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Vicente Silva Manansala Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1910 - d. 1981

Vicente Silva Manansala, born in the Philippines, is internationally celebrated for his groundbreaking work in Cubism. He pursued fine arts at the University of the Philippines and later studied in Paris and New York City. As countries began recognizing the potential in Manansala's drawings in the late 1940s, he was offered grants and fellowships from the United States, Canada, and France. Today, Vicente Silva Manansala art for sale is highly coveted.

Though he studied classical painting, Chinese calligraphy, and stained glass art, his passion lay in Cubism. As a result, Vicente Silva Manansala paintings and drawings portray Filipino culture through his unique spin on the style, now called Transparent Cubism. This artistic technique can be seen in Vicente Silva Manansala drawings, where poverty, nudity, and intimacy are expressed through overlapping, translucent brush strokes. Buyers can experience many artistic takes on fine nude drawings on gallery listings and at auction.

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                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fish
                  Jun. 08, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fish

                  Est: ₱400,000 - ₱520,000

                  Fish signed (lower right) watercolor on paper 16" x 23" (41 cm x 58 cm) PROVENANCE: Private collection, USA While many might find watercolors unpredictable and problematic (watercolor is fast-drying, hard to control, and heavily dependent on many outside factors), National Artist Vicente Manasala exerts great control over the medium. “Watercolors are one of my favorite mediums to use,” he said in Tagalog as written by Isabel A. Nazareno in Discovering Manansala. “It’s beautiful…it demands that you control it. It is difficult if you allow it to control you.” This incredible amount of restraint is extended to his Fish. Layers upon layers of colors were employed to create a diffused effect on the work. Nazareno in Discovering Manansala wrote Manansala, a practical man, refused to buy perishable goods just for his still-life paintings. Instead, he accompanied his wife Hilda to the market where he catalogued the array of produce on display. The fishes in Manansala’s Fish lie on their side, skeletons on display and very reminiscent of the scene in the local palengke where mothers carefully peruse for the ingredients in their next meal. Even in his still life, Manansala’s works imbibe the Filipino spirit. Fish recalls the daily market trips – an event one so often takes that it has already lost its appeal – and gives it a refreshing twist. It shines a spotlight on the seemingly mundane and gives it life, reminding us to take the time to appreciate the little things in life while remembering the people who have brought these goods to us – the farmers, the fishermen, and the vendors in their stalls. (Hannah Valiente)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Two Women, Banff
                  Jun. 08, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Two Women, Banff

                  Est: ₱1,000,000 - ₱1,300,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON J. ANTONIO ARANETA COLLECTION Two Women, Banff signed and dated 1948 (upper left) oil on canvas 11 1/2" x 15 1/2" (30 cm x 39 cm) Manansala’s First Brush With Cubism: A Felicitous Encounter in the Canadian Rockies By the time the Philippines ushered into the 1940s, Vicente Manansala was still finding his creative footing. Although by then among the legendary “Thirteen Moderns,” Manansala found painting to be a mere “skillful transposition of reality on a piece of paper or canvas,” as Rod. Paras-Perez puts it in his book Manansala. At that time, Manansala had been working as an illustrator for the Herald. In the years immediately after the Second World War, Manansala, who had been living in the slums of Reina Regente in Binondo, joined the nascent Art Association of the Philippines, founded on 15 February 1948 by its matriarch, Purita Kalaw-Ledesma. Manansala would become active in the organization, joining its “First National Art Exhibition” on 3 July 1948 and eventually bagging the 3rd prize for his oil on canvas work “Banaklaut (Boatmen),” following the respective 1st and 2nd prizes nods of Botong Francisco for “Kaingin” and Demetrio Diego for “Capas.” The AAP would also bestow Manansala an honorable mention for “I Believe in God.” Manansala would find artistic inspiration from Botong. In Cid Reyes’ “Conversations on Philippine Art,” Manansala says he has deep admiration and high regard for the Angono master’s virtuoso. He would then admit that Botong’s influence on his early works spilled onto his style and even to the point of capturing the master’s artistic feeling: folk, solemn, and possessing delicate elegance and rhythm. Manansala even shared that he mistakenly attributed his own 1948 work “I Believe in God” (now displayed in the National Museum) to Botong’s when he saw it in “The Manila Times” one day in April 1971. In June 1949, Manansala, who had been working as a staff artist for Ramon Roces Publications and the “Evening News,” won a sixmonth UNESCO Art Fellowship to Canada through the Canadian Council for Reconstruction, a fellowship program for artists from war-ravaged countries. Manansala’s win came as a result of his triumphs at the AAP and at a 1949 art competition organized by the Philippine National Red Cross, in which his design of the Red Cross as a lifesaver landed the second prize and was subsequently reproduced on two million copies of 4-plus-4 denomination semipostal Red Cross stamps. With his major feat, the AAP honored Manansala with a banquet at the Selecta Restaurant along Dewey (Roxas) Boulevard on June 18 and left for Canada the following day. Manansala, notes Roces, was the sole Filipino painter to be awarded the grant and was to enroll at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Banff located in Alberta, 4,500 feet high up on the Canadian Rockies. Manansala’s grant included free passage, a monthly allowance of $180, and $300 for traveling expenses. Owing to its idyllic environment, the arts center and leisurely capital that is Banff possessed a stimulating atmosphere for honing one’s virtuoso; students and artists loved Banff for the creative liberty it endowed them. Manansala first studied under an instructor with whom he would have disputes. Roces succinctly narrates, “An instructor with academic inclinations saw one of Manansala’s first classroom works and noted that the painting would be all right if the colors were changed. Manansala thought otherwise. He was convinced that color was what lent individually to a painting. His retort was brief: “I’ll change you first before I’ll change my colors!”” Eventually, Manansala moved to Joseph “Joe” Plaskett’s class. Manansala and Plaskett would quickly form a brotherhood built on creative camaraderie. (They even shared the same dorm room!) Manansala would join Plaskett on trekking and hiking excursions to hilltops, cliffs, and riverbanks overlooking the breathtaking Canadian Rockies to sketch landscapes. In one of those leisurely excursions (or even on Plaskett’s after-class sessions), the Canadian mentor-artist would formally introduce Manansala to the tenets of Cubism. Manansala would shed his Botong impulses and take on the road less traveled by his fellow artists in the motherland. Roces writes, “Plaskett showed Manansala a portrait fragmented into strips, which he was working on. Explaining that painting was primarily a question of manipulating space, Plaskett shifted the strips around, creating in the process an intensely active planar surface, a surface where each shape appeared to push or pull other shapes.” Although he worked mainly in a Post-Impressionist and Abstract Expressionist visual language, Plaskett possessed an affinity with Cubism. He once said, “Cubism came about because, in the process of analyzing form, something that lay in the form, a plane could be lifted out to float on its own.” Like a visionary reveling in the peace and quiet of Banff, Manansala saw the dawn of ingenuity with Plaskett’s artistic guidance. Manansala would take inspiration from this process, resulting in works that would become his first serious foray into Cubism, including this 1949 work at hand titled Two Women, Banff—the earliest Manansala cubist masterpiece to be offered at auction. The work depicts two women inspired by Manansala’s female classmates/acquaintances at Banff. They are shown in the height of their wonder, awe, and heedfulness, probably in sketching a sweeping vista of the picturesque Canadian Rockies or keenly listening to a mentor’s lectures. Manansala likely produced this work in one of his laidback periods of serenity and spontaneity. Did Manansala paint this in one of his painting classes? In an impromptu painting session at Banff’s great outdoors with his classmates as a form of creative relaxation? Or even in the quietude of his room while being guided by Plaskett? The answer’s left to the viewer’s fancy. In this painting, we see broad and overlapping planes of geometric forms, which are emphasized by a muted palette. Manansala endows the space with a delicate tension emphasized through the shunning of depth, effectively merging the foreground and background and resulting in solidity and flatness outlining the abstracted images of two women. Much like his Botong-inspired works, Manansala employs desaturated colors. Before his Canadian sojourn, Manansala’s works had already exhibited Cubistic tendencies, albeit muted, as evidenced by the blocky nature of his Botong-inspired works. But Manansala’s study grant to Canada would act as a light to find his own virtuoso, culminating in his career-defining Transparent Cubism, his shining legacy to Filipino art. (Adrian Maranan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fruit Vendors
                  Jun. 08, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fruit Vendors

