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Harry Joseph Anderson Sold at Auction Prices

Illustrator, Painter, b. 1906 - d. 1996

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        • Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk
          Feb. 08, 2024

          Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk

          Est: $250 - $300

          Anderson, Harry 1906 - 1996 Americans suffer when careless talk kills Offset 1943 20 x 14.1 in. (51 x 36 cm) Printer: U.S. Government Printing Office Condition Details: (A-) was folded#USA #World War II

          PosterConnection Inc.
        • Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture
          Nov. 30, 2023

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture

          Est: $250 - $500

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture, Phila b1943, Found Object artist, mixed media with sad iron, pool ball, glass insulator, etc. signed on base 2000, 18"h. CONDITION: Very fine. No issues identified.

          Barry S. Slosberg Inc
        • Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture
          Nov. 30, 2023

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture

          Est: $250 - $500

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture Phila b 1943; found object artist, mixed media with Fiesta style plates and cup, hose, signed on iron base 2004, hgt 21 1/2". CONDITION: Very fine, no issues noted.

          Barry S. Slosberg Inc
        • Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture
          Nov. 30, 2023

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture

          Est: $200 - $300

          Harry Anderson Lamp Sculpture, Phila. b.1943, Found Object artist, mixed media with Lily aluminum cup, iron wheel, porcelain creamer, world globe, etc., monogrammed signature on base,'98', 32"h. CONDITION: Very fine. No issues identified.

          Barry S. Slosberg Inc
        • Duo of Original US WWII Propaganda Posters
          Feb. 02, 2023

          Duo of Original US WWII Propaganda Posters

          Est: $150 - $250

          Lot of 2 original US WWII propaganda posters. Includes a 1943 "Americans Suffer when careless talk kills!" poster by Harry Anderson (1906-1996) and a Save Waste Fats poster from the War Production Board from 1942. Both posters are backed with poster board and have protective covering. Larger poster is 28" x 22". *notes- creases from previous folds.

          Embassy Auctions International
        • Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters
          Feb. 02, 2023

          Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters

          Est: $150 - $250

          Duo of original US WWII propaganda posters. Includes a 1943 "Americans Suffer when careless talk kills!" poster by Harry Anderson (1906-1996) and a Victory Loan poster with a bald eagle illustration by Dean Cornwell (1892-1960). Both posters have poster board backing and protective covering. Larger poster is 26" x 18 1/2". *notes- creases from previous folds.

          Embassy Auctions International
        • Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters
          Feb. 02, 2023

          Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters

          Est: $150 - $250

          Lot of 2 original US WWII propaganda posters. Includes a "Share the Care" Victory Loan poster from 1945 and a 1943 "Americans Suffer when careless talk kills!" poster by Harry Anderson (1906-1996). Larger is 20" x 14". Both have poster board backing and have protective covering. *notes- creases from previous folds.

          Embassy Auctions International
        • Duo of US WWII Propaganda Posters
          Feb. 02, 2023

          Duo of US WWII Propaganda Posters

          Est: $200 - $300

          Lot of 3 US WWII original propaganda posters. Includes a 1943 "Americans Suffer when careless talk kills!" poster by Harry Anderson (1906-1996) and a "Is Your Trip Necessary" OWI poster No. 73 from the Office of Defense Transportation also dated 1943. Larger poster measures 22 1/2" x 16". Both are backed with poster board and have a protective covering. *notes- creasing from previous folds.

          Embassy Auctions International
        • Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters
          Feb. 02, 2023

          Lot of US WWII Propaganda Posters

          Est: $200 - $300

          A trio of US WWII propaganda posters. Includes a 1943 "Americans Suffer when careless talk kills!" poster by Harry Anderson (1906-1996), an oversized $200 bill war bond poster with President Theodore Roosevelt's picture dated 1944 and a Victory Bonds poster from U.S. Treasury featuring President Franklin Roosevelt from 1945. Largest poster is 26" x 18 1/2". All have poster board backing and have protective covering. *notes- creasing from previous folds.

