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Jose Joya Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1931 - d. 1995

The artwork of Jose Joya paved the path for Filipino Abstract Expressionism, a new and bold movement championed by Joya's teaching. Born in Manila in 1931, he sketched at first, with early Jose Joya's drawings showing promise. Schooled traditionally, Joya graduated with a fine arts degree from the University of the Philippines in 1953, and soon felt the influence of Modernism. With a grant from the Spanish government, Joya traveled to Spain, and then to the United States on a Fulbright scholarship. Afterwards, Jose Joya's paintings showed an impressive variety of techniques and subjects, including nudes and sketchwork. Drawings by Jose Joya show he has never lost his sense of place, with colors and textures deeply rooted in Filipino culture. Joya's contribution to the Philippines has been showcased by the National Museum in Manila. To cultivate your own richer collection and add character to your living space, browse abstract portrait drawings for sale at Invaluable.

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          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Untitled / Abstract
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Untitled / Abstract

            Est: ₱2,000,000 - ₱2,600,000

            Untitled / Abstract signed and dated 1960 (upper left) oil on wood 11” x 17” (28 cm x 43 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya-Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE: León Gallery, The Spectacular Mid Year Auction 2018, Makati City, 9 June 2018, Lot 79. Joya’s Abstract Expressionist Bravura This untitled 1960 work comes from the same prolific period as (in fact, only a year after) the iconic "Space Transfiguration," Joya's beloved favorite and awardwinning piece (it won second prize at the 1959 AAP Annual). In 1960, when Joya produced the work at hand, he once again emerged victorious, winning the third prize for "Horse of Life" and the "Purchase Award" for "Church Silver." The lot at hand captures the same dynamic bravado of Space Transfiguration's brush strokes. Here, we see Joya fully embracing his abstract expressionist identity rooted in his oriental sensibilities. The onset of the 1950s is considered formative for Jose Joya's burgeoning artistry. In the early years of the decade, Joya graduated magna cum laude at the University of the Philippine School of Fine Arts, becoming the first student to achieve such distinction. In 1954, he traveled to Europe armed with a scholarship at Madrid's Instituto Cultura Hispanica, where he only stayed for nine months. Afterward, Joya embarked on an artistic field trip, visiting museums in France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and England. His creative senses would be reawakened upon seeing the works of the great European masters. "You can just imagine the tremendous impact of all these works of art on someone like me who came from the other side of the globe," Joya said in a 1973 interview with Cid Reyes and published in the latter's Conversations on Philippine Art. Joya was granted a Smith-Mundt-Fulbright scholarship grant to study his master's in fine arts at Michigan's Cranbrook Academy of Art. There, Joya encountered, for the first time, the dynamic impulse and vigorous strength of the Abstract Expressionist visual language that had been raging in the American art world, espoused by the likes of Pollock, de Kooning, Kline, Rothko, and Motherwell. "In America, I got exposed to the New York School of Painting," Joya said to Cid Reyes in a September 1973 interview published in the latter's Conversations on Philippine Art. "From the American abstractionists, I learned spontaneity and energy, the dynamic approach to abstraction." During his Cranbrook period, Joya produced his first abstract expressionist work, titled Poetry in Color, which Leonidas Benesa describes in the book Joya: Drawings as a work filled with "an explosion in color" and a "natural result of his experiences and experiments with gesture drawing, which fill[ed] up several sketch pads and sketchbooks." It is the same creative and kinetic quality that can be seen in the work at hand. Characterized by a kinetic impulse so dynamic in technique, this particular piece stands as a singular testament to Joya's virtuoso that gives prominence to the unbridled gush of emotions rather than the rigidity of academicism to which he had previously been attuned to while in college. It can be remembered that during his Cranbrook years, Joya discovered how a single twig soaked in ink and then calligraphed on paper can result in a gush of expressiveness rooted in harmony with nature. Like the old Chinese masters, this "liberated his imagination," as Benesa puts it. Joya's Oriental sensibilities—a sublime oneness with nature that pays reverence not only to its physical, realistic form but, moreover, its elements that come into play and the metaphysical energies that are dynamically captured in a single bravura of a calligraphic stroke—is perhaps his most important legacy to Philippine art, captured in this microcosm of his great art that is this 1960 piece. One year after this 1960 work, Joya would be granted the most prestigious Republic Cultural Heritage Award, the precursor to the Order of National Artists. Joya's abstract expressionist virtuoso would climax at the 1964 Venice Biennale, the Philippines historic, first-ever participation at what is dubbed "The Olympics of the Art World." (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Jade Day
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Jade Day

            Est: ₱1,400,000 - ₱1,820,000

            Jade Day signed and dated 1984 (lower right and verso) acrylic collage 14 1/2" x 22" (37 cm x 56 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot Jose Joya started working on his career-defining and artistry-changing acrylic collages in the early 1970s as a significant part of an increasing drive towards Filipinization in his art, which coincided with the resurgence of nationalistic ideals beginning in the late 1960s. They are characterized by Joya’s usage of finely grained, diaphanous rice papers reminiscent of the kiping and represent the artist’s reconnection with nature as an integral part of the praxis of abstraction—a sublime oneness with nature’s dynamic forces resulting in a gush of unbridled expressiveness. In the monograph Joya by Joya: Book of Drawings, the artist subtly touches on the origins of his creative love affair with the kiping and the integration of Filipino elements in his art. “With the imposition of martial law in the country in 1972 came the travel ban, virtually confining my travels exclusively to the Philippines,” Joya writes. “Paradoxically, it served to open my eyes to the beauty and potentials of my own country. A penetrating insight and concern for traditional values and culture gripped me. More than at any other stage in my artistic development, I came face to face—and celebrated—my identity as a Filipino.” In this work titled Jade Day, Joya uses the titular gemstone as a metaphor for harmony, stability, abundance, and peace and quiet. In Chinese culture, jade is also believed to possess powers to ward off evil and bad luck. Joya’s use of translucent rice papers cut in varying patterns seemingly shows the smooth feel and versatility of jade, which in turn likely symbolizes the versatility of rice paper—a medium that further pushed Joya’s virtuoso as an artist beyond the traditional mediums of oil and acrylic. The different shades of green and its complementary colors that Joya employs allude to jade’s representation of harmony, a plausible representation of the solidarity of the Filipino nation amid a diversity of cultures. As with the popular gemstone, Joya imbibes a distinctiveness that not only gave a novel touch to his abstraction but, moreover, gifted an indelible legacy that emphasizes the indivisibility of one’s Filipino sensibility and an inherent connection to nature, the endless fountain of creative inspiration. Joya’s language of abstraction expounds on an expressive language that combines his lived experiences with the cultural heritage he shares with his fellow people. And as Joya’s surname means “jewel,” so is his brilliant legacy to Filipino art encapsulated in the sheer luster of this work that is Jade Day. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Moon And Sand, Pinatubo
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Moon And Sand, Pinatubo

