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Emily Kngwarreye Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, b. 1910 - d. 1996

Emily Kame Kngwarreye was born around 1910 at Alhalkere (Soakage Bore). Emily is an Eastern Anmatyerre speaker and one of the senior artists of the Utopia-n Art Movement. She was adopted by Jacob Jones an important lawman in the Anmatyerre community and worked as a stock hand on pastoral properties in this area, showing her forceful independence. At this time women were only employed for domestic duties.

Emily, like many other women at Utopia moved into painting with acrylics during the summer of 1988-89 with 'A summer Project'. Emily moved happily into the new medium from her work in batik on silk as painting allowed her to explore techniques and vision with her artistic expression. Her painting reflects the layered transparency of batik, but her colour is translucent and has been built up through many touches of paint which overlap and meet to create an illusion of depth and movement.

Although her works relate to the modern art tradition, this resemblance is purely visual. The emphasis on Emily's paintings is on the spiritual meaning, based in the tradition of her people. At first she painted aspects of her culture that is sacred, falling foul of the tribal elders. That is when she moved into painting her culture as a whole. Though many Aboriginal paintings are focused on Dreamings, Emily chose to present a very broad picture of the land and how it supports their way of life. These images embrace the whole life story of myth, seeds, flowers, wind, sand and 'everything'.

"Whole lot, that's the whole lot. Awelye (my Dreamings), Alatyeye (pencil yam), Arkerrthe (mountain devil lizard), Ntange (grass seed), Tingu (a Dreamtime pup), Ankerre (emu), Intekwe (a favorite food of emus, a small plant), atnwerle (green bean), and Kame (yam seed). That's what I paint; the whole lot."

The form that these take in her paintings are lively and moving. Colours merge and change form to communicate a strong cosmological message. She has gone from particular subjects to show abstraction of her complete world, moving her beyond her cultural roots.

Emily is one of the most successful artists to come out of Utopia and is arguably amongst the most important Australian painters of the last decade. Emily, in her 80th year was described by the art collector, Michael Hollows, as being one of the most unusual and graphic of all Australia's renowned Aboriginal artists.

Her work is featured in all Australian state galleries and most reputable private collections in Australia, and is seen regularly in exhibitions and collections around the world. A host of solo exhibitions in the 90's has provided Emily with a significant plateau of fame, exceeding that of most Aboriginal artists of her time.

Emily's gift as an artist has touched many people but it was her personal presence that left the greatest impact. The Hollow family had the privilege of knowing Emily on a personal level, being able to watch her paint and talk to her about her own opinions of fame.

On the 2nd of September 1996 Emily passed away, a great loss to the art world and those people who knew her personally or through her paintings.


Awards:

1992: Australian Artists Creative Fellowship

“When you consider that she never studied art, never came into contact with the great artists of her time and did not begin painting until she was almost 80 years of age, there can only be one way to describe her. She was just a genius.”
– Akira Tatehata –Director, National Museum of Art, Osaka


A portrait of the famous Emily Kame Kngwarreye

Tim Jennings, owner of Mbantua Gallery, first met Emily in the late 1980’s when she was part of a women’s group working in batiks, a few years before she began painting in acrylics. He was close to Emily and members of her extended family right up until her death in 1996 and recalls her being a strong minded woman even though she spoke very little English.

Emily Kame Kngwarreye was a senior custodian for Alhalkere country. She began painting quite late in her life and had first been introduced to silk batik with a group of women from Utopia in 1977. Emily had been working with and exhibiting batik in Australia and abroad between 1977 and 1987 before taking up acrylics on canvas.

Canvas gave Emily and the other artists a greater freedom of expression to experiment with different styles in which to portray their Dreaming stories. Because batik had been the first medium that the artists at Utopia had really experimented with, and it being rather a 'one-hit' medium, they developed quite contrasting styles on canvas and Utopian Art now has probably the most diverse range of styles than any other Aboriginal Art.

A portrait of Emily Kngwarreye with her painting. Emily's trademark style of superimposed bold gestural dotwork, sometimes overlaying linear patterns derived from Ceremonial body paint designs, would have been technically impossible in batik. In this way, Kngwarreye, as an artist, was able to fully express her Country and Dreamings more accurately, as she had been taught.

"Emily’s work has been regularly compared to the New York abstract expressionists Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko. A principal distinction the critics make, and it is key to understanding the acclaim surrounding the paintings of the Utopian artist, is that Kngwarreye is better, more profound."- Sydney Morning Herald, 31/5/08

Emily Kame Kngwarreye’s paintings are described by leading international art academics as being equal to the works of Monet, and other great Impressionist and Abstract artists such as Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Rothko.

Experts have argued that Earth’s Creation is a more important painting for Australia than Jackson’s Blue Poles, the highly controversial American work that put the National Gallery of Australia onto the world stage in 1973, and remains one of its most celebrated works today.

Earth's Creation Aboriginal Art

Earth’s Creation was painted by a genius Australian, with no formal or even informal training in art. She knew nothing of any other schools of art - she’d never even seen another painting. She had barely 20 or so words in English. She spoke in ancient Australian languages, Anmatyerre and Alyawarr. She painted “everything” in a way that was never done before, and has never been seen since.