                  Est: ₱16,000,000 - ₱20,800,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DR. AND MRS. JOSE SAN GABRIEL COLLECTION Fruit Vendors signed and dated 1977 (upper left) oil on canvas 34" x 39" (86 cm x 99 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist EXHIBITED Ayala Museum, Images of Nation: Vicente Manansala as Social Realist (In Celebration of National Heritage Month 2010 and the birth centenary of Vicente Manansala), Makati City, 27 May - 4 July 2010 LITERATURE Paras-Perez, Rodolfo. Manansala. Manila: PLC Publications, 1980. Illustrated on page 26 and painting description on page 27. Images of Nation: Vicente Manansala as Social Realist (Exhibition Catalog). Makati City: Ayala Foundation, Inc., Filipino Heritage Festival, Inc., and Friends of Manansala Foundation, Inc., 2010. Published in conjunction with the exhibition "Images of Nation: Vicente Manansala as Social Realist" at the Ayala Museum. Full-color illustration and painting description on page 49. Vicente Manansala: The Greatest Filipino Painter of the 1970s Manansala was at the height of his artistic and commercial powers during the 1970s. Ask anyone well-versed in the arts during the 1970s, and they can proudly and wholeheartedly profess that “Manansala is the greatest living Filipino painter.” Although Manansala had already exposed himself abroad through the numerous study grants he had received, the 1970s witnessed his works being exhibited in major international cities. This included the 1971 show in New Zealand, in which his early work I Believe in God (which he mistook as a very beautiful Botong when he saw it in The Manila Times), was loaned by the National Museum and a late 1977 exhibition at the International Monetary Fund Center in Washington, D.C. In fact, during this fruitful decade, Manansala’s shows in the country were instant blockbusters; the entire show would be sold out in a quick snap. There was his 1974 exhibition at Silay, Negros Occidental, in which all 40 art pieces were sold in only ten minutes, breaking a record for a Philippine exhibition, as a report in the periodical Woman’s Home Companion. “For more than 20 years, Manansala has been receiving invitations from museums and galleries abroad for one-man shows,” says the article. “But he has turned them all down. That is because, although a prolific artist who religiously paints every day, he cannot gather enough pieces for one-man shows. His works are bought before they are even started.” In another show, in December 1977, art critic Leonidas Benesa wrote in the Philippines Daily Express that all 16 artworks were sold before the exhibit had even opened. Benesa raves about its rarity in the Manila art world, saying that before Manansala, only Tabuena had achieved this feat. In one 1971 interview, Manansala admits that he had lived comfortably enough, thanks to his art and the incessant demand patrons had built upon it. But despite the wild gush of success, Manansala remained homespun and humble. In Binangonan, Manansala would always stroll along the hilly terrain of his environs, painting prodigiously and always greeting his neighbors with a radiant smile. His neighbors would always attest to a modest man who was always all smiles at them and was friendly to the underprivileged. which was his wife’s ancestral home. Dr. San Gabriel’s daughter vividly recalls that their father loved Fruit Vendors as “it was not the usual painting with color.” “He would talk about how impressive it was that he could make a monochrome painting come to life, and that the faces of the women were multifaceted; you can view them as front facing or side view,” she says. The work at hand is a valuable memento from Manansala’s prime decade. More than the blockbuster period from when it was painted, this piece is palpable proof of Manansala’s constant experimentation. Manansala renders the painting solely in a black-and-white palette. For him, black-and-white compositions are more important than colored ones, saying in a 1973 interview with Cid Reyes that a painting’s valor shines brighter in a black-and-white painting. He cites his idol Picasso’s Guernica as a prime example.