          Embassy Auctions International
        • Harry Anderson (American) Lamp Sculpture
          Sep. 14, 2022

          Harry Anderson (American) Lamp Sculpture

          Est: $1,000 - $2,000

          Harry Anderson (American) Lamp Sculpture, Mixed media, signed and dated 2001. Size: 62'' x 31'' x 14'' (157 x 79 x 36 cm). Harry Anderson is a Philadelphia artist and founding member of the Dumpster Divers, a group of artists who create works out of found objects. Provenance: The Jimmy and Angela Clark Collection, Philadelphia.

          Material Culture
        • Original Vintage American WWII Poster 1943 - Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills by Anderson
          Jun. 21, 2022

          Original Vintage American WWII Poster 1943 - Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills by Anderson

          Est: $400 - $600

          Grieving parents have just learned the terrible fate of their son due to "Careless Talk". They look out to the viewer, as a haunting reminder to be careful when talking about the war or pertinent information regarding war related material from the factories. This poster entitled, Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills, was created by Harry Anderson in 1943. During the Second World War, there was a constant concern in the United States about inappropriate information being overheard by enemy agents both domestically and abroad. Harry Anderson (1906-1996) entered the world of illustration in the early 1930's doing work for local New York magazines. By 1937 he was involved in designing national advertising campaigns as well as paintings for all the major popular magazines of the time. Anderson is best remembered for his series of Christian paintings commissioned by the Latter Day Saints movement. Nearly 300 paintings saw heavy reproduction as church decorations and advertising material. In 1994, he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame. This is an Original Vintage Poster; it is not a reproduction. This poster is conservation mounted, linen backed, and in excellent condition. We guarantee the authenticity of all of our posters.

          The Ross Art Group, Inc
        • Harry Anderson, Mixed Media, 'Prometheus'
          Mar. 02, 2022

          Harry Anderson, Mixed Media, 'Prometheus'

          Est: $500 - $1,000

          Mixed media figural lamp, 1984 3'h x 2'w Provenance: Matthews Hamilton Gallery, Philadelphia, PA; Property from the Collection of Stephen and Stephanie Alpert

          Nye & Company
        • Harry Anderson Original Illustration Art Gouache
          Nov. 14, 2021

          Harry Anderson Original Illustration Art Gouache

          Est: $3,000 - $5,000

          ANDERSON, Harry, (American, 1906-1996): "Unwanted Son", original story illustration art for the Saturday Evening Post, February 7, 1953, Gouache/Paper, signed lower right, sight size 19" x 21", framed 29.5" x 32".

          Amero Auctions
        • Original Vintage American WWII Poster 1943 - Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills by Anderson
          Jun. 15, 2021

          Original Vintage American WWII Poster 1943 - Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills by Anderson

          Est: $400 - $600

          Grieving parents have just learned the terrible fate of their son due to "Careless Talk". They look out to the viewer, as a haunting reminder to be careful when talking about the war or pertinent information regarding war related material from the factories. This poster entitled, Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills, was created by Harry Anderson in 1943. During the Second World War, there was a constant concern in the United States about inappropriate information being overheard by enemy agents both domestically and abroad. Harry Anderson (1906-1996) entered the world of illustration in the early 1930's doing work for local New York magazines. By 1937 he was involved in designing national advertising campaigns as well as paintings for all the major popular magazines of the time. Anderson is best remembered for his series of Christian paintings commissioned by the Latter Day Saints movement. Nearly 300 paintings saw heavy reproduction as church decorations and advertising material. In 1994, he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame. This is an Original Vintage Poster; it is not a reproduction. This poster is conservation mounted, linen backed, and in excellent condition. We guarantee the authenticity of all of our posters.

