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NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1939 -

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      • NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2015
        Mar. 26, 2024

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2015

        Est: $8,000 - $12,000

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI (c.1939 - 2023) BARATJALA, 2015 natural earth pigments and recycled print toner on eucalyptus bark 74.5 x 44.0 cm (irregular) bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre cat. 4816-U bears inscription on label verso: artist’s name and Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre cat. 4816-U PROVENANCE Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Buku-Larrŋgay at the Darwin Art Fair, Darwin Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre which states: 'Baratjula is a Madarrpa clan estate adjacent to Cape Shield where the artist camped with her father and his many wives as a young girl. She lived nomadically as part of a clan group with a flotilla of canoes between Groote Eyelandt and the mainland. Her father's name was Mundukul (lightning snake) and this is also the name of the serpent (also known as Water Python, Burrut'tji or Liasis Fuscus) which lives deep beneath the sea here. Some of the designs show the rock set in deep water between the electric 'curse' that the snake spits into the sky in the form of lightning, and the spray of the sea trying to shift the rock foundation of the Madarrpa. Yurr'yunna is the word used to describe the rough waves over-topping the rock and the spray flying into the sky. This journey from the sacred to the descriptive shifts even further where she uses her mark making to portray more anonymous natural features of her landscape such as drying billabongs in the flood-plains of cracking mud. Her identity cannot be separated from her art and so although she disavows any sacred intent the echo of miny'tji persists. ESSAY Noŋgirrŋa Marawili’s Baratjala, 2015, abounds with the energy of her coastal lands. Dark forms of rocks, painted in ochre and charcoal, are outlined in white dots and contained by an overlay of irregular parallel lines of smaller dots, evoking the rhythm and cyclical interactions of currents, tides and breaking waves. In recording adjacent sites of Yathikpa and Baratjala, located on Blue Mud Bay, Marawili asserts the secular nature of her painting, ‘I paint water designs – the water as it splashes onto the rocks at high tide…. the painting that I do is not sacred…. The paintings I do are from the outside, Water, Rock, Rocks which stand strong and the waves which run and crash upon the rock, the Sea spray. This is the painting I do, but I know the sacred designs.’1 Marawili began painting in the 1990s as an assistant to her husband, Djutjadjutja Munuŋgurr, adding cross-hatching and in-fill according to his instructions, and over the next decade she would collaborate with him following established Yolŋu bark painting conventions. Marawili didn't begin to emerge in her own right until 2005 when she became a regular painter at Buku-Larrŋgay, but her most original works appeared from 2011 when she began to paint interpretations of her paternal lands. Her current work refers back to these areas, remembering ancient ways of living directly on country she grew up on as a child.  Marawili’s work has been the recipient of a number of awards, winning the NAATSIA Best Bark award in 2015 and again in 2019, and she has been the subject of a major solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales in 2018. Her paintings were also included in major group exhibitions, such as  Tarnathi, Art Gallery of South Australia in 2019;  NIRIN, Biennale of Sydney in 2020;  Know My Name, National Gallery of Australia; and  Bark Ladies, National Gallery of Victoria run over the summer of 2021 – 2022.   1. Pinchbeck, C. (ed.),  Noŋgirrŋa Marawili. From My Heart and Mind, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2018, p. 21 CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE © Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, courtesy Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Art Centre

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • Noŋgirrŋa Marawili - Baratjala, 2019
        Jun. 20, 2023

        Noŋgirrŋa Marawili - Baratjala, 2019

        Est: $4,000 - $6,000

        Hailed as one of the great innovators in Yolngu art, Nonggirrnga Marawili creates paintings which embody the powerful Ancestral forces that flow through the land, sea and sky of her sacred country. The daughter of artist and renowned warrior Mundukul Marawili and sister of artist and senior cultural leader Djambawa Marawili, she grew up on the Madarrpa clan lands on Blue Mud Bay in the Gulf of Carpentaria and began painting in the 1990s by assisting her husband, Djutjadjutja Munuggurr with his barks. During her childhood, her father, his four wives, and their family, comprised more than fifty people who lived on the ocean beach at Darrpirra north of Cape Shield. They travelled in a fleet of canoes back and forth between the mainland and distant Groote Island. These are cyclonic, crocodile infested waters with huge tides and ripping currents where lightning spits across the sky, its sacred power hitting the sea spray as it rises and smashes into the rocky outcrop at Baratjala. Nonggirrnga's paintings capture this energy and power during the cyclonic wet season in the Top End by reducing the Law to its sacred elements in her designs.

