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Vladimir Ivanovic Gau Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, b. 1817 - d. 1895

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      • Princess Elizaveta Vorontsova and her daughter Sofia
        Nov. 28, 2023

        Princess Elizaveta Vorontsova and her daughter Sofia

        Est: £8,000 - £12,000

        Vladimir Ivanovich Hau Russian 1817 - 1895 Princess Elizaveta Vorontsova and her daughter Sofia signed and dated W. Hau / 1842 middle right; inscribed lower left watercolour heightened with white on paper sheet: 34 by 27 cm; 13 1/4 by 10 1/2 in. framed: 56 by 48 cm; 22 in. by 19 in.

        Sotheby's
      • VLADIMIR IVANOVICH HAU (1816 – 1895) Russian woman with a basket of apples
        Mar. 08, 2023

        VLADIMIR IVANOVICH HAU (1816 – 1895) Russian woman with a basket of apples

        Est: €8,000 - €10,000

        signed and dated ‘W. Hau 1868’ (lower right) watercolour on paper 37 x 27 cm Executed in 1868 Vladimir Hau (Gau) was a portrait painter born in Revel (the Russian Empire), son of painter Johann Hau who was his first drawing teacher. Studied with the court painter K. von Kügelgen, he also visited the studio of the Professor of the Imperial Academy of arts, Alexander Sauerweid. In 1836, he received a Grand Silver Medal and the title of class artist and left the Academy of fine arts. In 1838-1840 he lived and worked in Germany and Italy where he completed his artistic education. In 1840, he returned to Russia and was appointed court painter for Emperor Nikolai I. For thirty years he fulfilled the orders of the court and gave drawing lessons to the members of the imperial family. In 1849, for the portraits of Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna with her children and wife of the Duke Maximilian of Leuchtenberg, Hau received the title of academician watercolor painting. Hau was a leading master of watercolour portrait for three decades.

        Hermitage Fine Art
      • Woldemar Hau (1816-1895)-attributed
        Feb. 28, 2023

        Woldemar Hau (1816-1895)-attributed

        Est: €150 - €300

        Woldemar Hau (1816-1895)-attributed , Portrait miniature of a young lady looking to the side with flowers in hair, signed center right, dated 1847 in wooden frame with silver classical mounts, on the reverse describtion in russian, standlink missing. 19th century, 20 x 15 xm

        Deutsch Auktionen
      • VLADIMIR HAU RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PAINTING, 1866
        Oct. 08, 2022

        VLADIMIR HAU RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PAINTING, 1866

        Est: $100 - $150

        Vladimir Ivanovich Hau, Russian, 1816 to 1895, watercolor on paper painting depicting a portrait of a young man with sideburns wearing a black suit. Signed by the artist to the left and dated 1866. Vladimir Ivanovich Hau was a painter, miniaturist, graphic artist. Studied under the guidance of C. F. von Kügelgen in 1827–1832 in Reval. In 1832–1836 he studied as a noncredit student at the Imperial Academy of Arts (IAKh), under the guidance of A. I. Zauerveid. In 1836 Hau was awarded a big silver medal and conferred the title of free (non-class) artist. In 1838–1840 he studied in Germany and Italy. In 1840 Hau was appointed court portrait painter. In 1849 he was elected academician of portrait painting. Vladimir Gau was a famous master of watercolor portraiture, which became widespread in Russia in the 1830s - 1850s. Antique Russian Fine Art For Collectors.

        Antique Arena Inc
      • VLADIMIR HAU RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PAINTING, 1866
        Jun. 18, 2022

        VLADIMIR HAU RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PAINTING, 1866

        Est: $100 - $150

        Vladimir Ivanovich Hau, Russian, 1816 to 1895, watercolor on paper painting depicting a portrait of a young man with sideburns wearing a black suit. Signed by the artist to the left and dated 1866. Vladimir Ivanovich Hau was a painter, miniaturist, graphic artist. Studied under the guidance of C. F. von Kügelgen in 1827–1832 in Reval. In 1832–1836 he studied as a noncredit student at the Imperial Academy of Arts (IAKh), under the guidance of A. I. Zauerveid. In 1836 Hau was awarded a big silver medal and conferred the title of free (non-class) artist. In 1838–1840 he studied in Germany and Italy. In 1840 Hau was appointed court portrait painter. In 1849 he was elected academician of portrait painting. Vladimir Gau was a famous master of watercolor portraiture, which became widespread in Russia in the 1830s - 1850s. Antique Russian Fine Art For Collectors.

