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David Bruce Milne Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, Illustrator, b. 1882 - d. 1953

(born 1882; died in Bancroft, Ontario, Canada 1953) Canadian painter. The youngest of ten children, David Brown Milne first aimed to become an illustrator and studied at the Arts Students League in New York from 1903 to 1905. He also worked as a window dresser and poster designer during this time. Deciding instead to become a painter, Milne achieved considerable success and had his works featured in the 1913 Armory Show. Milne lived in New York City until 1916 but became tired of the hustle of city life and moved to the rural town of Boston Corners in upstate New York to paint in the countryside. He did not stay long, however; in 1917 he enlisted to fight in World War I and although he never went into battle he was able to paint through participation in the Canadian War Records Scheme, which allowed him to record wartime experiences. While he painted figural and city scenes as well, Milne’s portfolio mostly consisted of landscapes for which he is most well known. Painting in a variety of media mainly comprising of watercolor and oil, Milne’s style can be described as austere and minimal in detail but his works nevertheless possess a tranquil grace to them. In 1929 he settled permanently in Ontario and continued to paint landscapes there until his death. Milne’s watercolors were featured in a retrospective at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and his art is included in the collections of such museums as The National Gallery of Canada and The British Museum.

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        • David B. Milne - Maple Leaves in Autumn
          Apr. 29, 2023

          David B. Milne - Maple Leaves in Autumn

          Est: $200 - $300

          DAVID B. MILNE ( Canadian 1882 - 1953 )

          Westbridge Fine Art Auction House
        • David Brown Milne (Canadian, 1882-1953) Painting Place (Hilltop), 1931 Drypoint
          Dec. 05, 2022

          David Brown Milne (Canadian, 1882-1953) Painting Place (Hilltop), 1931 Drypoint

          Est: $600 - $800

          David Brown Milne (Canadian, 1882-1953) Painting Place (Hilltop), 1931 Drypoint in colors on paper 4-3/4 x 6-3/4 inches (12.1 x 17.1 cm) (image) Edition of 3000 Signed in pencil along lower edge Published by The Colophon HID01801242017

          Heritage Auctions
        • David Browne Milne, Canadian (1882-1953), Painting Place, drypoint, 5 x 7 in. (12.7 x 17.8 cm)
          Apr. 30, 2021

          David Browne Milne, Canadian (1882-1953), Painting Place, drypoint, 5 x 7 in. (12.7 x 17.8 cm)

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          David Browne Milne Canadian (1882-1953) painting place drypoint signed 5 x 7 in. (12.7 x 17.8 cm)

          Maynards Fine Art & Antiques
        • Pair of David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953) 22 3/4 x 26 in. (58 x 66 cm) (unframed)
          Jul. 24, 2020

          Pair of David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953) 22 3/4 x 26 in. (58 x 66 cm) (unframed)

          Est: $30 - $50

          Pair of David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953) Maple Leaves in Autumn lithographs. 22 3/4 x 26 in. (58 x 66 cm) (unframed)

          Maynards Fine Art & Antiques
        • Three David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953), 26 x 29 in. (66 x 74.5 cm) (unframed)
          Jul. 24, 2020

          Three David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953), 26 x 29 in. (66 x 74.5 cm) (unframed)

          Est: $40 - $60

          Three David Milne, Canadian (1882-1953), Clouds lithographs. 26 x 29 in. (66 x 74.5 cm) (unframed)

          Maynards Fine Art & Antiques
        • The Colophon, Part 5- David Milne drypoint
          Aug. 10, 2019

          The Colophon, Part 5- David Milne drypoint

          Est: $300 - $500

          ''The Colophon: A Book Collectors' Quarterly'', Part 5, 1931, including an original drypoint in two colors by David B. Milne (Canadian 1882-1953)- ''Hilltop'', signed in pencil, overall good condition: book with minor age toning to page and slight light toning on cover, the Milne drypoint in very good condition, small 4to (8 5/8 x 10 3/4''h).

          Rachel Davis Fine Arts
        • DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), PAINTING PLACE, DRYPOINT ETCHING; PRINTED IN COLOURS; SIGNED IN THE PLATE LOWER RIGHT; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.8”)
          Aug. 23, 2018

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), PAINTING PLACE, DRYPOINT ETCHING; PRINTED IN COLOURS; SIGNED IN THE PLATE LOWER RIGHT; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.8”)

          Est: $700 - $900

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) PAINTING PLACEDRYPOINT ETCHING; PRINTED IN COLOURS; SIGNED IN THE PLATE LOWER RIGHT; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.8”)Provenance:The Isaacs Gallery, TorontoEstimate: $700—900

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE
          May. 10, 2018

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE

          Est: $1,000 - $1,200

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOKDRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE COLOPHON: A BOOK COLLECTOR’S QUARTERLY, PART FIVE, NEW YORK, 1931.Estimate: $1,000—1,200

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE
          Feb. 01, 2018

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE

          Est: $1,200 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOKDRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE COLOPHON: A BOOK COLLECTOR’S QUARTERLY, PART FIVE, NEW YORK, 1931.Estimate: $1,200—1,500

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE
          Jan. 25, 2018

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOK, DRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE

          Est: $1,200 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) HILL TOP (PAINTING PLACE) WITH BOOKDRYPOINT ETCHING PRINTED IN TWO COLOURS; SIGNED WITH INITIALS TOP LEFT IN THE PLATE; SIGNED IN PENCIL LOWER LEFT (Plate, 4.8” x 6.5”) Together with the book “THE COLOPHON: A BOOK COLLECTOR’S QUARTERLY, PART FIVE, NEW YORK, 1931.Estimate: $1,200—1,500

          Waddington's
        • DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), VARIOUS TITLES, SET OF FIVE DECORATIVE REPRODUCTION COLOUR PRINTS (Each sight approx. - 10.5” x 13”) (Each frame size approx. - 21” x 23”)
          Oct. 26, 2017

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953), VARIOUS TITLES, SET OF FIVE DECORATIVE REPRODUCTION COLOUR PRINTS (Each sight approx. - 10.5” x 13”) (Each frame size approx. - 21” x 23”)

          Est: $100 - $200

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) VARIOUS TITLESSET OF FIVE DECORATIVE REPRODUCTION COLOUR PRINTS (Each sight approx. - 10.5” x 13”) (Each frame size approx. - 21” x 23”)Estimate: $100—200

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, MORNING ON THE RIVER (NORTH OF COBOCONK), watercolour, sheet 10.75 ins x 14.5 ins; 52.7 cms x 36.8 cms
          May. 29, 2017