        Cooee Art
      • NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2020
        Mar. 22, 2023

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2020

        Est: $30,000 - $40,000

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI born c.1939 BARATJALA, 2020 natural earth pigments and printer ink on composition board 242.0 x 121.5 cm bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Arts cat. 2301-20 PROVENANCE Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre, Yirrkala, Northern Territory (label attached verso) Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, Sydney This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre. Deutscher and Hackett would like to thank Will Stubbs from Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre for his assistance in cataloguing this work. ESSAY Noŋgirrŋa Marawili’s imposing contemporary bark painting Baratjala, 2020, crackles with energy. Bouncing between circular rock forms, Noŋgirrŋa’s fluid gestures evolve from jagged parallel lines into regular dotted chains and loose strings of diamonds and back again. Evoking the rhythm and cyclical interactions between extreme currents, tides and breaking waves of her maritime lands, these lines are Noŋgirrŋa’s own stylistic invention, adapted from the hatching and cross-hatching of her father’s and family’s miny’tji (sacred clan designs) . Noŋgirrŋa has capitalised on a gender specific way of working within the confines of Yolŋu law while asserting a responsibility for, and belonging to, country.     Painted in deep hues of burnt umber and ochre, starkly contrasted with overlaid lines of white gypsum, the tones of this work signal Noŋgirrŋa’s return to the natural pigments of Yolŋu art after a period of experimentation with bright synthetic inks from printer cartridges in 2017 – 2018. For Yolŋu, it is customary to paint country using only materials collected from country. The muted shimmering tones of Baratjala creates a warm and melancholic effect. This mirrors the role of senior women in ceremonial song cycles, who instead of singing, perform the milkarri (crying songs) as explained by the artist’s brother, Djambawa Marawili AM, ‘her paintings cry for the land’.1    Noŋgirrŋa’s father was Yolŋu leader Mundukul Marawili of the Madarrpa clan and her mother, Buluŋguwuy, was one of four wives. Her childhood was spent in a large, extended family group, living wakir (nomadically) around Yilpara and Blue Mud Bay, using a flotilla of hand-hewn canoes to travel between Groote Eyelandt and the mainland. While Noŋgirrŋa started painting in the early 1990s assisting her husband, Djutatdjuta Munuŋgurr from the Djapu clan, it wasn’t until after his death that she would become a regular painter at Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre in Yirrkala, and began to paint the lands of her paternal inheritance.2 Her current work refers back to these areas, remembering ancient ways of living directly on country as she had done as a child.     A leader in the innovation of contemporary bark painting, Noŋgirrŋa has pushed the boundaries of what Yolŋu law permits in its art practice. She uses sophisticated gestural abstraction to respectfully disavow any sacred intent, while keeping a personal foundation to its artistic vocabulary. The qualities of her expressive abstraction have enabled public institutions such as the National Gallery of Australia and the Art Gallery of New South Wales to recently reposition her work adjacent to (and in discussion with) artworks by Tony Tuckson and Rosalie Gascoigne in their permanent collection galleries. Her technical innovations, including use of printer cartridge ink and composition boards such as featured in Baratjala, bypass the seasonal limitations to the harvest and preparation of stringybark wood, allowing her to continue producing artworks all year round. Her creative interpretation of the rules has both carved out as space for her own practice and broadened Yolŋu and external understanding of what bark painting can be in the contemporary world.     The visual power of Noŋgirrŋa’s work and its innovation within cultural laws have not gone unnoticed in the Western structures of the art world. After winning Best Bark in both 2015 and 2019 NAATSIA awards, Noŋgirrŋa’s work has been the subject of a major solo exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales (2018), as well as included in major group exhibitions, such as Tarnathi, Art Gallery of South Australia (2019); NIRIN, Biennale of Sydney (2020); Know My Name, National Gallery of Australia; and Bark Ladies, National Gallery of Victoria (2021 – 2022).     1. Djambawa Marawili, 2015, quoted in Pinchbeck, C. (ed.), Noŋgirrŋa Marawili. From My Heart and Mind, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2018, p. 44   2. Noŋgirrŋa had already referred to Madarrpa subject matter in a tentative manner through printmaking – the Yirrkala Print Space at Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre existing since 1995, with elders limiting the use of sacred designs to works created completely manually, using natural materials. Ibid, pp. 15 – 16  LUCIE REEVES-SMITH © Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, courtesy Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Art Centre

