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Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, b. 1617 - d. 1682

Spanish artist Bartolome Esteban Murillo, born in 1618, was considered one of the most popular painters in Spain during the 17th-century Baroque period. Bartolome Esteban Murillo's paintings depicted Franciscan saints with warm eyes and natural expressions. His skill with instilling emotion made his religious pieces inviting and less stern than those of his predecessors. One of his most famous religious paintings was his 1652 piece Immaculate Conception, which depicts the Virgin Mary.

A contemporary realist, artist Bartolome Esteban Murrillo also did paintings using soft, inviting colors and broad strokes, showing scenes of ordinary people and everyday life. Bartolome Esteban Murrillo's artwork, from later in his career, was inspired by Flemish painters from the 16th century. You can browse vintage religious paintings for sale online to bring a spiritual element to your space.

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            • After Murillo Immaculate Conception Oil, 19th C.
              Jun. 09, 2024

              After Murillo Immaculate Conception Oil, 19th C.

              Est: $1,000 - $2,000

              After Bartolome Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682), Immaculate Conception of Mary, Oil on Canvas, 19th century, label to verso from the Holy Name of Mary Parish in Montgomery, New York signed by Father Patrick Brady (third pastor of the church from 1874-1894) and dated 1879, giltwood frame. Image: 41" H x 29.75" W; frame: 44" H x 33" W x 1" D. Provenance: From a New York City Collection. Keywords: Painting, Religious Art, Virgin Mother, Antique, Baroque Revival, Old Master

              Auctions at Showplace
            • Sevillian school of the 17th century. Follower of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). ‘Virgin and Child’. Oil on canvas. Old frame. It presents faults and repainting.
              May. 29, 2024

              Sevillian school of the 17th century. Follower of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). ‘Virgin and Child’. Oil on canvas. Old frame. It presents faults and repainting.

              Est: €500 - €600

              Sevillian school of the 17th century. Follower of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). ‘Virgin and Child’. Oil on canvas. Old frame. It presents faults and repainting. Measurements: 70 x 58 cm; 79 x 67 x 4 cm (frame). Murillo invented his own model of Maternity, in which the union of the Mother and the Child was full and juicy, so that the tenderness and the affection were prioritised above any will to represent the figures in their sacredness. In fact, they could be ordinary people, a young woman with her child. The present painter, a follower of Murillo, takes up this legacy, as he also makes an expressive Baroque chiaroscuro his own. Sevillian school of the 17th century.

              Setdart Auction House
            • Spanish school of the XVIII century. Following models of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). "The Good Shepherd". Oil on canvas. Relined.
              May. 29, 2024

              Spanish school of the XVIII century. Following models of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). "The Good Shepherd". Oil on canvas. Relined.

              Est: €2,000 - €2,200

              Spanish school of the XVIII century. Following models of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). "The Good Shepherd". Oil on canvas. Relined. Measurements: 61 x 48 cm, 75 x 60 cm (frame). Following models of Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, copy of the original of the Prado Museum. Murillo has gone down in history as one of the great painters of children's themes, and this not only for his famous genre scenes starring children, but also for representations like this one, in which the Child Jesus appears in the biblical metaphor of the good shepherd who feeds and cares for his sheep. This is a type of image of great success among the Sevillian society of the time, and whose devotional effectiveness has remained intact through the centuries. In this type of work, which in many cases was intended for private worship, the author showed himself to be a true master when it came to combining a wise and delicate style with a gentle and sweet content. However, owner as he was of a powerful sense of composition, he endowed them with remarkable monumentality and balance. The ruins of architecture that appear in the background have a double meaning. On the one hand, they are part of a Virgilian tradition that is manifested in literature and the plastic arts and that likes the image of the shepherd among the fallen remains of a splendorous past. On the other hand, Christian iconography frequently used the reference to classical ruins as a symbol of defeated paganism. Relined.

              Setdart Auction House
            • Andalusian school of the second half of the seventeenth century. After BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Virgin with Child". Oil on canvas. Relined.
              May. 29, 2024

              Andalusian school of the second half of the seventeenth century. After BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Virgin with Child". Oil on canvas. Relined.

