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Ambrosius Benson Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1518 - d. 1550

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    • AMBROSIUS BENSON and Workshop; ca. 1600 (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Madonna and Child. Oil on oak panel. Engatillada.
      Dec. 13, 2023

      AMBROSIUS BENSON and Workshop; ca. 1600 (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Madonna and Child. Oil on oak panel. Engatillada.

      Est: €120,000 - €140,000

      AMBROSIUS BENSON and Workshop; ca. 1600 (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Madonna and Child. Oil on oak panel. Engatillada. The painting shows some paint splashes, repainting and restorations. It has an ebony frame following 17th century models. Measurements: 94 x 73 cm; 135 x 115 cm (frame). This work follows the models of the painting attributed to Ambrosius Benson which belongs to the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts in Seville. The Virgin is seated, three-quarter length, with the Child, who embraces her, standing on her lap. Mary's silky hair falls in waves of golden tones over the red mantle, which stands out against the dark background. The work shows a strong stylistic influence of Roger van der Weyden and is repeated with minor variations on numerous occasions in the 16th-century Bruges school. It also bears similarities to a painting in the collection of the Museum of Saragossa from the Monastery of Veruela. Ambroisus Benson was one of the so-called masters of the tradition, a successor of Van der Goes, and was influenced by Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and the Flemish Primitives in general. However, his work reveals 16th-century features from Italy, such as the triangular composition that can be seen in the present work. In fact, he was originally from Lombardy, so his painting sometimes has more Italian features. Particularly important was his personal use of colour, with a predominance of maroon tones in contrast to the whites and light tones of the flesh tones, which are thus very much emphasised in the composition. Also typical of his work is the velvety quality of the cloaks. Benson was a painter of religious subjects and portraits and trained with Gerard David in Bruges from 1518, the year in which he became a citizen. However, he had problems with his master that led to legal proceedings and by 1519 he was registered with the Painters' Guild as an independent master. From the following year onwards there was a clear increase in his activity and between 1522 and 1530 he rented between one and three stalls at the annual market to sell his paintings. Benson held high positions in the painters' guild, his works fetched very high prices and he had several apprentices, including two of his sons, Willem and Jan. Although only two signed works by Benson ("Triptych of Saint Anthony of Padua" in the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Belgium and "The Holy Family" in a private collection) and seven dated works are known, more than 150 paintings have been attributed to him on the basis of stylistic criteria. Benson's workshop produced a significant output and, like that of Adriaen Isenbrandt, his works were generally intended for the Iberian market. His painting was highly appreciated in Spain, although Benson never visited the country. With regard to his language, despite his adherence to tradition he formed, together with Isenbrandt and Jan Provost, the last generation of Bruges painters characterised by a break with the Gothic tradition and the introduction into their style of the innovations of the Italian Renaissance. This influence can be seen in their artistic style and in effects such as monumentality, as their themes and compositions are generally in the Flemish tradition. On the other hand, the variety of themes and formats that characterises his production may be due to the fact that he worked in a workshop with numerous collaborators. In all his works, whether religious themes, portraits or secular works, Benson is an excellent example of the crossover between north and south, between tradition and innovation. His works are now held in the world's leading art galleries, including the Museo del Prado, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the National Gallery in London, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, the Thyssen-Bornemisza, the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum.During the 15th century, the Dutch realist style had a strong influence abroad, especially in Italy, but in the 16th century the situation was reversed. The Italian Renaissance spread throughout Europe, and Antwerp became the centre of the Flemish school, supplanting Bruges and acting as a centre for the penetration of Italian influences. Thus, Mannerist influences arrive in the Netherlands, superimposed on the 15th-century style.