“What’s important is that she never would have visited anything like New York, she was a product of a very, very remote community. So there are similarities in style, but her source was entirely different - her work was rooted deeply in her culture and deep in Australia’s desert.” -

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              • EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, BODY PAINT, 1995
                Jun. 30, 2024

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, BODY PAINT, 1995

                Est: $15,000 - $20,000

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE (c.1910 – 1996) BODY PAINT, 1995 synthetic polymer paint on paper 77.0 x 52.0 cm bears inscription verso: Emily Kngwarreye, painted Dec ‘95 Utopia N.T. Australia” / Marc Gooch signature and cat. 31-1197 and Aboriginal Dreamings Gallery cat. 1568 donated by Anonymous PROVENANCE Painted in December 1995 for Rodney Gooch Aboriginal Dreamings Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Canberra DESCRIPTION This quintessential Body Paint work on paper was painted concurrently and in the same palette as a suite of six that is held by the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) in Sydney. © Emily Kam Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency 2024 This work is located at NCIE | 166 – 180 George St, Redfern, New South Wales, 2016

                Deutscher and Hackett
              • EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, BODY PAINT, 1995
                Jun. 30, 2024

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, BODY PAINT, 1995

                Est: $15,000 - $20,000

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE (c.1910 – 1996) BODY PAINT, 1995 synthetic polymer paint on paper 77.0 x 52.0 cm bears inscription verso: Emily Kngwarreye, painted Dec ‘95 Utopia N.T. Australia” / Rodney Gooch signature and Aboriginal Dreamings Gallery cat. 1567 donated by Anonymous PROVENANCE Painted in December 1995 for Rodney Gooch Aboriginal Dreamings Gallery, Canberra Private collection, Canberra DESCRIPTION This quintessential Body Paint work on paper was painted concurrently and in the same palette as a suite of six that is held by the Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) in Sydney. © Emily Kam Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency 2024 This work is located at NCIE | 166 – 180 George St, Redfern, New South Wales, 2016

                Deutscher and Hackett
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (1910 - 1996) My Country
                Jun. 16, 2024

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (1910 - 1996) My Country

                Est: $15,000 - $20,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (1910 - 1996) "My Country" Acrylic on canvas. Painted in 1995. Provanence; commissioned for Desert Art Gallery, Alice Springs.  Comes with Certificate of Authenticity. Artwork is framed and ready to hang. 68cm x 119cm

                Ozbid Auctions
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE, Aboriginal (1910 - 1996), Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 80 x 60 x 3 cm. (31 1/2 x 23.6 x 1.1 in.)
                Apr. 28, 2024

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE, Aboriginal (1910 - 1996), Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 80 x 60 x 3 cm. (31 1/2 x 23.6 x 1.1 in.)

                Est: $8,000 - $12,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE Aboriginal, (1910 - 1996) Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995 acrylic on linen (ready to hang) inscribed and titled verso, with DACOU Gallery Certificate of Authenticity, Cat no. DG0654

                Lawsons
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE, (1910 - 1996), Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 98 x 66 x 3 cm. (38.5 x 25.9 x 1.1 in.)
                Apr. 28, 2024

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE, (1910 - 1996), Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 98 x 66 x 3 cm. (38.5 x 25.9 x 1.1 in.)

                Est: $10,000 - $15,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (1910 - 1996) Wild Flower Dreaming, 1995 acrylic on linen (ready to hang) inscribed and titled verso, with DACOU Gallery Certificate of Authenticity, Cat no. DG0613E

                Lawsons
              • Terrain Dreaming
                Apr. 24, 2024

                Terrain Dreaming

                Est: €12,000 - €16,000

                Terrain Dreaming Provenance:Galerie Boomerang, Amsterdam, synthetic polymer on canvas, 110x92 cm (116x97 cm incl. frame), signed 'Emily', stamped and with inscriptions (on the reverse), Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996)

                Venduehuis der Notarissen
              • Untitled
                Apr. 24, 2024

                Untitled

                Est: €8,000 - €12,000

                Untitled Provenance:-Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne.-Galerie Boomerang, Amsterdam, synthetic polymer paint, 84x54 cm (89x63, 5 cm incl. frame), inscribed with the Australian Gallery of Dreams' inventory number 'A.G.O.D. # 4338' (on the reverse), Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996)

                Venduehuis der Notarissen
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) - My Country
                Apr. 23, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) - My Country

                Est: €15,000 - €20,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) My Country , inscribed with the Aboriginal Gallery Of Dreamings' inv. no. 'AGOD #5744' (on the reverse), synthetic polymer on canvas, unframed, 91x120 cm Painted in 1996 Provenance:-Acquired in 1997 from Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne.-Private Belgium collection, The work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued in 1997 by Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne.

                Venduehuis der Notarissen
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) - Yam Dreaming
                Apr. 23, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) - Yam Dreaming

                Est: €40,000 - €60,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c.1910-1996) Yam Dreaming, inscribed with the Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings' inv. no. 'A.G.O.D. #5568' (on the reverse), synthetic polymer on canvas 182, 5x91, 5 cm (188, 5x97, 5 cm incl. frame) Painted in 1996 Provenance: Acquired in 1999 from Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne, by the present owner.Exhibited: Utrecht, Aboriginal Art Museum, ‘Het oog van Simon Levie’, March - Oct. 2003, The work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued in 1999 by Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne.

                Venduehuis der Notarissen
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere (Utopia) , A Ceremonial Expression 1994, Acrylic on linen
                Apr. 23, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere (Utopia) , A Ceremonial Expression 1994, Acrylic on linen

                Est: $20,000 - $30,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye Alhalkere (Utopia) A Ceremonial Expression 1994 Acrylic on linen Grass Seed Dreamings are a celebration of the plants and seeds used by the women of Alhalkere (Utopia) to make food and medicine. These plants have helped the desert people to survive their traditional nomadic lifestyle in one of the harshest environments on the planet. This work showcases Emily Kame Kngwarreye's signature brushstroke technique and her use of pink, teal, white and brown are in keeping with her taste for unusual colours intermixed to create movement.

