as director general of the Caisse d’Epargne, with other bank officers including M. Mitouflet, appoints Jean Rodde as procurer general: Before the notary public of the Department of the Seine, living in Paris, the undersigned were present -­ citizens Joachim de LaFarge, Director General of the Savings and Loan Bank, living in Paris at 701, rue de Grammont in the Le Pelletier section; Jean Charles Magnaud du Planier, same address as the above; Pierre Etienne Recalle, living at the above-mentioned street and section; Louis Charles Mitouflet, the same address. The administrators of the said bank have created and named as their Procurer General and Special Assistant Mr. Jean Rodde, office boy at 701 rue de Grammont, to whom they give the power for them and in their names [to accept] all registered letters and packages by post which may be presently addressed to them and will be so in the future, to give receipts and sign all appropriate registers.Say, Jean-Baptiste. Autograph letter signed (“Say”), in French, one page large quarto, Paris, 5 August 1826, to the Engineer, Mr. Collier in Ghent; with the integral address leaf attached. The French economist writes in part: Here I am back home at last, where it seems I will not be disturbed. I saw the chancellor of France two times, the President of the Court of Peers, which is the only one with the jurisdiction to judge me, and it seems that they have no desire at all to treat me rigorously. I will probably be pardoned on the King’s birthday at the beginning of November. I thought you would receive this news with interest, and I ask you to have the kindness to pass it on to your son in London, whom I won’t write until later. The present letter has another purpose, as well, i.e., to solicit your good offices for having several prospectuses of my work on the judicial institutions of England &c. distributed in Ghent, particularly at the school; they will reach you with one of the next couriers. . . Say is best known for his law of markets, which postulates that supply creates its own demand. He attributed depression, therefore, not to a general deficiency in demand but rather to temporary overproduction for some markets and underproduction for others. This imbalance must automatically adjust itself, he believed, because overproducers have to redirect their production to conform with consumers’ preferences or be forced out of business. Say’s law remained a central tenet of orthodox economics until the Great Depression of the 1930s. An obvious implication of Say’s law is that the capitalist system is self-regulating; thus there is no need for government intervention in economic affairs. $5,000 - $8,000

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Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages. Zurich, Thursday [11 October 1900]

Lot 86: Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages. Zurich, Thursday [11 October 1900]

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 86. Einstein, Albert. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages (2½ in Einstein’s hand), (7 x 4.5 in.; 178 x 114 mm.), Zurich, Thursday [11 October 1900] to Helene Kaufler­-Savic, congratulating her on her recent marriage. Maric, Mileva. Autograph letter signed (“Miza”), in German, 1½ pages, being an addition integral to Einstein’s letter from his future first wife referring to her work in the laboratory; in a quarter tan morocco box.An early congratulatory letter filled with charm. In translation, Einstein writes in full: Dear Miss Kaufler! So it is true! I warmly congratulate you for your good fortune and your decision and wish you all the happiness a young girl could imagine possible. Of course if the things I see for you in your cards should not come true and you become a swift and productive housewife, then be a pleasure to him and an example to the rest of us. Unless the Lord has something else in mind, I will drop in at some point and cast critical glances around your little nest, to be assured of everything with the certainty of an old nose. My honey, along with her sister arrived here two days ago and as usual I am together with her all day long. Neither of us has been able to find a job and are living off private lessons - if only we could find something, which is still highly unlikely. Is this not just like the life of a handyman or even a gypsy? However, I think we will be quite content as always. Hopefully you will be coming together again to Zurich, so that the friendship doesn’t get rusty. I am also looking forward to seeing you conduct yourself as the ‘better half.’ How your single classmates will envy you! Once more, be warmly greeted and congratulated. Yours, Albert Einstein”Helen Kaufler Savic was the daughter of a Viennese attorney and history student at the University of Zurich where she met Mileva Maric and Albert Einstein as well as her future husband Milivoy Savic, whom she married right around the time of this letter.References: Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Volume I, page 268, document number 81. $8,000 - $12,000

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Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed, (

Lot 87: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed, ("A. Einstein") 2 pages, Princeton, 11 May 1945.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 87. Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed, (“A. Einstein”) 2 pages, (11 x 8 1/2 in.; 279 x 216 mm.), Princeton, 11 May 1945, to the Engineer, B. D. Steinman, New York; on his blind embossed stationery.Einstein writes to a distinguished Structural Engineer stating of the great accomplishments of the individual technician who has made important contributions to the startling technical development of our time.I thank you very much for the kindness to send me your interesting book. There is so little awareness in the minds of our contemporaries of the great accomplishments of the individual technician who has made important contributions to the startling technical development of our time. Something should be done to preserve the feeling of gratitude and warm interest for such creative personalities without which life becomes poor and cold.David Bernard Steinman, to whom the letter is addressed, was a notable Structural Engineer. He built bridges, including the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan, which is a large suspension bridge. Einstein clearly sees Steinman’s genius within his book and reminds him that he contributed greatly to technical advancements for the public, even if the public tends to overlook these great minds. $5,000 - $8,000

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[European Composers.] A fine group of six letters by three renowned European composers.