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2018
        Mar. 22, 2023

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI, BARATJALA, 2018

        Est: $30,000 - $40,000

        NOŊGIRRŊA MARAWILI born c.1939 BARATJALA, 2018 natural earth pigments and printer ink on eucalyptus bark 222.0 x 104.0 cm bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre cat. 6358–18 PROVENANCE Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Chapman & Bailey Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 2020 EXHIBITED Tarnanthi, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 18 Oct 2019 – 27 Jan 2020 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrŋgay Mulka Centre. Deutscher and Hackett would like to thank Will Stubbs from Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre for his assistance in cataloguing this work. ESSAY Noŋgirrŋa Marawili’s lines and dotted chains of ochre cover the chalky white background of Baratjala, 2018 radiating from vivid magenta rock forms.1 This network of jagged parallel lines upon a monumental sheet of gently undulating stringybark evoke the movement of water at Baratjala, where the artist camped as a child. Painted with swift confidence, the painting preserves smudged fingerprints and uneven brushstrokes which attest to the artist’s hand and physical presence. Her art is intuitive and immediate. It is characterised by modified forms of sacred clan crosshatching and sections of open space, anticanonical for Arnhem land bark painting. Baratjala, 2018 like many of Noŋgirrŋa’s mature works, demonstrates a bold divergence in Yolŋu art towards personal expression, liberated from the male responsibility of upholding of strictly codified practice but continuing to assert sovereignty over country.     The past two decades have seen an explosion of innovation in the development of Yolŋu bark painting, an avant-garde movement led by senior female practitioners working respectfully within the laws of their ancient culture while harnessing the potency of their individual artistic voices. The concrete courtyard of Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Centre, a community run arts centre in Yirrkala, has been the nexus of this movement, fostering a collaborative environment for artists such as sisters Gulumbu and Nyapanyapa Yunipiŋu and Noŋgirrŋa Marawili. Their secular and boldly contemporary works on bark and on larrakitj (memorial poles) have become renowned both nationally and internationally, keenly collected by national institutions and private collectors alike.     Noŋgirrŋa was born to an important Yolŋu family, one of many children of famed warrior-leader Mundukul Marawili of the Madarrpa clan. Her father died when she was young, never witnessing a time in which women were permitted to paint and before he could teach Noŋgirrŋa the sacred miny’tji designs of their people transmitted through countless generations. Without the authority to use these detailed ceremonial markings, crucial for painting the sites and songlines of the Madarrpa clan lands, Noŋgirrŋa’s artwork focusses instead on warraŋul (outside meaning) and associated sites of lesser sanctity, while remaining faithful to the Yolŋu belief system.     The Madarrpa are Yirritja moiety saltwater people, with their lands extending from Blue Mud Bay into the cyclonic and tidal waters of the Gulf of Carpentaria, beneath which Mundukul, the ancestral lightning snake lives. For Noŋgirrŋa, while the men are entitled to sing the songlines of the ‘big waters’ of the sacred snake, she can paint ‘ideas, from the waters that form the outside part of the story.’2 While the spraying and rippling movements and exchanges of energy between the water and lightning3 form the subject matter and linear designs in most of Noŋgirrŋa’s paintings, the large circles and rectangles represent the sacred rocks set in deep water at Baratjala, a significant place of knowledge for her clan. Also, the title of this work, ‘Baratjala’ was an anchorage point for Macassan trepangers from Sulawesi, who visited the area and interacted with the Yolŋu for several centuries until the early 20th century.     Noŋgirrŋa has painted this area of coastline since 2011, and her critical acclaim has brought significant attention to Yolŋu art and this remote area of the Northern Territory. Her late husband, Djutadjutja Munuŋgurr of the Djapu clan, also had secondary custodianship of Baratjala, reflecting a reciprocal relationship between the two clans. By virtue of Noŋgirrŋa’s respectful adherence to Yolŋu law and customs, she has been recognised by her people as caretaker and quiet custodian of Baratjala. Her role in the community as a senior Elder is to uphold this ancient area of cross-cultural connection and keep it alive, both physically and cosmologically.     1. In late 2017, Noŋgirrŋa challenged what it meant to collect materials from country by working with recycled printer cartridges mixes with ochre. See Russell-Cook, M., ‘Bark Ladies: Eleven Artists from Yirrkala’, Bark Ladies, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2021, p. 10  2. The artist, quoted in Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, University of Virginia [https://madayin.kluge-ruhe.org/experience/pieces/baratjala-baratjala-2/ ] (accessed 20/02/23)   3. The Top End of the Northern Territory experiences an extraordinarily high number of daily lightning strikes during the wet season from November to April.   LUCIE REEVES-SMITH © Noŋgirrŋa Marawili, courtesy Buku-Larrŋgay Mulka Art Centre