            Est: ₱1,400,000 - ₱1,820,000

            Moon And Sand, Pinatubo signed and dated 1991 (lower left) acrylic - collage 15" x 23" (38 cm x 58 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot Jose Joya takes inspiration from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in this work titled Moon and Sand, Pinatubo. Considered one of the most destructive natural disasters in the history of humankind, the eruption of the then-longthought-to-be dormant volcano was also the second-largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century, only behind the 1912 eruption of Alaska’s Mount Novarupta. The aftermath of the disaster revealed once-fertile environs, particularly in Central Luzon, now covered with thick layers of lahar. More than 800 lives were taken, along with over 20,000 people that were evacuated. Of the latter, 10,00 were rendered homeless. The massive release of aerosols and dust into the stratosphere also caused a significant decrease in the global temperature of approximately 0.4 degrees Celsius. Back to the work at hand, Joya’s use of fine rice papers evoking the kiping is a practice the artist integrated into his art starting in the early 1970s. For the artist, it is an integral part of not only an intimate reconnection with his native culture but more so with nature, from which Joya had first learned how to experiment with abstraction. In doing so, Joya not only reminds the viewer of nature’s power in influencing and illuminating man’s path towards creative liberation; it is nature who possesses the most potent forces of both creation and destruction in this ever-evolving physical world. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Mother and Child
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Mother and Child

            Est: ₱400,000 - ₱520,000

            Mother and Child signed and dated 1991 (lower right) pastel on paper 19 1/2" x 12 1/2" (50 cm x 32 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE Private collection, Manila The first among equals, Jose Joya’s occasional foray into the figurative portrays a different side of the artist past his abstractions. His drawings and sketches not only show his mastery of line and form but also his predisposition for the proletarian. “[Nothing] has ever fascinated me as much as run-down structures like barong-barongs, rugged landscapes, nudes of both sexes and all ages, as well as costumed country folk,” says Joya in his monograph Joya by Joya: Book of Drawings. Painted in 1991, Joya’s Mother and Child shows the artist’s fascination for the common folk. He indigenized the often Western vision for the mother and child, turning the commonly light-skinned pair into a scene washed in warm brown reminiscent of the subject’s supple skin. The mother's humble baro't saya denotes a simple barrio living, recontextualizing the ethereal version of the mother and child into the “humble and downtrodden” as Joya himself puts it. (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Morning Mist, Hangchow
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Morning Mist, Hangchow

            Est: ₱12,000,000 - ₱15,600,000

            PROPERTY OF A VERY DISTINGUISHED FAMILY Morning Mist, Hangchow signed and dated 1973 (lower right and verso) oil on wood panel 48" x 64" (122 cm x 163 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE The Luz Gallery EXHIBITED The Luz Gallery, Joya: New Paintings, Makati, 8 - 27 November 1973 LITERATURE Kalaw-Ledesma, Purita and Amadis Ma. Guerrero. The Struggle for Philippine Art. Manila: Purita Kalaw-Ledesma, 1974. Captured in a black-and-white photograph (page 132) at the opening night of Joya's 1973 exhibition at The Luz Gallery titled "Joya: New Paintings." Joya’s Triumphant 1970s By the 1970s, Jose Joya was not only the brightest name in Philippine art but the most “booked and busy” of them all. Joya had become the first-ever Filipino visual artist to be granted the Rockefeller scholarship fund—in fact, twice successively: the John D. Rockefeller III Foundation grant in 1967 and the Ford Foundation Assistance in 1968. Joya also participated in a 1970 traveling exhibit that visited New York, the Smithsonian Institute, the Denver Art Museum, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Minneapolis, and Atlanta. Upon returning to the Philippines, Joya mounted a homecoming exhibition. In 1970, he was anointed as an Associate Professor and new Dean of his alma mater, the UP College of Fine Arts. In 1971, he added another award to his string of accolades—the “Patnubay ng Kalinangan Award,’ bestowed by the City of Manila during its 4th centennial celebrations. Two years later, in 1973, Joya would be listed (along with Rod. Paras-Perez) in the prestigious London-published “International Who’s Who in Art and Antiques.” Winding back just a few years, in 1964, Joya, along with Abueva, represented the Philippines in its historic first participation at “The Olympics of the Art World”—the Venice Biennale. Joya’s Visit to the People’s Republic of China In mid-1972, as chairperson of the Philippine First Educators’ Group Delegation, Joya flew to China for a 16-day trip to formally present a letter of invitation to the Art Society of Peking to attend the Southeast Asian Regional Artists Conference, of which he was also secretary-general. Joya was also tasked to travel to Hong Kong to invite its artists to the conference and personally request that the influential Asia Magazine publish a special issue of Southeast Asian art. In China, Joya found more than spare time to immerse himself in Chinese culture and society, sketching people and places and visiting iconic landmarks: the Great Wall, Forbidden City, Tiananmen Square, and the Peking Palace of Fine Arts. He also visited major cities: Beijing, Canton, Nanjing, Shanghai, and Hangzhou, from which Joya drew inspiration for the work at hand, Morning Mist, Hangchow. Painted on February 4, 1973, almost a year after his Chinese sojourn, this work shows Joya’s fondness for his visit to China. “In fact, I had just left the border when I thought of going back. That’s how much I liked the place,” Joya said in a 12 July 1972 Manila Bulletin interview. Joya likely depicts in this work Hangzhou’s famed West Lake, which, especially on mornings, becomes laden with mist, seemingly transforming the lake and its surrounding landscapes into a Chinese ink-wash painting. West Lake has inspired many painters and poets since the 9th century and was declared by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 2011 for influencing garden design in China, Japan, and Korea. Joya’s employment of a cool and sweet pastel-like palette illuminated by a bluish-gray tone captures this scenario. Festive Homecoming Celebrations at The Luz Gallery Morning Mist, Hangchow would become part of Joya’s blockbuster exhibition at the Luz Gallery in November 1973, from which the owner acquired the work. Titled “Joya: New Paintings,” it showcased oil paintings and was the show that first introduced to the public his career-defining acrylic collages. The work encapsulates Joya’s consummate evolution from his artistry-defining abstract expressionism of the ‘50s and ‘60s to geometric expressionism characterized by a succession of weaved block-like forms, which borrowed elements from the seriality of Pop Art, the dominant art style in America in the 1960s when Joya pursued his Rockefeller grant. Joya and His Rediscovery of the Filipino Sensibility But Joya’s venture into geometric expressionism aligns more with a Filipino sensibility. While Pop Art’s seriality critiques mass production, consumerism, and media saturation, Joya’s geometric abstraction was influenced by an intimate reconnection with the cultures of his motherland. In 1967, when Joya had just settled in New York for his scholarship, he became engrossed with the study of Philippine history— probably a sign of part homesickness, part curiosity, and part reawakening in him. "At this time, the study of Philippine history engaged me,” Joya says in Leonidas Benesa’s Joya: Drawings. “Digging into rare sources, I came across materials that gave light facets to Philippine history." Furthermore, this reinvigorated spirit in Joya coincided with the resurgence of nationalistic and progressive ideals during the tumultuous 60s (also the era of the wars of national liberation against imperialism in many nations like Cuba, Vietnam, and the Philippines), in which the search for a pre-colonial past became intertwined with the concept of nation-building and the decolonization of Philippine history. Joya’s interest also coincided with the rise of nationalist historiography fostered by the eminent Teodoro Agoncillo and Renato Constantino. Said Joya in Benesa’s book, "Artists respond to interests prevailing during their times." Joya had even envisioned a design center at the UP campus laden with indigenous designs. As Dean, he also espoused the idea that “art has a big role to play in these troubled times, and the artist must realize that he, too, has a social commitment.” “Before they get a diploma from the state university,” Joya says in the Panorama interview, “I will require them to serve the communities in terms of sharing the things that they have learned in school. This country can be a leading producer in local handicrafts, and our artists can certainly improve the design.” (Philippine Panorama, 3 January 1971) Iconography inspired by old coins, anting-anting, and pre-colonial articles, such as pottery shards and metal fragments excavated in archaeological sites, e.g., Santa Ana, Manila in the late 1960s (in which nationalist anthropologist F. Landa Jocano formed part of the archaeological team), was Joya’s first answer to an increasing nationalistic impulse in his art. The shapes—which Joya says are “rich in visual vocabulary” and would later transform into the recognizable block-like forms in the early 1970s, evident in Morning Mist, Hangchow—and their seriality evokes the dynamic rhythm of repetition and progression found in Philippine indigenous art, particularly in weaving, embroidery, and ornamentation. Notice in Morning Mist, Hangchow the incised markings evoking various old Philippine alphabets, “almost as if they were cryptic Malayan symbols,” as Joya puts it in Cid Reyes’ ‘Conversations on Philippine Art.’ “I have always thought that we Filipinos suffer from too much Western influences. It is good for us to start rediscovering our past.” In doing so, Joya transforms the entire composition into that of a meditative space, an avenue to reclaim our past and redefine the present. Joya had liberated his art from the Western influences of the Abstract Expressionist school and had now identified himself and his art with the collective cultural psyche of his native motherland. Joya’s incorporation of indigenous elements, thus emphasizing his Filipino sensibility, proved to be the pinnacle of artistic maturation for the artist. Joya’s renewed interest in Philippine culture and history birthed his newfound creative expression. His integration and consolidation of various indigenous elements not only underscores the virtuoso of Joya but more so, a heightened understanding of the collective cultural—harmony in solidarity, as evoked by his contiguous forms. As Francia Jr. writes, “[Joya] takes us out of the temporal sphere or plane into the purer and eternal one.” Despite the foreign subject matter, Morning Mist, Hangchow is a sublime articulation of a Filipino visual language that would reach a high point in his monumental 1976 painting “Pagdiriwang” (PICC Collection), which Joya said is “the celebration of the Filipino’s struggle to discover himself and assert his own position in the universal society of men...a tribute to the Filipino’s pride in his own identity.” (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Seated Man
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Seated Man