Lot 89: [European Composers.] A fine group of six letters by three renowned European composers.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 89. [European Composers.] A fine group of six letters by three renowned European composers of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including:Lehár, Franz. Fine autograph letter signed (“Lehár Frz”), in Hungarian, 1 page (5.87 x 9.12 in.; 149 x 232 mm.), Vienna, 30 May 1924, to an unnamed librettist, on his personalized stationery.Proposals have already been made that I should write a really American operetta . . . but I must absolutely preserve my freedom. The Hungarian composer writes in full: Have read your interesting book twice and gained the best impression, so that I have the feeling a good opera could be made of it. However, I cannot decide to make any sort of binding declaration as I genuinely do not know what sort of form the coming season will take for me. The “Paganini” work fills up the whole summer and autumn. On 12 September I am conducting “Cloclo” in the Teatro Lyrico in Milan and then I am travelling to New York to produce ‘Cloclo” there. Proposals have already been made that I should write a really American operetta there. I still do not know what I shall do, but I absolutely must preserve my freedom. I must let events come to me. Do you understand my situation?After World War I, Lehár once again became popular with a new series of operettas beginning with “Cloclo” premiering in Vienna on 8 March 1924 and continuing with “Paganini” in 1925.Autograph letter signed (“Lehár Frz”), in pencil, in Hungarian, 1 page quarto, Vienna, 15 June 1929, to Emil Hilb of Hollywood, California, on his imprinted stationery, with address of his publisher rubber-stamped within the text of the letter; marginal fraying and stain from tape at top left corner. He writes in part: I think Friederike [Goethe] is an ingenious idea for a sound movie. Send your letter on to my publisher . .. Friederike has played now on 60 stages. In Berlin, the piece has already been playing for 7 months––in Vienna 4 months. In general, it is being acclaimed as the best thing I’ve done.Typed letter signed (“Lehár Frz”), in German, 2 pages quarto, Vienna, 4 May 1938 to Mohammed Tahir Pascha in Cairo, on imprinted stationery of Glocken-Verlag. He writes in part: I have already sent three numbers to America for registration of copyright . . . Regardless of our copyright registrations, you are now entitled to begin printing compositions . . . .Liszt, Franz. Autograph letter unsigned, in German and French, 2 pages (7.37 x 4.87 in.; 187 x 124 mm.), Liverpool, [Villa D’Este, 21 June 1874], to A.F. Eggers, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Musical Festival in Liverpool.In a letter declining an invitation to the Liverpool Musical Festival, Liszt explains that he has renounced himself as a pianist and only gives rare performances. The composer writes in full: Dear Sir, Your friendly communication rests upon harmless mistake. You do not seem to know that for 26 years past I have altogether ceased to be regarded as a pianist; hence I have for a long time not given any concerts, and only very occasionally played the piano in public, for some very special reason, to aid some charity of to further some artistic object, and then only in Rome, Hungary (my native country), and in Vienna—nowhere else. And on these rare and very exceptional occasions no one has ever thought of offering me any remuneration in money. Excuse me therefore, dear Sir, that I cannot accept your invitation to the Liverpool Musical Festival, inasmuch as I cannot in any way think of wearying the public with my piano-playing. On the verso, Liszt has written, in French, Apart from his high qualities as a statesman, M. de K. possesses those of a serious musician and of an excellent pianist. The natural horns harmonized in an enchanting, exquisite perfection.Rubinstein, Anton. Autograph letter signed (“Ant. Rubinstein”), in German, 1 page (10.5 x 8.12 in.; 267 x 206 mm.), Interlaken 3 July 1861, to My dear Zeliner; repair to vertical splits, repair to right margin.Rubinstein bitterly complains of being unable to compose. Autograph letter signed (“Ant. Rubinstein”), in German, 2 pages octavo, St. Petersburg, 9 February 1871, to his friend Lewy, regarding performances of “Feramors” ,“Children of the Heath” and “The Demon” in Vienna.The composer writes in part: The opera is now opening in Vienna, so most of the artists will have assembled . . . I expect to be in Vienna during the last week of August , so as to be present at the piano and all other rehearsals . . . It is wonderfully beautiful here, but I am leaving earlier than intended for various reasons. I cannot work here, for every house is a hotel and each rom contains a piano––so you can easily imagine the pleasure of working. When I try to compose, I hear all kinds of music; and when I play, everyone listens. It is unendurable . . . . $6,000 - $8,000

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Hugo, Victor. Group of three autograph letters signed by the French author of Les Misérables.