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala
                  May. 08, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala

                  Est: $15,000 - $20,000

                  Filipino, 1910-1981 Untitled, 1957 Signed and dated Manansala 57 (lr) Oil on Masonite 25 x 13 3/4 inches (63.5 x 35 cm) (Framed dimensions: 26 1/8 x 14 3/4 x 1 1/2 inches) Frame rubbing with scattered small chips along edge. The corners of the panel are rounded. The work is apparently on the reverse of a discarded earlier work. No evidence of restoration under UV inspection.

                  DOYLE Auctioneers & Appraisers
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Apr. 20, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱80,000 - ₱104,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON J. ANTONIO ARANETA COLLECTION Nude 340 dated 1967 charcoal on paper 27" x 36" (69 cm x 91 cm) PROVENANCE Cultural Center of the Philippines

                  Leon Gallery
                • VICENTE MANANSALA (1910 - 1981) CHARCOAL 1973
                  Apr. 07, 2024

                  VICENTE MANANSALA (1910 - 1981) CHARCOAL 1973

                  Est: $600 - $800

                  Vicente Manansala (1910-1981) charcoal of nude woman. Signed Manansala 73 in pencil upper left. Excellent condition. Art measures 17.5" x 22.5", frame measures 22.5" x 27".

                  Neely Auction
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Maliputo
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Maliputo

                  Est: ₱1,000,000 - ₱1,300,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF A DISTINGUISHED FAMILY Maliputo signed and dated 1979 (upper right) watercolor on paper 18" x 24" (46 cm x 61 cm) PROVENANCE: Acquired directly from the artist EXHIBITED: Tall Galleries, Metropolitan Mueum of Manila, Si Mang Enteng...Encountering Manansala, Manila, May 20 - July 31, 2010 LITERATURE: Si Mang Enteng...Encountering Manansala (Exhibition Catalog). Manila: Metropolitan Museum of Manila, 2010. Published on the occasion of the Vicente Manansala retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Manila in 2010. Full-color photograph and painting description on page 33. WRITE UP: In this 1979 watercolor, the canvas unfolds as a deliberate departure from the familiar realm of maternal and filial motifs which predominantly defined his earlier work. Renowned for his commitment to representing reality, Manansala did not believe in purchasing perishable food solely for artistic endeavors. In a departure from traditional artistic practices, Manansala was known to create spontaneous watercolor renditions of freshly cooked dishes, meticulously laid out on banana leaves. This deliberate placement on the periphery of the dinner table introduces a nuanced dynamism, inviting contemplation on the precarious balance between tradition and modernity. His dedication to authenticity, whether amidst the bustling marketplace or shared meal, distinguishes Manansala as an artist devoted to encapsulating the beauty of Filipino culture in its most unadulterated manifestation. At the venerable age of sixty-nine, Manansala's keen eye for detail provides a glimpse into the artist's evolving exploration of form, color, and subject matter. Maliputo stands as a testament to Manansala's ability to continually refine his artistic expression, showcasing his adaptability and willingness to embrace diverse aspects of Filipino life in his artistic repertoire. (Ysabella Vistan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Seated Nude
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Seated Nude

                  Est: ₱400,000 - ₱520,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO “GENY” LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION Seated Nude signed and dated 1970 (upper right) charcoal on paper 24 1/4" x 18 1/4" (62 cm x 46 cm) WRITE UP: Vicente Manansala’s exploration of the human form in his late charcoal nudes, such as the lot at hand from 1970, represents a stark deviation from his earlier, color-saturated cubist works. These pieces showcase a minimalist aesthetic, utilizing the monochromatic palette of charcoal to emphasize the interplay of light and shadow. In this particular work, the subject sits, her back to the viewer, a solitary figure rendered in sweeping, confident strokes. Unlike the fragmented, bustling street scenes of his postwar oeuvre, this composition revels in its simplicity and tranquility. Art critics and historians often note how Manansala's later works, such as this, serve as a bridge between his figurative and abstract periods. The form is discernible yet distilled to its essence, a confident balance between recognizability and abstraction. Manansala's late charcoals are not just representations of the human figure; they are contemplations of form, a dance between the definitive and the ethereal. (Ysabella Vistan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude

                  Est: ₱600,000 - ₱780,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO “GENY” LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION Nude signed and dated 1967 (lower right) charcoal on paper 39" x 25" (99 cm x 64 cm) WRITE UP: In 1967, Manansala's artistic odyssey took him to Los Angeles, California, where he enrolled at the Otis Art Institute to re-learn basic drawing. Initially, he viewed the model in segmented parts – the head, hands, torso, and so forth – and his drawings reflected this piecemeal perception. However, he began to see the figure as a cohesive whole. This holistic approach required him to capture the essential movement and structure of the figure in broad, unifying strokes, integrating the various elements into a singular, harmonious composition. Drawing the nude form, in particular, held a special significance for Manansala. It was more than just an exercise in replicating human anatomy; it was an exploration of form and the interplay of light and shadow, rendered in warm chiaroscuro hues. The nude was a canvas through which he could explore the subtleties of light and shadow and the dynamic interplay of lines and curves. Manansala sought to capture not just the physical likeness of the human form but its innate grace, vulnerability, and strength. These drawings were a testament to his ability to convey the essence of the human experience through the simplicity of line and form. (Ysabella Vistan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Vendors
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Vendors