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, MORNING ON THE RIVER (NORTH OF COBOCONK), watercolour, sheet 10.75 ins x 14.5 ins; 52.7 cms x 36.8 cms

          Est: $12,000 - $15,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEMORNING ON THE RIVER (NORTH OF COBOCONK)watercolourinscribed “David Milne/Morning on the River/Oct. 1945” by Douglas Duncan on the reverse sheet 10.75 ins x 14.5 ins; 52.7 cms x 36.8 cms Provenance:Douglas Duncan Picture Loan Society, TorontoMrs. W.D. Matthews, OttawaPrivate Collection, Ottawa (by descent)Literature:Ian Thom (ed.), David Milne, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver, 1991, pages 19, 161, 163 and 167.David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1996, page 317.David B. Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume II: 1929 - 1952, Toronto, 1998, page 875, cat. no. 405.75, reproduced. Ian Thom writes: "In 1945 (the year this work was painted), after a lapse of twelve years, Milne took up watercolour again. The medium was to dominate the last years of his career."  Thom asserts: "Milne's watercolours from the forties are amongst his most extraordinary achievements...a product of exceptional skill."Punctuating a decade of discord and penury which was the thirties, 1940 heralded the start of a special decade for David Milne (1882-1953), one in which he found both great happiness and some financial success. It was during this period that two particular people played an increasingly important part in Milne's life, his second wife Kathleen Pavey, and his dealer and agent, Douglas Duncan. David Silcox describes Kathleen and Duncan as Milne's "wonderful guardian angels."In late summer each year from 1940-1946 (with the exception of 1941), the Milne's, David, Kathleen and their young son, David Jr., went on a family camping trip for several weeks to Coboconk. David Silcox writes: "Milne usually stayed on after the family holiday for an extra two or three weeks to paint." This work, which has been dated to October 1945 by Douglas Duncan, is a product of the penultimate family camping trip to the area and the solo painting time that followed, a trip that had become nothing less than a "family ritual."Estimate: $12,000–15,000

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE, drypoint etching, printed in colours, Sheet 7.75 ins x 8.5 ins; 19.7 cms x 21.6 cms
          Mar. 11, 2017

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE, drypoint etching, printed in colours, Sheet 7.75 ins x 8.5 ins; 19.7 cms x 21.6 cms

          Est: -

          DAVID BROWN MILNEPAINTING PLACEdrypoint etching, printed in colourssigned in the print and signed in pencil in the lower margin Sheet 7.75 ins x 8.5 ins; 19.7 cms x 21.6 cms Provenance:Private Collection, OttawaEstimate: $1,200–1,500

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, EDGE OF THE CLEARING, watercolour on paper, sight 14.25 ins x 19.25 ins; 35.6 cms x 48.3 cms
          May. 30, 2016

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, EDGE OF THE CLEARING, watercolour on paper, sight 14.25 ins x 19.25 ins; 35.6 cms x 48.3 cms

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEEDGE OF THE CLEARINGwatercolour on paper sight 14.25 ins x 19.25 ins; 35.6 cms x 48.3 cms Provenance:Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, TorontoLaura Beattie, London, Ontario (1956)Miss Beverley Lindsey, London, Ontario (by descent)Canadian Fine Arts, TorontoPrivate Collection, TorontoExhibited:Hart House, TorontoThe Gallery, OttawaLiterature:David B. Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume II: 1929 - 1952, Toronto, 1998, page 804, no. 403.151, reproduced.David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1996, page 318.Note:In the fall of 1940, David Milne moved to Uxbridge from Toronto. David Silcox writes: “New surroundings and new circumstances had often renewed Milne’s determination to paint and within a month or so the move to Uxbridge proved congenial. His work poured forth in watercolour, colour dry points and the occasional oil... For both quantity and quality it was a year with few equals.” This watercolour dates within a year of Milne’s move to Uxbridge. While inscribed “Coboconk” by Douglas Duncan, according to Silcox, a letter from Milne to Duncan in October 1942 confirms this picture was painted at Uxbridge.

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, ADIRONDACK VALLEY, drypoint, printed in colours, Plate 5 ins x 7 ins; 12.7 cms x 17.8 cms
          May. 30, 2016

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, ADIRONDACK VALLEY, drypoint, printed in colours, Plate 5 ins x 7 ins; 12.7 cms x 17.8 cms

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEADIRONDACK VALLEYdrypoint, printed in colourssigned and inscribed /26 in pencil in the lower margin Plate 5 ins x 7 ins; 12.7 cms x 17.8 cms Provenance:Private Collection, TorontoLiterature:Rosemarie L. Tovell, Reflections in a Quiet Pool: The Prints of David Milne, National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1980, page 195, page 179 for Adirondack Valley (National Gallery of Canada), reproduced in colour and page 194, cat. no.79 for Adirondack Valley, (National Gallery of Canada), reproduced. Ian Thom (ed.), David Milne, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver, 1991, page 166.Note:Milne kept detailed notes and maintained a robust correspondence with his dealer, Douglas Duncan. As a result, we know a considerable amount about Milne’s thoughts, habits and the sequence of his art production. It was at Milne’s Six Mile Lake cabin in 1937 that the first state of Adirondack Lake was produced. The remaining four states, to which group this lot belongs, were pulled over a four day period in late April 1941, at Uxbridge.Milne had admitted “a weakness for textures” and correspondence between fellow artists testify to his struggle with balancing the contrasts of harsh and soft lines. Rosemarie Tovell suggests that the gap between the printing of the first state in 1937 and the other four may relate to the “specific textural and colour schemes of the subject.” Abandoned then, by 1941 these “fitted in perfectly with his watercolour style of concentrated dark washes and calligraphic lines.”Of the five states associated with this title, there are no known signed copied of states I through III. There are only twenty-six known signed impressions of states IV and V combined, at least one of which is in the permanent collection of the National Gallery of Canada (State V) making Adirondack Valley somewhat of a rara avis.

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE, 1931, drypoint etching printed in colours, drypoint etching sheet size 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms
          Nov. 23, 2015

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE, 1931, drypoint etching printed in colours, drypoint etching sheet size 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms

          Est: $1,200 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNEPAINTING PLACE, 1931drypoint etching printed in coloursetching signed by David B. Milne in pencil in the lower margin drypoint etching sheet size 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms Provenance:Private Collection, OntarioNote:This work is contained in The Colophon: A Book Collectors' Quarterly, Part V, Colophon Ltd., New York, 1931.