          The Ross Art Group, Inc
        • Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk
          Oct. 12, 2020

          Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk

          Est: $200 - $300

          Anderson, Harry 1906 - 1996. Americans suffer when careless talk kills. Offset 1943. Printer: U.S. Government Printing Office. Condition Details: (A-) was folded

          PosterConnection Inc.
        • Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk
          Sep. 26, 2020

          Original Vintage US World War II Poster Careless Talk

          Est: $200 - $300

          Anderson, Harry 1906 - 1996. Americans suffer when careless talk kills. Offset 1943. Printer: U.S. Government Printing Office. Condition Details: (A-) was folded

          PosterConnection Inc.
        • H. ANDERSON - Sunflowers and Granny Apples
          Dec. 09, 2018

          H. ANDERSON - Sunflowers and Granny Apples

          Est: $1,000 - $2,000

          Harry Anderson (1906-1996) Sunflowers and Granny Apples, signed and dated lower right: Harry Anderson / © '83

          Santa Fe Art Auction
        • Harry Anderson American Illustration Art Painting
          Sep. 26, 2018

          Harry Anderson American Illustration Art Painting

          Est: $1,500 - $3,000

          Harry Anderson [ 20th Century ] American illustration art. Titled: "Those Wonderful Flying Machines". Subject: matter features an airport field with onlookers watching planes in the air, centered with a bright yellow jalopy. Original oil painting on board. Signed lower right. Provenance : Exxon Commission for 1970 calendar art. Altermann Galleries. Additional labels / tags on verso. Work window measures 21 1/2" in height x 27" in length. Frame measures 27 1/8" x 32 5/8". Good to very good condition. Estate fresh to market. Frame having mild storage related wear. Guaranteed Authentic. Hill Auction Gallery in house continental USA domestic shipping $150 plus insurance INV (11)

          Hill Auction Gallery
        • Talking Wires Take Over from the Pony Express by Harry Anderson
          Sep. 14, 2018

          Talking Wires Take Over from the Pony Express by Harry Anderson

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          Harry Anderson (1906-1996), gouache on board, 21 x 27, signed lower left

          Jackson Hole Art Auction
        • Harry Anderson (1906-1996)
          Aug. 25, 2018

          Harry Anderson (1906-1996)

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          Harry Anderson (Ill./ N.Y 1906-1996), comprehensive sketch for calendar illustration, 1929 Chrysler and golfers at Pebble Beach, Exxon, July 1972. Gouache, 13" x 16 1/2". Unsigned. Illustration House 5/9/98. Some foxing/mold.

          Copake Auction Inc.
        • HARRY ANDERSON COURTSHIP PAINTING
          Aug. 07, 2018

          HARRY ANDERSON COURTSHIP PAINTING

          Est: $3,000 - $4,000

          Large gouache illustration painting of a courting couple in rowboat, the lovely young woman is seated holding a parasol over her head. Signed Harry Anderson 40. Back has label --July Gravure, Sunday Afternoon, Womans Home Companion. Framed under glass overall 45 x 25 inches. Image size 14 x 31 inches. Scattered minor touchup to paint. (Harry Anderson NY illustrator 1906-1986).

          Americana Auctions
        • Harry Anderson Autographed Postcard
          Jun. 28, 2018

          Harry Anderson Autographed Postcard

          Est: $20 - $30

          Harry Anderson autographed J.D. McCarthy postcard. PSA/DNA authenticated and encapsulated. Autograph is in EX/EX-MT condition. All items in this auction from Lot 300 to the last lot start with an opening bid of $10. We ship all items from this auction in-house and gladly combine shipping.

          Grant Zahajko Auctions, LLC
        • HARRY ANDERSON ILLUSTRATION PAINTING
          Jun. 03, 2018

          HARRY ANDERSON ILLUSTRATION PAINTING

          Est: $3,000 - $5,000

          Large gouache illustration painting of a courting couple in rowboat, the attractive young woman is seated holding a parasol over her head. Signed Harry Anderson 40. Back has label --July Gravure, Sunday Afternoon, Womans Home Companion. Framed under glass overall 45 x 25 inches. Image size 14 x 31 inches. Scattered minor touchup to paint. (Harry Anderson NY illustrator 1906-1986).