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • Nonggirrnga Marawili (b.1939) Untitled Natural earth pigments on bark
        Feb. 26, 2023

        Nonggirrnga Marawili (b.1939) Untitled Natural earth pigments on bark

        Est: $12,000 - $18,000

        Nonggirrnga Marawili (b.1939) Untitled Natural earth pigments on bark

        Artvisory
      • Nonggirrnga Marawili (b1939) Yathikpa 2013 Natural earth pigments on bark
        Feb. 26, 2023

        Nonggirrnga Marawili (b1939) Yathikpa 2013 Natural earth pigments on bark

        Est: $8,000 - $10,000

        Nonggirrnga Marawili (b1939) Yathikpa 2013 Natural earth pigments on bark

        Artvisory
      • Noŋgirrŋa Marawili - Baratjala, 2018
        Jun. 08, 2021

        Noŋgirrŋa Marawili - Baratjala, 2018

        Est: $10,000 - $15,000

        Cooee Art Indigenous Fine Art Auction "Baratjala is a Madarrpa clan estate adjacent to Cape Shield where the artist camped with her father and his many wives as a young girl. She lived nomadically as part of a clan group that travelled from season to season in a flotilla of canoes between Groote Eylandt and the mainland. Her father+IBk-s name was Mundukul (Lightning Snake) and this is also the name of the Water Python which lives deep beneath the sea here. These are cyclonic, crocodile infested waters with huge tides and ripping currents. Some of her designs show the rock set in deep water. Also depicted are du+AUs-gur+AUs-aniny, barnacles that grow on the rock. Yurr+IBk-yunna is the word used to describe the rough waves that break over the rock and the spray that flies into the sky. It is said that the serpent +IBg-spits+IBk lightning. This bark is a beautiful example of a departure from the artist+IBk-s earlier works, both in the reduced use of heavily crosshatched sections, and in the bold use of negative space with a confident and instinctive focus on composition.+IB0 Contact Cooee Art for more information on this Aboriginal artwork.

        Cooee Art
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, UNTITLED (YIḎAKI), 2013
        May. 19, 2020

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, UNTITLED (YIḎAKI), 2013

        Est: $3,000 - $4,000

        WORKS FROM THE MACLEAN COLLECTION NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI born c.1939 UNTITLED (YIḎAKI), 2013 natural earth pigments on hollow log 137.0 cm height PROVENANCE Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory (cat. 4505C) Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne Maclean collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 2013 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory which states in part: ‘Yiḏaki are didjeridus that are specific to North East Arnhem Land in Australia's Northern Territory, where the instrument originates. The term yiḏaki is used in Yolngu (the nation of North East Arnhem Land Aboriginal people) languages as the generic name for the didjeridu. The name yiḏaki is most correctly used for instruments from this region that have been solely made and decorated by Yolngu people. Yolngu artists carefully select naturally occurring termite hollowed tree stems, which are cut and shaped into suitable sounding instruments. They are made with certain desired acoustics that can vary dramatically between different clans, from high pitch to very low. Typical yiḏaki have small natural wooden mouthpieces around 30mm in diameter and taper out to a diameter of around 100mm at the distal end. Having a small mouthpiece means they require less air to play and produce sound easily as a result. Traditionally, yiḏaki are painted with naturally occurring red, white, black and yellow earth pigments. In recent years acrylic paints began to be used. Both the artwork and the sound and overall style of the yiḏaki denote cultural history and law.’ This item is located at our Melbourne Gallery © Nonggirrnga Marawili, courtesy Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Art Centre

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, FOUR ROCKS, 2015, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark
        Mar. 18, 2020

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, FOUR ROCKS, 2015, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

        Est: $3,000 - $4,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI born c.1939 FOUR ROCKS, 2015 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark SIGNED: bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrngay Mulka Arts cat. 4779N DIMENSIONS: 94.0 x 58.5 cm PROVENANCE: Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory (label attached verso) Maclean collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in August 2015 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala.