Lot 92: Hugo, Victor. Group of three autograph letters signed by the French author of Les Misérables.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 92. Hugo, Victor. Important group of three autograph letters signed by the French author of Les Misérables just before and then during his exile from France, including:Autograph letter signed, in French, 1 page quarto, 7 April 1850; mounting remnants on verso. Alas, why, in our France, there still are prisons and chains!In translation, Hugo writes in full: I am nothing but an honest man, and among humanity, I have no other passion than Justice and Truth. I am with those who suffer, with those who love, with those who work. I am filled with disgust with all forms of tyranny and I have only one wish in the world: to do away with weapons and chains. Your letter, so noble and painful touched my heart deeply. If I had to be rewarded, your thanks will reward me beyond the little I’ve done and the little I am worth. Tell the one you love, and whose absence causes you to suffer, that I hold out to him a fraternal hand. Alas, why, in our France, there still are prisons and chains! Please receive, Madame, my deepest respect.Autograph letter signed, in French,1 page octavo, Hauteville House, January 25, [1859]. To Jules Noirit, with integral address leaf attached; browning with some water staining. I am nothing but a quiet soldier of duty . . .The French author writes in full: In my solitude, I often receive some verse. I am not saying so out of pride, since I am nothing but a quiet soldier of duty, but as a tribute to the cause for which I have been exiled as well as to all the poets in my country. Well, sir, your stanzas are among the most beautiful verses I have received in seven years. Your poems have the innate nobleness of the ideal; they come from a deep, generous heart, which gives them wings. I thank you very much, and I congratulate you even more warmly. Your soul sings in you. I shake your hand, poet.By 1859 Hugo had adopted a new lifestyle, prompted by ill health, in which he spent the summers away from his island home on Guernsey. Although he avoided France, he would have been able to return home and end his now voluntary exile.Autograph letter signed (“V.”), in French, 3 pages octavo, H[auteville] H[ouse, Guernsey], 9 February [1860], to Noel Parfait, Paris; with integral address leaf.Homeland is sweet but exile is grand. One goes back home but one has to give up one’s freedom.Hugo writes in full: Your kind letter moves me. You are sad and happy at the same time, and it is quite normal. Homeland is sweet but exile is grand. One goes back home but one has to give up one’s freedom. I understand the double shock your soul is experiencing. But it does not matter, dear Parfait. You are going to be happy, I have no doubt about that. You are taking into the darkness that prevails in France nowadays the serenity of a proud conscience and the satisfaction of having overcome the ordeal. You will feel respectable among all the despicable people. That is an austere kind of joy but it is indeed a joy. Thank you for all the details you gave me. I congratulate and envy Dumas, who was able to help you and ensure that you will have enough to live on in Paris. That, plus all the intelligence, style, grace, talent and virtue that you have! I assure you that you are going to do very well. I am sorry for H.M. the world’s biggest scoundrel; H.M. stands for His Majesty [most likely Louis-Napoleon], but there is going to be one successful honest man in Paris. I already know seven or eight of them, maybe nine, and that will make ten with you. Our friend must be in Brussels at the moment. Tell him that I am going to answer his letter and ask him to send me, in the meantime, the issue of l’lndependance (by mail, since it costs two sous there and six francs here) in which my note on George Sand was printed. Also, I would like to have his address in Brussels....” In a postscript , Hugo as added, “Would you be so kind as to have the first of the two letters I am enclosing handed over to Bance! whose address I do not know, and mail the second one in Brussels? Sorry and many thanks. In February 1860, Hugo was still living in exile on Guernsey, still writing about the darkness that prevails in France and the world’s greatest scoundrel. It was an exile that had begun in December 1851 when a coup d’etat took place in France, which eventually resulted in the Second Empire under Napoleon III, and it did not end until the return of liberty and the reconstitution of the republic on 4 September 1870. However, his exile had recently become a voluntary gesture and an act of pride, a time to stand against Louis­ Napoleon. On 15 August 1859 (the birth of the Napoleon I), Napoleon III offered an amnesty to exiles, which was accepted by some of the exiles, but not Hugo. In a poem, Ultima verba, he marked his decision, stating “No one will suppose that I personally can take any notice of the thing called an ‘amnesty.’ In the present condition of France, protest -­ absolute, inflexible, eternal protest -- that is my duty. True to the engagements I have made with my conscience, I shall share the exile of freedom to the end. When freedom returns, I shall return”. The truth of the matter was that Hugo could not return during the reign of Napoleon Ill without inflicting a deep wound on his pride, and he could not resign himself to that. He was also well aware of the status and commercial value of banishment, even though the banishment was now self-imposed. The personal defiance of Napoleon III, the deliberate choice of martyrdom, gave Hugo a new heroic dimension. $6,000 - $8,000

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Khrushchev, Nikita. Typed letter signed (

Lot 96: Khrushchev, Nikita. Typed letter signed ("N. Khrushchev"),[Ukraine, USSR], 22 December 1944