      Setdart Auction House
    • Ambrose Benson, Milan 1495 - 1550 Flanders/Belgium, Adoration of the Child
      Nov. 14, 2023

      Ambrose Benson, Milan 1495 - 1550 Flanders/Belgium, Adoration of the Child

      Est: €10,000 - €15,000

      Ambrose Benson Milan 1495 - 1550 Flanders/Belgium Adoration of the Child Around 1525/35 Oil on oak panel 101 x 77.5 cm (with frame 115 x 93 cm) This magnificent Christmas painting was produced in the workshop of Ambrosius Benson in oil on oak panel. Benson was active in Bruges between 1518 and 1550 and painted in the style of the Flemish masters of Old Netherlandish painting. He did not usually sign his works, as in this case, but it can be securely assigned to his oeuvre due to typical characteristics. The religious work was either commissioned by the church or, in this case due to its size, painted as a private devotional picture. In terms of composition and individual elements, it is very similar to the Nativity exhibited in the State Hermitage in St. Petersburg. The Holy Family, consisting of Mary, Joseph and Jesus as an infant, occupies two thirds of the picture space and is constructed pyramidally: Mary and Joseph kneel in a reverent posture, flanking the child. He lies on a cloth in a manger filled with straw, which is also shown as a bundle in the foreground. An ox and donkey behind the child complete the group and locate the depiction in a stable. The walls made of stone blocks as well as the wooden ceiling appear rather fragile and ruinous; vegetation has also made its way through the stone bricks. In the background, a large window provides a view of a hilly landscape populated by sheep. Atmospheric lights in the opening in the sky between the clouds direct the view into the distance, while the earthly city walls suggest that the figures are staged in nature outside an urban environment. A younger and an older shepherd stand behind the window and look out at the action, mirroring the viewer. Behind them, an angel could even be seen silhouetted in white outlines, just announcing the good news that the Messiah has been born. Particularly exciting is also the group of six angels flying down from the upper left corner - from heavenly spheres - and expressing their homage in various gestures through folded or raised hands. The gazes of all the figures shown are directed towards the little child in the manger, whereby the relationship of gaze between mother and child is particularly emphasised, not least by the suggested halo of Mary and Jesus. The typical Flemish bonnet transports the action into a contemporary context. A particularly impressive example for comparison is the painting of the same subject in the Hermitage: not only the arrangement of the Holy Family is identical, but also the position and gestures of the descending host of angels and the child. The view of a hilly landscape in the right half of the picture is also similar; however, here four shepherds step closer to the action; the central family no longer occupies more than half of the scene, which this time is set in a more populated city and ancient ruined landscape. This is almost certainly due to different commissions: the wealth of the commercial metropolises, such as the Flemish city of Bruges, where the artist worked, meant that the rich patricians now also acted as important patrons of the arts. The stage-like scene of a ruinous temple landscape in the Hermitage goes back to the concept of the rudimentary primitive hut (man's first dwelling), which was readily replaced by ruins from the late 15th century onwards. However, in the case of the presented painting, the painter wanted to create an atmosphere in which poverty and simplicity are better displayed, which also emphasises the intimate togetherness and piety, especially in combination with the high degree of naturalism. The transition from the late Gothic to the Renaissance is particularly well-staged here: symbolic colours in a medieval manner, such as the bright red of Joseph's robe, could allude to the future Passion of Christ. The rich drapery and elongated proportions of the figures also refer to the late Gothic tradition. Here, special reference should be made to the comparison with Benson's painting "Rest on the Flight into Egypt" in the Groenigemuseum, since here both the bright red colouring of the cloak and the physiognomy of the child are identical. Furthermore, in the painting described, Mary is seen wearing an embroidered dress and a mantle richly decorated with brocade borders, which indicate her future position as Queen of Heaven. The same brocade-lined mantle in elaborate drapery can be seen in the Nativity scene in the Yale University Art Gallery. Here, the arrangement of the Holy Family, the position of the child and the white cloth draped underneath are all the same. What is particularly impressive in the presented painting, however, is the new, precise observation of nature, for example the plants sprouting from the walls or the individual stalks that have detached themselves from the bale of straw. A detailed material surface characterisation and plasticity is shown especially in the woven basket, which is present here (and also in the mentioned comparative examples) and filled with wrapping cloths. This is probably a characteristic feature of the birth scenes of Jesus executed by Benson. This universal formal language of Early Netherlandish painting was taken up and varied again and again by Benson in the course of his artistic activity in order to express a profound religiosity which, although still using late Gothic symbolic features, was already rooted in the naturalistic tradition of the Renaissance. Cf: St. Petersburg State Hermitage, "The Adoration of the Child" Groenigemuseum, Bruges "Rest on the Flight to Egypt" Yale University, New York, "Nativity"

