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Tina Modotti Sold at Auction Prices

Photographer, b. 1896 - d. 1942

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        • Tina Modotti (1896-1942): Woman with Flag
          Jun. 06, 2024

          Tina Modotti (1896-1942): Woman with Flag

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          Palladium print, 1928, printed c. 1992, signed by Ava Vargas (printer) and inscribed 'A/P' on the reverse. 11 1/2 x 10 in. (sheet), 20 1/2 x 16 1/2 in. (frame).

          STAIR
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Portrait of Antonieta Rivas Mercado.
          May. 16, 2024

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Portrait of Antonieta Rivas Mercado.

          Est: $5,000 - $7,500

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Portrait of Antonieta Rivas Mercado. Silver print, the image measuring 9¼x7¼ inches (23.5x18.4 cm). 1929 Provenance: Private dealer in Mexico City, 1993; to the Collection of Margaret Hooks & Michael Tangeman This is a rare print of a portrait made by Modotti in 1929 of Antonieta Rivas Mercado, the wealthy writer and arts patron taken during a professional sitting commissioned by Rivas Mercado. "It was probably through a painter close to this [Contemporáneos] group, Manuel Rodríguez Lozano, the former husband of Nahui Olin, that Tina came into contact with the wealthy arts patron, Antonieta Rivas Mercado. Tina made a series of portraits of her and Rodriguez Lozano [. . .] Tina's portraiture of Mexican high society at this time also included the Rivas Mercado family" (Hooks, Margaret, Tina Modotti: Photographer and Revolutionary, (HarperCollins, 1993) p. 188 Reproduced: Margaret Hooks, Tina Modotti: Photographer and Revolutionary (HarperCollins, 1993), page 201 Margaret Hooks, Tina Modotti: Aperture Masters of Photography series (New York: Aperture Foundation, 1999), p. 65 Margaret Hooks, Tina Modotti (Phaidon Press, 2002), pl. 50

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) A pair of studies, from Diego Rivera's mural "El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje" at the Ministry of Education,
          May. 16, 2024

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) A pair of studies, from Diego Rivera's mural "El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje" at the Ministry of Education,

          Est: $2,000 - $3,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) A pair of studies, from Diego Rivera's mural "El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje" at the Ministry of Education, Mexico City. Together, 2 silver prints, the images measuring 9⅝x7⅝ inches (24.4x19.4 cm), and the reverse, each with Modotti's credit stamp on verso. 1928 Provenance: Swann Galleries; to the Collection of Margaret Hooks & Michael Tangeman El que quiera comer que trabaje ("Let him who wants to eat, work"), 1928 [study of Diego Rivera Mural, Public Education Ministry, "Patio de las Fiestas," Second floor, South wall] * Detail, El que quiera comer que trabaje ("Let him who wants to eat, work"), 1928 [study of Diego Rivera Mural, Public Education Ministry, "Patio de las Fiestas," Second floor, South wall] Reproduced: Margaret Hooks, Tina Modotti (Phaidon Press, 2002), pl. 51 Maricela González Cruz Manjarrez, Tina Modotti y el Muralismo Mexicano (Mexico City: UNAM/IIE, 1999), p. 48

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Carved Door, c. 1925 stamped with photographer's c
          Feb. 22, 2024

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Carved Door, c. 1925 stamped with photographer's c

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Carved Door, c. 1925 stamped with photographer's credit (verso) image/sheet: 9 ¼ x 7 ½ in. (23.4 x 19 cm.)

          Christie's
        • 5 Photographs by Tina Modotti
          Feb. 21, 2024

          5 Photographs by Tina Modotti

          Est: $500 - $1,000

          Tina Modotti (1896-1942). Silver gelatin photographs, with four mounted to backings, two have come apart, and one loose. Each 9.25" x 7.25" and stamped to card verso, one signed to card l.r. Each depicting landscape or close view natural objects.