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, watercolour, 15 ins x 19 ins; 38.1 cms x 48.3 cms
          Nov. 23, 2015

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, watercolour, 15 ins x 19 ins; 38.1 cms x 48.3 cms

          Est: $40,000 - $50,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEPARLIAMENT BUILDINGS, watercolour; signed and dated 1939; titled and inscribed “David Milne” and “1939” on the reverse 15 ins x 19 ins; 38.1 cms x 48.3 cms Provenance: Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, TorontoArt Gallery of Toronto Women’s CommitteeCollection of Lady Kemp, Toronto (1948)Laing Galleries, Toronto (1956)Collection of Percy Bower, Winnipeg (1967)By descent to his familyPrivate Collection, OntarioExhibited: Recent Water Colours by David Milne, 11 - 24 January 1941, Picture Loan Society, Toronto, no. 13Women’s Committee Purchase Sale Exhibition, 30 October - 04 November 1948, Art Gallery of TorontoLiterature: David P. Silcox, Painting Place: the life and work of David B. Milne, University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1996, pages 307-308 and page 309 for this lot, reproduced.David B. Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume II: 1929 - 1952, Toronto, 1998, page 702, no. 401.21 for a related drawing in the Milne Estate and for this lot, reproduced.Note: According to Silcox and Milne Jr.: “The subject (of this work) is the provincial legislature building at Queen’s Park, Toronto, seen from the south and lit by flood lighting at night. Milne painted an oil version in January 1940, Parliament Buildings at Queen’s Park, 401.42, and the building is in the background of Shrine and Saints I and II, 404.10-11.”Silcox refers to the period in which this lot was produced as a productive one for Milne, but it would be erroneous to view such painting as commonplace. In fact, Silcox notes: “The watercolours, which were now carrying all the freight of Milne’s thought, not only had to survive Milne’s severe editing and repainting process, but also had to run the gauntlet of (dealer Douglas) Duncan’s fussy critical eye and his commercial concerns... On 28 October 1940 he (Duncan) recorded that he had taken home a bundle of watercolours and destroyed 68 (mostly inferior versions).” It would be fair to surmise that those which remained - such as this lot - were among those that Duncan and Milne deemed superior.

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE; BLUE SKY, PALGRAVE (CANCELLED), drypoint etching, printed in two colours, 8.75 ins x 6.75 ins; 22.2 cms x 17.1 cms
          May. 25, 2015

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, PAINTING PLACE; BLUE SKY, PALGRAVE (CANCELLED), drypoint etching, printed in two colours, 8.75 ins x 6.75 ins; 22.2 cms x 17.1 cms

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNE PAINTING PLACE; BLUE SKY, PALGRAVE (CANCELLED) drypoint etching, printed in two colourssigned in the print (recto); with an incomplete, cancelled print on the reverse 8.75 ins x 6.75 ins; 22.2 cms x 17.1 cms Provenance:Harold Stacey, Ontario (acquired directly from the artist)Private Collection, OntarioNote:This lot is sold together with a framed handwritten inscription dating to 1941 from Milne to Stacey, which references this lot, describing it as "slightly imperfect copy."

          Waddington's
        • DAVID MILNE born 1946 From Melbourne Port, and Even Older, Architect's Vision, Docklands Folder 2009
          Mar. 26, 2015

          DAVID MILNE born 1946 From Melbourne Port, and Even Older, Architect's Vision, Docklands Folder 2009

          Est: $10,000 - $15,000

          DAVID MILNE born 1946 From Melbourne Port, and Even Older, Architect's Vision, Docklands Folder 1999 synthetic polymer paint on Caravaggio linen 154.0 x 214.0 cm signed with initials and dated lower right: DM '99

          Menzies
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, Sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms
          Mar. 05, 2015

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, Sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms

          Est: -

          DAVID BROWN MILNEHILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE)drypoint etching printed in two colourssigned in pencil in the lower margin Sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms Note:In March of 1931, Milne began work on an etching based on his oil paintings for a book collectors quarterly, The Colophon. Milne was engaged to produce over 2000 etchings for inclusion in a forthcoming issue. The etching, which is called Hilltop, is also known as Painting Place.Estimate: $1,000-1,500

          Waddington's
        • DAVID MILNE born 1946 No. 106, 110, 111, 112 2007
          Dec. 11, 2014

          DAVID MILNE born 1946 No. 106, 110, 111, 112 2007

          Est: $4,000 - $6,000

          DAVID MILNE born 1946 No. 106, 110, 111, 112 2007 synthetic polymer paint on canvas (4) i) Glorious red dawn, seperate the night, God's imagination, divine mirror light, 46.0 x 46.0 cm, artist's no.106 ii) Under the ocean, black as night, Treasure deep down, endless night, 45.5 x 45.5 cm, artist's no.110 iii) From our birth to heaven's gate, Many treasures to alchemy state, 46.0 x 45.5 cm, artist's no.111 iv) Weather the fall, and God's wrath, Guide your soul on the gentle path, 45.5 x 45.5 cm, artist's no.112 each signed with initials and dated lower right: DM 07 each signed, dated and inscribed verso

          Menzies
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, Sheet 5.75 ins x 7.5 ins; 14.5 cms x 19 cms
          May. 26, 2014

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, Sheet 5.75 ins x 7.5 ins; 14.5 cms x 19 cms

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNEHILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE)drypoint etching printed in two colourssigned with initials in the plate, also signed in pencil in the lower margin Sheet 5.75 ins x 7.5 ins; 14.5 cms x 19 cms Provenance:Private Collection, OntarioNote:In March of 1931, Milne began work on an etching based on his oil paintings for a book collectors quarterly, The Colophon. Milne was engaged to produce over 2000 etchings for inclusion in a forthcoming issue. The etching, which is called Hilltop, is also known as Painting Place.

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, PARK AND CITY, NEW YORK, watercolour on illustration board, 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 24.8 cms
          May. 26, 2014

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, PARK AND CITY, NEW YORK, watercolour on illustration board, 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 24.8 cms

          Est: $20,000 - $30,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEPARK AND CITY, NEW YORKwatercolour on illustration board 8 ins x 10 ins; 20.3 cms x 24.8 cms Provenance:Estate of the artistMasters Gallery Ltd., CalgaryPrivate Collection, VancouverLiterature:David P. Silcox and David Milne, Jr., David B. Milne, Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 1: (1882-1928), University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1998, page 72, cat. no. 104.18, reproduced.Ian Thom (ed.), David Milne, Douglas & McIntyre, Vancouver, 1991, pages 30 and 37.Note:At the time this work was executed, circa 1912, Milne was living in New York and had a business at 5th Avenue and East 42nd Street - near the New York Public Library which had just opened in 1911.A guiding principal of aesthetic economy can be found throughout Milne's work and is quite evident here. In order that the artist's feeling be conveyed directly to the viewer, speed of execution was important. Boyanoski quotes Milne as stating: "the less expenditure of aesthetic means (color and line), the greater the power of the picture."