                  Est: ₱16,000,000 - ₱20,800,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO “GENY” LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION Vendors signed and dated 1963 (lower right) oil on canvas 39" x 27" (99 cm x 69 cm) WRITE UP: 1963 was a career high point for Vicente Manansala. That fortuitous year, Manansala was conferred the highly prestigious Republic Cultural Heritage Award, the precursor to the National Artist Award. Manansala would also be featured on the cover of two reputable magazines of his time: The Sunday Times Magazine (which featured his work "Birds in Flight") and The Chinese Weekly. Vendors come from that climactic year in Manansala's career. More than that, the piece comes from an exciting series of works that yet another makes Manansala a cubist virtuoso: the "Stained Glass Series." By 1963, Manansala had been very involved in a series of works dubbed the "Stained Glass Series." The name of this body of work comes from the fact that it evokes the "leaded, cloison effect seen in stained glass," as eminent art critic Rod. Paras-Perez puts it in his monograph on Manansala. The series began when Manansala was awarded a Smith-Mundt-Specialist Grant to study stained glass techniques at New York's Greenland Studio under Le Compt from March to July 1960. Speaking of the interesting origins of this series, Manansala says in the Paras-Perez book: "I had this vision while I was riding the cable car in L.A. (Los Angeles). At that time, I was studying stained glass at Greenland Studio. I saw a stained glass on top of a table with lights under it. The vibration and scintillating color fascinated me. Sabi ko, “Pwedeng gawin sa painting ito!” [I said to myself, this can be done in my paintings!]." "It [Stained Glass Series] is a phase that gives to his works a vibrancy of color and a stronger surface assertiveness, which prefigures a pendulum-like swing into the recovery of pictorial depth," writes Paras-Perez. 1963's Vendors evokes leaded lights or leaded windows (These are decorative windows created through came glasswork. This is made possible by soldering individual pieces of art glass through came strips (usually lead) and, thus, forming intricate designs.). Manansala uses this technique to render a diaphanous configuration of patterns that exude a vivid interplay between light, forms, and pictorial depth. Planes are fragmented through delicate gradations of color, which in turn makes distinguishing one figure from another easily identifiable, as "light" seemingly penetrates in a breeze through each and every plane. At this point in his career, it had already become evident that Manansala's cubist language avoids fragmenting his forms to retain that inner sense of dignity and humanity to his subjects, the Filipino masses. In doing so, Manansala evokes the inherent power of the broad range of the oppressed masses as the supreme liberator of society, much like how he renders the titular vendors in this masterpiece: enigmatic faces that give off a penetrating gaze and statures showing dignified pride in their profound contribution as providers and makers of society's wealth. With the subjects’ diaphanous forms, Vendors also evoke that fortuitous day during Manansala's ninemonth Parisian sojourn in 1950-51, where he studied at the University of Paris' Ecole des Beaux-Arts under the tutelage of the French cubist Fernand Leger, Picasso and Braque's close contemporary. Agnes Duval, writing in her article "Manansala," published in the April 1968 issue of Solidarity: Current Affairs, Ideas, and the Arts: "Window shopping one day [in Paris], he [Manansala] noted the interplay of reflected images on the plate-glass and the objects inside the window displays." This felicitous encounter would mark the realization within Manansala of his now-iconic and much-beloved Transparent Cubism. This style would tangibly manifest itself in the early 1960s, beginning in his Whirr Series, depicting birds in flight. Thus, we see in 1963's Vendors Manansala situating himself at the cusp of a style that has become his most important legacy in Philippine art. (Adrian Maranan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - a.) Nude b.) Nude
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - a.) Nude b.) Nude

                  Est: ₱400,000 - ₱520,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DELY TAMBUNTING ONGSIAKO COLLECTION a.) Nude signed and dated 1975 (upper left) charcoal on paper 17 1/2" x 12" (44 cm x 30 cm) b.) Nude signed and dated 1975 (upper left) charcoal on paper 12 1/2" x 19" (32 cm x 48 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist At fifty-seven, an age when most artists remain complacent in their skills, Vicente Manansala went to the Otis Art Institute in California where he enrolled at its prestigious drawing program. By then, he was already an established painter with a veritable list of awards under his belt, but ever a tenacious artist, he was on a continuous journey of improvement. The lot at hand, both nudes from 1975 and 1978, came after this period of study. They are studies that were drawn unconventionally for a nude: one focused on a woman’s bare back, her head bowed and her shoulders in an alluring slope while the other one was drawn lying on her side, hips jutting out with a blanket draped over her knees. The angle of the latter portrait also differed from the traditional nude, with the viewer’s perspective suggesting that they are standing in front of the woman. In both cases, the figures are made up of overlapping transparent shapes with the dramatic play of geometric shapes and the proficient manipulation of colors, lights, and shadows creating a vision of a human figure. In these works, Manansala exhibits his proficiency with the human body, light and shadow existing harmoniously on the rendered flesh. As art critic Rod Paraz-Perez stated: “[Manansala] saw the nude as a mass of interactive forms, of basic interpenetrating geometric masses to be stated with the simplest of means.” (Hannah Valiente)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Landscape
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Landscape

                  Est: ₱200,000 - ₱260,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DELY TAMBUNTING ONGSIAKO COLLECTION Landscape signed, dated 1976 (upper left), and dedicated "To Dely, happy birthday, Dec 22, 1975, From Enteng & Hilda" (lower left) watercolor on paper 12" x 16" (30 cm x 41 cm) PROVENANCE: A gift from the artist to the present owner WRITE UP: The earnest friendship Dely Tambunting-Ongsiako formed with Vicente Manansala is immortalized in this watercolor work by the maestro. This piece, a birthday present from Manansala and his wife, Hermenegilda “Hilda” Diaz, to Doña Dely, even possesses a remarkable handwritten dedication by the artist himself. Manansala once said in a May 1973 interview with Cid Reyes that he often uses watercolor as a medium “for relaxation” purposes, void of the obligations of any commissioned painting or mural. With his delicate and masterful control of every sweep of the brush, Manansala frees himself from the The influence of the Amorsolo of the South and his uncle Martino Abellana is evident in the works of Romulo Galicano. His works boast remarkable technicality, a product of his academic background at the University of the East and the private art lessons he got from Abellena when he was younger. His 1979 work Landscape showcases Galicano’s brilliance in shadow and colors. Depicting a provincial house in a shaded area, Galicano perfectly replicates the serenity of an early summer afternoon, the quiet that envelops the house as the family takes their afternoon siesta. The sunlight shines down from between the foliage of the trees, a bright pop of yellow burden of his prolific brush and liberates his spirit towards a realm of peace and quiet. This calming endeavor is made more passionate when elevated further into the context relating to the impeccable provenance of this charming work. (Adrian Maranan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Madonna and Child
                  Mar. 09, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Madonna and Child