        Antique Arena Inc
      • RUSSIAN PRINCESS OLGA NIKOLAEVNA LITHO WOLDEMAR HAU
        May. 07, 2022

        RUSSIAN PRINCESS OLGA NIKOLAEVNA LITHO WOLDEMAR HAU

        Est: $100 - $150

        Woldemar Hau, German, 1816 to 1895, lithograph print depicting a portrait of Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia, 1822 to 1892, a member of the Russian imperial family who by marriage to Charles I of Wurttemberg became Queen consort of the Kingdom of Wurttemberg until Charles death. She was the second daughter of Nicholas I of Russia and Charlotte of Prussia. Signed Hau lower left. Circa the second quarter of the 19th century. Woldemar Hau, aka Vladimir Ivanovich Hau, was a portrait painter who worked in the Biedermeier style. Among his most famous works are his portraits of Tsar Nicholas I and Tsarina Alexandra Fyodorovna. He eventually painted all the members of the Royal Family as well as many familiar figures in Russian and Baltic German society, such as Ferdinand Johann Wiedemann and Natalia Pushkina. Antique Russian Print Collectibles.

        Antique Arena Inc
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Feb. 20, 2022

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Feb. 20, 2022

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Jan. 09, 2022

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $60,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Nov. 28, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Nov. 28, 2021

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • A RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PORTRAIT SIGNED W. HAU, 19 C
        Nov. 14, 2021

        A RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PORTRAIT SIGNED W. HAU, 19 C

        Est: $2,000 - $2,500

        Antique Russian watercolor on paper portrait of an officer. Signed and dated at the lower right: "W.Hau 1847." Also inscribed in Russian on the margins. Vladimir Ivanovich Hau (Russian, 1816 - 1895) - the famous master of watercolor portraiture, which became widespread in Russia in the 1830s - 1850s.

        Helios Auctions
      • WOLDEMAR HAU (TALLINN 1816- SAINT-PETERSBOURG 1895) Doubles portraits présu
        Nov. 10, 2021

        WOLDEMAR HAU (TALLINN 1816- SAINT-PETERSBOURG 1895) Doubles portraits présu

        Est: €2,000 - €3,000

        WOLDEMAR HAU (TALLINN 1816- SAINT-PETERSBOURG 1895) Doubles portraits présumés d’Honoré de Balzac et de son épouse Ewelina Konstancja Wiktoria Hanska née Rzewuska Lavis avec rehaut de gouache blanche signés an bas à droite au crayon « W. Hau 1841 ». 25 x 18.5 cm Cadre : 45 x 60 cm Biographie : Woldemar Hau était un portraitiste allemand de la Baltique qui travaillait dans le style Biedermeier. Il était le fils du peintre Johannes Hau , qui avait émigré d’Allemagne du Nord en 1795, et il a grandi dans la communauté allemande de Tallinn («Reval» en allemand). Son demi-frère était le peintre Eduard Hau . En plus de son père, il a étudié avec l’ancien peintre de cour Karl von Kügelgen . À seize ans, il se voit offrir la possibilité de peindre les grandes-duchesses et reçoit une lettre de recommandation à Alexander Sauerweid , professeur à l’ Académie impériale des arts . De 1833 à 1835, il est « étudiant invité » à l’Académie. Il a travaillé comme peintre indépendant pendant trois ans, puis a beaucoup voyagé à travers l’Italie et l’Allemagne pendant deux ans. À son retour, il a été nommé peintre de la cour, passant les trois décennies suivantes à peindre la famille royale et ses associés. Il est nommé membre de l’Académie en 1849. Parmi ses œuvres les plus célèbres figurent ses portraits du tsar Nicolas Ier et de la tsarine Alexandra Fiodorovna . Il a finalement peint tous les membres de la famille royale ainsi que de nombreuses figures familières de la société allemande russe et balte, telles que Ferdinand Johann Wiedemann et Natalia Pushkina . Il a également produit 200 portraits miniatures d’anciens combattants du régiment Izmaylovsky . [1] Il est mort le 23 mars 1895 à Saint-Pétersbourg .

        Osenat
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Sep. 12, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Sep. 12, 2021

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Aug. 01, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $60,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Aug. 01, 2021

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050 g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition: Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects; Low Estimate: 50000; High Estimate: 100000; Original: Yes;

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Jun. 27, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Jun. 27, 2021

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895) Portrait of a young girl in a summer dress 17 x 14.5cm (6 3/4 x 5 3/4in).
        Jun. 09, 2021

        Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895) Portrait of a young girl in a summer dress 17 x 14.5cm (6 3/4 x 5 3/4in).