          Caza Sikes
        • Tinna Modotti. Strassenszene in Berlin
          Jan. 24, 2024

          Tinna Modotti. Strassenszene in Berlin

          Est: -

          Silver gelatin. Photograph taken in 1930, and reproduced in photogravure in 1982. Press photograph provided to Berlin newspapers by "Festivals Horizonte 80".

          Duran Arte y Subastas
        • Tina Modotti (1896-1942), "William Spratling, 1929," Gelatin silver print on paper hinged to mat board, as issued, Image/Sheet: 9.25" H x 7.375" W; Original mat board: 10.5" H x 8.5" W
          Dec. 06, 2023

          Tina Modotti (1896-1942), "William Spratling, 1929," Gelatin silver print on paper hinged to mat board, as issued, Image/Sheet: 9.25" H x 7.375" W; Original mat board: 10.5" H x 8.5" W

          Est: $8,000 - $12,000

          Tina Modotti (1896-1942) "William Spratling," 1929 Gelatin silver print on paper tipped to a board mount, as issued Signed in pencil on the mount, lower right: Tine Modotti; inscribed and dated in ink on the image, lower right: To Fred Davis with the warmest regards and sincerest appreciation of his friendship / Wm. Spratling / Mexico May 7, 1929

          John Moran Auctioneers
        • TINA MODOTTI (Italian 1896-1942) A PHOTOGRAPH, "Architectural Detail, Mexico City," CIRCA 1925
          Dec. 02, 2023

          TINA MODOTTI (Italian 1896-1942) A PHOTOGRAPH, "Architectural Detail, Mexico City," CIRCA 1925

          Est: $2,000 - $3,000

          TINA MODOTTI (Italian 1896-1942) A PHOTOGRAPH, "Architectural Detail, Mexico City," CIRCA 1925, black and white photograph, signed in ink L/R, "Tina Modotti," backing stamped, "PHOTOGRAPHS - TINA MODOTTI / MEXICO, D.F.;" 7 3/4" x 10", framed 14 1/2" x 16 1/2".

          Simpson Galleries, LLC
        • Tina Modotti, Untitled (Maguey)
          Dec. 01, 2023

          Tina Modotti, Untitled (Maguey)

          Est: $8,000 - $12,000

          Tina Modotti Untitled (Maguey) c. 1926 platinum print 5.67 h x 9.5 w in (14 x 24 cm) Signed to lower left 'Tina Modotti'. Stamped to verso 'Photographs-Tina Modotti Mexico, D.F.'. Provenance: The Artist | Xavier Guerrero, Diego Rivera's assistant | Jose Revueltas, brother of the composer Silvestre Revueltas | Collection of Jim Farber, Los Angeles Exhibited: Under the Mexican Sky: Gabriel Figueroa - Art and Film, 22 September 2013 - 2 February 2014, Los Angeles County Museum of Art This work will ship from Los Angeles, California.

          Los Angeles Modern Auctions
        • La téchnica (Mella's Typewriter)
          Nov. 16, 2023

          La téchnica (Mella's Typewriter)

          Est: $120,000 - $180,000

          Art House: The Collection of Chara Schreyer Tina Modotti 1896 - 1942 La téchnica (Mella's Typewriter) signed, annotated, and dated Mexico - 1928 - in ink (on the reverse) gelatin silver print  9½ by 7½ in. 24.1 by 19.1 cm. Executed in 1928.

          Sotheby's
        • Fox Skins on Sticks
          Oct. 25, 2023

          Fox Skins on Sticks

          Est: $6,000 - $9,000

          Tina Modotti 1896 - 1942 Fox Skins on Sticks  gelatin silver print, signed and dated in ink on the image, 1929 image: 3½ by 2⅜ in. (8.9 by 6 cm.)

          Sotheby's
        • Woman of Tehuantepec, Mexico
          Oct. 25, 2023

          Woman of Tehuantepec, Mexico

          Est: $20,000 - $30,000

          Tina Modotti 1896 - 1942 Woman of Tehuantepec, Mexico  gelatin silver print, tipped to a modern mount, framed, circa 1929 image: 9 by 7¼ in. (23 by 18.5 cm.) frame: 20⅝ by 16⅝ in. (52.5 by 42.3 cm.)