      Tiberius Auctions
    • Attributed to AMBROSIUS BENSON (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 – Bruges, 1550) and workshop. "Calvary". Oil on oak panel. Cradled. Pigment analysis attached. It has an export permit. It presents restorations.
      May. 22, 2023

      Attributed to AMBROSIUS BENSON (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 – Bruges, 1550) and workshop. "Calvary". Oil on oak panel. Cradled. Pigment analysis attached. It has an export permit. It presents restorations.

      Est: €45,000 - €50,000

      Attributed to AMBROSIUS BENSON (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 - Bruges, 1550) and workshop. "Calvary". Oil on oak panel. Engatillada. Attached pigment analysis. It has an export permit. It presents restorations. Measurements: 81.5 x 61 cm; 94.5 x 73 cm (frame). The aesthetic quality of this devotional panel is evident in the care with which the artist recreates the representation of Calvary. The Virgin Mary and Saint John flank the spiralling body of Christ as is customary in the depiction of this biblical passage. The biblical figures remain serene, graceful in their gestures and idealised in their features, with elongated anatomies that give subtlety to the forms of the body and endow each of the figures with a great sense of presence. The expressiveness is concentrated in the chromatic palette, with the carmine red of the saint's cloak and the blue plasticity of the Marian cloak standing out. But the artist not only creates the expressiveness of the image through the foreground, but also configures a landscape in depth where, through successive planes, he manages to bring a great spatiality to the scene. With a landscape that does not follow the guidelines of perspective set by the Italian school but which intuitively and in a detailed manner brings veracity to the scene. Returning to the foreground and the master's skill, it is necessary to mention the treatment of the drapery, where the folds are excessively careful, as can be seen in the Virgin's veil, Saint John's tunic and Jesus' purity cloth. However, the work is not merely a technical exercise, and the artist went further, attempting to convey a religious message, as can be seen in one of Christ's hands, which holds the gesture of blessing. Ambroisus Benson was one of the so-called masters of the tradition, a successor of Van der Goes, and was influenced by Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and the Flemish Primitives in general. However, his work reveals 16th-century features from Italy, such as the triangular composition that can be seen in the present work. In fact, he was originally from Lombardy, so his painting sometimes has more Italian features. Particularly important was his personal use of colour, with a predominance of maroon tones in contrast to the whites and light tones of the flesh tones, which are thus strongly emphasised in the composition. Also typical of his work is the velvety quality of the cloaks. Benson was a painter of religious subjects and portraits and trained with Gerard David in Bruges from 1518, the year in which he became a citizen. However, he had problems with his master that led to legal proceedings and by 1519 he was registered with the Painters' Guild as an independent master. From the following year onwards there was a clear increase in his activity and between 1522 and 1530 he rented between one and three stalls at the annual market to sell his paintings. Benson held high positions in the painters' guild, his works fetched very high prices and he had several apprentices, including two of his sons, Willem and Jan. Although only two signed works by Benson ("Triptych of Saint Anthony of Padua" in the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Belgium and "The Holy Family" in a private collection) and seven dated works are known, more than 150 paintings have been attributed to him on the basis of stylistic criteria. Benson's workshop produced a significant output and, like that of Adriaen Isenbrandt, his works were generally intended for the Iberian market. His painting was highly appreciated in Spain, although Benson never visited the country. With regard to his language, despite his adherence to tradition he formed, together with Isenbrandt and Jan Provost, the last generation of Bruges painters characterised by a break with the Gothic tradition and the introduction into their style of the innovations of the Italian Renaissance.