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 96. Khrushchev, Nikita. Typed letter signed (“N. Khrushchev”), in Russian, 2 pages (11.37 x 7.37 in.; 289 x 187 mm.), [Ukraine, USSR], 22 December 1944, to several members of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, autograph corrections of six words in the first paragraph are most probably in the hand of Khrushchev as well; left margin may have been trimmed, marginal wear, light creases, pencil notations in blank areas.Exceptional World War II- date letter from Nikita Khrushchev congratulating the Uzbeks for their success, to crush the menace that is the Nazi invader and saving the Soviet Ukraine from the German Fascist invaders, and restoring the economy and culture of our republic.Khrushchev writes in full: TO SECRETARY OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE UZBEKCOMMUNIST PARTY (Bolsheviks) - Comrade YUSUPOVTO CHAIRMAN OF THE PRESIDIUM OF THE CENTRAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE UZBEK SSR - Comrade MUMINOVTO CHAIRMAN OF THE UZBEK SSR COUNCIL OF PEOPLE’S COMMISSARS - Comrade ABDURAKHMANOVOn behalf of the Ukrainian people, the Central Committee of the Ukrainian Communist Party (Bolsheviks), the Presidium of the Central Executive Committee and the Ukrainian SSR Council of People’s Commissars would like to congratulate the Uzbek people on Union-wide holiday-the Twentieth Anniversary of the establishment of Soviet rule in Uzbekistan of the creation of Uzbek Soviet Socialist Republic. As a part of the mighty, heroic Soviet family throughout the years of Soviet rule, the Uzbek people have transformed Uzbekistan into a flourishing Soviet republic. When the Motherland was going through hard times, the Uzbek people rose up and joined the ranks of the rest of the Soviet people in an uncompromising stand in defense of the Union; they mobilized Uzbekistan’s industry and agriculture to aid at the battlefront; to crush the menace that is the Nazi invader. There was a good share of Uzbek sons amongst the Motherland’s mighty guardians, Heroes of the Soviet Union, who defended it at the gates of Moscow, at the gates of Leningrad, by Volga, by Dnepr, by Vistula and by Danube. Under the command of Marshal of Soviet Union Comrade Stalin, the Uzbek sons together with all Soviet peoples cleansed the Motherland of Hitler’s troops they helped Ukrainian people liberate the Soviet Ukraine from fascist captivity. On behalf of the Ukrainian people, we express our deepest gratitude towards the Uzbek people for lending their brotherly helping hand in the act of saving the Soviet Ukraine from the German Fascist invaders, and restoring the economy and culture of our republic. Long live the glorious Uzbek people who, under the supervision of the Lenin-Stalin party, join force with all of the Soviet people in a battle to save the humanity from the plague that’s known as Hitlerism, who stifle the German-Fascist invaders, who selflessly aid the courageous Red Army on the home front in trampling of the fascist beast.Long live the great Soviet Union!Long live the Stalinist friendship of nations!Long live the great Uzbek people!Long live the twentieth anniversary of Soviet Uzbekistan!Long live the great Comrade STALIN!N. KhrushchevWorld War II heavily impacted the Ukraine, recognized as the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic during its time under Soviet rule. Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet nation in 1941. What followed was a brutal oppression of the country’s inhabitants. Many civilians fell victim to forced labor, atrocities, and massacres perpetrated by the Nazi forces during their occupation. Total civilian losses are estimated at seven million, including over a million Jews that were shot and killed. It was not until 1943 that Soviet forces were able to fully liberate the Ukraine from Nazi occupation and when Khrushchev returned to the country for the first time since the outbreak of war, he found it in ruins.The employment of “scorched earth” policies on both sides had left the infrastructure of the Ukraine in ashes. Upon seeing the amount of destruction that had befallen his birth nation, Khrushchev sprang into action. The leader of the Central Committee of the Communist party rushed from district to district, attempting to encourage regrowth and to revitalize the nation’s economy. A technique that Khrushchev employed to help foster agricultural regrowth was “kolkhozes,” which encouraged the Ukrainian collective farms to expel those laborers who were not pulling their weight. Kolkhoz leaders used this policy as an excuse to expel their personal enemies, invalids, and the elderly. In total, nearly 12,000 people were sent to the eastern parts of the Soviet Union. Yet, despite Khrushchev’s efforts, the country’s harvest in 1944 was sparse and would even decrease the following year. By 1945, the Ukraine’s industry had barely reached a quarter of pre-war levels of production.A combination of lackluster results on Khrushchev’s part in terms of revitalizing the Ukrainian economy, as well as unrealistic demands regarding the nation’s agricultural and industrial output from Stalin lead to Khrushchev’s replacement as Central Committee leader and the loss of his post overseeing efforts in Ukraine. The stark contrast between the reality of the situation and how Khrushchev portrays it to his comrades gives a candid insight into the political climate of the Soviet Union during World War II. $5,000 - $8,000

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Nelson, Horatio. Two autograph letters signed twice, 3 pages, 9 and 10 February 1801.