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms
          Mar. 20, 2014

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms

          Est: -

          DAVID BROWN MILNEHILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE)drypoint etching printed in two colours; signed in pencil in the lower margin, unframed sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, U.S.A. Estimate: $1,000-1,500

          Waddington's
        • DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) WINTER
          Jan. 23, 2014

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) WINTER

          Est: $100 - $150

          DAVID B. MILNE (CANADIAN, 1882-1953) WINTER WOODLANDS; HAND PULLED SILKSCREEN - LIMITED EDITION OF 100, PUBLISHED BY THE NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA (Image, 18" x 22")

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms
          Nov. 27, 2013

          DAVID BROWN MILNE, HILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours, sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          DAVID BROWN MILNEHILLTOP (PAINTING PLACE), drypoint etching printed in two colours; signed with initials in the plate, also signed in pencil in the lower margin, unframed sheet 10.5 ins x 8.5 ins; 26.7 cms x 21.6 cms Provenance: Private Collection, CaliforniaNote: In the mid 1920s, Milne had become unhappy with his watercolours and ceased using this medium for a period. He wrote to his close friend James Clarke suggesting etching be used "as a running mate for oil and successor of watercolour."In March of 1931, Milne began work on an etching based on his oil paintings known as Painting Place (various versions) for a book collection quarterly The Colophon founded in 1929. Each issue of the quarterly would include an original work of art and Milne was engaged to produce over 2000 etchings for inclusion in a forthcoming issue. The work was laborious and daunting; Milne could only produce about 40 prints per session. Deadlines came and passed. For his effort, he was paid $400.

          Waddington's
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint etching on Fabriano wove paper Painting Place
          May. 30, 2013

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint etching on Fabriano wove paper Painting Place

          Est: $800 - $1,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint etching on Fabriano wove paper Painting Place 4 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches 12.1 x 17.1 centimeters signed in the margin and initialed in the plate Literature:Rosemarie L. Tovell, Reflections in a Quiet Pool, The Prints of David Milne, National Gallery of Canada, 1980, reproduced page 150 Provenance:Private Collection, Montreal

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint Across the Lake (Second Version)
          May. 30, 2013

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint Across the Lake (Second Version)

          Est: $7,000 - $9,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint Across the Lake (Second Version) 5 3/8 x 6 7/8 inches 13.7 x 17.5 centimeters signed and editioned /25 Literature:Rosemarie L. Tovell, Reflections in a Quiet Pool, The Prints of David Milne, National Gallery of Canada, 1980, catalogue #56, page 114, reproduced page 114 Provenance:Mausbey Kimball, Buffalo, NY Miss Emily Kimball, Connecticut Caroline Haun, Pennsylvania Associated American Artists, New York Private Collection, Toronto Rosemarie Tovell's definitive description of this work begins: "Across the Lake (Second Version) marks an important development in Milne's oeuvre. In drypoint, it was the first time Milne used a warm colour in the key plate." David Milne's diary notes his new "system" of allowing a softer, weaker colour to define the image while holding back the bolder colour - in this case the vermillion taking precedence over the ultramarine blue. Milne's edition mark indicates 25 impressions but only 11 signed and 5 unsigned proofs have been accounted for.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on
          May. 15, 2013

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on

          Est: $30,000 - $40,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on canvas Wooded Valley 12 x 16 inches 30.5 x 40.6 centimeters signed and on verso titled on the Laing Gallery label and inscribed ""no. 76"" in graphite by Vincent Massey Literature:David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, reproduced page 499, catalogue #302.24 Provenance:Milne sale to Vincent Massey, 1934 Laing Galleries, Toronto, 1958 Collection of C. Stewart, Toronto, 1958 The Framing Gallery, Toronto, circa 1970 Private Collection, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection In 1943, David Milne wrote to Alice and Vincent Massey, who were known for their patronage of the arts and who already owned one of his paintings. Milne proposed to sell them some 300 pieces of art as a collection, in order to keep the works together. The Masseys accepted, but then began a program of disseminating the work through galleries and as gifts and donations, as well as initiating exhibitions. While Milne objected to the break-up of the collection, the Massey's efforts, in the long term, resulted in greater exposure and increased appreciation for Milne's art. Wooded Valley is a characteristically spare Milne oil, painted with black as the defining, outlining colour, accented and enlivened by green, purple, red and brown plus white. It depicts the woodlands near Palgrave, within walking distance of where Milne was living at the time. Milne's controlled palette is used with masterful dexterity in this serene work, where the blank sky, something he explored fully at Palgrave, allows the focus to rest almost fully on the forest.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on
          May. 15, 2013

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on

          Est: $70,000 - $90,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on canvas Drying Waterfall 20 x 24 inches 50.8 x 61 centimeters on verso signed, titled, dated 1916 and inscribed by Douglas Duncan ""David Milne, Drying Waterfall (Berkshires), (Summer 1916)"" Literature:David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, 1996, page 79 and reproduced page 80 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 1: 1882 - 1928, 1998, reproduced page 173, catalogue #107.52 Provenance:Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto R. MacDonald, Woodbridge, Ontario, 1960 Private Collection, Toronto, circa 1968 By descent to the present Private Collection David Milne moved a great deal during his career. Perpetually impecunious as well as endlessly curious about landscape motifs, he made the most of his surroundings. His work from Boston Corners in New York State is some of the finest he ever did, and Drying Waterfall stands out even in this company. Milne painted both long and close views of the landscape at this time. Where the more distant prospects are distinguished by their openness, an effect accomplished with his usual minimal application of pigment and by leaving many areas of the surface untouched, Drying Waterfall brings us into an intimate visual relationship with nature's complex forms and colours. Boldly intricate, the scene of a waterfall diminishing in force with the change of season displays a remarkable range of forms, hues and lines. Milne brings our eyes to the brink of confusion with this view: what, we might wonder at first, is the theme, the central motif? Yet with the attentive looking he demanded of himself and, in turn, of those who see his work, the scene becomes readily legible without losing any of its density. Drying Waterfall is, as a physical painting, an intensely delicate lattice of interlocking elements carefully delineated by Milne's signature outlines. The result might remind us of cloisonné, the elaborate compartmentalization of miniatur coloured insets on metal work, long practiced in many cultures and adapted to painting in the late nineteenth century, particularly by Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin. But Milne's image is not flat or still. It depicts at least three spatial planes, moving back from a close and almost tactile foreground, through a vertical middle space over which the water flows (and whose vertical axis is both confirmed and measured by the birch trees in the right foreground) and into a deeper space behind the ebbing waterfall. A strong diagonal that runs from near the top left hand corner to the bottom right of the image suggests the course that the flowing water must follow without actually showing us a stream. Milne articulates this satisfying complexity with characteristic economy, using only five colours, none of which is typically used to indicate water (green, brown, grey, black and white). One of the great pleasures of a major Milne painting such as this one is that we can - with Milne's aesthetic guidance - m et his challenge to look at a landscape in all its complexity and achieve a new way of understanding what we see. On the one hand, Drying Waterfall presents us with a special place. It is as if we have discovered something singular and intimate. On the other hand, though, and as Milne's laconic title suggests, the phenomenon that we witness is cyclical and fleeting. The waterfall will be gone soon. The painting is in this way appealingly anti-heroic. Milne does not set himself up as a daring explorer discovering a sublime natural site. He simply sees and depicts what is readily present to the eye. The painting is similarly intimate and quiet. It does not lead us grandly to a stupefying view, but instead revels in the pleasures of close looking. We thank Mark Cheetham, Professor of Art History at the University of Toronto, for contributing the above essay.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour
          May. 15, 2013