          Americana Auctions
        • AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER
          May. 10, 2018

          AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER

          Est: $400 - $600

          Grieving parents have just learned the terrible fate of their son due to "Careless Talk". They look out to the viewer, as a haunting reminder to be careful when talking about the war or pertinent information regarding war related material from the factories. This poster entitled, Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills, was created by Harry Anderson in 1943. During the Second World War, there was a constant concern in the United States about inappropriate information being overheard by enemy agents both domestically and abroad. Harry Anderson (1906-1996) entered the world of illustration in the early 1930's doing work for local New York magazines. By 1937 he was involved in designing national advertising campaigns as well as paintings for all the major popular magazines of the time. Anderson is best remembered for his series of Christian paintings commissioned by the Latter Day Saints movement. Nearly 300 paintings saw heavy reproduction as church decorations and advertising material. In 1994, he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame. This is an Original Vintage Poster; it is not a reproduction. This poster is conservation mounted, linen backed, and in excellent condition. We guarantee the authenticity of all of our posters.

          The Ross Art Group, Inc
        • AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER BY HENRY ANDERSON 1943
          Apr. 13, 2017

          AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER BY HENRY ANDERSON 1943

          Est: $400 - $600

          Grieving parents have just learned the terrible fate of their son due to "Careless Talk”. They look out to the viewer, as a haunting reminder to be careful when talking about the war or pertinent information regarding war related material from the factories. This poster entitled, Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills, was created by Harry Anderson in 1943. During the Second World War, there was a constant concern in the United States about inappropriate information being overheard by enemy agents both domestically and abroad. Harry Anderson (1906-1996) entered the world of illustration in the early 1930's doing work for local New York magazines. By 1937 he was involved in designing national advertising campaigns as well as paintings for all the major popular magazines of the time. Anderson is best remembered for his series of Christian paintings commissioned by the Latter Day Saints movement. Nearly 300 paintings saw heavy reproduction as church decorations and advertising material. In 1994, he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame. This is an Original Vintage Poster; it is not a reproduction. This poster is conservation mounted, linen backed, and in excellent condition. We guarantee the authenticity of all of our posters.

          The Ross Art Group, Inc
        • AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER
          Nov. 11, 2016

          AMERICANS SUFFER WHEN CARELESS TALK KILLS ORIGINAL VINTAGE WWII POSTER

          Est: $400 - $600

          Grieving parents have just learned the terrible fate of their son due to ?Careless Talk?. They look out to the viewer, as a haunting reminder to be careful when talking about the war or pertinent information regarding war related material from the factories. This poster entitled, Americans Suffer When Careless Talk Kills, was created by Harry Anderson in 1943. During the Second World War, there was a constant concern in the United States about inappropriate information being overheard by enemy agents both domestically and abroad. Harry Anderson (1906-1996) entered the world of illustration in the early 1930?s doing work for local New York magazines. By 1937 he was involved in designing national advertising campaigns as well as paintings for all the major popular magazines of the time. Anderson is best remembered for his series of Christian paintings commissioned by the Latter Day Saints movement. Nearly 300 paintings saw heavy reproduction as church decorations and advertising material. In 1994, he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators? Hall of Fame. This is an Original Vintage Poster; it is not a reproduction. This poster is conservation mounted, linen backed, and in excellent condition. We guarantee the authenticity of all of our posters.