              Est: €1,000 - €1,200

              Andalusian school of the second half of the seventeenth century. After BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Virgin with Child". Oil on canvas. Relined. Presents restoration, Repainting, dirt and frame with some chipping. Stretcher frame with some old xylophagous. Measurements: 98 x 72 cm; 109 x 86 cm (frame). In this canvas the Virgin Mary is represented with the Child in her arms, both embracing each other with tenderness. Mary appears in three quarters, seated, holding her son with both hands, surrounding him with her arms. Jesus, for his part, appears almost naked, although Mary covers him with a white cloth as is common in this iconography. The Child turns his body towards his mother, resting his hands on her breast. The composition is placed in a dark interior, the figures are cut out against a neutral background that is illuminated by the soft light radiating from the figures. The Virgin wears pink inner tunic and blue mantle and golden veil, colors that allude respectively to purity, the future Passion of her son, the concepts of truth and eternity and the divine Glory. Formally, important traces of Murillo's art can be appreciated in this work, both in the way of composing the scene and in the type of the child, of great sweetness and naturalism, as well as in the studied and effective illumination and in the chromaticism tending to monochrome, around ochre, earthy and carmine colors.

              Setdart Auction House
            • Attributed to BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). ‘Christ Salvator Mundi’. Oil on copper.
              May. 29, 2024

              Attributed to BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). ‘Christ Salvator Mundi’. Oil on copper.

              Est: €62,000 - €64,000

              Attributed to BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1618-1682). ‘Christ Salvator Mundi’. Oil on copper. Size: 11 x 9 cm; 27.5 x 25 cm (frame). The monumentality of the figure and the consistency of the figure that is portrayed through a vaporous brushstroke that creates an almost powdery atmosphere, together with the softening of the gesture and the psychological capture of the protagonist that conveys great tenderness are characteristic of Murillo's painting. It should also be noted that this type of image was a great success among Sevillian society at the time, and its devotional efficacy has remained intact over the centuries. In this type of work, which in many cases was intended for private worship, the artist showed himself to be a true master when it came to combining a wise and delicate style with a gentle and sweet content. However, as he possessed a powerful sense of composition, he endowed them with remarkable monumentality and balance. Little is known of Murillo's childhood and youth except that he lost his father in 1627 and his mother in 1628, for which reason he was taken into the care of his brother-in-law. Around 1635 he must have begun his apprenticeship as a painter, most likely with Juan del Castillo, who was married to a cousin of his. This working and artistic relationship lasted about six years, as was customary at the time. After his marriage in 1645 he embarked on what was to be a brilliant career that gradually made him the most famous and sought-after painter in Seville. The only trip he is known to have made is documented in 1658, when Murillo was in Madrid for several months. It is conceivable that while at court he kept in touch with the painters who lived there, such as Velázquez, Zurbarán and Cano, and that he had access to the collection of paintings in the Royal Palace, a magnificent subject of study for all the artists who passed through the court. Despite the few documentary references to his mature years, we know that he enjoyed a comfortable life, which enabled him to maintain a high standard of living and have several apprentices. Having become the leading painter in the city, surpassing even Zurbarán in fame, he was determined to raise the artistic level of local painting. In 1660 he decided, together with Francisco Herrera el Mozo, to found an academy of painting, of which he was the main driving force. His fame spread so far throughout Spain that Palomino states that around 1670 King Charles II offered him the possibility of moving to Madrid to work there as a court painter. We do not know whether this reference is true, but the fact is that Murillo remained in Seville until the end of his life.