Lot 100: Nelson, Horatio. Two autograph letters signed twice, 3 pages, 9 and 10 February 1801.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $6,000 - $8,000

Description: 100. Nelson, Horatio. Two autograph letters signed twice (“Nelson and Bronte” and “Nelson & Bronte”), on a bifolium, 3 pages (8 x 7.75 in.; 225 x 198mm), 9 and 10 February 1801, to an unidentified confidant; first leaf trimmed at foot with loss of a line or two of text, only the top third of second letter is present. The losses appear to be deliberate to keep the anonymity of the recipient; red wax splotch on verso of first leaf.A staggering pair of letters revealing Horatio Nelson’s despair upon learning of the future George IV’s interest in Lady Emma Hamilton.In his letter of 9 February 1801, Nelson writes in full: O God who knowest the purity of my thoughts & the uprightness of my conduct, look down I beseech thee, on me, one I am of the most unworthy of thy servants, help and support me, for thou O Lord art my only comfort, and to thy Infinite Mercy alone do I look for support to bear me through this transitory life, and I beseech thee O most merciful God that in thy good time thou will take me by myself and remove me from this World where I have no friend to comfort or relieve me even on the Bed of Sickness. Relieve me O Lord from the misery of this World speedily speedily speedily amen, amen, amen. Nelson and Bronte In his letter of 10 February 1801, Nelson writes in part: . . . God knows I never wish to sett [sic] my foot out of the ship but I must go where duty orders it. Without your friendship and confidence I only wish myself removed from this World. The St. George is just arrived but it blows so strong & such a heavy Sea that my things cannot be moved . . . You cannot think how dirty the St. George compares to my own San Josef and probably her inside is worse than her outside appearance . . . The ship is not fitted for a flag . . . and is truly uncomfortable but it suits exactly my present feelings which are miserable in the extreme. I have not closed my Eyes all night and am almost blind and far from well & all brought on by fretting at false accusations . . .Shortly after his arrival in England, Nelson was appointed to be second-in-command of the Channel Fleet under Lord St. Vincent. He was promoted to Vice Admiral of the Blue on 1 January 1801, and travelled to Plymouth on 22 January. He was granted the freedom of the city, and on 29 January Emma Hamilton gave birth to their illegitimate daughter, Horatia. Nelson was delighted but quickly disappointed when he was instructed to move his flag from the HMS San Josef to the HMS St George in preparation for a planned expedition to the Baltic. At the same moment he was moving his flag, Nelson learned the young Prince Regent, later King George IV, was smitten by Lady Emma Hamilton and paying her all too much attention. Nelson’s two letters herewith clearly reveal his inconsolable despair over another man focusing his attention on his mistress who just gave birth to his namesake. $6,000 - $8,000

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Nelson, Horatio. Fine autograph letter signed, 4 pages, Amazon, 11 September 1801

Lot 101: Nelson, Horatio. Fine autograph letter signed, 4 pages, Amazon, 11 September 1801

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $8,000 - $12,000

Description: 101. Nelson, Horatio. Fine autograph letter signed (“Nelson & Bronte”), 4 pages, (9.2 x 7.3 in.; 232 x 188mm), Amazon, 11 September 1801, to Evan Nepean; tipped onto paper, edges strengthened and a few letters slightly shaved.Nelson responds with gusto to a mooted plan to destroy the Dutch fleet at Goree.In the preset letter to Evan Nepean, Nelson enthusiastically responds to the mooted plan to destroy the Dutch fleet at Goree. He writes in part: I feel sensibly the flattering compliment paid me by sending me the plan for an attempt to destroy the Dutch ships at Goree, and nothing could give me more real satisfaction than the aiding and assisting in any manner for the success of the enterprise, all thoughts of prize money to come (if you will believe me) sink to nothing for although I do not believe I am £10000 in the world, yet I declare to God I would not do an unhandsome thing by a brother officer & be worth millions . . . I am one of those who are of the opinion Boats might burn our fleet at Spithead or Torbay, and that there is nothing which boats may not accomplish by surprise . . . the boats must be in several divisions under officers of movement. The smaller the divisions the better. 30 boats can certainly be fitted to fire carcasses, and if these have resolution 4 or 5 to each ship of the line of fire each 3 to 4 carcasses into the ship, will the carcasses not be broke to pieces passing through the ships side and will the combustible take fire after such a resistance. Capt. Congreve can tell you. If he says yes, then there requires only for the service to be directed . . . .Plans to destroy enemy fleets in port continued to be discussed after Nelson’s failure at Boulogne in August 1801, but were finally shelved on account of the inherent difficulties and the peace concluded in the autumn.Provenance: Christie’s London, 20 June 1990, lot 230. $8,000 - $12,000

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Sand, George. A fine collection of nine autograph letters signed spanning over three decades.