          Sotheby's
        • Selected Puppet Studies from 'The Hairy Ape'
          Oct. 25, 2023

          Selected Puppet Studies from 'The Hairy Ape'

          Est: $6,000 - $9,000

          Tina Modotti 1896 - 1942 Selected Puppet Studies from 'The Hairy Ape'  2 gelatin silver prints, comprising The Police Beating Yank and The Police Taking Yank Away, the latter credited and each with annotations in pencil on the reverse, framed, 1929 images to 5¾ by 9⅝ in. (14.6 by 24.4 cm.) frames to 14 by 17½ in. (35.6 by 44.5 cm.)

          Sotheby's
        • Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje.
          Jun. 01, 2023

          Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje.

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) El que Quiera Comer que Trabaje. Gelatin silver print, with artist's stamp on verso; depicting the Diego Rivera fresco mural by the same name that adorns the walls of the Secretaria de Educacion Publica in Mexico City, this particular image showing Salvador Novo with donkey ears, bent over a harp, glasses, and artist's palette, with the foot of a worker firmly held on his back; with Modotti's stamp in purple on verso, some light creases, slight mottling to verso, 9 1/2 x 7 1/2 in.

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) Baile en Tehuantepec.
          Jun. 01, 2023

          Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) Baile en Tehuantepec.

          Est: $1,000 - $1,500

          Modotti, Tina (1896-1942) Baile en Tehuantepec. Gelatin silver print, with artist's stamp on verso; depicting the Diego Rivera oil on canvas by the same name, the largest painting on canvas created by Rivera, depicting Oaxacan dancers performing the folk dance called zandunga, a traditional Mexican waltz, under a banana tree; sheet with an old fold, verso somewhat mottled, 9 x 7 1/2 in. Baile en Tehuantepec was exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1930 and at MoMA in 1931. It is now in private hands. Modotti was born in Udine, Italy, but pursued acting in San Francisco, activism in Mexico, and picked up an interest in photography while involved with Edward Weston. Closely associated with Rivera and Frida Kahlo, and deeply supportive of the Communist Party, she eventually ended up in Cuba and then in exile around 1930. She spent a decade traveling from country to country in Europe and lost her life under suspicious circumstances at the age of forty-six while in a taxi on the way to see Pablo Neruda.

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Mexican church courtyard.
          Apr. 27, 2023

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Mexican church courtyard.

          Est: $2,500 - $3,500

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Mexican church courtyard. Silver print, the image measuring 9 1/8x7 1/2 inches (23.2x19.1 cm.), with Modotti's signature in ink on recto and her Photographs-Tina Modotti Mexico, D.F. stamp on verso. Circa 1924 Provenance: Private Dealer, Florida

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • Tina Modotti (1846 1942)
          Nov. 25, 2022

          Tina Modotti (1846 1942)

          Est: £200 - £300

          Tina Modotti (1846 1942) Tina Modotti (1846 1942) ELECTA EDITRICE PORTFOLIO,1979. Photogravures (12) image sizes 242 x 188mm (largest) and 214 x 189mm (smallest), overall print sizes, 430 x 291 mm, labelled and titled recto

          Chiswick Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Tornado, c. 1928 stamped photographer's credit i
          Oct. 06, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Tornado, c. 1928 stamped photographer's credit i

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Tornado, c. 1928 stamped photographer's credit in ink (verso) image: 3 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (8.8 x 5.7 cm.) sheet: 3 5/8 x 2 1/2 in. (9.2 x 6.3 cm.)

          Christie's
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Fishermen’s Nets on a Beach, 1929 signed and dat
          Oct. 06, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Fishermen’s Nets on a Beach, 1929 signed and dat

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Fishermen’s Nets on a Beach, 1929 signed and dated in ink (recto); stamped photographer's credit and annotated '36' in pencil (verso) image:2 1/4 x 3 1/4 in. (5.7 x 8.2 cm.) sheet: 2 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (5.7 x 8.8 cm.)