      Setdart Auction House
    • "Vanitas", Ambrosius Benson (?,1519-Bruges, 1550), Flemish school of the 16th Century
      Oct. 27, 2022

      "Vanitas", Ambrosius Benson (?,1519-Bruges, 1550), Flemish school of the 16th Century

      Est: €12,000 - €18,000

      Ambrosius Benson (¿,1519-Bruges, 1550)"Vanitas". Oil on board. Legend in Latin that reminds the viewer of the ephemeral and vain nature of physical beauty: "In front of the mirror you look beautiful, but turn around to see what's behind it, that which shows that beauty is nothing." Certificates from Georges Marlier and Paul Antonini are attached. 81 x 70 cm. In 1518 he worked for a time in the workshop of Gérard David. In 1519 he was already registered in the Guild of Painters as an independent master. From 1520 there is a growth in the production of Benson's workshop, and he rents, between 1522 and 1530, from one to three stalls in the annual market to sell his paintings. Benson held high posts in the Painters Guild. Ambrosius Benson died between January 12 and 19, 1550, and was buried in the Church of Our Lady in Bruges. Benson's workshop had an important production, but of irregular quality, generally destined for the Spanish market where his painting was highly appreciated and had a large number of followers, despite never having been to this country. Together with Adriaen Isenbrandt and Jan Provost he was part of the last generation of Bruges painters characterized by breaking with the Gothic tradition and introducing the innovations of the Italian Renaissance into their style. This influence can be seen in the plastic arts and in the monumental effects, since the themes and the composition continue to be inscribed in the Flemish tradition. His production is characterized by the variety of themes (religious, secular scenes and portraits) and fo Oil on panel. Legend in Latin that reminds the viewer of the ephemeral and vain nature of physical beauty: "

      Templum Fine Art Auctions
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON School; around 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges since 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Virgin with Child". Oil on oak panel. The frame follows old models. Carved and ebonized wood, 20th century.
      Mar. 30, 2022

      AMBROSIUS BENSON School; around 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges since 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Virgin with Child". Oil on oak panel. The frame follows old models. Carved and ebonized wood, 20th century.

      Est: €5,000 - €6,000

      School of AMBROSIUS BENSON; ca. 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges from 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Madonna and Child. Oil on oak panel. The frame follows ancient models. Carved and ebonised wood, 20th century. It has an Antwerp stamp under the band and has restorations and slight repainting. Measurements: 58 x 43 cm; 82,5 x 67 cm (frame). Ambroisus Benson was one of the so-called masters of the tradition, successor of Van der Goes, and he showed the influence of Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and the Flemish primitives in general. Nonetheless, his work reveals 16th-century features from Italy, such as the triangular composition in the present work. In fact, he was originally from Lombardy, so his painting sometimes has more Italian features. Particularly important was his personal use of colour, with a predominance of maroon tones in contrast to the whites and light tones of the flesh tones, which are thus very much emphasised in the composition. Also typical of his work is the velvety quality of the cloaks. Benson was a painter of religious subjects and portraits and trained with Gerard David in Bruges from 1518, the year in which he became a citizen. However, he had problems with his master that led to legal proceedings and by 1519 he was registered with the Painters' Guild as an independent master. From the following year onwards there was a clear increase in his activity and between 1522 and 1530 he rented between one and three stalls at the annual market to sell his paintings. Benson held high positions in the painters' guild, his works fetched very high prices and he had several apprentices, including two of his sons, Willem and Jan. Although only two signed works by Benson ("Triptych of Saint Anthony of Padua" in the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Belgium and "The Holy Family" in a private collection) and seven dated works are known, more than 150 paintings have been attributed to him on the basis of stylistic criteria. Benson's workshop produced a significant output and, like that of Adriaen Isenbrandt, his works were generally intended for the Iberian market. His painting was highly appreciated in Spain, although Benson never visited the country. With regard to his language, despite his adherence to tradition he formed, together with Isenbrandt and Jan Provost, the last generation of Bruges painters characterised by a break with the Gothic tradition and the introduction into their style of the innovations of the Italian Renaissance. This influence can be seen in their artistic style and in effects such as monumentality, as their themes and compositions are generally in the Flemish tradition. On the other hand, the variety of themes and formats that characterises his production may be due to the fact that he worked in a workshop with numerous collaborators. In all his works, whether religious themes, portraits or secular works, Benson is an excellent example of the crossover between north and south, between tradition and innovation. His works are now in the world's leading art galleries, including the Museo del Prado, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the National Gallery in London, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, the Thyssen-Bornemisza, the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum.During the 15th century, the Dutch realist style had a strong influence abroad, especially in Italy, but in the 16th century the situation was reversed. The Italian Renaissance spread throughout Europe, and Antwerp became the centre of the Flemish school, supplanting Bruges and acting as a centre for the penetration of Italian influences. Mannerist influences thus arrived in the Low Countries, superimposed on the 15th-century style. Many painters continued the style of the Flemish primitives, but others were so open to Renaissance influences that they stopped painting on panel.

