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Henry H. La Thangue Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1859 - d. 1929

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    • Lot withdrawn: please contact Bonhams for more information about this lot
      Jun. 03, 2020

      Lot withdrawn: please contact Bonhams for more information about this lot

      Est: -

      Lot withdrawn: please contact Bonhams for more information about this lot

      Bonhams
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) - Sussex Apples
      Jul. 11, 2018

      Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) - Sussex Apples

      Est: £150,000 - £250,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) Sussex Apples oil on canvas 42 x 35 in. (106.7 x 88.9 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert LA Thangue (British 1859-1929).
      Aug. 01, 2014

      Henry Herbert LA Thangue (British 1859-1929).

      Est: £60 - £80

      Henry Herbert LA Thangue (British 1859-1929). ''Study Of A Boy With A Calf'' Original lithograph on grey wove paper. 12 x 9.25 inches approximately. In original folder. From the studio magazine special supplement - representative art of our time 1903.

      Gerrards Auction Rooms
    • Circle of Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) Profile of a Young Lady
      Dec. 02, 2013

      Circle of Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) Profile of a Young Lady

      Est: €800 - €1,200

      Circle of Henry Herbert La Thangue (1859-1929) Profile of a Young Lady oil on canvas signed h:34  w:23.50 cm.

      Morgan O'Driscoll
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929)
      Jul. 10, 2013

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929)

      Est: £12,000 - £18,000

      The fisherman signed 'H.H.LATHANGUE.' (lower right) oil on canvas 40.5 x 29cm (15 15/16 x 11 7/16in).

      Bonhams
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      Dec. 13, 2012

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £20,000 - £30,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) A Spanish Mill signed 'H. H. La Thangue' (lower left) and further signed and inscribed 'A Spanish Mill H.H. La Thangue' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas 38½ x 43 in. (97.8 x 109.2 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      May. 31, 2012

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £120,000 - £180,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) The Wool Gatherer signed 'H.H. LA THANGUE' (lower right) oil on canvas, in the artist's original frame 63¾ x 49 in. (161.9 x 124.5 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      Dec. 15, 2011

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £100,000 - £150,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) The First Meal signed 'H.H.LA THANGUE.' (lower left) oil on canvas 43 x 38½ in. (109.2 x 97.8 cm.) Painted circa 1894

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      Dec. 15, 2011

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £60,000 - £80,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) Calling to the Valley signed 'H. H. LaThangue' (lower left) and signed and inscribed 'Calling to the Valley H. H. La Thangue' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929) Polly
      Jul. 13, 2011

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929) Polly

      Est: £10,000 - £15,000

      Polly bears a later signature 'H.H.LA THANGUE' (lower left), inscribed 'POLLY/HH La Thangue ARA' on an old label attached to the reverse of the frame oil on canvas 28.5 x 23.5cm (11 1/4 x 9 1/4in).

      Bonhams
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929) A Mediterranean Island
      Jan. 27, 2011

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, RA (British, 1859-1929) A Mediterranean Island

      Est: £10,000 - £15,000

      A Mediterranean Island signed 'H.H.LA THANGUE.' (lower left); inscribed with title on reverse oil on canvas 41 x 50cm (16 1/8 x 19 11/16in).

      Bonhams
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      Dec. 15, 2010

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £30,000 - £50,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) Spring in Provence signed 'H. H. La Thangue' (lower left) oil on canvas 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)
      Dec. 16, 2009

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929)

      Est: £300,000 - £500,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A. (1859-1929) In the Orchards, Haylands, Graffham signed 'H.H. LA THANGUE' (lower right), and inscribed by the artist 'H.H. La Thangue' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas 40 x 35 in. (101.6 x 88.8 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A., (1859-1929)
      Dec. 16, 2009

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A., (1859-1929)

      Est: £10,000 - £15,000

      Henry Herbert La Thangue, R.A., (1859-1929) Provençal Lane, Martigues signed 'H.H. LA THANGUE' (lower right), and inscribed by the artist 'Provencal Lane' (on the reverse of the stretcher). oil on canvas 23 x 26 in. (58.4 x 66 cm.)

      Christie's
    • HENRY HERBERT LA THANGUE R.A. (BRITISH, 1859-1929)
      Oct. 10, 2008

      HENRY HERBERT LA THANGUE R.A. (BRITISH, 1859-1929)