                Theodore Bruce Auctioneers & Valuers
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (c1910-1996), Yam Dreaming 1996
                Mar. 27, 2024

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (c1910-1996), Yam Dreaming 1996

                Est: $50,000 - $70,000

                PROPERTY FORMERLY FROM THE COLLECTION OF DR MICHAEL & MRS PATRICIA BERNARD, MELBOURNE EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (c1910-1996) Yam Dreaming 1996 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 122.0 x 152.5 cm; 124.5 x 155.5 cm (framed) bears inscription verso: #5514 accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne

                Menzies
              • EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (ALHALKERE COUNTRY), 1993
                Mar. 26, 2024

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (ALHALKERE COUNTRY), 1993

                Est: $30,000 - $40,000

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE (c.1910 - 1996) UNTITLED (ALHALKERE COUNTRY), 1993 synthetic polymer painting on canvas 121.5 x 90.0 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Delmore Gallery cat. 93F068 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Delmore Gallery, via Alice Springs, Northern Territory in 1993 Private collection Gallery one93, Queensland Private collection, Queensland, acquired from the above This painting is accompanied by a certificate from Delmore Gallery which states in part: 'In Alhalkere Country, the progression of colour from the dry earth tones to lush green growth, and then to the delicate colours of wildflowers, is slow after a winter rain. An invigorated mood is all pervading as all life waits for an early glimpse of warmth to give plants that final bit of zest to produce a desert in full carpeted bloom. Once this occurs, the bloom is brief and settles into a dry state. The wild flower may seem sparse, but on close inspection have exceptional colour tones. The colours are sombre, of deep green leaves in misty acacia grey dawns over frosted, dried-off grasses, and small pink and white wild flowers. This wonderful work is an aerial perspective of the winter landscape, celebrating the abundant food source it provided.' © Emily Kam Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency 2024

                Deutscher and Hackett
              • EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (EMU COUNTRY), 1993
                Mar. 26, 2024

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (EMU COUNTRY), 1993

                Est: $70,000 - $90,000

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE (c.1910 - 1996) UNTITLED (EMU COUNTRY), 1993 synthetic polymer paint on canvas 152.0 x 91.5 cm bears inscription verso: artist’s name and Delmore Gallery cat. 93A171 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Delmore Gallery, via Alice Springs, Northern Territory in 1993 Songlines Gallery, San Francisco, USA Private collection, New York, USA, acquired from the above in September 2007 EXHIBITED Songlines Aboriginal Art: Utopian Visions, Art 1999 Chicago, Chicago, USA, 7 – 11 May 1999 This painting is accompanied by a copy of the certificate of authenticity from Delmore Gallery. ESSAY Renowned for her colourful and vibrant recording of the ever-changing desert landscape in her father and grandfather’s Country of Alhalker, Emily Kam Kngwarreye chronicled on canvas her custodial responsibility for the Yam and the Emu – reflecting her connection to country and Women’s ceremonies through body painting and dance. Located at the western edge of Utopia this triangular shaped country was where Emily was born and where she lived in the traditional ways of the eastern Anmatyerr, following a way of life that had continued unchanged from long before European presence. Her mark making recorded the seasonal variations, sometimes subtle but often dramatic, of the harsh desert environment and the explosion of growth that occurred after rain. Referred to by Emily as the ‘green time’1, the desert would come to life, wildflowers carpeting the red earth and plants and grasses flourishing, supplying the women with seeds, tubers and fruit.   With her distinctive use of pattern and colour, Kngwarreye had seemingly endless variations to call upon in the depiction of her country. Her paintings would often dissolve into fields of layered colour achieved through a build-up of dots upon dots as in  Untitled (Emu Country), 1993 – in this case, a tracery of soft milky pink dots hover over an underlying ground of green, yellow and red dots. 'This is Emu Country - called Alalgura (sic.) where the male emu's role is to look after the emu chicks and keep them in sight of their home and not beyond their preferred seeds and fruits. These foods include the Nterkwe, a small purple-blue plum, and the Anooralya, a long, thin yam with a small flower.2   Kngwarreye bears witness though her painting to that abundance that carpets the earth after rain, sustaining country and celebrating the hardiness and fertility of their bush tucker and food sources, and in turn, her people’s own resilience.   1. Isaacs, J., ‘Amatyerre Woman’ in Isaacs, J. et al.,  Emily Kame Kngwarreye Paintings, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998, p. 13 2. Cited in the accompanying certificate from Delmore Gallery CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE © Emily Kam Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency 2024

                Deutscher and Hackett
              • EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (ENDUNGA), 1990
                Mar. 26, 2024