Lot 105: Sand, George. A fine collection of nine autograph letters signed spanning over three decades.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 105. Sand, George. A fine collection of nine autograph letters signed spanning over three decades of her prolific writing career. A French Romantic writer, Sand found her true form in her rustic novels, which drew their chief inspiration from her lifelong love of the countryside and sympathy for the poor. The present collection of letters provides abundant detail on Sand’s personal and literary life. Highlights of the collection include:Autograph letter signed, in French, 1 page octavo, [no place, 14 April 1835], on stationery with her embossed initials, to Anténor Joly; integral address panel. Sand writes of her novel, Engelwald, in part: Please allow me to complete my novel before I see about selling it. I have done some calculations and found out that the courier did not offer me much less than I could ask for somewhere else, without being greedy. However, judging by reasonable standards your figures are somewhat too low. The difference is not so big that I might reject your offer, but it will give us the opportunity to discuss it a little further before we conclude a deal . . .So I am going to finish my story and in a few days, I will write to you “it is finished, come and see me.”Autograph letter signed (“G. Sand”), in French, 3 pages octavo, 29 April 1842, on stationery with her embossed initials,to an unnamed critic; repair to central horizontal fold. Sand writes in part: I owe my thanks, Sir, for the kind and generous appreciation of my works you wrote in la Phalange; you gave my talent much more praise than it deserves; but the honesty and the elevation of your heart led you to such excess of kindness to me, because you recognized someone well-intentioned in me. Pax Hominibus bonae voluntatis [Peace on earth and goodwill to all men]. That is my motto, and it is also the only Latin I know. But this being certain, from the bottom of my soul, that I have always meant well, has helped me find consolation for other people’s injustices as well as for my own failings . . .Sand continues her lengthy letter asking if her correspondent might read a small book she has sent along, noting: I am sure that you will want to encourage such a sturdy , such a wildly strong talent, and that it will strike you as it does me. . .Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages octavo, Nohant, 7 December 1851, to an unidentified woman. Sand writes to her correspondent about her play, “Le Mariage de Victorine,”a love story which concluded with the happy marriage of a poor adopted daughter to the son of the house. Contrary to her custom, Sand went to Paris for the opening of the play. A few days after the opening, Louis Napoléon staged his coup d‘état, Sand quickly returned to Nohant and the play closed. In the present letter Sand laments the situation. She writes in part: Be sure that I feel sorry about the great misfortune Victorine went through more for you and Mr. Montigny than for myself. Be sure too that I want to do all I can to make up for this disaster, by writing another play in better days to the best of my ability, for which I promise right now that I won’t ask him any bonus if, as it is to be feared, Victorine, after being stricken down in its prime, does not rise again from the barrier which it has fallen . . . In 1876, the play was revived––a new generation of theater-goers who had not seen the original production twenty-five years earlier was charmed and a long run was assured.Autograph letter signed, in French, 1 page octavo, [no place], 30 August 1855, to Abbé S. Clément. The letter is accompanied by an autograph poetical manuscript signed by Clément being a gift for Sand on the death of her grand-daughter. Sand’s poignant letter, in full: Thank you so much, dear Sir; you are the good shepherd, both sympathetic and consoling. Your poem is sincere, and that is what makes it good, since form only is nothing when the idea is not there. Yes, yes, it is true love is stronger than death, and I am sure that my child and I will be together again. The other night, I dreamed that she was returned to me, and I regard this dream as a gift sent to me. I do not have superstitions about dreams, but when they are sweet, I think we must be grateful. They are a consolation that night brings to our days. Again, thank you. With much love from the bottom of my heart.Autograph letter signed (“G. Sand”), 4 pages octavo, Nohant, 18 August, 1871, to her publisher, retuning a proof with corrections. She writes in part: . . . I beg you to make sure that my punctuation is observed; without it my style, (by it’s very nature) is incomprehensible. Thus, I am very careful in my corrections, but most newspapers couldn’t care less . . .I admit that I am extremely sensitive to a comma which distorts an idea . . .A particularly rich collection of letters revealing precious details on Sand’s literary endeavors and her personal trials and tribulations. $10,000 - $15,000

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Shaw, George Bernard. An extensive archive of 30 autograph letters signed.