            Est: ₱120,000 - ₱156,000

            Seated Man signed and dated 1982 (lower right) pastel on paper 22 1/2" x 15 1/4" (57 cm x 38 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot “The humble and the downtrodden” find themselves on the center stage of Jose Joya’s canvases. “They seem to me, to offer a broad range of stimulating forms [...] mirroring their true character,” he writes in his monograph Joya by Joya: Book of Drawings. This honest portrayal is evident in his 1982 Portrait of a Man. Clearly an image of a native Filipino man (as evidenced by the dark curly hair and the deep brown skin), Joya puts into the forefront the oft-forgotten Filipino natives. His mastery of line and form shows the sturdiness of the Filipino man who often worked on taxing physical labor as a means of livelihood. In Portrait of a Man, Joya not only localizes a common portraiture, he also calls to attention his dexterity in his craft with Rodolfo A. Salaveria saying, “If Joya had merely produced drawings, he could still count among the major artists of the country." (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Mother and Child
            Jun. 08, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995) - Mother and Child

            Est: ₱400,000 - ₱520,000

            Mother and Child signed and dated 1990 (lower right) pastel on paper 19 1/2" x 12 1/2" (50 cm x 32 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE Private collection, Manila Joya's occasional dabbling into the figurative, primarily through his sketches and drawings, evidently brought out the foremost Filipino abstractionist's inherent connection to nature and the intersectionality of his cultural and proletariat roots. It is not only a way of seeing but a manner of inward contemplation, reflecting his relentless search for identity, both on a personal and cultural level. "Brown is quintessentially Filipino and beautiful. It is my favorite color for drawing...," Joya writes in the monograph Joya by Joya: Book of Drawings. Painted on Christmas Day, the date of creation of this Mother and Child piece points out to religious undertones, yet its composition evokes the native, evidenced by the traditional baro't saya worn by the mother. The figures are clearly an image of the Filipino masses (note the mother's humble clothing). In depicting such subjects, Joya not only indigenizes an enduring subject (In Philippine art, the theme of the "mother and child has long been associated with the iconography of Mary and Jesus, usually Western in orientation) but returns the hallowed holiday season back to its humble origins, void of any rampant commercial associations and leaning more on its essence: the celebration of dignified humility and compassionate humanity. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • JOSÉ JOYA (1931-1995) Untitled acrylic and oil on paper 40.5 x 56 cm. (16 x
            May. 29, 2024

            JOSÉ JOYA (1931-1995) Untitled acrylic and oil on paper 40.5 x 56 cm. (16 x

            Est: $150,000 - $250,000

            JOSÉ JOYA (1931-1995) Untitled acrylic and oil on paper 40.5 x 56 cm. (16 x 22 in.)