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE, UNTITLED (ENDUNGA), 1990

                Est: $150,000 - $250,000

                EMILY KAM KNGWARREYE (c.1910 - 1996) UNTITLED (ENDUNGA), 1990 synthetic polymer paint on linen 121.0 x 90.5 cm bears inscription verso: artist's name and Delmore Gallery cat. 0H19 PROVENANCE Commissioned by Delmore Gallery, via Alice Springs, Northern Territory in 1990 Private collection, Alice Springs, Northern Territory Sotheby's, Sydney, 9 November 1997, lot 130 (as ‘Edunga’) Private collection, Melbourne Sotheby's, Melbourne, 24 June 2002, lot 203 (as ‘Edunga’) Private collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Emily Kame Kngwarreye: Werke Australischer Privatsammlungen, Kunsthaus Zug, Zug, Switzerland, 1 October 2019 – 12 January 2020 LITERATURE Drury, N., Images 2 – Contemporary Australian Painting, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1994, p. 282, pl. 267 (illus.) Voight, A., and Drury, N., Wisdom of the Earth – The Living Legacy of Aboriginal Dreamtime, Simon & Shuster, Sydney, 1997, p. 86 (illus.) This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Delmore Gallery. ESSAY Deeply rooted in the Anmatyerr land of her ancestors to whom she paid respect through a lifetime of devotion to women’s ceremony in song, dance and the ceremonial painting of bodies, the art of Emily Kam Kngwarreye reveals a deep affinity to the country and the ever-changing desert landscape in her father and grandfather’s Country of Alhalker. As the youngest of three children, Kngwarreye chronicled on canvas this triangular-shaped country – the place she was born, and where she lived in the ways of the eastern Anmatyerr. The traditional life of the Anmatyerr and Alyawarr people was forever disrupted in the 1930s, when the borders of the Utopia pastoral lease were drawn across their lands. Over time, many local people including Kngwarreye found periodic work on the emergent pastoral stations. Sixty years later however, Kngwarreye was introduced to batik as part of adult education classes held on Utopia Station in 1977 and the following decade, in 1988‒89, Emily painted her first work on canvas, sparking a meteoric rise to fame. Untitled (Endunga), 1990 is one of a small number of paintings of similar tonal colour produced in the second year of her painting that have come to symbolise her oeuvre. A masterpiece of strength and simplicity, the distinctive meandering linear pattern, based on the underground growth of the Atnulare yam, is infilled and overpainted with patterns of dotting that represents the fruit, seeds (Ntang) and reedy strands of the Endunga grass. Working from the periphery of the canvas, traceries and over-dotting spread energetically across the canvas limited only by the reach of the artist’s arm. ‘Kngwarray painted with great speed and intensity and the strength of her arms and hands…is apparent in the rhythmic, confident marks she made… echos of batik style and process are apparent in these early works on canvas.’1   Often domestic in theme, Kngwarreye’s painting demonstrates the interconnectedness of life, landscape and culture, a celebration of the seasonal variations in her homeland of Alhalker and the related spiritual and domestic obligations to country. When looking at this work, as Janet Holt states in the accompanying certificate, ‘One can imagine Kngwarray leaning forward, her digging stick nearby, her hands quickly rustling aside drying leaves and grasses seeking cracks in the ground indicating the presence of yams and their lineal connecting “strings” beneath the earth.’2 More than two decades have passed since Emily Kngwarreye died in September 1996, yet her name remains synonymous with the best of Australian Indigenous art. An original, intuitive and often enigmatic artist, her painting career lasted less than a decade, but the critical acclaim for her prodigious output has not diminished and her reputation has been sustained both in Australia and internationally. 1. Jenny Green, ‘The Life and Legacy of Emily Kam Kngwarray’ in Cole K., Green J., and Perkins H., (eds.) Emily Kam Kngwarray, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2023, p. 157 2. From the accompanying Delmore Gallery certificate of authenticity. CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE © Emily Kam Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency 2024

                Deutscher and Hackett
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Bush Yam Awelye, 1994
                Mar. 05, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Bush Yam Awelye, 1994

                Est: $90,000 - $110,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye began painting at the age of seventy-nine and in just eight years completed no fewer than four thousand works of art. Her artistic achievement, miraculous in its strength and powerful appeal, owes much to the inspiration of Indigenous spirituality and the magical creation stories that underpin its belief systems. Her first paintings, created in 1989, were characterised by finely dotted surfaces painted over intimate traditional symbols and linear tracing. As her work progressed, any evidence of under-painting disappeared beneath increasingly gestural fields created by employing larger and larger brushes. By the mid-1990s, the runnels of dotted colour across the surfaces of her more abstract works began to be more formally arranged in parallel lines, as in this particularly magnificent work of the period which was exhibited in her first international solo exhibition at the Oude Kerk,Amsterdam in 1999, opened by Simon Levie, Director of the Rijks Museum. By the time she passed away on September 2nd, 1996, her fame had achieved mythic status. Emily was an artistic superstar, the highest-paid woman in the country who had left one of the most significant artistic legacies of our time. Emily Kngwarreye was one of Australia’s’ three representative artists at the Venice Biennale in 1997, the year following her death, and the subject of a touring retrospective exhibition mounted by Margo Neale for the Queensland Art Gallery. A retrospective exhibition ‘Utopia: The genius of Emily Kngwarreye’ was presented by the National Museum of Australia and toured Japan in 2008. The sale of her masterwork ‘Earth’s Creation I’(1995) by CooeeArt Marketplace in 2017 for $2.1 million, stands as the record price paid at auction for any work of art by an Australian female artist.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Alalgurra Soak - My Country, 1994
                Mar. 05, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Alalgurra Soak - My Country, 1994

                Est: $35,000 - $45,000

                Emily Kame Kgwarreye produced paintings constantly throughout the last eight years of her life, and while she was always happy to go back and produce a work from an earlier stylistic period, a chronological walk through her paintings reveals a line of development that connects them all. Her early style featured visible linear tracings following the tracks of the Kame (Yam) and animal prints with fields of fine dots partially obscuring symbolic elements and playing across the canvas’s surface. By 1992, her fine dotting and symbolic under-painting gave way to works in which symbols and tracks were increasingly concealed beneath a sea of dots until eventually, they were no longer evident at all. She began using larger brushes to create lines of dots that ran across vibrantly coloured, haptic surfaces. These works became progressively visually abstracted and ethereal. By the mid-1990s, Emily had developed a style of painting euphemistically referred to as ‘dump dump’ works, which she created by employing larger and larger brushes. Later, Emily's paintings became more and more structured, as she moved away from depicting country as cloud-like amorphous colour fields. She began applying paint in tracks of colour across the surface of the works rather than underneath as she had prior to 1993. Paintings of this period can be seen, in hindsight, as a transition toward her 'line' paintings that began to emerge the following year. In this painting, Emily has represented a vast area of her country. We can see ochre pits and areas of the Spinifex grass that when burnt, regularly scars the landscape, as well as the arteries of old creek beds that flow with the coming of summer rains.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Wildflower Dreaming, 1994
                Mar. 05, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Wildflower Dreaming, 1994