      Setdart Auction House
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON School; around 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges since 1518 - Bruges, 1550)."Virgin with Child".Oil on oak panel.
      Mar. 11, 2021

      AMBROSIUS BENSON School; around 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges since 1518 - Bruges, 1550)."Virgin with Child".Oil on oak panel.

      Est: €9,000 - €10,000

      AMBROSIUS BENSON School; around 1600. (Lombardy, active in Bruges since 1518 - Bruges, 1550). "Virgin with Child". Oil on oak panel. The frame follows old models. Carved and ebonized wood, 20th century. It presents the Antwerp stamp and has restorations and slight repaints. Measurements: 58 x 43 cm; 82.5 x 67 cm (frame). Ambroisus Benson was one of the so-called masters of the tradition, successor of Van der Goes, and evidenced the influence of Van Eyck, Van der Weyden and the Flemish primitives in general. However, in his work we can appreciate features already typical of the 16th century, coming from Italy, such as the triangular composition that we see in this work. In fact, he was originally from Lombardy, which is why his painting sometimes shows more Italian traits. Especially important was his personal use of color, with a predominance of maroon tones in contrast to the whites and light tones of the flesh tones, which are thus very highlighted in the composition. Also typical of his work is the velvety quality of the cloaks. Benson was a painter of religious subjects and portraits, and trained with Gerard David in Bruges from 1518, the year he became a citizen there. However, he had problems with his master that ended in a judicial process, and in 1519 he appears already registered in the Painters' Guild as an independent master. From the following year there was a clear growth in his activity, and between 1522 and 1530 he rented between one and three stalls in the annual market to sell his paintings. Benson held high positions in the painters' guild, his works were valued at very high prices and he had several apprentices, including two of his sons, Willem and Jan. Although only two of his signed works are known ("Triptych of St. Anthony of Padua" in the Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts in Belgium and "The Holy Family" in a private collection), and seven dated, based on stylistic criteria more than one hundred and fifty paintings have been attributed to him. Benson's workshop had an important production and, as was the case with Adriaen Isenbrandt's, his works were generally destined for the Iberian Peninsula market. His painting was highly appreciated in Spain, despite the fact that Benson was never in our country. As for his language, despite his affiliation to tradition, he formed, along with Isenbrandt and Jan Provost, the last generation of Bruges painters characterized by breaking with the Gothic tradition and introducing the innovations of the Italian Renaissance into their style. This influence can be appreciated at the plastic level and in effects such as monumentality, since their themes and compositions are generally still inscribed in the Flemish tradition. On the other hand, the variety of themes and formats that characterizes his production may be due to a workshop with numerous collaborators. In all of his works, whether religious themes, portraits or secular works, Benson shows himself to be an excellent example of the crossover between north and south, between tradition and innovation. Today his works are preserved in the most important art galleries around the world, including the Prado Museum, the Metropolitan Museum in New York, the National Gallery in London, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, the Thyssen-Bornemisza, the Ashmolean in Oxford and the Fine Arts Museum in Bilbao.During the fifteenth century, the realistic style of the Netherlands had a great influence abroad, especially in Italy, but in the sixteenth century the picture is reversed. The Italian Renaissance spread throughout Europe, and Antwerp became the center of the Flemish school, displacing Bruges and functioning as a center of penetration of Italian influences. Thus, Mannerist influences arrived in the Netherlands, superimposed on the style of the 15th century. There were many painters who continued the style of the Flemish primitives, but others were so open to Renaissance influences that they even stopped painting on panel.