            Christie's
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Apr. 20, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

            Female Nude signed and dated 1976 (lower right) pastel on paper 23" x 15 1/2" (58 cm x 39 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Apr. 20, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱80,000 - ₱104,000

            Female Nude signed and dated December 2, 1985 (lower right) pastel on paper 11 3/4" x 19" (30 cm x 48 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • José Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Apr. 20, 2024

            José Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱160,000 - ₱208,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO “GENY” LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION New York City signed and dated 1968 (lower right) colored marking ink 33" x 26" (84 cm x 66 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Untitled / Abstract
            Mar. 09, 2024

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Untitled / Abstract

            Est: ₱1,600,000 - ₱2,080,000

            Untitled / Abstract signed and dated 1960 (lower right) oil on wood 11” x 18” (28 cm x 46 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya-Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE: León Gallery, The Spectacular Mid-Year Auction 2018, June 9, 2018, Lot 67 WRITE UP: This is another work that comes between his 1959 “Space Transfiguration” stage and the Yeseria stage. In 1957, Joya went to the United States for further studies. He was exposed to the abstract expressionist movement as it was becoming an establishment there. At the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan, Joya fell under the influence of his mentor, Zoltan Sepeshy. Sepeshy was a firm believer in this aesthetic. Joya’s abstract expressionism - sometimes known as action painting — was of a more dramatic, bravura laden type. Instead of the palette knife or syringe, he started to use huge brushes and trowels, much like a mason. This work was done in 1960, just two years before the 1964 Venice Biennale, but it paved the way for the period of “breaking loose in Venice”. In 1972, Alfredo Roces told Cid Reyes: “After his travels and scholarship abroad, Joya introduced these large scale canvases, something not very common at the time. He has carried on with his abstract expressionist paintings, very poetic and lyrical. Then after that, he started to use more vigorous forms, which are closer to the works of de Kooning and characterized by slashes.” Also, in 1972, Manuel Duldulao told Cid Reyes: MD: “He was beginning to make a name for himself in the art scene. At that time, to hang a Joya abstraction in your wall was to risk the ridicule of your friends. Cid Reyes: “Why?” MD: “Joya’s paintings were then considered visual atrocities. People thought they were done by a child in fifth grade. They were shocked to heart that you had to pay for these paintings. Now the same friends who used to laugh at me 10 years ago are in for another shock.” He was of course referring to the sky-high prices that buyers had to pay for a Joya, and that was 1972. Joya’s abstract expressionist reputation — of New York school - was still to be given a wider audience with his participation in the 32nd Venice Biennial in 1964, for which had painted very large works in thick paint applied in semi automatist, gestural manner. Art critic Eric Torres described such works as expressive not much of statements as of states of feeling. “Most of the participating countries had constructed their own pavilions and each cost about P200,000. Because this was the first time that the Philippines had participated in this Biennale, we had been allotted an adequate but small room by the host country. However, this space was good only for one exhibit.” But what a huge, lasting legacy from such a small exhibition room. And in the same vein, what an equally huge, lasting legacy from the 1950s New York School.

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Autumn in Edo
            Mar. 09, 2024

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Autumn in Edo

            Est: ₱2,000,000 - ₱2,600,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A VERY DISTINGUISHED GENTLEMAN Autumn in Edo signed and dated 1985 (lower right and verso) acrylic-collage 16" x 28" (41 cm x 71 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot WRITE UP: Although Jose Joya initially gained renown as a landscape painter and realist, he would go on to become a pioneer of abstract expressionism in Philippine art. This reorientation of his artistic journey came aptly at a time when the abstract expressionists of New York— the likes of Rothko, Pollock, and de Kooning— were making waves in the Western art world for their masterful skill in bringing out the expressiveness of paint without rendering figurative subjects. While Joya had only studied in New York briefly from 1956 to 1957, the abstract expressionist ethos of the time would manifest in a full transformation of his artistic vision. Although the abstract expressionists were generally known for their experimentations in paint, what we have here is a gestural collage that combines acrylic and rice paper. Joya takes the abstract expressionist ethos and brings out the possibilities of feeling from an experimental combination of mediums. Taken as among the artist’s visual travelogues, the result is a gestural collage that evokes a unique sense of place— a memory of the landscape recalled as a patchwork of impression and feeling. (Pie Tiausas)

            Leon Gallery
          • LOT WITHDRAWN
            Mar. 09, 2024

            LOT WITHDRAWN

            Est: ₱1,000 - ₱1,100

            LOT WITHDRAWN

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Yellow Abode
            Mar. 09, 2024

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Yellow Abode

            Est: ₱16,000,000 - ₱20,800,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO “GENY” LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION Yellow Abode signed and dated 1961 (lower right) oil on canvas 32" x 32" (81 cm x 81 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE: The Luz Gallery Finale Art File EXHIBITED: The Luz Gallery, Christmas Group Show, Manila, December 22, 1961 - January 6, 1962 WRITE UP: The very surname of Jose Joya denotes “jewel”—a crowning gem in the annals of Philippine art. Joya’s success is attested by his many accomplishments throughout every decade of his career. He triumphantly closed his formative years of the 1950s when he won the First Prize for Non-Objective Painting at the 1958 Art Association of the Philippines (AAP) Annual Competition and Exhibition and the Second Prize at the 1959 Annual for his now-iconic work Space Transfiguration. With the dawn of the 1960s, Joya’s success only went from strength to strength, constantly flexing his creative virtuoso. And it is in that festive atmosphere that Joya created this spirited work titled Yellow Abode. Yellow Abode is a valuable memento from the same prolific year when Joya was granted two of his most important awards in his lifetime: the Republic Cultural Heritage Award, precursor to the National Artist Award (he was awarded the latter posthumously in 2003) and the Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM) Award. Writes Ileana Maramag in her article “Top Young Men of 1961 Named”: “Joya was selected for his accomplishments as the leading young (30) non-objective artist in the country today. An exponent of non-figurative art in the Philippines, his works have consistently won prizes too lengthy to list. Earlier this year, he won the Republic Cultural Heritage Award.” Yellow Abode is characterized by turbulent, dynamic strokes and rich slabs of impastos, much like the painter who had then become wealthy in accomplishments. The piece was among the works included in a Christmas group exhibition at the Luz Gallery that formed part of the first anniversary celebrations of Arturo Luz’s brainchild (The Luz Gallery celebrated its first anniversary on December 4, 1961). The onset of the 1960s can be seen as a budding climax, starting from Joya’s formative years of the 1950s to being a champion of a lyrical type of abstract expressionism characterized by a dynamic oriental sensibility. Joya’s Cranbrook period from 1956-57 unleashed his abstract expressionist powers; he would abandon any traces of representation in his paintings. A quick investigation of Joya’s works during this period would reveal the artist’s earliest explorations of abstract expressionism. “It was only during the late 1950s or early ‘60s that I started doing these Abstract Expressionist paintings,” Joya said to Cid Reyes in a September 1973 interview and published in the latter’s Conversations on Philippine Art. “From the American abstractionists [Pollock, de Kooning, Kline, Rothko, and Motherwall], I learned spontaneity and energy, the dynamic approach to abstraction.” At Cranbrook, away from the confines of academicism espoused by his alma mater, the UP School of Fine Arts, Joya sketched everything he saw. Eventually, he would yield to nature’s “magic” and use twigs soaked in ink in his sketches. This discovery gave Joya a creative power so surreal that his imagination and emotions seemingly ran unbridled from within. This was the birth of Joya’s abstract expressionist finesse. Although then living in the Occident, this discovery in Joya was undoubtedly Oriental in sensibility, for Abstract Expressionism traces its roots in the spontaneous calligraphic drawing found in ancient Chinese scroll painting and its sublime oneness with nature’s dynamic forces and elements that drew Joya in. Even Joya himself admitted in the Reyes interview that calligraphy has always played “a very extensive” role in his paintings; a single calligraphic stroke results in an inner landscape of the mind, born from nature and one with nature. With paint applied in spontaneous, calligraphic-like slashes, Yellow Abode epitomizes Joya’s embrace of that oriental sensibility. There is a central core, characterized by invigorated impastos, from which the painting derives energy. Joya states this is “a strong sense of oriental occult balance” or asymmetrical balance. From the central core of heavy impastos, slabs, streaks, and strokes of paint project themselves, evoking a strong sense of movement and thus creating dynamic balance. As with the subject of Yellow Abode, Joya depicts not the physicality of the titular “abode” but its essence. It is an “abode” in the spiritual sense in which solid swathes of yellows, the imperial color of prosperity in oriental culture, signify an endless source of power. As “abode” is defined as a place of dwelling from a denotational viewpoint, Joya’s Yellow Abode sublimely expresses a place of dynamic contemplation; a reinvigorating haven for rest and calm; a return to his oriental roots. Art critic Leonidas Benesa, writing in the book Joya: Drawings, notes that Joya practiced this “oriental occult balance” in the years immediately preceding and succeeding the 1964 Venice Biennale, considered the apex of Joya’s career. “A landscape in the Chinese artist’s way,” characterized by wedding observation with developing “an unconscious feeling” for the “rise and fall of the visual motion…the socalled breathing spaces of Chinese calligraphic art,” as Benesa puts it. This “oriental occult balance” in Joya’s artistic praxis would signify his transition into pure, lyrical painting centered on the dynamics of the inner mind, a retreat into an abode of enlivening meditation and self-expression. Thus, Yellow Abode is both a reminder of Joya further honing his creative muscle and what’s yet to come in his career. Much like Yellow Abode, Joya would become an abode himself—a wellspring of creative power, a powerhouse of Philippine art. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Picnic at the Great Wall II
            Mar. 09, 2024