          Christie's
        • MODOTTI, TINA 1(896-1942) [Diego Rivera Mural for the Ministry of Education, Mexico City, detail] circa 1928.
          Jun. 21, 2022

          MODOTTI, TINA 1(896-1942) [Diego Rivera Mural for the Ministry of Education, Mexico City, detail] circa 1928.

          Est: $400 - $600

          MODOTTI, TINA 1(896-1942) [Diego Rivera Mural for the Ministry of Education, Mexico City, detail] circa 1928. Vintage gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 3/8 inches (240 x 190 mm), unsigned and unstamped. Some minor oxidation, soft creases. C The Collection of Jay I. Kislak sold to benefit the Kislak Family Foundation

          Doyle New York
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Jun. 12, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH - MEXICO- STUDIO STAMPED. SIGNED. 3 1/8" X 2 1/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist.As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio.Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography.Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston.In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali.Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses.Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Jun. 12, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED 3 5/8" X 2 3/8" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist.As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio.Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography.Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston.In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali.Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses.Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Jun. 12, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI STUDIO STAMPED. MEXICO. 3 3/4" X 2 1/2" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist.As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio.Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography.Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston.In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali.Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses.Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • Photograph, Tina Modotti
          Apr. 24, 2022

          Photograph, Tina Modotti

          Est: $1,000 - $2,000

          Tina Modotti (Italian, 1896-1942), Untitled, circa 1920, gelatin silver print, unsigned, studio stamp ("Photographs, Tina Modotti, Mexico, D.F") verso, sight: 3.75"h x 2.5"w, overall (with frame): 15.25"h x 12.25"w

          Clars Auctions
        • Photograph, Tina Modotti
          Apr. 24, 2022

          Photograph, Tina Modotti

          Est: $3,000 - $5,000

          Tina Modotti (Italian, 1896-1942), Untitled (Road, Mexico City), 1923-26, gelatin silver print, signed in pen lower right, studio stamp ("Photographs, Tina Modotti, Mexico D.F") verso, sheet/image: 2.5"h x 3.25"w, overall (with frame): 12.25"h x 15.25"w

          Clars Auctions
        • Tina Modotti Fragile Life Hardcover Photography
          Apr. 10, 2022

          Tina Modotti Fragile Life Hardcover Photography

          Est: $40 - $60

          "Tina Modotti: A Fragile Life" hardcover photography biography by Mildred Constantine. Published by Rizzoli International, New York, 1983. Good condition, includes dust jacket with some wear along the edges, self wear, etc. 189 pages. 10.5" x 10.5".

          District Auction
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a boy, 1926 credited, titled and dated
          Apr. 07, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a boy, 1926 credited, titled and dated

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a boy, 1926 credited, titled and dated on affixed gallery label (frame backing board) each image/sheet measuring approximately 3 x 2 1/2 in. (7.6 x 6.3 cm) mount: 12 7/8 x 9 1/2 in. (32.7 x 24.1)

          Christie's
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a Boy, 1916 signed and dated in ink (r
          Apr. 07, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a Boy, 1916 signed and dated in ink (r

          Est: $10,000 - $15,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Portrait of a Boy, 1916 signed and dated in ink (recto) image/sheet: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (21.5 x 16.5 cm.)

          Christie's
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Interior Church Tower, Tepotzotlan, Mexico, 1924 c
          Apr. 07, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Interior Church Tower, Tepotzotlan, Mexico, 1924 c

          Est: $20,000 - $30,000

          TINA MODOTTI (1896–1942) Interior Church Tower, Tepotzotlan, Mexico, 1924 credited, titled and dated on affixed gallery label (frame backing board) image/sheet: 9 1/2 x 7 1/8 in. (24.1 x 18 cm.)