          The Ross Art Group, Inc
        • Americans Suffer. 1943
          Aug. 11, 2016

          Americans Suffer. 1943

          Est: $300 - $500

          Artist: HARRY ANDERSON (1906-1996) Size: 14 1/8 x 20 in./35.6 x 50.9 cm US Government Printing Office

          Poster Auctions International Inc
        • Harry Anderson (American, 1906-1996)
          Oct. 29, 2015

          Harry Anderson (American, 1906-1996)

          Est: $200 - $400

          24 3/4" x 17 1/2" paper "Going Down", 1938. Charcoal on paper, unsigned, sketch for an original Cream of Wheat Ad of the same title, framed and matted, overall 31 1/2" x 21 1/4". Online Bidding and additional information at AspireAuctions.com

          Aspire Auctions Fine Art & Antiques
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently linen backed. Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson
          Feb. 17, 2014

          WWII Careless Talk Kills, Harry Anderson

          Est: $50 - $100

          Artist: Harry Anderson Artist Dates: 1906 - 1996 Signed Within Plate: Yes Date of Work: 1943 Description: Weeping parents look up from the dreaded message that their son is a war casualty. The American secrecy campaign depended, to some extent, on a desire to gain control over otherwise uncontrollable events. Anderson, a devout Seventh-day Adventist, is well known for his Christian themed illustrations and paintings.This collection is from Dr. David Orzeck by descent to his daughter Lida Orzeck and the entire collection is offered without reserve. Lida Orzeck came across more than 750 vintage war posters from World War I and World War II in her family’s home basement that her father, David Orzeck, a Brooklyn doctor, had meticulously collected. Discovered in 1970, the posters â€" of which few pristine prints remain with the exception of the National Archives and the Library of Congress â€" were in mint condition, neatly catalogued and folded in brown wrapping paper from grocery stores. Size: 20" H x 14" W Weight: < 1 ounce Provenance: Dr. David Orzeck Condition: Poster has original fold marks and has not been exposed to sunlight, thus preserving the vibrant colors. Recently mounted on archival paper (reversible). Artist Biography: Illustrator Harry Anderson was born in 1906 in Chicago to Swedish parents. Talent for mathematics seemed to run in the family, so young Harry naturally later chose it for his college major, studying at the University of Illinois in 1925. Then he took an art course as an easy counterpoint to the math classes, and discovered both a talent and a love for drawing. With the change in major came a change in venue. He moved to Syracuse, New York, to attend the Syracuse School of Art in 1927. It was a classical art education with the entire first year devoted to drawing from casts -- a practice of presenting the student with a bust or other piece of sculpture in various lighting and having them render it in different media. It is a grueling technique despised by most students for its repetitious boredom, but it instills basic drawing skills that are crucial to an illustrator's success. With the second year's classes, came figure drawing and anatomy classes as detailed as those for medical students; more fundamentals that stood him in good stead his entire career.At Syracuse he met and roomed with Tom Lovell who became a lifelong friend and an important illustrator in his own right. They graduated with honors and moved to New York to share a studio and make their fortune. Unfortunately, this was 1931 and the Depression was in full force. Anderson sold candy at night and peddled his art to agencies during the day. It took him over a year to make his first magazine sale, and several more years before he felt established enough to move back home to Chicago.With some New York magazine sales behind him, he joined an art service agency that found work for its artists in return for a portion of the fee. By 1937 Anderson was working on national ad campaigns like the one for Sealed Power Piston Rings in 1938. He was also much in demand for story illustrations for the major magazines. His work appeared in Collier's, Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping, Ladies' Home Journal, Redbook, The Saturday Evening Post and others. The images were on a par with the best work being done at the time.He married his wife, Ruth Huebel, around 1940. She worked in the same building as Harry and posed for him on