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Picnic at the Great Wall II

            Est: ₱12,000,000 - ₱15,600,000

            Picnic at the Great Wall II signed and dated 1973 (lower right) oil on wood 48" x 64" (122 cm x 163 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE The Luz Gallery EXHIBITED The Luz Gallery, Joya: New Paintings, Makati, November 8 - 27, 1973 WRITE UP: In mid-1972, Jose Joya, during his deanship at the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts (he was appointed in 1970 and would serve until 1978), embarked on a 16-day visit to China as chairperson of the Philippine First Educators' Group Delegation to the country. Joya was part of the Southeast Asia Regional Artists Conference, and he was tasked to formally present a letter of invitation to the Art Society of Peking to attend the said conference. While in China, Joya visited the cities of Canton, Beijing, Nanjing, Hangzhou, and Shanghai, where he came face- to-face with contemporary Chinese aesthetics, particularly socialist art. In the book Joya: Drawings, eminent art critic Leonidas V. Benesa writes that while in China, Joya also "...did several sketches of ordinary people...as well as familiar sights and landmarks by the Pearl and Yangtze waterways." In a September 1973 interview with Cid Reyes and published in his Conversation on Philippine Art, Joya, himself one of the most traveled Filipino artists, also revealed that his trip to China was among the most memorable. Joya's lingering memories of his Chinese sojourn are evident in this 1973 work, Picnic at the Great Wall. Here, we see Joya's trademark geometric block-like forms that resemble the ancient stones and bricks of the Great Wall of China. The composition is predominantly bathed in varying shades of yellow, with golden yellow serving as the standout hue. In Imperial China, golden yellow was a color reserved for the emperor. The color also refers to the yellow sediments of the Huang He River, popularly known as the “Yellow River,” the birthplace of Chinese civilization. In the work at hand, Joya employs yellow as a historic reference to the Great Wall as the paramount symbol of Imperial China’s commitment to safeguard its territory and civilization. Picnic at the Great Wall would be exhibited at a landmark 1973 show at The Luz Gallery aptly titled “Joya: New Paintings.” Esteemed poet, painter, printmaker, and titan of Philippine literature Hilario Francia, Jr. would comment on the show in his The Philippines Daily Express column dated November 30, 1973. He writes: “...It is evident now that his [Joya’s] art and craft has finally reached a high point of development—requiring skills of a high order—that the observation of critic Leonidas Benesa that Joya is the foremost ‘exponent of pure painting’ is now adequately supported by his latest and most outstanding performance to date.” Furthermore, this work shows Joya's abandonment of the abstract expressionist language that characterized much of his paintings from the 1950s to the late 1960s. Picnic at the Great Wall epitomizes Joya's transition from dynamic and vigorous abstract expressionism to spontaneous, lyrical geometric expressionism characterized by a further exploration of calligraphic-like patterns. Benesa notes that "... by 1967, the enthusiasm of the artist as a painter of abstract expressionist landscapes...appeared to have run its course...” Joya's employment of geometric expressionism was a conscious attempt to integrate indigenous elements into his art. Although influenced by the serial style of Pop Art, which was the dominant style in America in the late 1960s when Joya pursued his Rockefeller and Ford scholarships, Joya's block-like figures, with their contiguous repetition and pattern, resemble more the recurring geometric patterns and shapes found in the art—particularly in textiles weaving and ornaments—of the indigenous peoples of the Philippines. Joya's employment of such can be traced back to 1967, upon his second New York sojourn. Of this, he says in the Benesa book: "At this time, the study of Philippine history engaged me. Digging into rare sources, I came across materials that gave light facets to Philippine history." This he had done as a contemplative search for personal artistic identity within the context of the collective cultural. It was in line with his creative pursuit of wedding his Filipino sensibility that flows through his blood with his landscapes of the psyche, "of the noumena rather than the phenomena," as Benesa puts it. Interestingly, prior to this work at hand, Joya had also envisioned a design center at the UP campus integrating indigenous design/folk art. Various factors also influenced Joya's venture into his native sensibilities: the nationalistic fervor of the 1960s characterized by the fueling dissent against US imperialism and solidarity with the wars of national liberation (particularly in Cuba, Vietnam, and the Philippines). Also, Joya's interest in Philippine history by the late 1960s coincided with its reevaluation from a nationalist historiographical standpoint, with Teodoro Agoncillo and Renato Constantino at the helm. As Joya says in the Benesa book, "Artists respond to interests prevailing during their times." When Joya painted this work, the artist added a string of local and international recognitions to his ever-strengthening accomplishments. In 1973, he was awarded a "Citation for Meritorious Contribution to Art" by the influential Art Association of the Philippines during its 25th anniversary. That same year, the UP Alumni Association honored him with the "Most Distinguished Professional Award in Fine Arts." Just a year prior, in 1972, Joya was listed in the "International Who's Who in Art and Antiques" by London's Melrose Press. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jan. 20, 2024