Lot 106: Shaw, George Bernard. An extensive archive of 30 autograph letters signed.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 106. Shaw, George Bernard. An extensive archive of 30 autograph letters signed that journey through Shaw’s personal life punctuated by his political views. The body of letters also provides individual insights into European history during a tumultuous time period. An extraordinary archive providing extensive coverage of Shaw’s intimate and personal opinions on politics, marriage and the business of writing plays. Shaw’s extensive collection of plays includes Pygmalion, which inspired the famous My Fair Lady musical. He is the only recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature and an Oscar for Pygmalion. An exceptional writer and commentator, the present archive provides an intimate portrait of the personal thoughts and opinions of a true political activist. Since Shaw was not immediately successful in his writing career, he pursued his interest in politics and activism. His interests lead him to a British Socialist organization, the Fabian Society, which was attended by well-known literary geniuses such as Virginia Woolf and H.G. Wells. In an early autograph letter signed, Shaw writes to Clarence Henry Norman on 18 November 1907, illustrating Shaw’s ability to affect change by bringing political issues to public light: Don’t let anything expensive be done until after the Egyptian New Years Day. If anything is going to come of the agitation it will come then & not till then. Meanwhile, nothing must occur that would make an act of clemency difficult. If the day passes & nothing is announced, then we may say we have failed; but after the release of the two Indians I feel pretty sanguine. Shaw discusses the Denshawai incident, a confrontation between British soldiers during British occupation of Egypt, to his fellow political critic and author. British soldiers unjustifiably fired into a crowd and took prisoners. Shaw became a critic of this action and even mentioned the incident in the preface of “John Bull’s Other Island”. Shaw’s strong political views continued to be fodder for his writing expeditions. His opinions were spewed into letters attempting to affect change. In an autograph letter signed with his initials, he writes to classical scholar Gilbert Murray on 5 November 1914: On the 14th my War Manifesto will appear. In it I explain my attitude towards the Prussian Tsardom and the occasionally inspired idiots whom it hangs, flogs, & sends to Siberia. I am curious to see how far Russian genius will be extinguished by the prohibition of vodka. Some of the circular is so good that I conclude that you drafted it. But I will not put my name to any document that deals with Russia unless it expressly and emphatically damns the Tsardom uphill, down dale, and all the way to hell. This marks his long love affair with Russia. Shaw was one who welcomed zealously the Russian Revolution of 1917. Many of his lesser-known plays revolve around the revolution and the Romanov family. He later became a supporter of Joseph Stalin and even met with the Russian leader. The irony here lies in Shaw’s pacifist beliefs, which seem contradictory to his admiration for Stalin. Magazines and news organizations were often looking for Shaw’s political opinion. A letter from The Associated Press dated 14 May 1945 asks if Shaw believes that peace will be achieved in Europe after World War II. In his cynical and crass manner, Shaw replies: No. How can anyone hope that the men who have made such an unholy mess of Europe will not make a paradise of the world? The only hope is that circumstances will be too strong for them to do their worst all over again. How far will they co-operate when the German bayonet is no longer at their throats? When asked to make a prediction of the climate in Europe after ten years have gone by he simply states: I don’t know until I make the prediction, which I have not the smallest intention of doing. All I can do is to assure you that all the predictions will prove wrong, as only damned fools will be conceited enough to make them.Shaw’s personal life wasn’t without its own controversy. The archive includes letters regarding his views on marriage and free love where he states that marriage is essentially a contract. This reflects his own relationship as it is widely debated that his marriage to Charlotte Payne-Townshend, a woman’s rights activist, was never consummated. The two married after she nursed him back to health. She remained abstinent during the entire marriage while Shaw carried out several affairs. The passion for writing never ceased. Even though he was 94 years old, Shaw was in the middle of crafting another play at the time of his death. The final letter of the archive is one of the very last Shaw ever wrote. It captures his cantankerous spirit he was so well known for. It is dated 26 August 1950, two weeks before he fell off a ladder on his property and broke his hip. Injuries sustained from the incident proved fatal nearly nine weeks later. His autograph letter signed with his initials was written to Russell Scott, Jr. he writes: Never waste your time writing to very old men. I am 94, finished. I can do no more. You must carry on from where I left off. No use bothering me about it. I have said my say about [Dr. Feliks von] Kunowski and have not changed my mind. Thank you all the same for your letter. The “it” Shaw speaks about is the phonetic alphabet Scott came across in a number of schools in Germany. Scott was aware of Shaw’s interest in the subject and sent him details. Shaw dismissed the idea even though Scott expressed that it was the exact tool that Shaw was searching for. The idea that Scott must carry on was taken at face value and the rest of his life was devoted to campaigning on behalf of speech tracing. This later became part of Shaw’s legacy as a portion of his estate was left to developing a phonetic alphabet in an attempt to improve spelling of the English language. This significant archive includes letters to English Socialist and critic, Henry S. Salt; Commander Halim Nusseir of Egypt; philosopher and linguist Charles Kay Ogden; social scientist Oscar Jaszia; a myriad of editors at various newspapers and magazines; as well as his actresses including Katharine Pole. His letters consist of topics from opera and Bolshevism to negotiations regarding payment for articles and stage performances of his works. His plays including Fanny’s First Play and Great Catherine, which he discusses as a failure on stage, are also discussed through this rich array of correspondences. $20,000 - $30,000

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Valéry, Paul. Fine series of four autograph letters signed by the French poet.