                  Est: ₱7,000,000 - ₱9,100,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DELY TAMBUNTING ONGSIAKO COLLECTION Madonna and Child signed and dated 1977 (upper right) oil on canvas 26 1/2" x 24" (67 cm x 61 cm) PROVENANCE: Acquired directly from the artist EXHIBITED: Tall Galleries, Metropolitan Mueum of Manila, Si Mang Enteng...Encountering Manansala, Manila, May 20 - July 31, 2010 LITERATURE: Paras-Perez, Rod. Manansala. Manila: PLC Publications, 1980. Full-color illustration and painting description on page 28. Si Mang Enteng...Encountering Manansala (Exhibition Catalog). Manila: Metropolitan Museum of Manila, 2010. Published on the occasion of the Vicente Manansala retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Manila in 2010. Full-color photograph and painting description on page 31. WRITE UP: The years 1949 and 1950 were a turning point for artist Vicente Silva Manansala. Already an established painter in the Philippines with a veritable amount of awards under his belt, Manansala received a six-month grant from UNESCO to study in Quebec, Canada by 1949 followed by a nine-month scholarship in Paris in 1950. The West was already abuzz with a multitude of schools of thought at the time and Manansala, forever a student, drank it all in, immersing himself in art as he had never done before. “[For] a painter to be able to turn out a good piece of work, he must first have that feeling of consecration,” he stated, “with a mind absolved for all ego and pretense, a soul dedicated to the creation at hand, and a spirit properly attuned to the release of the vital and straining energies within.” He opened himself up to the mass of art movements but a particular one caught his attention. As he submerged himself in his studies in Canada, he met Joseph Plaskett, a notable painter and an equally notable mentor who showed Manansala the process of creating an intense and active plane, pointing out the push and pull of shapes on the canvas. It continued in France, where for eight months Manansala studied in the Montmartre studio of Cubist Fernand Leger. While both these events did not turn Manansala into a full-fledged Cubist after Europe’s own heart, they did leave him with enough appreciation for the movement to spin it and make it his own. “I feel that I have yet to learn a great deal,” mused Manansala after his fateful travel, published by Rod ParasPerez in Manansala Nudes, “and that is mostly about myself, my energies, my ideas, and the force and vitalities I have yet to awaken in me.” And so began Manansala’s foray into his very own version of cubism: the transparent cubism. For the next few decades, Manansala refined this method, producing work after work that, unlike the style of analytic cubism, retained its essential forms, tones, and shapes that are expertly juxtaposed to be both delicate and translucent. It was in his signature style of transparent cubism that Manansala unveiled another interpretation of the classic image of Mother and Child. This painting, entitled simply Mother and Child, was created almost 30 years after Manansala’s first brush with Cubism and as such, it shows Manansala’s cubism at a mature stage. Depicting a woman with her babe suckling at her chest, the figures were stylized using planes and geometric patterns. An air of protectiveness and love is evident in the way that the mother holds her child and the tender way she looks at them. He highlights the soft curve of the woman’s neck and breasts and emphasizes the baby by swaddling them in blue, a striking shade contrasting the warm palette. Manansala’s Mother and Child was created in the twilight years of his career, a prodigious one that lasted almost 60 years. Through the years, Manansala continued to aim for greater heights, forever on a quest for betterment. He was never truly satisfied with his works, always looking forward to make the next artwork better. Mother and Child is a culmination of decades of practice, accolades, and studies, a preview of Manansala at his maturity and a celebration of his continued and relentless breakthroughs. (Hannah Valiente)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Jan. 20, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱150,000 - ₱195,000

                  Baclaran signed and dated 1956 (lower right) watercolor on paper 13 1/2" x 18 1/2" (34 cm x 47 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Jan. 20, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱30,000 - ₱39,000

                  a.) Study (Front) stamped (lower right) pen and ink on paper 13" x 9 1/2" (33 cm x 24 cm) b.) Study (Verso) stamped (lower right) pen and ink on paper 9 1/2" x 13" (24 cm x 33 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Jan. 20, 2024

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱30,000 - ₱39,000

                  Study stamped (upper right) pen and ink on paper 8" x 11" (20 cm x 28 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Faith, Hope, and Charity
                  Dec. 02, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Faith, Hope, and Charity

                  Est: ₱3,000,000 - ₱3,900,000

                  Faith, Hope, and Charity signed and dated 1981 (upper right) oil on canvas 22” x 18 1/4” (55 cm x 46 cm) Accompanied by a certificate of attestation issued by Cora B. Lopa confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist Faith, Hope, and Charity is among Vicente Manansala’s last works, painted months before his passing on August 22, 1981. Here, Manansala depicts the three traditional theological virtues in their corresponding symbolisms and attributes. For Faith, Manansala uses the image of the white dove. In Christianity, the dove is a manifestation of the Holy Spirit, which came down from the heavens on Jesus’ baptism, symbolizing his purity and innocence as the Messiah, the “Anointed One,” to which the central dogma of Christianity is anchored. In this context, the dove signifies faith in Christ as the Son of God, the Redeemer of humanity from all its sins. The dove also evokes Manansala’s Whirr series, which Manansala once described as “the action of birds in flight [in which they] produce a whirring sound.” Manansala then renders the virtue of Hope in the form of the Easter lily, a species of flowering plants known for their slow growth and maturation; it is patiently cultivated for two to four years before it can be harvested. From this, Manansala uses the Easter lily as a metaphor for the eager anticipation and belief in the second coming of Christ and the full realization of the promise of everlasting life. The Easter lily resembles a trumpet, an allusion to the resounding announcement of Christ’s coming: first as a Redeemer of humanity and second, His triumphant return at the end of times to judge the living and the dead—the Parousia. Lastly, Charity is represented by the red rose, an enduring symbol of love. In Christian theology, charity is equated with love, in accordance with Christ’s commandment of “loving God above all” and “loving one’s neighbor as one’s self.” When viewed in its totality, the work at hand is Manansala’s prayer to his Creator—a form of thanksgiving for a prolific life and career, a celebration of his God-given abilities, and a plea for forgiveness for all transgressions. Faith, Hope, and Charity encapsulates Manansala as a man at peace with his being, surrendering to his Creator whatever life in him had remained. It is Manansala at his most reflective and spiritual. (Adrian Maranan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Madonna
                  Dec. 02, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Madonna