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱600,000 - ₱780,000

            Boreas (North Wind) signed and dated 1987 (lower right and verso) acrylic collage 13" x 10" (33 cm x 25 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Red Reefs
            Dec. 02, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Red Reefs

            Est: ₱1,200,000 - ₱1,560,000

            Red Reefs signed and dated 1988 (lower right & verso) acrylic, collage 22 3/4” x 15 3/4” (58 cm x 40 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot WRITE UPA pioneer in the Filipino Modernism, Jose T. Joya is one of the leading artists in the field of Filipino abstract expressionism. He was a professor and dean of the University of the Philippines School of Fine Arts, revamping the program’s curriculum during the 1960s and influencing the next generation of artists for years to come. With the advent of the seventies, Joya experimented with new art styles. In this 1988 piece entitled Red Reefs, his relationship with color, depth, and opacity is at full display with the work showing his mastery of order and balance. An artist who was trained in the traditional form of Amorsolo, Joya eventually branched out into modernism. His journey as an artist led him to Spain and America, further improving his skills. However, despite his foreign influences, Joya proved himself as an ingenious artist, integrating into his works the Western art practice and transforming them to reflect his local Filipino inclinations. (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Solar Valley
            Dec. 02, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Solar Valley

            Est: ₱4,600,000 - ₱5,980,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A VERY DISTINGUISHED COUPLE Solar Valley signed and dated 1976 (lower right and verso) sponge painting, acrylic on canvas 30” x 24” (76 cm x 61 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE: León Gallery, The Kingly Treasures Auction 2015, December 5, 2015, Lot 116 WRITE UPIn the field of Filipino Abstract Expressionism, perhaps no artist is lauded more than Jose T. Joya. Academically trained at the University of the Philippines College of Fine Arts, Joya embarked for graduate school abroad, following in the footsteps of other Filipino artists whose trip abroad drastically inspired their artistic career going forward. “His trip in Europe helped him undergo a complete reorientation,” Leonidas V. Benesa stated in his book Drawings by Joya, “a reversal of attitude and of vision, a rejection of intellect in favor of intelligence, of mind in favor of imagination. He had to undergo this or else perish as an artistic entity and come home defeated by Europe.” Joya’s metamorphosis in Europe is not merely a change of technique but a total psychological change. He was gradually influenced by American abstraction and the emerging Philippine modernism. In this 1976 work entitled Solar Valley, the eventual National Artist shows off his mastery of the abstraction. His attention to color and texture takes the forefront as Solar Valley takes advantage of its complementary color scheme and overlapping layers of paint to create a cohesive piece. It is a vibrant and expressive piece that feels right at home with the rest of Joya’s oeuvre. Joya’s works have been included in the Philippine Art Gallery, the Venice Biennale, the Museum of Philippine Art, the National Museum, and the Ayala Museum. (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Blue Horizon
            Dec. 02, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Blue Horizon

            Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

            Blue Horizon signed and dated 1961 (lower left) oil on paper 4” x 17 3/4” (10 cm x 45 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE: Private collection, Manila WRITE UPAbstract expressionism flourished post-World War II in tandem with other art movements that aimed to break free from the ever-present classical style. Characterized with spontaneity and gestural brushstrokes, there is perhaps no other artist credited with the heading of the birth and growth of abstract expressionism than National Artist Jose T. Joya. As shown in this 1961 piece, Joya’s sense of vibrant colors, his dynamic spontaneity, and his vigorous composition is ever- present. “In creating an artwork, the artist is concretising his need for communication,” Joya has said and through his harmonious and lively artworks, Joya's voice and stories shine through. (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • Four Books
            Oct. 22, 2023

            Four Books

            Est: ₱3,000 - ₱3,900

            i. Charlson Ong Anita Magsasay-Ho with Twelve Filipino Poets Crucible Workshop, 1996 ii. Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Joya by Joya Book of Drawings Association of the Philippines, Inc. 1978 by Jose T. Joya Kyodo Printing Company, Inc iii. Nick Joaquin (1917 - 2004), Paul Zafaralla (b. 1983) and Cesar Legaspi (1917 - 1994) Legaspi Drawings: Padding around Asia, Europe and America with a ball point pen book and cover design by Mauro Malang Santos iv. Manuel D. Duldulao Tam P. Austria

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱80,000 - ₱104,000

            Female Nude signed and dated 1985 (lower right) pastel 12” x 19” (30 cm x 47 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱80,000 - ₱104,000

            Male Nude signed and dated 1989 (lower right) pastel on paper 19” x 12” (48 cm x 30 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Seated Female Nude signed and dated 1983 (lower right) pastel on paper 16 1/2” x 11 1/4” (42 cm x 29 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Woman with Head Gear signed and dated 1976 (lower right) pastel on paper 15 1/2” x 11” (38 cm x 28 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱800,000 - ₱1,040,000

            Kulintang signed and dated February 7, 1982 (verso) oil 22” x 14” (56 cm x 36 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Barrio Malinao Fishing Village Majayjay, Laguna signed and dated August 26, 1976 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 11 1/4” x 17 1/2” (29 cm x 44 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Old House Barrio Laguian Pila, Laguna signed and dated August 15,1975 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 11 1/4” x 15 1/2 (29 cm x 39 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mrs. Josefa Joya-Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

            Untitled Abstract signed and dated 1964 (lower right) mixed media (oil wash, pen and ink) 8” x 9 1/2” (20 cm x 24 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mrs. Josefa Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Mother and Child edition 1/50 pigment ink on 300gsm matte archival Accompanied by a certificate issued by Cartellino Gallery confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱10,000 - ₱13,000

            Mother and Child handsigned and dated 1994 (lower right) etching 65/70 10” x 7” (25 cm x 18 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱15,000 - ₱19,500

            Mother and Child signed and dated 1992 (lower right) print 19 1/4” x 12 1/2” (49 cm x 32 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Sierra Madre signed and dated 1981 (verso) print 7/24 13” x 21” (33 cm x 53 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱15,000 - ₱19,500

            Mother and Child signed and dated 1992 (lower right) print 38/300 22” x 14” (56 cm x 36 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931-1995)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931-1995)