          Christie's
        • Photograph, Tina Modotti
          Mar. 25, 2022

          Photograph, Tina Modotti

          Est: $2,000 - $4,000

          Tina Modotti (Italian, 1896-1942), Untitled, circa 1920, gelatin silver print, unsigned, studio stamp ("Photographs, Tina Modotti, Mexico, D.F") verso, sight: 3.75"h x 2.5"w, overall (with frame): 15.25"h x 12.25"w

          Clars Auctions
        • Photograph, Tina Modotti
          Mar. 25, 2022

          Photograph, Tina Modotti

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          Tina Modotti (Italian, 1896-1942), Untitled (Road, Mexico City), 1923-26, gelatin silver print, signed in pen lower right, studio stamp ("Photographs, Tina Modotti, Mexico D.F") verso, sheet/image: 2.5"h x 3.25"w, overall (with frame): 12.25"h x 15.25"w

          Clars Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH WITH STUDIO STAMP 3 1/2" X 2 3/8" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED 4 1/4" X 6 1/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH WITH STUDIO STAMP 4 1/4" X 3 1/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED 6 1/4" X 4 1/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH STUDIO STAMPED 2 1/2" X 3 3/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. STUDIO STAMPED. 2 1/2" X 3 3/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. STUDIO STAMPED. 5" X 3 1/2" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. STUDIO STAMPED. 2 1/2" X 3 3/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. STUDIO STAMPED. 6" X 8" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. SIGNED. 4" X 6 1/2" MATTING 10" X 8" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED. 5" X 3 1/2" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED. 2 1/2" X 4 1/4" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI POSTCARD
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI POSTCARD

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI POSTCARD. SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED. 3 1/2" X 5 1/2" Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Feb. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH. STUDIO STAMPED. Tina Modotti (born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini, August 16/17, 1896 – January 5, 1942) was an Italian American photographer, model, actor, and revolutionary political activist for the Comintern. She left Italy in 1913 and moved to the USA, where she worked as a model and subsequently as a photographer. In 1922 she moved to Mexico, where she became an active Communist. As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio. Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children.[6] She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography. Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic, all the while shunning the term 'artist', insisting she merely wanted to "capture social realities". Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera.[ Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City.Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston. In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali. Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated. Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses. Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico" 13 3/4" X 11" All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) The Fecund Earth, Diego Rivera Murals, Chapingo, Mexico.
          Feb. 10, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) The Fecund Earth, Diego Rivera Murals, Chapingo, Mexico.

          Est: $1,500 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) The Fecund Earth, Diego Rivera Murals, Chapingo, Mexico. Silver print, the image measuring 9 5/8x7 1/2 inches (24.4x19.1 cm.), with Modotti's stamp on verso. Circa 1925

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Reparto de Tierras (detail), Capilla Riveriana, Universidad Autónoma, Chapingo * Guardia de la Verdad, Diego R
          Feb. 10, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Reparto de Tierras (detail), Capilla Riveriana, Universidad Autónoma, Chapingo * Guardia de la Verdad, Diego R

          Est: $3,000 - $4,500

          TINA MODOTTI (1896-1942) Reparto de Tierras (detail), Capilla Riveriana, Universidad Autónoma, Chapingo * Guardia de la Verdad, Diego Rivera Mural, Chapingo, Mexico * La Tierra Dorminda, Diego Rivera Murals, Chapingo, Mexico. Together, 3 photographs. Silver prints, the images measuring 8x10 inches (20.3x25.4 cm.), and the reverse, each with Modotti's stamp on verso. Circa 1925

          Swann Auction Galleries
        • TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH
          Jan. 23, 2022