              Setdart Auction House
            • F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The grape and melon eaters, Lithography
              May. 25, 2024

              F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The grape and melon eaters, Lithography

              Est: €300 - €400

              Ferdinand Piloty sen. (1786 Homburg - 1844 Munich) after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618 Seville - 1682 ibid.): The grape and melon eaters Poorly dressed boys gleefully dining with a basket filled with grapes, 19th century, Lithography Technique: Lithography on Paper Inscription: Signed below the image on the left and right. The original painting is in the Munich Pinakothek. The print is from the publication series 'Königlich Baierischer Gemälde-Saal zu München und Schleissheim'. This publication summarises the royal collection lithographically. The series was published between 1810 and 1816, with Piloty and Strixner providing the largest number of lithographs. Date: 19th century Description: Although the children are poorly dressed and seem to live on the streets, they do not have to starve. Murillo, who mostly captured children and beggar figures in supposed everyday situations, presents an idealised image of poverty. Keywords: Simplicity, everyday life, idealised naturalism, poverty, street children, idyll of poverty, idyll, grapes, children, child life, child poverty, Alte Pinakothek, Staatsgemäldesammlung, Munich, 19th century, Baroque, Genre, Spain, Size: Paper: 63,4 cm x 46,7 cm (25 x 18,4 in), Depiction: 45,0 cm x 34,0 cm (17,7 x 13,4 in)

              Fichter Kunsthandel
            • F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The pie eaters, Lithography
              May. 25, 2024

              F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The pie eaters, Lithography

              Est: €300 - €400

              Ferdinand Piloty sen. (1786 Homburg - 1844 Munich) after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618 Seville - 1682 ibid.): The pie eaters Poorly dressed boys gleefully dining with a basket filled with dog and fruit, 19th century, Lithography Technique: Lithography on Paper Inscription: Signed below the image on the left and right. The original painting is in the Munich Pinakothek. The print is from the publication series 'Königlich Baierischer Gemälde-Saal zu München und Schleissheim'. This publication summarises the royal collection lithographically. The series was published between 1810 and 1816, with Piloty and Strixner providing the largest number of lithographs. Date: 19th century Description: Although the children are poorly dressed and seem to live on the streets, they do not have to starve. Murillo, who mostly captured children and beggar figures in supposed everyday situations, presents an idealised image of poverty. Keywords: Simplicity, everyday life, idealised naturalism, poverty, street children, idyll of poverty, idyll, children, children's life, child poverty, Alte Pinakothek, Staatsgemäldesammlung, Munich, 19th century, Baroque, Genre, Spain, Size: Paper: 63,6 cm x 46,3 cm (25 x 18,2 in), Depiction: 44,4 cm x 34,3 cm (17,5 x 13,5 in)

              Fichter Kunsthandel
            • F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), Delousing of a boy, Lithography
              May. 25, 2024

              F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), Delousing of a boy, Lithography

              Est: €300 - €400

              Ferdinand Piloty sen. (1786 Homburg - 1844 Munich) after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618 Seville - 1682 ibid.): Domestic toilet Simple interior with old woman delousing a boy, 19th century, Lithography Technique: Lithography on Paper Inscription: Signed below the image on the left and right. The original painting is in the Munich Pinakothek. The print is from the publication series 'Königlich Baierischer Gemälde-Saal zu München und Schleissheim'. This publication summarises the royal collection lithographically. The series was published between 1810 and 1816, with Piloty and Strixner providing the largest number of lithographs. Date: 19th century Description: The boy leans in the old woman's lap, plays with a small dog and lets himself be deloused. Keywords: Domesticity, Simplicity, Grandmother, Grandson, Boy, Dog, Interior, Everyday life, Alte Pinakothek, Staatsgemäldesammlung, Munich, 19th century, Baroque, Genre, Spain, Size: Paper: 63,3 cm x 46,2 cm (24,9 x 18,2 in), Depiction: 44,5 cm x 33,0 cm (17,5 x 13 in)

              Fichter Kunsthandel
            • Estaban Murillo framed oil on canvas
              May. 16, 2024

              Estaban Murillo framed oil on canvas

              Est: $5,000 - $10,000

              Estaban Murillo framed oil on canvas, Spanish 1617 - 1682, attributed to, unsigned, baroque style, sleeping putti, red draped tent and landscape background image - 29 3/4" x 40" in a 36" x 46 1/4" carved and gilt frame. Condition: appears to have old professional cleaning, good

              Barry S. Slosberg Inc
            • AFTER BARTOLOME MURILLO (1617-1682)
              May. 11, 2024

              AFTER BARTOLOME MURILLO (1617-1682)

              Est: $1,000 - $2,000

              "Madonna and Child". Grand tour. Oil on canvas. Unsigned. Housed in elaborate gilt wood Adams style frame. 38 x 29 3/8 inches.