                Est: $30,000 - $50,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye's paintings of wildflowers reflect a stage in the growth cycle of the wild yam. Emily's middle name, Kame, is taken from the yam Dreaming site at Alhalkere. The nutritional value of the yam is hidden underground, in the swollen roots and their pod-like attachments which are difficult to locate as the plant's unpredictable growth patterns make harvest complicated and specialised. Traditionally, much effort is expended across large areas in the harvest of this valuable food.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Untitled (Awelye), 1995
                Mar. 05, 2024

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Untitled (Awelye), 1995

                Est: $7,000 - $9,000

                In this work, commissioned by Rodney Gooch in Alice Springs during 1995. Emily depicted the root system of the complex mass of roots that stretch underground spreading up to 12 metres from the yam plant at its centre. At ground level, the yam exhibits bright green leaves with yellow flowers and its branches cover a great deal of surface area. It is found in woodlands, close to water sources. The yam is most abundant after rainfall, when the root system develops rapidly. Several months later, the plant dies off and Indigenous women look for cracks in the earth indicating where the roots and tubers are located. Often, large areas are excavated in their search to find the edible tubers of the plant. Once found, the yams are taken back to the community, where they are eaten raw or cooked. They have a rather bland taste but make a filling meal. In the Yam Dreaming, the Emily is paying homage to the spirit of the yam plant, so that it regenerates year after year to feed people.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kngwarreye, Aboriginal 1910-1996, Wild Flower, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 80 x 60 x 3 cm. (31 1/2 x 23.6 x 1.1 in.)
                Feb. 25, 2024

                Emily Kngwarreye, Aboriginal 1910-1996, Wild Flower, acrylic on linen (ready to hang), 80 x 60 x 3 cm. (31 1/2 x 23.6 x 1.1 in.)

                Est: $10,000 - $15,000

                Emily Kngwarreye Aboriginal, 1910-1996 Wild Flower acrylic on linen (ready to hang) inscribed and titled verso, cat no. DG0654

                Lawsons
              • Emily Kngwarreye, 1910-1996, Earth Creation, 1995-96, synthetic polymer paint on canvas (ready to hang), 197.5 x 286.5 x 3 cm. (77.7 x 112.8 x 1.1 in.)
                Feb. 25, 2024

                Emily Kngwarreye, 1910-1996, Earth Creation, 1995-96, synthetic polymer paint on canvas (ready to hang), 197.5 x 286.5 x 3 cm. (77.7 x 112.8 x 1.1 in.)

                Est: $60,000 - $80,000

                Emily Kngwarreye 1910-1996 Earth Creation, 1995-96 synthetic polymer paint on canvas (ready to hang) signed verso; bears inscription verso: 1036 Dacou

                Lawsons
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE (c1909 - 1996) - Wild Flower acrylic on linen 98 x 66 cm (ready to hang)
                Feb. 25, 2024

                EMILY KNGWARREYE (c1909 - 1996) - Wild Flower acrylic on linen 98 x 66 cm (ready to hang)

                Est: $15,000 - $25,000

                Emily Kngwarreye Aboriginal, 1910-1996 Wild Flower acrylic on linen (ready to hang) inscribed and titled verso, cat no. DG0613E

                Lawsons
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere (c. 1909-1996), My Country 1994, Acrylic on canvas
                Dec. 04, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Alhalkere (c. 1909-1996), My Country 1994, Acrylic on canvas

                Est: $25,000 - $35,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye Alhalkere (c. 1909-1996) My Country 1994 Acrylic on canvas Inscribed verso with the artist's name Corbally Stourton Contemporary Art Ltd Certificate of Authenticity: Cat. No. CSCA 168

                Theodore Bruce
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - MY COUNTRY - ACRYLIC ON CANVAS
                Nov. 21, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - MY COUNTRY - ACRYLIC ON CANVAS

                Est: $22,000 - $28,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (B.c.1910-1996) MY COUNTRY Aboriginal Desert Art catalogue number 18078-1-93-EEK-123-96 and certificate of authenticity accompanies this artwork Acrylic on canvas 96 x 136cm Estimate $22,000/28,000 AUD

                GFL Fine Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c. 1909-1996) Untitled Body Marks
                Nov. 20, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye (c. 1909-1996) Untitled Body Marks

                Est: $14,000 - $18,000

                ochres on belgian linen inscribed verso ‘#17122, IFT-EK47’

                Shapiro Auctioneers
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Earth's Creation II, 1995
                Nov. 08, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Earth's Creation II, 1995