Lot 109: Valéry, Paul. Fine series of four autograph letters signed by the French poet.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $8,000

Description: 109. Valéry, Paul. Fine series of four autograph letters signed by the French poet, critic, essayist and philosopher including:Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages octavo, 12 March 1923. Valéry writes in part: You complain of my silence, and yet you send me these articles from the Liège Universitaire in which you speak so kindly of me. But I thought I had written you before leaving for Brussels. I was hoping to see you there. They overdid it over there, and almost assassinated me with friendship. I’m sorry that you didn’t appear among the assassins. I came back half-dead, and found myself in front of a desk, which struck terror into my heart. I am so burdened down with things to do, and especially with an amount of correspondence, which is becoming unbearable. That’s why you shouldn’t hold it against me if I don’t always answer whoever writes me.... I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all of your attention and your articles. I hope to be able to say that to you in person some day, if I go back to Belgium .... Autograph letter signed, in French, one page small quarto, undated [1925]. On his imprinted stationery, to the artist, [Dunoyer de] Segonzac. The author writes in full: My sister-in-law Paule Gobillard is submitting to the jury for the Pittsburgh exhibition a canvas that she calls “Causerie”. I allow myself to recommend both canvas and sister-in-law. You would give us great pleasure if in your capacity as juror you could give the picture a little push towards America.Autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages quarto, [Paris], only dated XVI, to a friend named Hélène; marginal splits to vertical and horizontal folds. Valery writes cryptically about being slighted in a matter of importance to him: You obviously know what happened in Geneva! Until now I knew only the bare outlines: the nomination of B., the apotheosis of L., and the silence about your humble servant. Ultimately I wrote to our friend Op., who answered me today. It seems clear that P.P.P handled the entire affair. I confess to you that I feel somewhat as if I’ve been tricked. I’m waiting for a little more information before I draw the appropriate conclusions. Do you have more precise information? Maybe more information could be obtained from Tit. I hope you’re enjoying a wholesome life in Vichy. I gave your address to my friend Larbaud, who may visit you, even though he’s preoccupied with his mother’s condition. He isn’t leaving her alone this summer. Turning to his literary work, he writes: I’m still in Paris, still plagued by my thankless task and a thousand other problems. The weather is continually stormy, which makes me a nervous wreck. It’s dreadful to have to work without the slightest desire, when it’s the mind that has to produce. Who will write the Martyrology of the Brain? Dear friend Hélène, I kiss your hands affectionately.Autograph letter signed (“PV”), in French, three pages octavo, [June, 1943], to “an undisciplined young lady.” A fine letter in which Valéry discusses his feelings regarding Emile Rideau’s Introduction to the thoughts of Paul Valéry, published in Paris in 1944. Here you are returning from I know not what distances of the spirit to the old man of letters, abandoned without phrases and without other compliments! What punishment do you deserve? I will leave the choice of chastisement up to you. Meanwhile, you allege that you have ben working, writing poetic tales and sweating over your V[aléry] as time permitted. I have the honor to let people toil. Some time ago, a worthy Jesuit, a professor of philosophy, sent me a large package devoted to said Me and which is one of the most complete studies of this difficult work. Its conclusion is curious enough. It exalts me for five pages and casts me down for five others. These are two so neatly defined pourings, first one way and then the other that one could suppress the one or the other at will. Needless to say, he couldn’t help condemning that which is damnable in my case. I enjoyed this differential system very much. As to the rest, the analysis of the texts is very exact. But to reconstruct the personage of a mind, in considering the work of an entire life, criticism regards thoughts or forms as simultaneous, which were produced in reality at very different periods, etc. I am telling you this for your own orientation. But at last I will see your V. with all the interest I attach to you , my dear and illustrious person , and, don’t doubt it, with all the very sincere kind feelings, as you well know. Only don’t disappear suddenly in a trap door. That would do my Mephisto good. $5,000 - $8,000

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Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 110: Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed ("Rich Wagner"), in German, 1 page. Bayreuth, 2 July 1873.

by Profiles in History

July 11, 2014, 11:00 AM PST

Calabasas, CA, USA

Estimated Price: $5,000 - $7,000

Description: 110. Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed (“Rich Wagner”), in German, 1 page (8.5 x 5.62 in.; 216 x 143 mm), Bayreuth, 2 July 1873, to an unidentified correspondent.Wagner directs his operas will go forth despite legal issues.With great formality, Wagner writes in part: Mr. Feushel alerted us to the following threat. Haase has already sold his villa in Gotha: he filed an appeal, may file an appeal for a second time, and while the misfortune is thus being held up in its legal effect, he can continue with my operas, and this situation might drag on for a period of up to two years, during which Haase can divert all his assets until nothing is left to be seized. There is only one way to prevent this: to accuse Haase of above intention based on the sale of his villa and (as a precaution) garnish his earnings. You know this just as well as I do. I . . . deemed it necessary that we inform you of our opinion . . . A fine letter by the great German composer revealing his callousness when dealing with the financial woes of those involved with his performances. $5,000 - $7,000

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