      Setdart Auction House
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON (¿,1519-BRUJAS, 1550)"VANITAS".
      Dec. 22, 2020

      AMBROSIUS BENSON (¿,1519-BRUJAS, 1550)"VANITAS".

      Est: -

      Ambrosius Benson (¿,1519-Brujas, 1550)"Vanitas". Óleo sobre tabla. Leyenda en latín que recuerda al espectador lo efímero y vano de la belleza física: "Frente al espejo te ves bella pero girate a ver que hay detrás, aquello que muestra que la belleza no es nada". Se adjuntan certificados de Georges Marlier y Paul Antonini. 81 x 70 cm. En 1518 trabajó una temporada en el taller de Gérard David. En 1519 ya aparecía inscrito en el Gremio de Pintores ­como maestro independiente. A partir de 1520 se aprecia un crecimiento de la producción del taller de Benson, y alquila, entre 1522 y 1530, de uno a tres puestos en el mercado anual para vender sus cuadros. Benson ocupó altos puestos en el Gremio de Pintores. Ambrosius Benson murió entre el 12 y el 19 de enero de 1550 y fue enterrado en la iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Brujas. El taller de Benson tuvo una producción importante, pero de calidad irregular, en general destinada al mercado español donde su pintura gozó de gran aprecio y tuvo un gran número de seguidores, a pesar de no haber estado nunca en este país. Junto con Adriaen Isenbrandt y Jan Provost formó parte de la última generación de pintores de Brujas caracterizados por romper con la tradición gótica e introducir en su estilo las innovaciones del renacimiento italiano. Esta influencia se aprecia en la plástica y en los efectos monumentales, ya que los temas y la composición siguen inscritos en la tradición flamenca. Su producción se caracteriza por la variedad de temas (escenas religiosas, profanas y retratos) y de fo Óleo sobre tabla. Leyenda en latín que recuerda al espectador lo efímero y vano de la belleza física: "Frente al espejo te ves bella pero girate a ver que hay detrás, aquello que muestra que la belleza no es nada". Se adjuntan certificados de Georges Marlier y Paul Antonini. 81 x 70 cm.

      Aletheia Subastas
    • Ambrosius Benson (¿,1519-Brujas, 1550)"Vanitas".
      Dec. 10, 2020

      Ambrosius Benson (¿,1519-Brujas, 1550)"Vanitas".