one occasion. The following year he left the agency and joined the studio of Haddon Sundblom -- famous for his Coca-Cola Santa Claus paintings. He was too old for military service but he did contribute one poster to the war effort. The purchase of a home in Highland Park during this period led to a second fork in his career path. Anderson had no time to do the repair work needed, and a handyman was hired. It was through this man that the Andersons renewed their religious faith.He and Ruth joined the Seventh Day Adventist Church and in 1944 Harry was asked if he would contribute to their publishing efforts. Their pastor sent samples of Anderson's illustrations to the denomination's Review and Herald Publishing Company, publishers of inspirational books and study materials. The Review's art director, Terence K. Martin, had long had the idea of showing Christ as a tangible presence in modern times, in modern day settings. When he saw Anderson's samples, he knew he had an artist who could bring that idea to life. Thus Anderson began his career in religious art, still illustrating for magazines to supplement his income.The next year, his most famous image was crafted. What Happened to Your Hand? was done for a children's book in 1945 and immediately touched the hearts of that audience. The adults in charge of the publishing program were less enthusiastic; some even considering it near-blasphemous to show Christ in the present day. Cooler heads prevailed and Anderson spent the rest of his active career dividing his efforts between commercial assignments at his premium wages, and religious ones done for love and for minimal payment.The inner peace that allowed Anderson to make his choice to contribute his time and effort at virtually minimum wage was evident in his paintings and in his depiction of Jesus. However, this dedication and calm is present in all of his work. As an important and popular illustrator, he is almost unique in the gentleness of his images. Quite capable of depicting nearly anything, his choice of assignments and his approach to them was always in line with the dictates of his heart. Not many people can live their lives the way they want to. It seems that Anderson did. He enjoyed the same quiet, focused strength in his private life that's evident in his art.He was featured in a 1956 issue of American Artist magazine and received awards from several art associations throughout his career, including the prestigious New York Art Directors Club. In 1994 he was inducted into the Society of Illustrators' Hall of Fame.In the Sixties he began painting calendars for Exxon Oil company (then Esso) and was able to stretch his artistic muscles on images based on Great Moments in American History and Great Moments in Early American Motoring. Interestingly enough, Anderson was actively supporting himself with illustration work at a time when most of his generation were in forced retirement. Norman Rockwell is one of the few other illustrators who were still working and, coincidentally, also one of the very few who took a moral stance with his work and maintained it throughout his career.In the mid-Sixties, Harry Anderson expanded his religious horizons to include the Mormon Church, for whom he created a mural for the 1964 New York World's Fair. It was done in oil paints which he'd abandoned early is his career due to allergies to turpentine. New thinners allowed him to explore the medium again. He produced a dozen more oil paintings for the Mormons, many of which have been reproduced in one of their publications entitled the Family Home Evening.In 1976, Review and Herald published Harry Anderson, The Man Behind the Paintings, from which much of this essay is taken. The picture one gets from reading it is that of a man of conviction and great talent who was aware of both and didn't feel the need to discuss either. His talents weren't limited to painting as he crafted models of ships and buggies, hooked rugs, carved flocks of birds, made furniture, and enjoyed many other dexterous skills. Harry Anderson died in 1996 at the age of 90, the last of a generation of illustrators from The Golden Age of Magazine Illustration. It is almost certain that he was one of the last active members of that group. His work is still being circulated, and appreciated, today, in publications like Your Bible and You, and The Desire of Ages. Meta: Poster, WWI, WWII, Military, Militaria, Army, Navy, Marines, AirForce, Propaganda.