              John McInnis Auctioneers
            • Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Seville 1617 - 1682 Seville, follower, Virgin of Madrid/ Immaculate Conception
              May. 07, 2024

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Seville 1617 - 1682 Seville, follower, Virgin of Madrid/ Immaculate Conception

              Est: €100 - €200

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Seville 1617 - 1682 Seville, follower Virgin of Madrid/Immaculate Conception High-quality repetition of the important painting 19th century Oil on canvas 68.5 x 55.5 cm, with frame 86 x 64 cm

              Tiberius Auctions
            • BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (1618-1682) WORKSHOP OF "THE SORROWFUL MOTHER" OIL ON CANVAS. 17TH CENTURY.
              Apr. 27, 2024

              BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (1618-1682) WORKSHOP OF "THE SORROWFUL MOTHER" OIL ON CANVAS. 17TH CENTURY.

              Est: €4,000 - €6,000

              Bartolome Esteban MURILLO (1618-1682) workshop of "The Sorrowful Mother" Oil on canvas. 17th century. Enclosed is a document written in Spanish and signed by Mr. Enrique Valdivieso Gonzalez (Spanish art historian holding the post of professor of art history at the University of Seville and specialist in the Sevillian school of painting). "Enrique Valdivieso Gonzalez, Emeritus Professor of Art History at the University of Seville, reports on a painting on canvas (36 x 28 cm), which depicts a Dolorosa, pointing out that it is a work with clear stylistic characteristics that suggest it was painted in Murillo's studio. In fact, following a model created by the master that is currently conserved in the Prado Museum, this work was created in his studio, in which the forms created by Murillo are maintained at a high level of quality, so that we can see the softness and elegance of the drawing and the harmony of the different chromatic shades used. The repetition of works in Murillo's studio is justified by the great success that this pictorial model had with the Sevillian public, who bought this type of painting to be placed in the private chapels of many large residences or at least in the oratories that were found in every important house. This demand obliged Murillo to produce, with the help of his studio, numerous repetitions of this type of Dolorosa, which was always accompanied by an Ecce Homo, although for various reasons such as inheritances and scores, the couple found themselves repeatedly and currently separated; (a study of the different typologies of Dolorosas that Murillo painted is collected in E. Valdivieso, The School of Murillo. Seville, 2018, pp. 365-371). The expression of the Virgin, who is undoubtedly contemplating her son, who has been brutally beaten and crowned with thorns, is particularly meticulous in this work. However, her highly balanced expression is based on the fact that her spiritual suffering is more profound than her physical suffering. On the other hand, the chromatic treatment is very sober, alternating the white of the veil with the blue of the brushstroke, warning that the latter hue has darkened considerably over time, tending towards black." Seville, 20 March 2023 - Weight: 7.68 kg - Shipping unavailable - Region: Spain - Sizes: H 625mm x L 550mm avec cadre - At first sight: restored

              Goldfield Auction
            • AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (1617-1682), MADONNA AND CHILD
              Apr. 10, 2024

              AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (1617-1682), MADONNA AND CHILD

              Est: $2,000 - $3,000

              After Bartolome Esteban Murillo (1617-1682), Madonna and Child Oil on canvas 89 x 63 cm

              Hammersite
            • Workshop of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The apparition of the Virgin and Child to San Felix de Cantalicio". Oil on canvas. Relined. It presents Repainting and restorations.
              Apr. 10, 2024

              Workshop of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The apparition of the Virgin and Child to San Felix de Cantalicio". Oil on canvas. Relined. It presents Repainting and restorations.