        Est: £4,000 - £6,000

        Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895) Portrait of a young girl in a summer dress enclosed in a blue velvet frame with oval aperture outlined with bronze ormolu border; verso covered with blue moire fabric, with additional panel in the same fabric connected with a pair of blue ribbons and attached paper label from Nicholls & Plincke 'Magasine Anglaise' in St. Petersburg signed in Latin and dated '1849' (centre right) watercolour over pencil on paper 17 x 14.5cm (6 3/4 x 5 3/4in). For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

        Bonhams
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        May. 16, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $60,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Apr. 04, 2021

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Apr. 04, 2021

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • A VLADIMIR GAU, RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PORTRAIT, 19 C.
        Apr. 04, 2021

        A VLADIMIR GAU, RUSSIAN WATERCOLOR PORTRAIT, 19 C.

        Est: $2,000 - $2,500

        Vladimir Ivanovich Hau (1816 - 1895) was active/lived in Russian. Vladimir Hau (Gau) is known for Miniatures on ivory and portraits.

        Helios Auctions
      • ATTRIBUTED TO VLADIMIR IVANOVIC GAU (1816-1895) Portrait of a Man with a Girl
        Feb. 25, 2021

        ATTRIBUTED TO VLADIMIR IVANOVIC GAU (1816-1895) Portrait of a Man with a Girl

        Est: €3,000 - €4,000

        signed and dated ‘W Hau 1844’ (lower right) watercolour, pastel on paper 38 x 31 cm бумага, акварель, пастель подпись и дата ‘W Hau 1844’ (справа внизу) 38 x 31 см

        Hermitage Fine Art
      • VLADIMIR IVANOVIC GAU (1816-1895) attributed
        Oct. 27, 2020

        VLADIMIR IVANOVIC GAU (1816-1895) attributed

        Est: €3,000 - €4,000

        Portrait of a Man with a Girl signed and dated ‘W Hau 1844’ (lower right) watercolour, pastel on paper 38 x 31 cm executed in 1844 ВЛАДИМИР ИВАНОВИЧ ГАУ (?) (1816-1895) Портрет мужчины и девочки бумага, акварель, пастель подпись и дата ‘W Hau 1844’ (справа внизу) 38 x 31 см 1844 год

        Hermitage Fine Art
      • VLADIMIR HAU (1816-1895) Portrait of a lady in a dress with lace trim
        Jul. 21, 2020

        VLADIMIR HAU (1816-1895) Portrait of a lady in a dress with lace trim

        Est: £2,000 - £3,000

        VLADIMIR HAU (1816-1895) Portrait of a lady in a dress with lace trim signed and dated 'WHau./1840' (lower right) pencil, ink and watercolour, heightened with white, on paper; unframed141⁄2 x 11 in. (36.9 x 27.9 cm.) ; octagonaltogether with a watercolour portrait of an infant by Karl Hampeln (1794-1880)

        Christie's
      • HAU Vladimir Ivanovitch (1816-1895), dans le goût de.
        Jul. 10, 2020

        HAU Vladimir Ivanovitch (1816-1895), dans le goût de.

        Est: €300 - €500

        HAU Vladimir Ivanovitch (1816-1895), dans le goût de. Portrait présumé de la comtesse Ekaterina von Tiesenhausen (1803-1888) (Circa 1830). Aquarelle et gouache sur carton, portant une signature à gauche, annotée au dos probablement de manière erronée « de Ficquelmont ». Dans un cadre ovale en bois doré. H. 14 x L. 11 cm – H. 18,2 x L. 15 cm (cadre). Historique L’identification du portrait pourrait être celui de Daria (Dorothée) de Ficquelmont (1804-1863), née comtesse Tiesenhausen, petite-fille du maréchal Koutouzov, mais l’on préfère l’attribuer à sa sœur Ekaterina (Catherine) par sa ressemblance en comparaison au portrait d’Alexander Pavlovich Briullov (1798-1877) intitulé Portrait de la comtesse E. F. Tiesenhausen et D. F. Ficquelmont datant de 1825 conservé au Musée Pouchkine à Moscou. Владимир Иванович ГАУ (1816-1895), от. Предполагаемый портрет графини Екатерины фон Тизенхаузен (1803-1888) (около 1830). Около 1830 Картон, акварель, гуашь. Подпись с левой стороны. На обороте три раза повторяется фамилия Фикельмон, без подробностей. Овальный портрет, в овальной деревянной позолоченной рамке.