          Louis J. Dianni, LLC
        • Mustered Out
          Feb. 13, 2014

          Mustered Out

          Est: $2,000 - $4,000

          Mustered Out

          Copley Fine Art Auctions
        • Harry Anderson 1906 - 1996 nach - Jesus betet...
          Jul. 06, 2013

          Harry Anderson 1906 - 1996 nach - Jesus betet...

          Est: €550 - €650

          Harry Anderson 1906 - 1996 nach - Jesus betet in Getsemani - Polychrome Emailmalerei/bombierte Kupfertafel. Ca. 18,5 x 13 cm. 33 x 28,5 cm (mit Rahmen). Bez. l. u.: d' après H. Anderson. Bez. r. u.: J-R. Garant. / Limoges. Rahmen.

          Das Kunst- und Auktionshaus Kastern GmbH & Co KG
        • Harry Anderson American-Illinois/New York
          Jan. 18, 2012

          Harry Anderson American-Illinois/New York

          Est: $600 - $900

          Harry Anderson American-Illinois/New York (1906-1996) Watercolor on Paper Laid down on Board "The Spirit of Times Square" Circa 1940. Signed Lower Left with Inscription and Dated 1940. Good to Very Good Condition. Measures 9-7/8 Inches by 15-7/8 Inches (sight) Frame Measures 19-3/8 Inches by 23-3/8 Inches. Shipping $80.00

          Kodner Galleries
        • HARRY ANDERSON, American, 1906-1996, "Man and Woman with Cake"., Egg tempera on paper, 5¾" x 14" sight. Framed.
          Aug. 03, 2011

          HARRY ANDERSON, American, 1906-1996, "Man and Woman with Cake"., Egg tempera on paper, 5¾" x 14" sight. Framed.

          Est: $400 - $600

          HARRY ANDERSON American, 1906-1996 "Man and Woman with Cake". Advertisement for Omar Wonder Flour, "Just out of the Oven Flavor", created by the American Poster Corp., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Label verso for the "Eighth Annual Exhibition of Outdoor Advertising Art, Chicago, Illinois, November 18th - November 27, 1937". Egg tempera on paper, 5 3/4" x 14" sight. Framed.

          Eldred's
        • Harry Anderson (b.1906) Story illustration: "Quick
          Jun. 25, 2011

          Harry Anderson (b.1906) Story illustration: "Quick

          Est: -

          Harry Anderson (b.1906) Story illustration: "Quick Decision", author: Cecile Gilmore, Woman's Home Companion, October 1942, p. 22-23; Young girl sternly talking to her father as mom and maid watch.

          Illustration House
        • Harry Anderson (American, 1906-1996) "Cream of Wheat,"
          Jun. 22, 2011

          Harry Anderson (American, 1906-1996) "Cream of Wheat,"

          Est: $2,000 - $3,000

          "Cream of Wheat," original advertising artwork. Signed lower left. Oil on canvas. 71.1 x 66cm (28 x 26in). Framed.

          Bonhams
        • Harry Anderson, American, Illinois/NY, 1906 - 1996, gouache on paper, Covered Bridge, 17" x 24", signed lower left, recently framed ...
          May. 03, 2011

          Harry Anderson, American, Illinois/NY, 1906 - 1996, gouache on paper, Covered Bridge, 17" x 24", signed lower left, recently framed ...

          Est: $600 - $1,200

          Harry Anderson, American, Illinois/NY, 1906 - 1996, gouache on paper, Covered Bridge, 17" x 24", signed lower left, recently framed and matted

          William Bunch Auctions & Appraisals
        • HARRY ANDERSON (American, 1906-1996) Teenage
          Jul. 15, 2009

          HARRY ANDERSON (American, 1906-1996) Teenage

          Est: $3,000 - $5,000

          HARRY ANDERSON (American, 1906-1996) Teenage Party, Coca-Cola ad illustration Oil on board 20 x 39 in. Not signed This painting was won from the Coca-Cola Bottling Company at the Bottler's Convention held in Atlanta Georgia October 11-15, 1969. Award labels are included in this lot. From the Estate of Charles Martignette.

          Heritage Auctions
        • Harry Anderson (1906-1996) Advertisement, Cream of
          Dec. 08, 2007

          Harry Anderson (1906-1996) Advertisement, Cream of

          Est: -

          Harry Anderson (1906-1996) Advertisement, Cream of Wheat, 1937; Boys riding on a homemade fire engine; dog alongside.

          Illustration House
        • Story illustration: The Marriage, author: Gladys Hasty Carroll, Woman's Home Companion
          Dec. 03, 2005

          Story illustration: The Marriage, author: Gladys Hasty Carroll, Woman's Home Companion

          Est: $3,000 - $5,000

          Story illustration: The Marriage, author: Gladys Hasty Carroll, Woman's Home Companion Deminude emerging from bath.

          Illustration House
        • Harry Anderson
          May. 19, 2001

          Harry Anderson

          Est: -

          Altermann Galleries
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