              Est: €6,000 - €7,000

              Workshop of BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The apparition of the Virgin and Child to San Felix de Cantalicio". Oil on canvas. Relined. It presents Repainting and restorations. Measurements: 100 x 68 cm: 118 x 84 cm (frame). This painting is a version of the painting of the same title that is in the Museum of Fine Arts of Seville by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo. It depicts the miracle in which the Virgin appears to the saint to put the Child in his arms. It is an iconographic model of Italian origin, although it is Murillo who gives it its perfect form in this version of around 1665-1668. The original painting of the master is of large dimensions - 283 by 188 cms - and has the Catalog No. 199 of the Museum of Fine Arts of Seville. This is one of the sixteen works made by the Sevillian master for the Capuchin convent in Seville. In the paintings dedicated to Franciscan saints - Saint Anthony of Padua, Saint Felix Cantalicio and Saint Francis embracing the cross - the softness of lights and colors, harmonizing without violence the brown of the Franciscan habit with the greenish or illuminated backgrounds intensify the intimate character of his mystical visions, stripped of all dramatism. Saint Felix is the patron saint of the lay brothers, and had been canonized during the years when the Capuchins of Seville took charge of the chapel that bears his name. It is a painting of gentle, soft forms with a certain pictorial richness that reminds us of Leonardo's sfumato although at the same time it already points to rococo. It seems reasonable to maintain that its beauty was so appreciated that Murillo's workshop received requests to make copies of it in smaller canvases for the residences of the Andalusian nobility or the local bourgeoisie. Very few artists in the second half of the seventeenth century were able to escape the influence of Murillo. Some of them were his disciples and even important Flemish painters. Of the direct disciples the best known and closest is Francisco Meneses Osorio, who completed the work just begun by Murillo in the altarpiece of the Capuchins of Cadiz. Cornelius Shut, originally from Antwerp, painter who lived many years in Seville and became president of the Academy of Fine Arts of Seville has left us several drawings of great influence of the master and moved firmly within his circle of influence. Other painters of the time who followed his style were Valdés Leal, Francisco Herrera el Mozo or Zurbarán himself. Some of his most important disciples - great followers of Murillo's style - who could be authors of this work are Francisco Meneses Osorio, Matías de Arteaga, Francisco Polanco, Ignacio de Ries and the Granada-born Sebastián Gómez, about whom a legend was woven that made him Murillo's "slave painter", probably to draw a parallel with Velázquez and Juan de Pareja. Likewise, linked to Murillo's painting, without being able to specify the exact degree of personal or professional relationship were Esteban Márquez de Velasco, of whom some works of a certain quality very influenced by the master, with Alonso Miguel de Tovar and Bernardo Lorente Germán, the painter of the Divinas Pastoras, the influence of Murillo goes into the first half of the eighteenth century. Both of them, together with Domingo Martínez, Murillo's taste for the delicate and tender, served the court during their stay in Seville from 1729 to 1733, a moment of glory for Murillo's painting given the fondness shown by Queen Isabel de Farnesio, who bought as many works as she could, including many of those that are currently preserved by his hand in the Prado Museum. At that time, none of his genre paintings remained in Seville and Palomino wrote, with some dismay, since what was valued was the sweetness of the color rather than the drawing, that "so today, outside Spain, a painting by Murillo is valued more than one by Titian, or Van-Dyck. Among the painters who worked in the transition from the seventeenth to the eighteenth century faithfully following Murillo's style, Juan Simón Gutiérrez stands out. We know that he worked in Seville for more than half a century and therefore his artistic production must have been very abundant although only three signed works have come down to us. The Death of Saint Dominic, today in Seville, the Virgin with the Augustinian Saints, in a convent of the Trinity in Carmona and a Holy Family in the Recoletas of Medina Sidonia, his hometown. We believe that it is possible that this is one of his works that shows a personal style within the Murillo style, especially in the remains of his characters that have allowed us to identify unsigned works by his hand. Murillo's success lies in the kind character of his models, which responds to a sensibility that moves away from the baroque and approaches the softness and kindness, the sweetness, the delicate and sentimental of the rococo. In any case and in spite of not being possible to affirm the authorship with absolute accuracy, this Virgin and San Félix Cantalicio is a significant work of excellent quality based on a model of the master, being that the works of Juan Simón Gutiérrez and other painters of his orbit and his disciples were so abundant, of such great quality and so similar to those of Murillo that it is very difficult to attribute them firmly to each painter and often they have been erroneously attributed to the master.