                Est: $400,000 - $600,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye was born at Utopia station in a remote desert community almost 300 km north-west of Alice Springs. Before beginning her professional painting career in the late 1980’s, she worked at Utopia as a batik artist for around 10 years. Her career as a painter was as prolific as it was passionate, and after several years she had established herself both locally and internationally. She died in September 1996 leaving behind a remarkable story of inspiration, a profound and invaluable legacy to the art world. Emily went through many different individual styles during her short eight-year career as a professional painter. By the 1990’s early works with intimate tracking and animal prints interspersed with fine dotted colour fields, gave way to running dotted lines over cloud-like ethereal landscapes, and parallel horizontal and vertical stripes, representing ceremonial body painting, in a wide array of colours. Within a year she began using larger brushes than previously and by 1993 she began creating floral images in a profusion of colour by double dipping brushes into layers of paint resulting in variegated petals in hepatic profusion. Her formal body painting line images yielded to the serendipity of scrambling yam roots and, in the final months of her life, to colour fields painted with large flat brushes that are simply brilliant in their assuredness and utter simplicity. While her preoccupation was the life cycle of the Yam in all of its seasonal manifestations and the women’s ceremonies that celebrated its importance and their responsibility as its custodians, Emily painted many interrelated themes and species. In her own words, she painted: ‘Whole lot, that’s all, whole lot, awelye, arlatyeye, ankerrthe, ntange, dingo, ankerre, intekwe, anthwerle and kame. That’s what I paint: whole lot. My Dreaming, pencil yam, mountain devil lizard, grass seed, dingo, emu, small plant emu food, green bean and yam seed.’ In 1995, Fred Torres (Aboriginal art dealer and son of Emily’s niece, Barbara Weir) initiated a workshop on the Utopia clan lands in which Emily created the masterpieces, Earth’s Creation I and Earth’s Creation II. The workshop was held during a period in which Emily was creating wildly colourful canvases by double-dipping brushes into pots of layered paint. Despite her age, Emily’s physicality was evident as she painted. Often with a brush in each hand she simultaneously pounded them down on to the canvas spreading the bristles and leaving the coagulating paint around the neck of the brush to create depth and form. In preparation for this workshop Torres and Weir prepared large canvases by hand-sewing individual panels together in such a way that Emily could paint a single painting that could later be unpicked and stretched onto several interlocking and adjoining frames. Of these, Earth’s Creation I, the major triptych measuring 632 x 275 cm, was included in her touring retrospective exhibition curated by Margo Neale for the Queensland Art Gallery in 1998. The painting was offered for sale in 2007 and sold for $1.056 million. On the request of the National Museum of Australia, Earth’s Creation I was subsequently loaned to tour in Tokyo and Osaka in Japan in 2008, and exhibited at the National Museum in Canberra in 2008. It was exhibited in the Great Hall of Parliament House in Darwin before heading to its new home in Alice Springs. In 2015 the work was exhibited in the Giardini Central Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale,“All the World’s Futures”, curated by Okwui Enwezor. Earth’s Creation I, was subsequently sold at auction in 2017 through Cooee Art for $2.1 million, breaking the record it had set in 2007 for the highest sale price achieved by an Australian female artist. Earth's Creation II, the work on offer here, was painted in the same workshop. The palette is cooler and the overall impression more subdued, yet it lacks none of the spiritual intensity and vision of her larger work. The reduced palette of predominately blue and white, with touches of red, gives the impression of floodwater after rain. From every part of the work, its sublime orchestration engages the eye with dazzling energy and flowing movement. The painting is a luminous celebration with a mystical, ethereal presence. It’s about her life, her story, her country. It’s about her universe and the mythologies that inform the Dreamings. Filled with mystery, it pays reverence to the sacredness of the Earth, the seasons, vegetation, people, the epic adventures of her spiritual ancestors, and ceremonies that she daily engages with in her life. Together, Earth’s Creation I and Earth’s Creation II can be seen as companion pieces. Both works exhibit an assurance in execution that was based upon Kngwarreye’s inseparable link to her country and its ceremonies.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Kame - Yam Dreaming site at Alhalkere, 1995
                Nov. 08, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Kame - Yam Dreaming site at Alhalkere, 1995

                Est: $35,000 - $40,000

                Beginning late in 1991 and throughout the following years, Emily explored a range of techniques after largely abandoning the fine dotting and submerged linear tracking which had characterised her earlier works. She used larger brushes to create broader circular dabs of paint, which often involved 'double dipping' the brush in various colours, before attacking the canvas. In this work, she shows tremendous confidence and great subtlety of colour in rendering the floral profusion throughout her desert homeland after summer rains. The linear application of broad dotting creates swathing rhythm across the canvas. Despite the sweeping gestural flourishes, the resultant image contains considerable nuances, which evoke the physical and spiritual fertility of the land, and radiance of being, that is sought during ceremony.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Alhakere - My Country, 1994
                Nov. 08, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Alhakere - My Country, 1994

                Est: $30,000 - $40,000

                Emily Kgwarreye produced paintings constantly throughout the last eight years of her life, and while she was always happy to go back and produce a work from an earlier stylistic period, a chronological walk through her paintings reveals a line of development that connects them all.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - My Country, 1994
                Nov. 08, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - My Country, 1994

                Est: $120,000 - $140,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye began painting at the age of seventy-nine and in just eight years completed no fewer than four thousand works of art. Yet, she never went to art school, never looked through art books, and rarely went to galleries. Her first experience of serious painting was the making of boldly fluid marks on the greased skin of her countrywomen. Her artistic achievement, miraculous in its strength and powerful appeal, owes much to the inspiration of Indigenous spirituality and the magical creation stories that underpin its belief systems.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994
                Nov. 08, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Bush Yam Dreaming, 1994

                Est: $80,000 - $120,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye was born at Anilitye (Boundary Bore) and began painting on canvas when in her late 70s. She was awarded the Australian Creative Fellowship in 1992 and continued painting prolifically until her death in 1996.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye
                Nov. 03, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye

                Est: $100 - $150

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye: Alhalkere Paintings from Utopia. By Margo Neale. Published by Queensland Art Gallery and Macmillan in 1998. Softcover with dust wrapper, in very good condition. A profusely illustrated retrospective of one of Australia's most celebrated contemporary Indigenous painters, produced in conjunction with her major national exhibition in 1998.

                Sydney Rare Book Auctions
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996), Women's Dreaming
                Oct. 29, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996), Women's Dreaming

                Est: $6,000 - $8,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996) Women's Dreaming synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed and cat. no. verso: EMILY KAME KNGAWARREYE "WOMEN'S DREAMING" CAAMA 57789 76 x 46cm PROVENANCE CAAMA, Alice Springs Anvil Gallery, Wodonga Private Collection, Melbourne © Emily Kame Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2023

                Gibson's
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), Woman's Dreaming 1993
                Oct. 29, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), Woman's Dreaming 1993

                Est: $35,000 - $50,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996) Woman's Dreaming 1993 synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed verso (wrapped around stretcher) : Emily / MB1217 104 x 177cm PROVENANCE Mbantua Gallery, Alice Springs (accompanied by a certificate of authenticity) Private Collection, Melbourne EXHIBITED Lauraine Diggins Fine Art, Melbourne (label verso) © Emily Kame Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2023