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour

          Est: $20,000 - $30,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour on paper Poppies and Lilies III 21 1/4 x 14 1/2 inches 54 x 36.8 centimeters dated 1944 - 1946 and on verso titled in graphite and inscribed by Douglas Duncan ""W-493, ca. Apr. 1946"" Literature:David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, 1996, pages 320, 333 and 344 and reproduced in colour page 322 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, reproduced page 881, catalogue #406.5 Provenance:Douglas Duncan, Picture Loan Society, Toronto James Coyne, Toronto, 1955 The Framing Gallery, Toronto, circa 1970 Private Collection, Toronto, circa 1970 By descent to the present Private Collection Exhibited:The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Water Colours by David Milne, January 22 - February 7, 1954, titled as Poppies and Lilies No. 1 National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, David Milne, September 16 - October 9, 1955, traveling exhibition, catalogue #106 In 1941 David Milne began a series of paintings of delicate flowers using a pink wash that precipitated the use of an increasing range of colour - David Silcox describes it as "a scarlet richness that saturated the paper in a way that was new in Milne's work, and that he would exploit over the new few years." The fragile poppy flowers, with their soft, gauzy petals and hairy stems, were especially well suited to Milne's interest in gentle line and ethereal form. Silcox counts these works amongst Milne's finest, as they seem "to fulfill his statement that he would like to have 'wished' his images onto the paper." A related watercolour entitled Poppies and Lychnis was painted circa August 1943 and acquired by the National Gallery of Canada in 1947. Of the four versions of Poppies and Lilies, two are from August of 1943 and two are from early 1946, and all but this work are in public or government collections - the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Vancouver Art Gallery and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Government of Canada.

          Heffel
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE
          Mar. 14, 2013

          DAVID BROWN MILNE

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          DAVID BROWN MILNE PAINTING PLACE, colour drypoint; signed in the margin 4.25 ins x 6.75 ins; 10.6 cms x 16.9 cms

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNEMAIN STREET, 1942, colour drypoint; signed and numbered 38/40 in the margin 7 ins x 9 ins; 17.5 cms x 22.5 cms Literature: David Silcox, "Painting Place, The Life and Work of David B. Milne," Toronto, 1996, page 314.David Silcox,
          Nov. 26, 2012

          DAVID BROWN MILNEMAIN STREET, 1942, colour drypoint; signed and numbered 38/40 in the margin 7 ins x 9 ins; 17.5 cms x 22.5 cms Literature: David Silcox, "Painting Place, The Life and Work of David B. Milne," Toronto, 1996, page 314.David Silcox,

          Est: $20,000 - $30,000

          DAVID BROWN MILNEMAIN STREET, 1942, colour drypoint; signed and numbered 38/40 in the margin 7 ins x 9 ins; 17.5 cms x 22.5 cms $20,000-30,000Literature: David Silcox, "Painting Place, The Life and Work of David B. Milne," Toronto, 1996, page 314.David Silcox, "David Milne, 1882-1953" (exhibition catalogue introduction), Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Kingston, 1967.Rosemarie L. Tovell, "Reflections in a Quiet Pool, The Prints of David Milne", Ottawa, 1980, page 196, plate 80, illustrated.Note: After moving to Uxbridge in 1940, Milne rented a studio above Gray's Bakery on Brock Street. Silcox notes how, as a means of hiding him from his estranged wife, Milne's agent Douglas Duncan had "...disguised Milne's whereabouts by giving generic titles, such as Main Street, to paintings of what was really Brock Street in Uxbridge". Milne had also kept his address private from most friends and family, so all correspondence would be done through Duncan, at the agent's gallery, the Picture Loan Society. Milne first used Main Street as a subject in 1940, with "Window on Main Street", and continued years later with this work. By the time Milne had produced "Main Street (1942)" he had developed the perfect reproducible colour for the drypoint. The artist had been using varying mixtures for his drypoints, but by 1942, he began to use more stable and consistent mixtures so that the results would be predictable. He continued to use what many refer to as his "hellish colour". Rosemarie Tovell notes, "Milne's use of 'hellish colour'- a mixture of Yellow Ochre and Permanent Violet- broke dominance of the harsher blacks, whites, Cobalt Blues, and Chinese Vermilions. By early 1940, 'hellish colour' had become lighter and more transparent, varying from sandy to salmon shades." Milne's concern for mixing the perfect colour indicates a desire for his art to provide an immediate impact through accessible depictions. Silcox quotes Milne: "Since art is aesthetic emotion, exhausting, to be sustained intensely only a short time, the more quickly readable a picture is, the more its emotional effect is compressed and the greater its power". "Main Street" is a remarkable example of a vibrant street scene with tones that thrill the senses.