            Est: ₱15,000 - ₱19,500

            Cityscape handsigned and dated 1969 etching 1/15 16 1/2” x 13” (42 cm x 33 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Bulls and Bears
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Bulls and Bears

            Est: ₱4,000,000 - ₱5,200,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Bulls and Bears signed and dated 1989 (lower right) acrylic collage 29 1/2" x 43 1/2" (75 cm x 110 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot Characterized by art critic Leonidas Benesa as the “exponent of pure painting”, Jose Joya has become an influential name in Philippine abstraction for his mastery of non-figurative expression. Although his first forays into the art scene as a student at the UP College of Fine Arts would gain him recognition for his realist and still life works which granted him awards such as the prestigious Shell Art Competition Prize, Joya’s artistic journey would find his subject matter straying from the outer object and instead gradually drawing inwards within the artist himself, resulting in spontaneous gestures of pure feeling and imagination on canvas. During his studies in New York from 1956 to 1957, Joya’s artistic direction would be steered towards abstraction. At that time, abstract expressionism had reached its peak in Western painting with the likes of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Mark Rothko utilizing unconventional techniques and styles of making non-figurative art that gave emphasis to the expressive qualities of paint. Having taken to heart such artistic philosophy, Joya’s works eventually found less figurative subjects in favor of ‘landscapes of feeling and mind’. However, this did not mean that Joya completely ceased to render figures and still lifes for the rest of his artistic career. Joya’s documentarylike travelogues, after all, often featured figurative subjects drawn with pencil and ink in gestural lines. Philosophically, such a gestural manner would also manifest in his works of abstraction as the growing spontaneity of his technique tended to capture energies in their utmost dynamism rather than merely rendering form. It was in the 1970s that Joya would embark on a series of acrylic collages which took his abstract expressionism towards a more experimental direction. By combining acrylic and rice paper, Joya takes off from Western abstraction and the calligraphic gestural to bring his work back ever closer to the subject matter he had become accustomed to initially: nature and the landscape. Despite the heightened experimental approach, one cannot help but appreciate the overlapping organic intensities that bloom across the composition of Joya’s acrylic collages. His abstractions curiously bear no real definable resemblance to any observable object in nature, but perhaps such is only what makes Joya’s expressionism all the more special. It is an expressionism that abstracts not just from nature, but from a heart that is at one with it. (Pie Tiausas

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Red Talisman
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Red Talisman

            Est: ₱3,000,000 - ₱3,900,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Red Talisman signed and dated 1975 (lower right) oil 22 1/2” x 22 1/2” (57 cm x 57 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot JOYA’S BELOVED RED TALISMAN His Most Exhibited Work by LISA GUERRERO NAKPIL By all accounts, Jose Joya was born under a lucky star; certainly, it was one that augured a stellar career in the arts. He was not only a prodigy but, while still only in college, also made his way into the most elite group of artists in the country, those that called the Philippine Art Gallery their home. He would thus be on first-name basis with its resident Neo-Realists; and was the youngest bona fide painter to be part of the PAG. It guaranteed him continuous press coverage and the attention slowly but surely built him both credibility and an enthusiastic following of collectors. He would thus begin that inexorable trajectory into the pantheon of Philippine modern art. It would be, for example, Fernando Zóbel who would arrange a scholarship for him to study in Spain in 1954, beginning Joya’s appreciation of a world view. He would win first prize in 1958 in the Art Association Philippines’ annual competition, the bellwether of Filipino art. In 1964, Joya would be the first Philippine representative to the 32nd Venice Biennale. He also would be the first Filipino recipient of the John D. Rockefeller III Fund Grant, the precursor to the Asian Cultural Council Foundation. Joya would steep himself in the American art world in 1967 through 1969. In New York, he would even meet Andy Warhol who he wrote to friends was interested in coming to Manila. Joya would also travel to Europe, where in Spain he would write enthusiastically about his patron Zóbel’s Cuenca museum. The work at hand, Red Talisman, from Joya’s personal collection, is also his most exhibited, besting even the record of the legendary Space Transfiguration. It would be featured in his retrospectives and travel the world in prestigious exhibitions. Its meditatively perfect circle would refer to Joya’s voyage into the metaphysical world, referencing the sacred mandala and the symbolisms of the planets. Red Talisman is a rare rendering, however, since Joya would prefer muted or earth tones for this spiritually-grounded series. Here it is composed around strong scarlets, suggesting a more intense, if rawer sensibility, with the same exuberance that always defined Joya.

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Cylone
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Cylone

            Est: ₱700,000 - ₱910,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Cylone signed and dated 1990 (lower right and verso) oil on collage 13" x 10" (33 cm x 25 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mr. Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot The lot at hand, Cylone, is a Jose Joya oil on collage piece dated December 8, 1990. Here, the artist reinterprets the traditional format of landscape painting, recreating an abstract pictorial realm teeming with vibrant colors accumulating in generous layers of impasto strokes. A notable name in abstract expressionism, it has been said that it was he who “spearheaded the birth, growth, and flowering of abstract expressionism” in the Philippines. He was also deemed as the creator of compositions that were described as “vigorous compositions of heavy impastos, bold brushstrokes, controlled dips, and diagonal swipes.” His works clearly show his mastery of gestural painting, where the paint is applied intuitively and spontaneously. In 1991, Jose Joya received the Gawad CCP Para sa Sining, the highest award granted by the Cultural Center of the Philippines. For his efforts in developing Filipino abstract art, he was awarded the title of National Artist in 2003, eight years after his death in 1995. A retrospective of his work was held in 2011 at the National Museum. (Isabella Romarate)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - The Twelfth Night
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - The Twelfth Night

            Est: ₱4,000,000 - ₱5,200,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) The Twelfth Night signed and dated 1992 (lower right & verso) acrylic & collage 40" x 26 1/4" (102 cm x 67 cm) Accompanied by a certificate signed by the artist confirming the authenticity of this lot Jose Joya imparts a reverent message in The Twelfth Night. As with his oeuvres that depict fiestas and festivals, the lot at hand was named with the intent to allude to the Epiphany of the Lord. The Christian feast day commemorates the events from the birth of Christ Child and the visit of the Magi, Jesus’ baptism administered by John the Baptist, to the miracle at the wedding in Cana. In the Philippines, it is known as “Three Kings’ Day” and Pasko ng Matatanda or “Feast of the Elderly.” The feast day marks the end of the country’s Christmas season. However, the artist portrayed in this painting not the feast day in particular but the night prior to it – the eve of Epiphany, also called the Twelfth Night. In some churches, the celebration mostly centers on the visitation of the Magi. The Magi are believed to represent the non-Jewish peoples of the world, and thus it is also observed as Christ’s corporeal manifestation to the Gentiles. Epiphany, from the word epiphainen, means “manifestation.” As such, this Joya abstraction, in a way, solemnly invites its audience to remember the time that Christ has made Himself known to the world. The traditional date for the Epiphany of the Lord is the 6th of January, and the aptly titled acrylic & collage piece is as well dated on the same day in 1992. (Isabella Romarate)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Summer Retreat
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Summer Retreat