                Gibson's
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996), Bush Yam Dreaming 1994
                Oct. 29, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996), Bush Yam Dreaming 1994

                Est: $7,000 - $10,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1909-1996) Bush Yam Dreaming 1994 synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed verso: Emily 138 x 65cm PROVENANCE Saltbush Gallery, Alice Springs NT (accompanied by a certificate of authenticity) Private Collection, South Australia © Emily Kame Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2023

                Gibson's
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), Yam Dreaming, 1995
                Oct. 29, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), Yam Dreaming, 1995

                Est: $28,000 - $35,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996) Yam Dreaming, 1995 synthetic polymer paint on canvas bears cat. no. and inscription verso: SS119734 / Emily Kame Kngwarreye / Yam Dreaming / 1995 / HS484 91 x 61cm PROVENANCE Dacou Aboriginal Art (cat. no. SS119734) Private Collection, NSW Cooee Aboriginal Art, Sydney (cat. no. 19632) Private Collection, Melbourne © Emily Kame Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2023

                Gibson's
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), My Country 1995
                Oct. 29, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996), My Country 1995

                Est: $8,000 - $10,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (CIRCA 1910-1996) My Country 1995 synthetic polymer on canvas inscribed and cat no. verso: Emily / AGOD#4336 81 x 51cm PROVENANCE Aboriginal Gallery of Dreamings, Melbourne (accompanied by Certificate of Authenticity) The Lady Marsha and Sir Andrew Grimwade CBE Collection, Victoria © Emily Kame Kngwarreye/Copyright Agency, 2023

                Gibson's
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye
                Oct. 06, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye

                Est: $100 - $150

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye: Alhalkere Paintings from Utopia. By Margo Neale. Published by Queensland Art Gallery and Macmillan in 1998. Softcover with dust wrapper, in very good condition. A profusely illustrated retrospective of one of Australia's most celebrated contemporary Indigenous painters, produced in conjunction with her major national exhibition in 1998.

                Sydney Rare Book Auctions
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Bush Plum (1992) synthetic polymer paint on canvas 121.3 x 91 cm
                Aug. 23, 2023

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Bush Plum (1992) synthetic polymer paint on canvas 121.3 x 91 cm

                Est: $30,000 - $50,000

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Bush Plum (1992) synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed '92K84/ Emily Kngwarreye' verso 121.3 x 91 cm PROVENANCE Emily Kngwarreye, Alice Springs Delmore Gallery, Alice Springs, commissioned from the above Private Collection, Sydney Australian and European Paintings, Christie's Australia, Sydney, 17 August 1998, lot 1007, illustrated Private Collection, Sydney, acquired from the above

                Smith & Singer
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Anooralya, 1994
                Jun. 20, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Anooralya, 1994

                Est: $100,000 - $140,000

                In this highly dramatic work, the application of pink, yellow, and blue colours highlight the varied and changing hues in the lifecycle of the Anooralya Yam and the seasonal change after storms bring rain to the dry desert landscape near Alalgura on Utopia Station, west of Delmore Downs. The fusion of these thin veils of colours indicates the desert’s bounty after rain. The requirement to understand the life cycle of all bush foods and when to collect seed, fruit, and root vegetables is necessary to the survival of Alyawerre and Anmatjerre people. This work evokes the transition and recovery after a stormy season. The rain falls and water slowly flows along the broad shallow watercourse replenishing the soakage at Alalgura. The flourish of growth that follows is exceptional and rapid. The dramatic transformation of the desert from bare to abundant is a display of the desert’s power. Linked into this, women’s ceremonial life is based on the belief that they help nurture the desert food sources by ensuring future fertile generations.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Of My Country, Alalgura, 1992
                Jun. 20, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Of My Country, Alalgura, 1992

                Est: $90,000 - $110,000

                When Janet Holt documented this work by Emily Kngwarreye, she noted that its movement in colour and form illustrated the explosive energy of growth of the desert life forms with the arrival of rain. Now the heat ripens the fruit, and brings the flowers and grass seed-heads to full maturity. Gradually, the bloom wanes, everything dries off, and the seeds disperse. In ceremony, this cycle is celebrated and Emily spiritually nurtured the lives of her family members, ensuring that they too would survive the erratic nature of the desert's seasons. The hidden tracking on this canvas reveals the underground growth pattern of the Arlatyeye, a big yam. Layered above are scattered seeds, leaves, flowers, and dried fruits of her main bush tucker species including the bush tomato, wild fig, bush plum, certain grasses, and native pine.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Arlatyite Dreaming (Bush Potato), 1995
                Jun. 20, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Arlatyite Dreaming (Bush Potato), 1995

                Est: $80,000 - $110,000

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye was born at Anilitye (Boundary Bore) and began painting on canvas in her late 70s. She was awarded the Australian Creative Fellowship in 1992 and continued painting prolifically until her death in 1996. The subject of this work is Arlatyeye, the Pencil Yam or Bush Potato. This is a valuable food source and the subject of important songs, dances and ceremonies amongst Eastern Anmatjerre people. It was the subject of a great number of Emily Kngwarreye’s paintings, which were created, most familiarly, in a vast array of vibrant colours. In this painting however, Emily has characterised the roots of the yam in the plant’s full period of maturity. As the foliage dies off, cracks appear in the ground, which trace the root system, and indicate that the engorged tubers are ready to be dug up and eaten. Solid lines, stark and unadorned, trace the meandering paths of the pencil yam roots as they forge their way through the desert sands. Images such as this are always linked to Awelye - ceremonies that release spiritual power to maintain natures’ fertility and hardiness. Body painting lines are fundamental to the participatory role of women in these ceremonies. This practice is symbolically linked to this work and helps evoke an atmosphere of ceremony. The belief that good seasons always return, that yam ‘always comes back’, is fundamental to understanding the desert environment and therefore survival. A parallel layer of expression runs with the fundamental understanding of Awelye , that being of basic human nature, understanding it, and abiding by the rules set down by society in order that it too, will survive.