          Waddington's
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour
          Nov. 22, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour on paper Afterglow 11 x 14 1/2 inches 27.9 x 36.8 centimeters on verso inscribed by Douglas Duncan ""Afterglow"" / ""W-651"" / ""(Oct. 1950)"" and by the Duncan estate ""575"" Literature:David P. Silcox, David Milne (1882 - 1953), A Survey Exhibition, Galerie Godard Lefort, 1971, listed, unpaginated Ian M. Thom et al, David Milne, Vancouver Art Gallery and the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, 1991, page 169 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, page 921, reproduced page 956, catalogue #502.53 Provenance:Galerie Godard Lefort, Montreal The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1971 Private Collection, Vancouver By descent to the present Private Collection, Vancouver Exhibited:Galerie Godard Lefort, Montreal, David Milne (1882 - 1953), A Survey Exhibition, April 22 - May 15, 1971, catalogue #38 Afterglow was painted while David Milne was at Baptiste Lake, south of Algonquin Park in Ontario. He had chosen a site for a cabin there in 1947, and built it himself, moving in by 1949. Solitude was a balm for Milne, and the new location an inspiration. After a 12-year break from painting watercolours, Milne began again in 1937, and this medium, which is characterized by luminous washes, would dominate the remainder of his career. Milne described his meticulous approach: "The planning has to be done before-hand in great detail; the order in which the colours are to be applied, what brushes are to be fully charged and what with only the slightest amount of paint on them, what effects of the diffusion, spreading and overlapping, due to the wetness of the paper." In Afterglow, Milne characteristically used a few carefully selected colours contrasted against a dark foreground. Bold and atmospheric, featuring a glowing sky and lush green hills tinged with orange and golden yellow from the setting sun, Afterglow is a fine example of Milne's engagement with Baptiste Lake.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour
          Nov. 22, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour

          Est: $10,000 - $15,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint on Japan paper Lines of Earth (2nd State) 4 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches 12.1 x 17.1 centimeters signed and editioned /25 and on verso titled and inscribed ""Dry point - 3 plates - Not more than 25 printed, including 5 of this first color plan"" Literature:Rosemarie L. Tovell, Reflections in a Quiet Pool, The Prints of David Milne, National Gallery of Canada, 1980, pages 5 and 141, reproduced page 140 Provenance:Dr. Charles H. Best and Mrs. Margaret Mahon Best, Toronto By descent within the family of the above, Ontario Throughout his career, one of David Milne's most important patrons was James Alfred Clarke, a New York commercial artist. Clarke was financially successful in his artistic career and therefore able to support Milne with loans and purchases of his work. In 1926 Clarke purchased a press for Milne, opening the door for his work in drypoint. More important than Clarke's patronage was his friendship with Milne. Rosemarie Tovell writes, "The most important feature of the friendship was Milne's recognition of Clarke as a kindred spirit in matters of art." Milne frequently corresponded with Clarke about his work. In a letter dated July 14, 1930, Milne described to Clarke how the first state of Lines of Earth had an anthropomorphic quality, with the soft flesh-coloured contours of the earth suggesting "the thighs and belly of a woman". Tovell states, "Milne allowed the equation of nature and the female figure in only this one instance, and then swiftly veered away from it in the second state, when he used a green tint instead of a flesh-coloured tint," as seen in this fine impression.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour
          Nov. 22, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian colour drypoint on Whatman wove paper St. Michael's Cathedral 7 3/8 x 8 3/8 inches 18.7 x 21.3 centimeters signed and editioned 16/53 and on verso inscribed 'E267 State V, 11 Prints"" and on the backing inscribed variously by Carl Fellman Schaefer Literature:Rosemarie L. Tovell, Reflections in a Quiet Pool, The Prints of David Milne, National Gallery of Canada, 1980, page 202, state VII reproduced page 202, and the different states described page 203 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, the 1940 watercolour entitled St. Michael's Cathedral 1, in the collection of the Owens Art Gallery at Mount Allison University, Sackville, reproduced page 709, catalogue #401.49, the 1940 watercolour entitled St. Michael's Cathedral II, in the collection of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, reproduced page 710, catalogue #401.50 and the 1943 canvas entitled St. Michael's Cathedral III, in the collection of the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg, reproduced page 819, catalogue #404.15 Provenance:Collection of Carl Fellman Schaefer, Toronto By descent to the present Private Collection, Ontario From February to May of 1943, David Milne executed seven states in colour drypoint within an edition of 53 representing St. Michael's Cathedral, located at Bond and Shuter Streets in Toronto. He had already produced two watercolours of this image in 1940 while in Toronto, both now in public collections. In May of 1943, he produced a canvas of this image, which is now in the McMichael Canadian Art Collection. Rosemarie Tovell describes this print as "perhaps the masterpiece of all the colour drypoints.....Drypoint line and burr elegantly and harmoniously articulate the style of neo-gothic architecture."

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on
          Nov. 22, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on

          Est: $100,000 - $150,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on canvas Paint Box, Easel and Canvas 12 x 16 inches 30.5 x 40.6 centimeters signed and on verso titled Painting Place on the Klinkhoff and Laing labels and inscribed on the canvas ""88"" by Massey Literature:David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David Milne, 1996, pages 236 and 250 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, reproduced page 574, catalogue #303.13 David Milne (1882 - 1953): Exposition Rétrospective, Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., 2001, reproduced page 6 A.K. Prakash, Canadian Art: Selected Masters from Private Collections, 2003, titled as Painting Place or Paint Box, Easel and Canvas, reproduced page 145 Provenance:Milne sale to Vincent Massey, 1934 Laing Galleries, Toronto, 1958 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal Private Collection, Montreal, 1972 A.K. Prakash & Associates Inc., Toronto, 1999 Private Collection, Toronto, since 2001 Exhibited:Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., Montreal, David Milne (1882 - 1953): Exposition Rétrospective, September 15 - 29, 2001 Several qualities distinguish this canvas by one of Canada's (and North America's) pre-eminent modern artists, among them its provenance. Always skirting poverty and yet dedicated to making art, David Milne conceived a plan in about 1933 to sell large numbers of his works in one lot. As this was during the Depression, his motive was in part financial. Writing to Alice and Vincent Massey - the eventual purchasers of this canvas - he reasoned that the total price he set for this collection of recent work "isn't large enough to have made their painting a profitable, or even possible, enterprise; yet it is enough to ensure years of undisturbed painting for the artist with simple tastes. The aim is to trade twenty-five years of painting that is past for five or ten years in the future." Selling this and other works to the Masseys, who were among Canada's leading collectors at the time, was prestigious for Milne, even though the subsequent exhibition and sale of some of this work was not what he had envisioned. The Masseys' own invoice number - the large number 88 inscribed on the back of the canvas itself - remains a significant part of this painting. Important, too, is this work's close connection to other canvases and drypoints that Milne referred to with the simple but evocative phrase "painting place". Milne was an extraordinarily keen observer of the visual details and the feel of an individual place; the close view was to him more important than a national outlook. He painted and drew in the United States and in Canada with equal aesthetic commitment. The "painting place" works characteristically show both the observed details of such attention and display for us the artist's simple tools - in this case, the paint box, the easel, the prominent canvas and, of course, part of what the artist sees in nature and sets out to render. Such simplicity and the dedication that an artist's mastery of these restricted means requires are themselves important subjects in the work. It would, however, be a mistake to think that Milne was overly invested in traditional technique or artistic skill, in himself or in the other historical and contemporary artists who interested him. He valued the emotional effect that a picture could give. He believed that speed in both execution and a viewer's apprehension heightened this effect. In a letter from about the time this painting was done, he claimed that "quickness of execution is important." We might agree with Milne that work from this time emphasized immediacy through a certain sketch-like quality, one that he consciously sought and even practiced. He thought for a long time about his motif, then put it down quickly. The resulting immediacy guaranteed authenticity of vision. Paint Box, Easel and Canvas is compelling because of its conciseness. Its compact efficiency contains a wealth of observation - how the traces of red and green vegetation emerge from the darkness of what we take to be the forest - and of implication. With economy and audacity, Milne has us face both the scene he is thinking about and the canvas that will soon receive his painterly ideas. The stark blankness of this canvas is striking. But its temporary emptiness is not threatening, not an omen of the artist's inevitable struggle. Instead, it conveys the moment of excitement that Milne so clearly felt in front of nature. We thank Mark Cheetham, Professor of Art History at the University of Toronto, for contributing the above essay.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on
          Nov. 22, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on