      Est: £4,000 - £6,000

      HENRY HERBERT LA THANGUE R.A. (BRITISH, 1859-1929) Provencal Oaks, Bormes, 1913, signed 'H. H. LATHANGUE' lower right, oil on canvas, 21 ¢" x 23 ¢" (see illustration) Provenance: Purchased by Moses Nightingale Esq. (possibly from the Leicester Galleries, London, 1914); thence by descent Exhibited: London, Leicester Galleries, Exhibition of Paintings by H. H. La Thangue, R.A., April 1914, no. 9 Brighton, City Art Gallery and Museum, Memorial Exhibition of Works by the Late H. H. La Thangue R. A., September 1930, no. 21 Literature: Anon, Watercolours and Oils at Hazeldene, Crawley, Sussex, 1919, no. 105, as Provencal Oaks, Bormes, 1913 La Thangue established a studio at Bormes, a village eight miles from HyÞres, during the Edwardian years, just before its 'semi-Moorish streets à mellow with age' began to attract itinerant artists. The New Zealand painter, Sydney Lough Thompson, who visited him in 1915 indicates that he was well established in the village prior to the Great War. Thompson appears to have followed in La Thangue's footsteps, painting in Bormes, St Jeannet and Grasse in the 1920s, one of many artists attracted to the region. A travel writer of the twenties noted that it had 'found favour in the sight of many painters who wish to pursue their art beneath the azure skies of the midi, far from the grey winter of Paris or Brittany' (Capt. Leslie Richardson, Things Seen on the Riviera, 1927, p. 25). Known since 1968 as Bormes-les-Mimosas, the town lies at one end of the 'Mimosa Road' which stretches up the coast to Grasse, centre of French perfume production. As is clear from La Thangue's Royal Academy Diploma picture, collecting flowers for perfume became one of the painter's most important themes (McConkey, A Painter's Harvest, 1978, Oldham Art Gallery, no. 31). Exploring cart tracks to discover neglected hillside gardens became his daily routine in the years preceding his solo exhibition of 1914 and many landscapes resulted. Provencal Oaks, Bormes, included in the Leicester Galleries exhibition in 914, shows the small evergreen, shallow-rooted Cork or Kermes oaks native to the area (Comerfield Casey, Riviera Nature Notes, 1903, [2004 ed.], p. 47). Other Nightingale acquisitions such as A Provencal Sea, Bormes, shown at the Royal Academy in 1918, and two further works entitled Provencal Landscape, Bormes, show trees of a similar variety. One of these, identical in size to the present work and painted from a slightly more elevated position overlooking the bay, may have been intended as a companion-piece, A Provencal Landscape, Bormes, c. 1913 (sold Christie's 19 June 1997) (fig 1). Commenting on his work in 1905, the critic of The Academy noted that while 'he delights in the brilliant lights and reflections of southern climesàEvery touch appears to have been put on with a heavily loaded spatula andàhe is scrupulous to give the conflicting colours of reflectionà' The effect gave La Thangue's landscapes a characteristically granular quality which, sometimes reminding the viewer of Monet's work, is quite unique. In common with Monet, La Thangue also appears to have been fascinated by the changing light at different times of the day, although he appears not to have painted these phases from precisely the same angles.

      Mallams
    • Henrietta R. Rae (1859-1928)
      Nov. 30, 2000

      Henrietta R. Rae (1859-1928)