                  Est: ₱8,000,000 - ₱10,400,000

                  Madonna signed and dated 1980 (uppper left) oil on canvas 26” x 30” (66 cm x 76 cm) Accompanied by a certificate of attestation issued by Cora B. Lopa confirming the authenticity of this lot PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist LITERATURE Paras-Perez, Rod. Manansala. Manila: PLC Publications, 1980. Mentioned as “Madonna” on page 264 in Manansala’s “Chronology” by Florina H. Capistrano-Baker. Vicente Manansala takes a keen interest in anything Filipino. From the barrio to the city, his oeuvre features many Filipino subjects. One of his most famous works, Madonna of the Slums (1950), reimagines the popular image of the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus as a poverty-stricken mother and child in an urban shanty. A postwar artist who had experienced the hardship of war firsthand, Manansala’s works do not shy away from the uncomfortable realities of Philippine society. At first glance, this 1980 work, aptly entitled Madonna, seems a deviation from his typical works with the painting dappled in soft light colors. Like the dark Madonna of the Slums, a mother and her child are at the forefront. However while the former painting utilizes its warm muted palette to convey the cramped situation of the congested city, the 1980 Madonna is all cool bright colors. Blue and green are the dominating colors, with pops of pink and yellow to brighten the piece. The wind blowing in the mother’s hair and swirling through the trees in the background suggests an open space unlike the confined spaces of the slums of his usual works. However, while drastically different from his usual repertoire, this piece still features Manasala’s classic cubist style and his affinity for anything quintessentially Filipino. (Hannah Valiente)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Pieta
                  Dec. 02, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - Pieta

                  Est: ₱6,000,000 - ₱7,800,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE DON VICENTE “TIKING” H. LOPEZ, JR. COLLECTION Pieta signed and dated 1970 (lower right) oil on canvas 22 x 29 (56 cm x 74 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist WRITE UPThe friendship between Don Vicente “Tiking” Lopez, Jr. and Vicente Manansala was the quintessential embodiment of the artist-collector bond. Curator Lisa Guerrero Nakpil notes that of Don Tiking’s collection, which ranged from art and antiques, his trove of modern art was his most prized. The León Gallery curator writes that Don Tiking would invite the famous Saturday Group of Artists, to which Manansala once belonged, “to his penthouse at the family-owned Elena Apartments in Ermita. (The building was named after his mother, the elegant Doña Elena Hofileña Lopez. Tiking was thus cousin two times over to the Eugenio Lopezes.)” Guerrero Nakpil also made particular mention of a sumptuous feast at Don Tiking’s, which counted among its honorable guests Manansala. She writes: “Gathered at his table would be Vicente Manansala, Hernando R. Ocampo, Sym Mendoza, Alfredo Roces, and Tiny Nuyda, to name a few. There were also musical soirees featuring the Elena String Ensemble, which included members of the Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra with Don Tiking on his 17th-century cello. Jose Joya was a particularly avid fan of these evenings. Don Tiking would also invite this circle to enjoy the delights of the Vallehermoso country air.” It was in this atmosphere of congeniality and goodwill that Don Tiking acquired several masterpieces from Manansala. Among the Manansala opuses Don Tiking acquired was this poignant interpretation of the Pieta depicting Mary sorrowfully cradling the dead body of her son, Jesus. (In June 2022, León Gallery auctioned a Manansala from Don Tiking’s collection: Madonna No. 2, also a 1970 work.) A deeply spiritual and devout person, Don Tiking—who actively participated in the spiritual retreats and other ministerial activities of the Cursillo Foundation of the Philippines and later became a Eucharistic minister at Ermita’s Nuestra Senora de Guia Parish—found solace in the moving image of Christ’s passion and death, a reminder of his commitment to his vocation as a servant of the Lord. Manansala created Pieta at a time of his sweet, overwhelming success. In the same year as this work, he was conferred the Araw ng Maynila Award. Seven years prior, in 1963, Manansala was awarded the Republic Cultural Heritage Award, the prestigious precursor to the National Artist Award. But more than this string of continuous success, Pieta shows the maturation of Manansala’s Transparent Cubism, with his smooth and graceful brush strokes showing refinement and the meticulous ability to render transparent layers of superimposed planes so as to retain their sheer realism and heightened emotional resonance and imbibe a sense of humanization. Manansala’s journey to Transparent Cubism was an arduous two decades in the making. Manansala first laid the foundations of his cubist language during his ninemonth Parisian sojourn of 1950-51, in which he became the first Filipino to be awarded by the French government a scholarship to the famed Ecole des Beaux-Arts of the University of Paris. There, Manansala was mentored by the French cubist Fernand Leger, a close contemporary of the pioneers of Cubism Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, two of Manansala’s foremost luminaries. Agnes Duval, in her article “Manansala” in the April 1968 issue of Solidarity: Current Affairs, Ideas, and the Arts magazine, writes of Manansala’s particular catalyst for the birth of his Transparent Cubism. “Window shopping one day [in Paris], he [Manansala] noted the interplay of reflected images on the plate-glass and the objects inside the window displays.” And the rest, as they always say, is history. Pieta also encapsulates Manansala’s Catholic faith. In his landmark book Conversations on Philippine Art, Cid Reyes says to Manansala: “Isa pa hong lagi ninyong ipinipinta e yung Kristo.” Manansala answers: “Oo. Taon-taon yan, gumagawa ako ng isang Kristo.” The artist adds that it has become a kind of devotion, a religious vow. In Rod. ParasPerez’s book Manansala, the maestro revealed: “I used to go to Mass every day at the San Francisco Church. At 14, I wanted to become a priest.” On that account, Manansala imbibes a solemn, reverential atmosphere in his paintings of the suffering Christ. In his language of Transparent Cubism, Manansala never fragmented the subject; he remained faithful to its actuality. As such, Manansala captures the invincibility and omnipotence of the Divine, even in the face of agony and death. (Adrian Maranan)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - The Bayanihan of Philippine Country Livelihoods : Fishing, Rice, Abaca, Sugar, Copra, Home Industry (Mat and Hat Weaving)
                  Dec. 02, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1981) - The Bayanihan of Philippine Country Livelihoods : Fishing, Rice, Abaca, Sugar, Copra, Home Industry (Mat and Hat Weaving)