          Est: $125,000 - $175,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian oil on canvas Afternoon Sky 24 1/4 x 36 1/4 inches 61.6 x 92.1 centimeters signed and dated 1932 - 1934 and on verso inscribed in a circle ""A"" and by others ""51 Afternoon Sky / David Milne / Toronto"" and ""M 133"" Literature:Donald W. Buchanan, Exhibition of Paintings by David B. Milne, Mellors Galleries, 1935 An Exhibition of Canadian Paintings, Fortnum and Mason Ltd., 1955 David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, 1996, pages 212 and 217 David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, reproduced page 588, catalogue #303.48 Provenance:Milne sale to Vincent Massey, 1934 Frederic Hudd, London, England, 1937 Graham Spry, London, England, circa 1937 W.H. Wert, Montreal, circa 1970 Galerie Walter Klinkhoff Inc., 1971 The Art Emporium, Vancouver, 1971 M.F. Feheley, Toronto, circa 1972 Milne Estate, 1984 Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto, 1985 Fay Loeb, Toronto, 1985 Acquired from the above by the present Private Collection, 1985 Exhibited:Mellors Galleries, Toronto, Exhibition of Paintings by David B. Milne, November 1935, catalogue #16 James Wilson & Co., Ottawa, Exhibition of Pictures by David B. Milne, December 1935 Fortnum and Mason Ltd., London, England, An Exhibition of Canadian Paintings, January 20 - February 4, 1955, catalogue #56 David and Patsy Milne moved to Palgrave, a village northwest of Toronto, in 1930. Like Boston Corners, it was a small town, located close, but not too close, to Toronto, and of a similar, rolling landscape, wherein the town was surrounded by hills. "Palgrave has almost as much character as B.C. (Boston Corners)," Milne wrote. "It isn't a necklace of coloured beads, more like a nest of Easter eggs.....It has a railway station - about a dollar fare to Toronto - two hotels - two very small churches and an Orange hall - three stores in one of which is the post office - a harness-maker's shop - two garages - a little flour mill - one Doctor - a school and very few - perhaps 20 - houses." He was pleased to have a small garden again, with some fruit trees and berry bushes, and, most importantly, an expansive, westward view. Milne's life at this time was in turmoil. The Great Depression was hard on everyone, but for an artist, who struggled to make a living at the best of times, it was a financial disaster. There was trouble in his marriage to Patsy - their only income, aside from the sales of Milne's art, were the payments that came from a cottage they had previously sold, and those were in arrears. Milne took on general labour to supplement their income, but the couple barely had enough money to buy food and pay their rent. Expensive art supplies must have seemed a frivolity. Milne believed that he needed solitude and the time to focus uninterrupted for hours at a time in order to create good work, and resentment grew between the couple. Milne has been described as an obsessive painter, but this is an understatement - he was utterl compulsive. He worked the same subjects through in repeated, yet slightly varying versions, until they were exactly as he desired they should be. His writing, too, was extremely detailed - he was as compulsive a letter writer as he was a painter, yet rarely do his letters mention his personal feelings or indicate unhappiness. Instead, they are quite joyous. He wrote in 1932, "Sunday Morning again! Here am I, one of the kings of the earth - and that's higher than any heaven I have ever seen described. If I were asked to name anything to be added to this morning's possessions or conditions I would be hard driven to do it. The mohammedan idol perhaps, some houris. No houris here, but, since they would destroy most of the joys already in my possession, I am just as well off this way." His art provided him a personal solace, and he produced an exceptional body of work at Palgrave, despite how troubled his life was. Afternoon Sky is a masterpiece oil on canvas. The village is painted with a limited palette, composed of the little shops, homes and buildings that Milne describes nesting together, Easter egg-like along the train tracks, with a band of trees in the distance. A predominance of black and white, colours that Milne used so successfully, settle the buildings into the landscape, and the masterful blends of colour in the sky, loose and airy in feeling - float above them. Milne truly understood the importance of line and colour, and his exhaustive explorations of these two aspects of art had given him an innate sense of what each could do in a composition. His lines, which sometimes masquerade as spots or dashes, are never too much, never too little. His balance of colours, so precise and orderly, are the result of hours and hours spent at the canvas, obsessively painting one colour against another, then closing his eyes, opening them again quickly, and considering the visual response that he felt. Lines and colours defined shapes, shapes defined forms, forms defined objects, and so, no matter how spare he was in his use of these things, he could always give us what he wanted to in his works. Milne painted several versions of this vista while he lived at Palgrave; Village in the Sun, Village Spread Out and Serenity are but a few of the titles, indicating how pleased he was with the work he produced at this particular painting place.