            Est: ₱2,000,000 - ₱2,600,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Summer Retreat signed and dated 1992 (lower right & verso) acrylic and collage 30" x 22" (76 cm x 56 cm) Accompanied by a certificate signed by the artist confirming the authenticity of this lot Two decades before Summer Retreat was created, in the ‘70s, Jose Joya entered his experimental phase. He worked in a variety of media and forms and explored the limits of acrylic and collage, resulting in oeuvres that revealed multilayered space penetrated with vibrant hues and sometimes neutral tones. The spectrum of colors on his canvas is believed to draw inspiration from tropical landscapes. For the lot at hand, one can observe the fine artist’s interesting departure from his usual brilliant palette. As expected from Joya, in the absence of coloristic concerns, his interest resided in textural detail. His gestural strokes create a motion implied in the amorphous forms, and the paint seems to be applied intuitively and spontaneously. His use of complex swathes of collage effects and overlapping strokes shows us how he perceived the world with a creative vision that gives importance to controlled freedom. The piece is dated 1992, it is the same year when he created one of his renowned abstractions titled Spirit of Season. And, in 1991, only a year prior, he became a recipient of the Gawad CCP Para sa Sining, the highest award granted by the Cultural Center of the Philippines. (Isabella Romarate)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Save the Earth
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Save the Earth

            Est: ₱1,400,000 - ₱1,820,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Save the Earth signed and dated 1993 (verso) acrylic 23" x 15" (58 cm x 38 cm) Accompanied by a certificate signed by the artist confirming the authenticity of this lot When Jose Joya finished painting the work at hand on April 19, 1993, annual celebrations around the world for Earth Day 1993 were only beginning to commence. Founded in 1970, Earth Day, according to its official website, “is widely recognized as the largest secular observance in the world, marked by more than a billion people every year as a day of action to change human behavior and create global, national and local policy changes.” Grounded in its mission “to diversify, educate, and activate” the global environmental movement, Earth Day became an international event in 1990, with the first observance in the Philippines commencing on April 22, 1990. The reds in this piece symbolize the living world as the lifeblood of all the creatures that depend on nature’s blessings to survive. The blues represent the waters, the vital element that sustains life on Earth. One can notice how Joya applies the slashes and blobs of paint instantaneously. It is as if he represents all of us, rapidly racing against the clock, crying out to everyone, and exclaiming the gravity of the Earth’s situation and the urgency of collective action and putting an end to a mercenary and exploitative system to save the Earth, before we all woefully cling at the end of the rope, pleading before nature’s unforgiving wrath. Joya’s compelling abstract expressionism stresses our collective responsibility in nurturing, cultivating, and conserving the world we live in. A work with a similar theme titled The Ozone (1992) was recently auctioned by León Gallery last June 2023. (Adrian Maranan)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Summer Frolic
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) - Summer Frolic

            Est: ₱2,000,000 - ₱2,600,000

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995) Summer Frolic signed and dated 1988 (lower right) acrylic collage 22 3/4" x 30 1/2" (58 cm x 77 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Mrs. Josefa Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot Joya’s venture into the abstract was borne from the heightened movement of abstract expressionism in Western painting and the New York School in the 1950s, a scene characterized by spontaneity, experimentation, and the improvisational arts. Despite the vigor of such a movement eventually seeping into Joya’s works by the 1960s, there is a curious quality of dynamic rumination in his abstract pieces. How exactly does a vibrant outburst of life elicit a sense of contemplation at the same time? In Joya’s acrylic collages, the artist takes a refreshingly experimental approach to the aesthetic origins of abstraction— that is the art of Chinese calligraphy founded on oneness with medium and nature. It is an art only rendered possible through a natural flow of energies between medium, spirit, body, and environment—and the same can be said of Joya’s works. There is something artfully gestural in his manner of piecing together a harmonious tapestry of dynamic flows, composed through an overlay of texture and color that is not only clearly drawn from life despite the absence of figuration, but is also life-giving in itself. His is an art only rendered possible through a state of oneness that simply frolics in the moment. (Pie Tiausas)

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Untitled (Cebu City) signed and dated 1974 (lower right) pastel on paper 17 1/4” x 11 1/4” (44 cm x 29 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱150,000 - ₱195,000

            Mother and Child signed and dated March 10,1992 (lower left and verso) pastel on paper 19 3/4” x 12 3/4” (50 cm x 32 cm) Accompanied by a certificate signed by the artist confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Woman with Head Gear signed and dated 1976 (lower right) pastel on paper 15 1/2” x 11” (38 cm x 28 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Steve signed and dated June 9, 1988 (lower right and verso) pastel on paper 19” x 12” (48 cm x 30 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Nude signed and dated August 2, 1979 (lower right) pastel on paper 22” x 13” (56 cm x 33 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Alexander Richard Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)
            Jun. 17, 2023

            Jose Joya (1931 - 1995)

            Est: ₱2,000,000 - ₱2,600,000

            Daybreak signed and dated 1989 (lower right); signed, titled, and dated November 25, 1989 (verso) acrylic collage 22" x 29 1/2" (56 cm x 75 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by Josefa Joya Baldovino confirming the authenticity of this lot LITERATURE: Arcellana, Francisco. Joya. Manila: Dick Baldovino Enterprises, 1996. Full-color photograph. Listed as "Daybreak, November 25, 1989" in Joya's Catalogue of Works compiled by Ruben D.F. Defeo. Earlier in the ‘70s, Jose Joya entered his experimental phase. He worked in a variety of media and forms and explored the limits of acrylic and collage, resulting in oeuvres that revealed multilayered space penetrated with vibrant hues and sometimes neutral tones. The spectrum of colors on his canvas is believed to draw inspiration from tropical landscapes. For the lot at hand, the fine artist depicted in his distinct abstract approach the time in the morning when daylight appears, and thus the title Daybreak. One can also observe in this acrylic painting his usual brilliant palette. Furthermore, Joya’s iconic textural detail is evident in the gestural strokes that create a motion implied in the amorphous forms, and the paint seems to be applied intuitively and spontaneously. His use of complex swathes of collage effects and overlapping strokes shows us how he perceived the world with a creative vision that gives importance to controlled freedom. Only two years prior to the creation of this piece dated 1989, Joya became a recipient of the Order de Chevalier des Arts et Lettres from the French government in 1987. Then, in 1991, he received the Gawad CCP Para sa Sining, the highest award granted by the Cultural Center of the Philippines. (P.I.R.)

            Leon Gallery
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