                Cooee Art
              • Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Final Series, 1996
                Jun. 20, 2023

                Emily Kame Kngwarreye - Final Series, 1996

                Est: $250,000 - $350,000

                Emily Kngwarreye began painting at 79 years of age and over the 7 years preceding her death in 1996, she created more than 4000 canvases celebrating her country, Alhalkere, and the ceremonies and body paint designs associated with her Yam Dreaming. Those who watched her career unfold month by month, year after year, could chart the constant progression in her stylistic approach, imagery, and colour palette. Her finest paintings were entirely intuitive. She was renowned for walking away from a canvas without even surveying the finished product, such was her faith in its composition, content, and meaning. In August 1996 she was 86 years of age and clearly in poor health. Realising the end was imminent, she wanted to paint one last time and asked her nephew, Fred Torres, to bring paint and canvas. He flew from Adelaide and rushed to her side. With no other materials at hand, he gave her a one-inch gesso brush normally used to cover the canvas with its first ground. In no time at all, she dipped the brush into a pot of paint and filled a section of the small canvass he’d placed before her. Over the next few days she completed twenty-three more extraordinary canvases in this style. The paintings were like nothing she had ever painted before. Dr. Margo Neale, the curator of Emily’s retrospective at the Queensland Art Gallery and her show for the National Museum of Australia, which toured Japan in 2008, described these paintings: All lines and dots vanished into broad, gestural strokes swept across the surface as slabs of high-keyed colour composed in sections. Some were painted thinly, in washes of strident hot pinks, cyan blue, and magenta over a black background, and others were lushly painted, in which every movement of the brush was visible in creamy folds of paint. Dr. Daniel Thomas AM, Emeritus Director, Art Gallery of South Australia, 1998 referred to them as: Her most American-seeming abstractions. Great slabs of pure colour, often in a single layer. Lush and hectic pink and orange or stately blue and orange or, to close the Queensland Art Gallery’s retrospective exhibition, a ghostly whiteness, a curatorial suggestion of the artist’s impending death. In these last paintings we are confronted not with visuality but materiality. Judith Ryan, the senior curator at the National Gallery of Victoria, went so far as to suggest that in creating these works featuring broad blocks in high tone and colour, Emily had ‘reinvented herself’. While Christopher Hodges, who knew the artist and her work intimately, called them ‘beguiling in their simplicity’.

                Cooee Art
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE "YAM"
                Jun. 04, 2023

                EMILY KNGWARREYE "YAM"

                Est: $15,000 - $30,000

                Circa 1992. Important acrylic on board by arguably the most collected indigenous artist today 76cm x 43cm

                Phillip Caldwell Auctioneers
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE "ALHALKER"
                Jun. 04, 2023

                EMILY KNGWARREYE "ALHALKER"

                Est: $28,000 - $40,000

                Circa 1995 Important large synthetic polymer paints on canvas by arguably the most collected indigenous artist today 88cm x 83cm

                Phillip Caldwell Auctioneers
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - "Title"
                May. 28, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - "Title"

                Est: $10,000 - $12,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE "Title" Acrylic on canvas. Painted in 1994. Comes with Certificate of Authenticity. Artwork is stretched and ready to hang. 59cm x 68cm

                Ozbid Auctions
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - "Yam Dreaming"
                May. 28, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - "Yam Dreaming"

                Est: $8,000 - $12,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE "Yam Dreaming" Acrylic on canvas. Painted in 1994. Comes with Certificate of Authenticity. Artwork is stretched and ready to hang. 62cm x 67cm

                Ozbid Auctions
              • EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - ARLATYEY - PENCIL YAM 98 - NATURAL EARTH PIGMENTS ON CANVAS
                May. 23, 2023

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE - ARLATYEY - PENCIL YAM 98 - NATURAL EARTH PIGMENTS ON CANVAS

                Est: $22,000 - $28,000

                EMILY KAME KNGWARREYE (B.c.1910-1996) ARLATYEY - PENCIL YAM 98 Creative Native certificate of authenticity catalogue number VTR-EKK9856 accompanies this artwork Natural earth pigments on canvas 120 x 85cm Estimate $22,000/28,000 AUD

                GFL Fine Art
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas
                May. 02, 2023

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas

                Est: $60,000 - $80,000

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed 'Emily Kngwarreye / 93G040' verso 151 x 121 cm PROVENANCE Emily Kngwarreye, Alice Springs Delmore Gallery, Alice Springs, commissioned from the above in 1993 Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London Private Collection, England, acquired from the above Aboriginal Art, Sotheby's Australia, Sydney, 20 October 2008, lot 246, illustrated Private Collection, London, acquired from the above

                Smith & Singer
              • EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Merne Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas
                May. 02, 2023

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Merne Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas

                Est: $80,000 - $100,000

                EMILY KNGWARREYE 1908-1996 Merne Alhalkere (1993) synthetic polymer paint on canvas inscribed '93K021/ Emily Kngwarreye / Delmore' verso 153 x 121.5 cm PROVENANCE Emily Kngwarreye, Alice Springs Delmore Gallery, Alice Springs, commissioned from the above Donald Holt, Delmore Downs Station, Northern Territory Aboriginal and Oceanic Art Including Paintings by Emily Kngwarreye from The Delmore Collection, Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 27 March 2013, lot 11, illustrated Private Collection, Adelaide, acquired from the above Australian & International Fine Art, Menzies, Melbourne, 9 February 2017, lot 54, illustrated Private Collection, Victoria, acquired from the above

                Smith & Singer
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