          Heffel
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE
          Jun. 13, 2012

          DAVID BROWN MILNE

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          Canadian, 1882-1953, Painting Place, State V, Colour etching with drypoint, initialed in the matrix, signed in graphite in lower margin, 4.75 x 6.75 IN, 12 x 17 CM

          Walker's
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian double-sided pencil and gouache on board Man in a Bar / Standing Figure Left Profile (verso)
          May. 31, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian double-sided pencil and gouache on board Man in a Bar / Standing Figure Left Profile (verso)

          Est: $4,000 - $6,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian double-sided pencil and gouache on board Man in a Bar / Standing Figure Left Profile (verso) 19 3/4 x 15 inches 50.2 x 38.1 centimeters on verso inscribed "back before 7 Milne" and "#18" Literature:David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings Volume 2: 1929 - 1953, 1998, reproduced page 1010, catalogue #604.3 and #604.2 Provenance:Florence Martin, Big Moose Lake, New York, until 1929 Dr. D.K. McElroy, Bronxville, New York, until the late 1950s Private Collection, Malibu, California Private Collection, Vancouver

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour
          May. 17, 2012

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour

          Est: $30,000 - $40,000

          David Brown Milne 1882 - 1953 Canadian watercolour on paper Woman Standing at Easel 15 5/8 x 15 3/8 inches 39.7 x 39 centimeters signed, dated Dec. 11, 1921 and inscribed ""M.R."" Literature:David P. Silcox, Painting Place: The Life and Work of David B. Milne, 1996, page x David Milne Jr. and David P. Silcox, David B. Milne: Catalogue Raisonné of the Paintings, Volume 1: 1882 - 1928, 1998, page 342, reproduced page 342, catalogue #204.26 Provenance:Galerie Agnès Lefort, Montreal An Important Private Estate, Montreal Exhibited:Art Association of Montreal, Exhibition of Water-Colour Drawings by David B. Milne, January 1 - 19, 1924, titled as Figure in the Sun, catalogue #102 Arts Club, Montreal, David Milne, January - February 1924, titled as Figure in the Sun David Milne was one of the most accomplished artists of his generation, whether in Canada or beyond. He was as profound a thinker about the processes of art as he was prolific, producing over 6,000 works in oil, drypoint, drawing and watercolour during a career of over 50 years. Milne also distinguished himself as a writer about his own work and as a war artist of penetrating vision at the conclusion of World War I. Born in Bruce County in rural southwestern Ontario, Milne was ambitious enough to leave at age 21 to study at the Art Students League in New York City (1903 to 1905). Here he came to know both American and European Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and Fauvism, styles that would shape his own unique approach to artmaking. Milne was successful in New York; his work was exhibited and noticed approvingly. The best measure of this early acclaim was his participation in two of North America's most important exhibitions of avant-garde art in the early twentieth century: the Armory Show of 1913 (seen in New York, Boston and Chicago) and the Panama-Pacific International Exposition at the World's Fair held in San Francisco in 1915. It is significant that Milne showed watercolours in both these prestigious exhibitions. The delicacy, intimacy and speed of execution characteristic of this medium defined what he wanted his art to be. Milne also valued the small scale typical of watercolours. "The thing that makes a picture is the thing that makes dynamite - compression," he wrote. "It's an explosion. Everything must hit at once." Woman Standing at Easel encapsulates this and many other qualities. It was painted during a highly productive time in Milne's long stay in upstate New York. Mt. Riga is a hamlet near Boston Corners, the centre of Milne's activities in this region. Milne and his wife Patsy moved to Mt. Riga in October of 1921. In this month he began making work with accompanying notes marked by the "M.R." notation that we see after his signature in this work. As the catalogue raisonné relates, Milne wrote, "Patsy and I walked up the trail above Rudd Pond at noon Sunday and each made a sketch. As is often the case I did not realize how the larger shapes would simplify against each other until they were on paper. The head and clumps of sumach would have been clearer if left clear white instead of attempting to be literal and use richer color to mark them." Milne was habitually specific about the time and place of his work and he usually focused on formal challenges in both his painting and explanations. Here Patsy becomes a "larger shape" that must be simplified and integrated into the visual details of the foliage behind her. The contrast of detail and scale is accomplished by leaving the foreground almost completely open. Colour is another issue. While Milne notes that richer colour would have been more literally accurate, again he simplifies, using a restrained and exquisitely subtle palette of blue, black, red and green, hues that highlight rather than fill the spaces they touch. While Milne's means and intentions were decidedly compressed, this watercolour especially invites us to think more expansively as well. He reflects here on the difficult yet thrilling assimilation of nature into art by setting the easel prominently across the centre of the image. Its straight wooden legs integrate yet contrast with the tangle of sumachs that surround and almost consume it. The watercolour is a meditation on painting itself. We thank Mark Cheetham, Professor of Art History at the University of Toronto and author of the recent Artwriting, Nation, and Cosmopolitanism in Britain: The "Englishness" of English Art Theory since the 18th Century, for contributing the above essay.

          Heffel
        • David Brown Milne, CGP, CSGA, CSPWC, Canadian (1882-1953), Painting Place, colour drypoint etching, 4 7/8 x 6 7/8 in. (12.5 x 17.3 c...
          May. 16, 2012

          David Brown Milne, CGP, CSGA, CSPWC, Canadian (1882-1953), Painting Place, colour drypoint etching, 4 7/8 x 6 7/8 in. (12.5 x 17.3 c...

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          signed in the margin

          Maynards Fine Art & Antiques
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE
          Apr. 18, 2012

          DAVID BROWN MILNE

          Est: $1,200 - $1,600

          Canadian, 1882-1953. Painting Place, State V. Colour etching with drypoint, initials in the matrix, signed in graphite in lower margin. 4.75 x 6.75 IN, 12 x 17 CM

          Walker's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE
          Mar. 15, 2012

          DAVID BROWN MILNE

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          DAVID BROWN MILNE PAINTING PLACE, colour drypoint; signed in the margin 4.25 ins x 6.75 ins; 10.6 cms x 16.9 cms

          Waddington's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953
          Nov. 28, 2011

          DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953

          Est: $90,000 - $120,000

          KELLY ORE BED signed and dated Aug 20 '20 watercolour 38.7 by 55.6 cm. 15¼ by 22¾ in.

          Sotheby's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953
          Nov. 28, 2011

          DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953

          Est: $45,000 - $65,000

          QUARRIES watercolour 45.8 by 33.7 cm. 18 by 13¼ in.

          Sotheby's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953
          Nov. 28, 2011

          DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953

          Est: $25,000 - $35,000

          BLIND ROAD signed and numbered /25 in the lower margin colour drypoint 12.6 by 17.6 cm. 5 by 7 in.

          Sotheby's
        • DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953
          Nov. 28, 2011

          DAVID BROWN MILNE1882 - 1953

          Est: $25,000 - $35,000

          QUEEN'S HOTEL signed and numbered /25 in the lower margin colour drypoint 17.6 by 22.3 cm. 7 by 8¾ in.

          Sotheby's
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