        Millon & Associes
      • Vladimir Hau (1816-1895) A leather bound album entitled 'Portraits' comprising thirteen watercolour...
        Nov. 25, 2019

        Vladimir Hau (1816-1895) A leather bound album entitled 'Portraits' comprising thirteen watercolour...

        Est: £70,000 - £90,000

        Vladimir Hau (1816-1895) A leather bound album entitled 'Portraits' comprising thirteen watercolour... pencil and watercolour, some heightened with white, on card laid on paper sheet: 10½ x 8¾ in. (26.2 x 21.8 cm.) album: 10¾ x 8 7/8 in. (27.1 x 22.6 cm.)

        Christie's
      • Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895)
        Oct. 16, 2019

        Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895)

        Est: £4,000 - £6,000

        Portrait of a ladysigned and dated 1860, watercolour, 24 x 20cm (9 7/16 x 7 13/16in).

        Bonhams
      • Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895)
        Oct. 16, 2019

        Woldemar Hau (Russian, 1816-1895)

        Est: £4,000 - £6,000

        Portrait of a lady,signed and dated 1861, watercolour, 20 x 16cm (7 13/16 x 6 1/4in).

        Bonhams
      • HAU, VLADIMIR (1816–1895) Portrait of a Lady
        Jun. 05, 2019

        HAU, VLADIMIR (1816–1895) Portrait of a Lady

        Est: £4,000 - £6,000

        HAU, VLADIMIR (1816–1895) Portrait of a Lady signed and dated 1863. Pencil, watercolour and gouache on paper, laid on cardboard, 38.5 by 28 cm (paper size).

        MacDougall's
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Dec. 01, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $60,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Dec. 01, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050 g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition: Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects; Low Estimate: 50000; High Estimate: 100000; Original: Yes;

        Eternity Gallery
      • VLADIMIR IVANOVICH HAU | Portrait of a Lady
        Nov. 27, 2018

        VLADIMIR IVANOVICH HAU | Portrait of a Lady

        Est: £5,000 - £7,000

        watercolour heightened with white on paper

        Sotheby's
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Oct. 27, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Oct. 27, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Sep. 22, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $60,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Sep. 22, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050 g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition: Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects; Low Estimate: 50000; High Estimate: 100000; Original: Yes;

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Jul. 14, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Jul. 14, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

        Eternity Gallery
      • Woldemar Hau (1816 - 1895) Dame portrait, 1841
        Jun. 14, 2018

        Woldemar Hau (1816 - 1895) Dame portrait, 1841

        Est: zł4,500 - zł6,000

        watercolour, pencil on paper; 20.5 x 16 cm

        Desa Unicum SA
      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        May. 10, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $30,000 - $80,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

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      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        May. 10, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $50,000 - $100,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050 g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition: Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects; Low Estimate: 50000; High Estimate: 100000; Original: Yes;

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      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Mar. 07, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $30,000 - $80,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

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      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Mar. 07, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $50,000 - $100,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050 g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition: Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects; Low Estimate: 50000; High Estimate: 100000; Original: Yes;

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      • W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror
        Jan. 31, 2018