      Est: $362,500 - $507,500

      Hylas and the Water Nymphs signed 'Henrietta Rae' (lower right); and further inscribed 'Hylas and the Water Nymphs/Henrietta Rae (Mrs. Ernest Normand)/4 Fox Hill Gardens/Upper Norwood/London S.E.' (on a label on the reverse) oil on canvas 56 x 873/4 in. (142.3 x 222.8 cm.) PROVENANCE Bought from the artist by Sir Alfred and Lady Newton, and by descent in their family until 1988; Weycroft Hall sale (Michael Matthews, Honiton), 21 October 1988, lot 50. LITERATURE Royal Academy Pictures, London, 1910, p. 36. Chrstopher Wood, Dictionary of Victorian Painters, Woodbridge, 1971, p.114. Antiques Trade Gazette, 12 November 1988, p.31, illustrated. EXHIBITION London, Royal Academy, 1910, no. 447. NOTES The youngest of seven children, Henrietta Rae was born in Hammersmith and brought up in Holloway. Her father was a civil servant with literary and theatrical interests, her mother a musician who had studied under Mendelsohn. In 1874, when she was fifteen, she entered Heatherley's School of Art in Newman Street. She was the School's first female student, and her fellow pupils included Solomon J. Solomon, Edmund Blair Leighton (see lot 9), and T.C. Gotch. Three years later she graduated to the Royal Academy Schools, where among her contemporaries were Margaret Dicksee, Arthur Hacker, Stanhope Forbes, Henry La Thangue, Ernest Normand, Solomon J. Solomon again, and the sculptor Alfred Gilbert. Her teachers included the veteran W.P Frith, Frank Dicksee, the elder brother of her friend Margaret, Hubert von Herkomer, and Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, who influenced her strongly for a time. She began to exhibit in 1879, showing a small landscape at the Society of British Artists. The following year she sent work to the Dudley Gallery, and in 1881 she made her debut at the Royal Academy with a portrait, Miss Warman . The RA remained her principal place of exhibition for thirty-eight years, although she also supported the Grosvenor Gallery, the New Gallery, the Institute of Painters in Oil-Colours, and other bodies. Her work embraced portraits, landscapes, literary subjects and eighteenth-century genre scenes … la Marcus Stone, but she saw herself primarily as a painter of classical themes, often carried out on a considerable scale and generally with a strong emphasis on the female nude. This essentially Victorian tradition she was to maintain tenaciously well into the twentieth century. In 1884 Rae married her fellow RA student Ernest Normand, and the following year they joined the artistic community, dominated by Sir Frederic Leighton, G.F. Watts and other luminaries, in the Holland Park area of Kensington. Leighton, who of course was President of the RA and embodied the Victorian art establishment, became the couple's hero. He took a personal interest in their progress, profoundly influenced their treatment of classical subjects, and ensured that, like him, they contributed to the murals executed for the Royal Exchange in the City of London. Rae's painting, The Charities of Sir Richard Whittington, was eventually completed in 1900. This was only one example of Rae's considerable success during these years. Her Euridice had won medals in international exhibitions in Paris and Chicago, while Ophelia was bought for the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool, in 1890. This year, however, both she and Normand suffered a crisis of confidence when their pictures were badly hung at the Royal Academy, and they decided to seek further instruction at the Acad‚mie Julian in Paris. This may seem surprising, given that they were already well established artists while Rae was a headstrong and independent personality, but no doubt they were influenced by the fact that so many of their contemporaries had enjoyed a Parisian training. At all events, that summer found them working in the French capital under Benjamin-Constant and Jules LefŠvre. They then went on to spend some weeks painting en plein air at Grez, the village near Barbizon which had been an inspirational centre for young artists of all nationalities since the early 1870s. On their return to London, the couple were dismayed to find that Leighton strongly disapproved of Rae's latest work, which had become more 'impressionistic' under the influence of Paris and Grez. In 1892 they decided to leave the rather claustrophobic world of Holland Park and moved to Norwood in south-east London. There in a specially constructed studio, complete with a 'glass house' condusive to open air effects, Rae completed Psyche before the Throne of Venus, a ten-foot long canvas which appeared at the RA in 1894 and was bought by the wealthy mining engineer George McCulloch, entering his great collection in Queen's Gate. For some years prior to this Rae had abandoned classical subjects, but the success Psyche, which she regarded as her masterpiece, led her to return to her favourite genre, many examples of which followed. A visit to Italy in 1896, surprisingly enough her first, proved a great stimulus. In 1905 she was the subject of a monograph by Arthur Fish. It is full of inacuracies, but remains the most substantial source of information about her life and work. In 1910, five years too late to be mentioned by Fish, the present picture appeared at the Royal Academy. Painted when the artist was fifty, it epitomises her style; the classical theme, the ambitious scale, the emphasis on the female nude and the stylistic synthesis between academic form and 'impressionistic' handling, are all typical. Hylas, whose story is told by Theocritus, was a handsome Greek youth who acted as servant and companion to Hercules during the expedition of the Argonauts to capture the Golden Fleece. When the party made landfall one evening, he was sent to find fresh water, and came to a spring where the Naiads, or waternymphs, were bathing. Captivated by his beauty, they dragged him into the water, and he was never seen again. The subject had been memorably treated by J.W. Waterhouse in one of his finest works, exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1897 (fig.1). Rae would certainly have known this picture, and there are obvious similarities between Waterhouse's version and hers, although characteristically she opts for a larger canvas and a more complex design. She must also have been aware of another work which dealt with the theme of nymphs, or, in this case, a mermaid, dragging a young man down to a watery death, namely Burne-Jones's Depths of the Sea (private collection). This picture had appeared at the RA in 1886, being the only work the artist ever showed at Burlington House. However, while it adds to the iconographical context of Rae's picture, in terms of composition and psychology it exist in a different world. Despite its size, Hylas and the Water Nymphs seems to have attracted no critical comment when it was exhibited. As reviewers often noted, literary subject pictures were becoming increasingly rare on the Academy's walls, while critics for their part were not only writing much shorter reviews than they had done during the Victorian heyday but tended to reserve their comments for works which represented more realistic and seemingly advanced trends. For all this, the picture found a good home, being bought by Rae's patrons Sir Alfred and Lady Newton and installed at Weycroft Hall, their country house near Axminster in Devon. It seems likely that Rae had met the Newtons through her work for the Royal Exchange, since Sir Alfred had been Lord Mayor of London in 1899. That year she had exhibited a portrait of their son, H.K. Newton, at the New Gallery. A likeness of Lady Newton (illustrated in Fish, facing p.90) was shown at the RA the following year, and one of Sir Alfred himself would appear there in 1914. Hylas and the Water Nymphs remained at Weycroft Hall until a house sale was held in October 1988. The picture was the star lot of the sale.

      Christie's
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