      Est: €10,000 -

      Ambrosius Benson (¿,1519-Brujas, 1550)"Vanitas". Óleo sobre tabla. Leyenda en latín que recuerda al espectador lo efímero y vano de la belleza física: "Frente al espejo te ves bella pero girate a ver que hay detrás, aquello que muestra que la belleza no es nada". Se adjuntan certificados de Georges Marlier y Paul Antonini. 81 x 70 cm. En 1518 trabajó una temporada en el taller de Gérard David. En 1519 ya aparecía inscrito en el Gremio de Pintores ­como maestro independiente. A partir de 1520 se aprecia un crecimiento de la producción del taller de Benson, y alquila, entre 1522 y 1530, de uno a tres puestos en el mercado anual para vender sus cuadros. Benson ocupó altos puestos en el Gremio de Pintores. Ambrosius Benson murió entre el 12 y el 19 de enero de 1550 y fue enterrado en la iglesia de Nuestra Señora de Brujas. El taller de Benson tuvo una producción importante, pero de calidad irregular, en general destinada al mercado español donde su pintura gozó de gran aprecio y tuvo un gran número de seguidores, a pesar de no haber estado nunca en este país. Junto con Adriaen Isenbrandt y Jan Provost formó parte de la última generación de pintores de Brujas caracterizados por romper con la tradición gótica e introducir en su estilo las innovaciones del renacimiento italiano. Esta influencia se aprecia en la plástica y en los efectos monumentales, ya que los temas y la composición siguen inscritos en la tradición flamenca. Su producción se caracteriza por la variedad de temas (escenas religiosas, profanas y retratos) y de fo Óleo sobre tabla. Leyenda en latín que recuerda al espectador lo efímero y vano de la belleza física: "Frente al espejo te ves bella pero girate a ver que hay detrás, aquello que muestra que la belleza no es nada". Se adjuntan certificados de Georges Marlier y Paul Antonini. 81 x 70 cm.

      Aletheia Subastas
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON | Mary Magdalene reading
      Dec. 05, 2018

      AMBROSIUS BENSON | Mary Magdalene reading

      Est: £200,000 - £300,000

      oil on panel

      Sotheby's
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Crucifixion, with scenes from the Passion beyond
      Jun. 08, 2017

      AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Crucifixion, with scenes from the Passion beyond

      Est: $100,000 - $150,000

      oil on panel, arched top

      Sotheby's
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON
      May. 17, 2017

      AMBROSIUS BENSON

      Est: -

      AMBROSIUS BENSON (Lombardía, activo en Brujas desde 1518-Brujas, 1550). "Descendimiento", óleo sobre tabla, 101x78 cm. Se adjunta certificado de Don José Manuel Arnaiz.

      Sala de Ventas
    • ATTRIBUTED TO AMBROSIUS BENSON | Madonna and Child
      Jan. 26, 2017

      ATTRIBUTED TO AMBROSIUS BENSON | Madonna and Child

      Est: $30,000 - $50,000

      oil on panel

      Sotheby's
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Lamentation
      Jan. 28, 2016

      AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Lamentation

      Est: $300,000 - $500,000

      oil on oak panel, with a shaped top

      Sotheby's
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON | Virgin and Child
      Jan. 27, 2016

      AMBROSIUS BENSON | Virgin and Child

      Est: $300,000 - $500,000

      oil on panel

      Sotheby's
    • AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Crucifixion, with scenes from the Passion beyond
      Jul. 08, 2015

      AMBROSIUS BENSON | The Crucifixion, with scenes from the Passion beyond

      Est: £100,000 - £150,000

      oil on panel, arched top

      Sotheby's
    • Master of the Female Halflengths, Saint Mary Magdalene
      May. 16, 2015

      Master of the Female Halflengths, Saint Mary Magdalene

      Est: €60,000 - €70,000

      The name “Master of the Female Half-Lengths” was given to this unidentified painter due to the large number of unsigned works with this motif attributed to him. These pieces generally show half-length depictions of elegantly dressed women with fine features, often reading or making music. This compositional scheme was followed with just a few exceptions throughout his entire extensive oeuvre, a singular phenomenon in the history of Dutch painting in 1525-1550. The artist's style is close to that of Adriaen Isenbrant and Ambrosius Benson. Master of the Female Halflengths

      Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
    • Antwerp School around 1520/1525, The Virgin on the Crescent Crowned by Angels
      May. 16, 2015