                  Est: ₱500,000 - ₱650,000

                  PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF HOLY ANGEL UNIVERSITY The Bayanihan of Philippine Country Livelihoods : Fishing, Rice, Abaca, Sugar, Copra, Home Industry (Mat and Hat Weaving) ca. 1970 pen and ink on paper 13” x 116 1/2” (33 cm x 296 cm) PROVENANCE: Acquired directly from the artist WRITE UPVicente Manansala, one of the country’s leading modernists, creates a pantheon of Philippine Country Livelihoods, with its central image being the Bayanihan, the spirit of community and cooperative spirit that is uniquely Filipino. Six industries are selected for this drawing : fishing, rice, abaca, sugar, copra, home industry (covering mat and hat weaving.) It was intended to be the template for a massive wood carving that would measure more than 7 feet in length. There are echoes of Botong Francisco’s Progress of Medicine mural created for the Philippine General Hospital — as well as foreshadowing of Ang Kiukok’s Fishermen. (Botong and Manansala were fellow instructors in UST; while Manansala would be a pivotal mentor to the young Ang. It is generally believed that, of all the artists that came out of the post war modernist movement, there is perhaps no one that inspired the next generation more than Vicente Manansala. He utilizes what art historian Rodolfo Paras- Perez described as a “unique synthesis of classistic and expressionist theories.” This is quite possibly one of the reasons why Manansala continues to be an imposing figure in the Philippine art scene. In his works, in watercolor or in painting, Manansala’s affinities lean towards the Filipino sensibility. He explored culture, intimacy, and poverty in his works, with Filipino landscapes and figures dominating his canvases. One of his most popular paintings, the Madonna of the Slums, repositions the Virgin Mary and baby Jesus into the Philippine squatters, opening the conversation about the intersection of Filipino culture and religion. He continues to explore the Filipino sensibility with this lot at hand. Created around 1970, this huge pen and ink creation depicts multiple scenes that are dear to the Filipino identity. Drawn in a mural-like fashion, Manansala portrays a sequence of women peering out of a window, men working in the fields, farmers planting rice, and fishermen hauling netful of fishes. All these are quintessential Filipino scenes that, through Manansala’s sketches, were brought into life.

                  Leon Gallery
                • VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (1910-1981) - Tiangge (Market Scene)
                  Nov. 28, 2023

                  VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (1910-1981) - Tiangge (Market Scene)

                  Est: $6,000,000 - $8,000,000

                  VICENTE SILVA MANANSALA (1910-1981) Tiangge (Market Scene) oil on canvas laid on board 124 x 195 cm. (48 7⁄8 x 76 3⁄4 in.)

                  Christie's
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled pen and ink on paper 8 3/4” X 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 9” x 12” (23 cm x 30 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled pen and ink on paper 8 3/4” X 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 6 3/4” x 11” (17 cm x 28 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 9” X 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled graphite on paper 9” X 13” (22 cm x 33cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  Carabao sketches a) 4 1/2” x 5 3/4” (11 cm x 15 cm) b) 4” x 6” (10 cm x 15 cm) c) 4 1/2” x 5 3/4” (11 cm x 15 cm) d) 4 1/2” x 5 3/4” (11 cm x 15 cm) e) 4 1/2” x 5 3/4” (11 cm x 15 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled pen and ink on paper 7” x 9” (18 cm x 23 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled stamped (upper left) ink on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm) b) Untitled graphite on paper 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Two Men graphite on paper 8 3/4” x 13” (22 cm x 33 cm) b) Woman graphite on paper 13” x 8 3/4” (33 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled stamped (lower right) graphite on paper 8” x 11” (20 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled graphite on paper 13” x 8 3/4” (33 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 8 3/4” x 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled graphite on paper 8 3/4” x 11” ( 22 cm x 28 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Man ink on paper 13” x 8 3/4 (33 cm x 22 cm) b) Man ink on paper 13” x 8 3/4 (33 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm) b) Untitled stamped (lower right) ink on paper 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 11” x 6” (28 cm x 15 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Bird ink on paper 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm) b) Birds ink on paper stamped (upper right) 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 8 3/4” x 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled pen and ink on paper 8 3/4” x 11” (22 cm x 28 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 11” x 8 3/4” (28 cm x 22 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled graphite on paper 6 3/4” x 8” (17 cm x 20 cm) b) Untitled graphite on paper 8” x 6 3/4” (20 cm x 17 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

                  a) Untitled pen and ink on paper 10” x 7 1/2” (25 cm x 19 cm) b) Untitled pen and ink on paper 8 3/4” x 11” (22 cm x 28 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱25,000 - ₱32,500

                  Untitled stamped (upper right) pen and ink on paper 10 1/4” x 8” (26 cm x 20 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

                  Portrait of a Man signed and dated 1943 (lower right) pastel on paper 13 1/2” x 9 1/4” (34 cm x 23 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱150,000 - ₱195,000

                  Seascape signed and dated 1940 (lower left) watercolor on paper 13 1/4” x 19” (34 cm x 48 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱15,000 - ₱19,500

                  All Souls Day In The Philippines signed and dated 1969 (upper right) ink on paper 10” x 20” (25 cm x 51 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by National Museum confirming the authenticity of this lot

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)
                  Oct. 21, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988)

                  Est: ₱10,000 - ₱13,000

                  Rural Scene handsigned and dated 1971 (lower right) serigraph, 48/352 11” x 10” (28 cm x 25 cm)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude
                  Sep. 09, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude

                  Est: ₱200,000 - ₱260,000

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) Nude signed and dated 1980 (upper left) charcoal on paper 25 3/4" x 18 1/2" (65 cm x 47 cm) The discipline to which the artist of the lot at hand subjected himself was draftsmanship. Vincente Manansala, throughout his entire artistic career, has consistently exhorted on the importance of teaching drawing, more than teaching art. According to the modernist master, “You can’t teach art. You can only teach drawing.” Other than his excellent draftsmanship, Manansala was also known for his transparent Cubism, the evocative layering of planar surfaces to evoke an image. He was able to extend this stylistic treatment to his charcoal works as well, which is exemplified by this untitled charcoal on paper piece dated 1980. However, cubism’s tendency to bisect forms did not extend to his depiction of the female form. Instead, he shows his deft skill in depicting the human body, rendering with utmost realism. (Isabella Romarate)

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Sugpo (Shrimp)
                  Sep. 09, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Sugpo (Shrimp)

                  Est: ₱2,200,000 - ₱2,860,000

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) Sugpo (Shrimp) signed and dated 1967 (upper right) oil on canvas 13 1/2" x 30" (34 cm x 76 cm) Vicente Manansala is a master of color manipulation, using translucent colors for its power and evocative appeal. His oeuvre is widely celebrated for his dexterity in amplifying the beauty of each rendered subject matter and theme. As he utilized his signature transparent cubist style, he stayed close to figuration and produced renditions in basic geometric shapes through different mediums. Through his technical approach to watercolor painting in particular, folk images and everyday objects are also masterfully depicted in its domestic context. The overall coherence in this painting is achieved by his distinct sensibilities of perception and color and ability to provide structure and texture.

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - London Park
                  Sep. 09, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - London Park

                  Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) London Park signed and dated 1971 (lower right) watercolor on paper 17" x 23" (43 cm x 58 cm) Vicente Manansala created landscape paintings with refined composure and restraint, as seen in this untitled piece done in 1971. He achieved this through his outstanding use of watercolor, his favorite medium. For him, the beauty of it is that it demands the artist to control it, it would be difficult if the artist allowed it to control them. Manansala excelled in manipulating the medium, which he had been using since childhood, even if many people found the unpredictability of watercolor problematic. He masterfully used the clear surface of the paper as a foil to the layers of color he applied to it, creating a diffused effect due to the greater amount of water used and allowing the colors to blend into each other more subtly. In the 1970, a year prior to the creation of this piece, Manansala was awarded the Patnubay ng Sining and received a grant from Germany to study in Zurich. (Isabella Romarate

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fish Vendors
                  Sep. 09, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Fish Vendors

                  Est: ₱16,000,000 - ₱20,800,000

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) Fish Vendors signed and dated 1969 (upper right) oil on canvas 30 1/2" x 34 1/2" (77 cm x 88 cm) FISHES THAT FEED THE SOUL Lasting Symbols of the Spirit — and Plenty and Prosperity by LISA GUERRERO NAKPIL By 1969 — the year ‘Fish Vendors’ was painted — Vicente Manansala was flush with success. He was not only the recipient of an armful of awards, (including the Republic Cultural Heritage Award in 1963), his one-man shows would attract thousands of guests on opening night. His latest show — the entire one, consisting of 40 paintings — would be snapped up in a matter of minutes by adoring collectors according to newspaper reports. He was undoubtedly one of the immortals among the “Thirteen Moderns’ of his once and future mentor, Victorio Edades. In the company of the arch-Neo Realist Hernando R. Ocampo, he would next become part of the most significant art movement of the country; and originate his own highly recognizable style that would be dubbed by art critics as ‘Transparent Cubism.’ Manansala had several sides to his art : The first being the abstracts produced under the aegis of the legendary Philippine Art Gallery. The second was his turns at a Filipino cubism, influenced by his interest in stained glass techniques and butterfly collection. Both of these facets were used to depict the Filipino condition, from life in the slums to queuing for rice rations to the narratives of candle vendors and vegetable hawkers; while all the while, speaking its truth in all its beauty. The beauteous film star Celia Flor (neé Trinidad Teodoro who would later become Mrs. Jose “Peping” Escaño Corominas) would meet Vicente Manansala in 1970. It was thanks to an introduction made by her bosom friend and Manansala aficionado Lucy Cruz, wife of the political pundit, later Philippine ambassador to the Hague and the United Kingdom. Unsurprisingly Manansala would ask her to pose in the nude for a portrait, a flattering invitation to which she obliged. She would then acquire other works from him, including a view of Holland Park and this remarkable work called “Fish Vendors.” In the work at hand, two women are surrounded by the bounty of the sea — dozens of baskets literally filled to the gills of fish of all shapes and sizes. There are a record number of them, 35 to be exact, with three blue, speckled crab for good measure. The fish would be a coded symbol of Christianity and its devout followers evading Roman persecution. It would become spiritual shorthand for the peace and serenity in the centuries to come. In Asia, the fish is both symbolic of ‘plenty’ and the prosperity it would bring. For both Celia Flor, who relished it everyday in her London home, and the maestro Mang Enteng, that was certainly most true.

                  Leon Gallery
                • Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude
                  Sep. 09, 2023

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) - Nude

                  Est: ₱200,000 - ₱260,000

                  Vicente Manansala (1910 - 1988) Nude signed and dated 1981 (upper right) charcoal on paper 24" x 18" (61 cm x 46 cm) In art, nudes are seen as embodiments of classical beauty and ideal form. To depict the eloquence and beauty of a person’s physique is a challenge for many artists, but Vicente Manansala was among the ones who demonstrated a profound understanding of human anatomy. Manansala’s nude works, whether in any medium he employed, show his dexterity and expertise in depicting the human body. When he was in his prime, a model would come to his house on Wednesdays to pose in the nude. Here, he captured the appealing features and even the flaws of the flesh with utmost realism, and, owing to the master’s clever manipulation, lights and shadows interact harmoniously in this charcoal piece. (Isabella Romarate)

                  Leon Gallery
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