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI‎, born c‎.‎1939‎, GAPU‎, ‎2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark‎
        Mar. 18, 2020

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI‎, born c‎.‎1939‎, GAPU‎, ‎2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark‎

        Est: $4,000 - $6,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI‎ born c‎.‎1939‎ GAPU‎, ‎2013 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark‎ SIGNED: bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts cat. 4459B and Alcaston Gallery cat. AK19732 DIMENSIONS: 127‎.‎0 ‎x ‎46‎.‎0 ‎cm ‎(‎irregular‎)‎ PROVENANCE: Buku‎-‎Larrnggay Mulka Arts‎, ‎Yirrkala, Northern Territory (label attached verso) Alcaston Gallery‎, ‎Melbourne Private collection‎, ‎Sydney EXHIBITED: Nonggirrnga Marawili‎: ‎Lightning and the Rock‎, ‎Alcaston Gallery‎, ‎Melbourne‎, ‎2015, cat. 13 (illus. in exhibition catalogue, dated as ‘2014’) This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala.

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, GUYKTHUN, 2014, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark
        Mar. 18, 2020

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, GUYKTHUN, 2014, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

        Est: $6,000 - $8,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI born c.1939 GUYKTHUN, 2014 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark SIGNED: bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrngay Mulka Arts cat. 4581A and Alcaston Gallery cat. AK19734 DIMENSIONS: 154.0 x 64.0 cm (irregular) PROVENANCE: Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory (label attached verso) Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne Maclean collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in April 2015 EXHIBITED: Nonggirrnga Marawili Lightning and the Rock, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne, 7 April – 2 May 2015, cat. 8 (illus. in exhibition catalogue) This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala.

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, YATHIKPA, 2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark
        Mar. 18, 2020

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, YATHIKPA, 2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

        Est: $6,000 - $8,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI born c.1939 YATHIKPA, 2013 natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark SIGNED: bears inscription verso: Buku–Larrngay Mulka Arts cat. 4421S bears inscription on aluminium brace verso: Alcaston Gallery cat. AK18907 DIMENSIONS: 140.0 x 92.0 cm (irregular) PROVENANCE: Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne Maclean collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in January 2014 EXHIBITED: Nonggirrnga Marawili: Yathikpa, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne, 14 January – 14 February 2014 This work is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku–Larrnggay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala.

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, NYINDIJYA (DRIED UP BILLABONG), 2014, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark
        Nov. 30, 2016

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, NYINDIJYA (DRIED UP BILLABONG), 2014, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

        Est: $3,000 - $4,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, NYINDIJYA (DRIED UP BILLABONG), 2014, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark SIGNED: bears inscription verso: Alcaston Gallery cat. AK 19735 and Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts cat.46320 DIMENSIONS: 166.0 x 84.0 cm irregular PROVENANCE: Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne The McKay Superannuation fund Art Collection, Brisbane ESSAY: This painting is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity from Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts.

        Deutscher and Hackett
      • NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, YATHIKPA, 2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark
        May. 25, 2016

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, YATHIKPA, 2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark

        Est: $8,000 - $10,000

        NONGGIRRNGA MARAWILI, born c.1939, YATHIKPA, 2013, natural earth pigments on eucalyptus bark SIGNED: bears inscription on Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts label verso: artist’s name, location and cat. 4324P DIMENSIONS: 236.0 x 110.0 cm PROVENANCE: Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts, Yirrkala, Northern Territory Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne The McKay Superannuation Fund Art Collection, Brisbane EXHIBITED: National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, 9 August 2013 – 10 November 2013 This work is accompanied by a certificate from Buku-Larrngay Mulka Arts which states: ‘This is a painting of fire but also simultaneously of water. It is a raw rendition of Madarrpa clan sacred design of the ocean at Yathikpa which is melting and crashing to the horizon.’

        Deutscher and Hackett
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