      Antwerp School around 1520/1525, The Virgin on the Crescent Crowned by Angels

      Est: €28,000 - €32,000

      Julius Böhler's original ascription of this work to the circle of Ambrosius Benson was based on the motif of the Virgin floating above a landscape accompanied by two angels. The same motif was used in a triptych depicting the assumption of the Virgin to the central panel, the whereabouts of which are currently unknown (Friedländer, op. cit., no. 233), and a depiction of the Virgin and Child in the Louvre (ibid., no. 270). However, although the motif of this work speaks for an attribution to Benson's circle, the same cannot be said of the style. The beautiful, expansive landscape in the lower register is stylistically closer to the Antwerp school than that of Bruges. Antwerp School around 1520/1525

      Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
    • Ambrosius Benson, Portrait of a Young Man with an Engagement Ring (Goldsmith?)
      May. 16, 2015

      Ambrosius Benson, Portrait of a Young Man with an Engagement Ring (Goldsmith?)

      Est: €90,000 - €100,000

      Ambrosius Benson, probably born Benzone or Bensoni, was born in Lombardy but resided in Bruges from 1518 to 1550 and trained there under the painter Gerard David. He was accepted as a “freimeister” by the Bruges Guild of Saint Luke in 1519. Only his later works are signed, which probably attests to his growing self-confidence as an artist as opposed to a mere craftsman. His motifs also underwent considerable changes throughout the years: Alongside religious pieces for the church, Benson later began to carry out numerous commissions for the developing burgher class, such as the present work. He managed his own workshop in Bruges and became a respected and wealthy painter. It is assumed that he is identical with the Master of Segovia, the creator of the unsigned crucifixion triptych in Segovia cathedral. The present work depicts a young man in a black vest, white shirt and black beret, wearing a gold chain suspending a stylised claw pendant. He holds a glove in his left hand and a ring in his slightly raised right hand, a gesture indicating a promise of marriage. Ambrosius Benson

      Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
    • École FLAMANDE vers 1550, suiveur d'Ambrosius BENSON Portrait d'homme caressant son chien et tenant une lettre Portrait de dame...
      Jun. 29, 2012

      École FLAMANDE vers 1550, suiveur d'Ambrosius BENSON Portrait d'homme caressant son chien et tenant une lettre Portrait de dame...

      Est: €10,000 - €15,000

      École FLAMANDE vers 1550, suiveur d'Ambrosius BENSON Portrait d'homme caressant son chien et tenant une lettre Portrait de dame en buste caressant son chien Paire de panneaux de chêne, une planche, non parquetés 38 x 27,5 cm (Restaurations)

      Piasa
    • Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-before 1550 Bruges)
      Dec. 07, 2011

      Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-before 1550 Bruges)

      Est: £70,000 - £100,000

      Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-before 1550 Bruges) An elegant company with musicians seated at a table with fruit and wine, in a landscape oil on panel 36¾ x 50 7/8 in. (93.3 x 129.1 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges)
      Oct. 29, 2010

      Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges)

      Est: £6,000 - £8,000

      Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges) The Holy Virgin and Child oil on panel 12½ x 9 3/8 in. (31.7 x 23.7 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-1550 Bruges)
      Jul. 07, 2010

      Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-1550 Bruges)

      Est: £70,000 - £100,000

      Attributed to Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy late 15th century-1550 Bruges) Portrait of a gentleman, half-length, in a fur-trimmed black mantle and hat, his left hand on a wooden table with a carnation and papers oil on panel 17¼ x 13 1/8 in. (43.8 x 33.3 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges)
      Dec. 09, 2009

      Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges)

      Est: £12,000 - £18,000

      Circle of Ambrosius Benson (?Lombardy, late 15th Century-1550 Bruges) The Holy Virgin and Child oil on panel 12½ x 9 3/8 in. (31.7 x 23.7 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Ambrosius Benson (born in Lombardy, active Bruges 1519-1550) and Workshop
      Jul. 10, 2002

      Ambrosius Benson (born in Lombardy, active Bruges 1519-1550) and Workshop

      Est: $12,480 - $18,720

      The Virgin and Child attended by an angel with a bowl of cherries oil on panel 31 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. (81 x 60.6 cm.).

      Christie's
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