        W Han dynasty, Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror

        Est: $15,000 - $30,000

        Genuine Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. Stunning, absolutely incredible Cosmic TLV Chinese Bronze Mirror, 100% authentic. This mirror has a distinctive island of reflective surface 35 x 15 mm TLV design incorporates both scientific and mythological elements. The mirrors are also called "compass mirrors" by Chinese Scholars. Made in Han Dynasty: 206 BC-AD 220; Diameter: 137 mm = 5.5 inches. Weight = 400 g = 14 oz. Development The first mirrors with TLV symbols appeared during the second century BCE, with some believing that they were related to Liu An's astrological and cosmological interests. The dragon was an important symbol of these early TLV mirrors. In early mirrors from the second century BCE, the dragons were often used as an arabesque, however by the first century BCE, the dragons lost their arabesque form and became fully-fledged figures. In the later part of the Western Han period, the dragons had been replaced by winged figures, monsters and immortals. These new mirrors also saw the division of the main area into two separate rings, with the TLV symbols being placed in the inner part of the main area, and other decorations being placed in the outer area.[3] By the end of the first century BCE, the band dividing the main area into two concentric rings largely lost its structural function of separating the mirror into two sections. Instead it existed merely as a line, or not at all. Mirrors from the Xin Dynasty (8-23 CE) usually have an outer band with cloud or animal motifs, and an inner circle with a square containing a knob. The inner circle often contains a series of eight 'nipples,' and various mythological animals and being, often including the Queen Mother of the West. The central square could have an inscription, or contain the characters of the Twelve Earthly Branches. Inscriptions placed in between the mirror's sections frequently discuss Wang Mang and his reign. Symbolism Scholars are engaged in a debate as to what the symbols on TLV mirrors mean. Some scholars believe that they represent ideas from Chinese Cosmology, while others believe that they could also be used to play the boardgame of liubo. Cosmological significance TLV mirrors are circular. At their centers is a circular boss inset on a square panel. According to Schuyler Camman, the design of TLV mirrors was cosmologically significant. The V shapes served to give the inner square the appearance of being placed in the middle of a cross. This forms an illustration of the Chinese idea of the five directions North, South, West, East and Center. The central square represents China as the Middle Kingdom. The area in between the central square and the circle represented the Four Seas. During the Han Dynasty the Four Seas represented territories outside China, and did not literally refer to water. The central square within the round mirror likely alludes to the ancient Chinese idea that heaven was round and earth was square. The Ts represented the concept of the Four Gates of the Middle Kingdom, an idea present in Chinese literature. They could have also represented the idea of the four inner gates of the Han place of sacrifice, or the gates of the imperial tombs built during the Han period. The Ls possibly symbolized the marshes and swamps beyond the Four Seas, at the ends of the earth. The bending of the Ls could possibly have served to create a rotating effect which symbolized the four seasons, which were very closely related to the cardinal directions. The nine nipples in the central square likely represented the nine regions of the earth as discussed by Cammann as having come from the Shiji. The eight nipples outside of the central square were most likely representations of the Eight Pillars, mountains that held up the canopy of heaven. The area between the inner round border and the outer rim of the mirror was often filled with swirls that represented the clouds in heaven. The game of Liubo Some believe that the design of TLV mirrors is derived from the board game liubo. Because of the lack of written documentation, the rules of the game are still as yet unconfirmed, although some scholars such as Lien-sheng Yang have made suggestions as to the method of play. Yang Sheng-yin believes that the liubo game was played between two players with each player having 6 men. In addition there were six throwing sticks shared between them. From a formula written by an expert player of liubo, Yang theorizes that a players piece would start on an L and try to move to a V depending on stick rolls. At this moment certain throws by the sticks would allow ones piece to move into the center and kill the opponents piece if already present in the center. Once present in the center, ones piece could begin to block the enemys pieces from taking the square. For each block one would gain two points. One could also attempt to recover ones pieces after they are blocked, and would gain three points for doing this. If one failed to win after having blocked two men, then the opponent would gain six points and win the game. The first player to six points would win the game. The six points needed to win is where part of the title of the game comes from, for liu in Chinese means the number six. Condition Natural patina and oxidation, no other defects Low Estimate: 30000 High Estimate: 80000 Orignal: Yes

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      • W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror
        Jan. 31, 2018

        W Han dynasty Chinese inscriptions museum bronze mirror

        Est: $12,000 - $50,000

        Genuine Bronze Mirror, Western Han Dynasty, 8-inch, 206 BC - AD 9. Awesome antique authentic bronze Chinese mirror; Amazing thick patina; Museum quality, more than 2000 years old; Age: Early Western Han Dynasty 206 BC - AD 9; Most inner section depicts 12 disks surrounding the central knob, which may represent 12 planets around the Sun or 12 animal years of Chinese Astrology: the rat, the ox, the tiger, the cat, the dragon, the snake, the horse, the goat, the monkey, the rooster, the dog, and the pig; in that order. Next inner circle: 25 archaic Chinese characters. Middle circle: 4 flowers with knob-like centers and schematic pictures of pair of Phoenixes, Black Turtle, White Tiger and Dragon, which guard the four quarters of the world. The dragon and phoenix had been associated since ancient times, but the concept that these two animals, together with the White Tiger and Black turtle guard the 4 quarters of the world, owes much to the philosophy of the five elements (Wuxing), which originated and developed in the Han period. However on Han and later mirrors, the dragon and phoenix are often stressed, indicating that the old tradition had not died yet. (Donald Graham Jr. Collection, "Bronze Mirrors from Ancient China"); Outer circle: double saw tooth pattern around the flat rim; The mirror surface has several remnant islands of reflective surface. The size of the biggest island is 11 x 25 mm; Diameter = 8.25 inches = 207 mm = 20.7 cm; Weight = 2.3 lb = 1.05 kg = 1050g; Knob height: 7 mm; Thickness: 4 mm; Condition Natural ancient patina, small area of original cast imperfection, no other defects Low Estimate: 50000 High Estimate: 100000 Orignal: Yes

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