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH

          Est: $250 - $2,500

          TINA MODOTTI PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED AND STUDIO STAMPED SLIGHT WRINKLING AND WATERMARK. SHOWN. 3 3/4" X 2 1/4" Modotti was born Assunta Adelaide Luigia Modotti Mondini in Udine, Friuli, Italy.As a young girl in Italy her uncle, Pietro Modotti, maintained a photography studio. Later in the U.S., her father briefly ran a similar studio in San Francisco. While in Los Angeles, she met the photographer Edward Weston and his creative partner Margrethe Mather. It was through her relationship with Weston that Modotti developed as an important fine art photographer and documentarian. By 1921, Modotti was Weston's lover. Ricardo Gómez Robelo became the head of Mexico's Ministry of Education's Fine Arts Department, and persuaded Robo to come to Mexico with a promise of a job and a studio.Robo left for Mexico in December 1921. Perhaps unaware of his affair with Modotti, Robo took with him prints of Weston's, hoping to mount an exhibition of his and Weston's work in Mexico. While she was on her way to be with Robo, Modotti received word of his death from smallpox on February 9, 1922. Devastated, she arrived two days after his death. In March 1922, determined to see Robo's vision realized, she mounted a two-week exhibition of Robo's and Weston's work at the National Academy of Fine Arts in Mexico City. She sustained a second loss with the death of her father, which forced her to return to San Francisco later in March 1922. In 1923, Modotti returned to Mexico City with Weston and his son Chandler, leaving behind Weston's wife Flora and their youngest three children. She agreed to run Weston's studio free of charge in return for his mentoring her in photography.Together they opened a portrait studio in Mexico City. Modotti and Weston quickly gravitated toward the capital's bohemian scene and used their connections to create an expanding portrait business. Together they found a community of cultural and political "avant-gardists", which included Frida Kahlo, Lupe Marín, Diego Rivera, and Jean Charlot. In general, Weston was moved by the landscape and folk art of Mexico to create abstract works, while Modotti was more captivated by the people of Mexico and blended this human interest with a modernist aesthetic. Modotti also became the photographer of choice for the blossoming Mexican mural movement, documenting the works of José Clemente Orozco and Diego Rivera. Between 1924 and 1928, Modotti took hundreds of photographs of Rivera's murals at the Secretariat of Public Education in Mexico City. Modotti's visual vocabulary matured during this period, such as her formal experiments with architectural interiors, blooming flowers, urban landscapes, and especially in her many beautiful images of peasants and workers during the depression. In 1926, Modotti and Weston were commissioned by Anita Brenner to travel around Mexico and take photographs for what would become her influential book Idols Behind Altars. The relative contributions of Modotti and Weston to the project has been debated. Weston's son Brett, who accompanied the two on the project, indicated that the photographs were taken by Edward Weston.In 1925, Modotti joined International Red Aid, a Communist organization. In November 1926, Weston left Mexico and returned to California. During this time Modotti met several political radicals and Communists, including three Mexican Communist Party leaders who would all eventually become romantically linked with her: Xavier Guerrero, Julio Antonio Mella, and Vittorio Vidali.Starting in 1927, a much more politically active Modotti (she joined the Mexican Communist Party that year) found her focus shifting and more of her work becoming politically motivated.Around that time her photographs began appearing in publications such as Mexican Folkways, Forma, and the more radically motivated El Machete, the German Communist Party's Arbeiter-Illustrierte-Zeitung (AIZ), and New Masses.Mexican photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo divided Modotti's career as a photographer into two distinct categories: "Romantic" and "Revolutionary", with the former period including her time spent as Weston's darkroom assistant, office manager and, finally, creative partner. Her later works were the focus of her one-woman retrospective exhibition at the National Library in December 1929, which was advertised as "The First Revolutionary Photographic Exhibition In Mexico". All items Located in Hollywood Florida Warehouse. Thank you for your inquiry about shipping your precious item/items purchased at Puckett Auctions. Please note that we are a family owned and operated UPS Store since 1991, we are located 1/2 mile from the Gallery and have daily pickups at the Gallery. Puckett Auctions has trusted us in being their preferred shipper and we ask that you do the same. Being that we are a family run store, my brother and I will always be the ones to pick up your items from the Gallery. We hand pack the items ourselves to ensure all packing and shipping guidelines are followed so your items arrive intact and to the correct location. Please also note that we provide all Puckett Auction customers our family discount and our quote below shall reflect such. You are more than welcome to call Brian or Mark with any questions at 954.963.2222

          Puckett Auctions
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