              Setdart Auction House
            • ANTIQUE KPM PAINTING ON PORCELAIN AFTER MURILLO
              Mar. 30, 2024

              ANTIQUE KPM PAINTING ON PORCELAIN AFTER MURILLO

              Est: $100 - $150

              ​​An antique German KPM Porcelain Factory in Berlin porcelain plaque painting after a 1645 work of the Spanish Baroque painter Bartolome Esteban Murillo, 1617 to 1682, titled Grape and Melon Eaters. Although he is best known for his religious works, Murillo also produced a considerable number of paintings of contemporary women and children. Impressed with the KPM monogram and scepter mark to the back. Circa 1900. Antique German Porcelain Paintings And Collectibles.

              Antique Arena Inc
            • After Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682),
              Mar. 27, 2024

              After Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617-1682),

              Est: $200 - $300

              Madonna and Child of the Napkin oil on canvas signed indistinctly lower right 28cm x 30cm

              Aalders Auctions
            • Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 1618 Sevilla – 1682, Kreis des
              Mar. 21, 2024

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 1618 Sevilla – 1682, Kreis des

              Est: €30,000 - €40,000

              DIE VISION DES HEILIGEN BERNHARD Öl auf Leinwand. Doubliert. 169 x 115 cm. In ebonisiertem Profilrahmen. Dargestellt der Heilige Bernhard von Clairvaux (um 1090-1153 Clairvaux bei Troyes), der als einer der bedeutendsten Mönche des Zisterzienserordens gilt und für dessen Ausbreitung über ganz Europa er verantworltich war. Die Szene in eine Landschaft mit Baumstaffage verlegt, der Mönche in einer aufstrebenden Diagonale komponiert, die in die Sitzfigur der Maria übergeht, welche auf einer Wolkenbank Platz genommen hat und das Christuskind trägt. Dahinter und im Himmel neben dem göttlichen Schein mehrere Engel. Dem Heiligen zu Füßen ein Engel, ein Buch lesend, sowie ein Engel mit Kruzifix. Die Komposition nimmt Bezug auf eine Komposition Murillos, die im Prado in Madrid verwahrt wird. (13902737) (13) Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 1618 Sevilla – 1682, circle of THE APPARITION OF THE VIRGIN TO SAINT BERNARD Oil on canvas. Relined. 169 x 115 cm.

              Hampel Fine Art Auctions
            • AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO MADONNA & CHILD
              Feb. 25, 2024

              AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO MADONNA & CHILD

              Est: $800 - $1,500

              Framed oil on canvas painting, The Virgin and Child, after Bartolome Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682), relined, sight: approx 29.25"h, 21.25"w, overall: approx 38"h, 30"w, 13lbs

              Austin Auction Gallery
            • AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO MADONNA & CHILD
              Feb. 25, 2024

              AFTER BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO MADONNA & CHILD

              Est: $1,500 - $3,500

              Framed oil on canvas painting, The Virgin and Child, after Bartolome Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682), relined, sight: approx 63 1/8"h, 42"w, overall: approx 68.5"h, 47"w, 33lbs

              Austin Auction Gallery
            • Bartolomé Esteban Murillo. San Lorenzo
              Feb. 21, 2024

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo. San Lorenzo

              Est: -

              Oil on canvas. Relined. On the back, inscription [Madrid, July 1906. From the collection of the Marquis of Villarias]. Provenance: - Private collection Attached report issued by Mr. Enrique Valdivieso.

              Duran Arte y Subastas
            • Santo Tomás de Villanueva dando limosna
              Feb. 07, 2024

              Santo Tomás de Villanueva dando limosna

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1668-1669 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Sevilla.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Santo Tomás de Villanueva
              Feb. 07, 2024

              Santo Tomás de Villanueva

              Est: -

              Fragmento de obra original realizada hacia 1668-1669 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Sevilla.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • La educación de la Virgen
              Feb. 07, 2024

              La educación de la Virgen

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1655 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en el Museo Nacional del Prado de Madrid.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Holy Family with a Young Saint John the Baptist
              Feb. 01, 2024

              Holy Family with a Young Saint John the Baptist

              Est: $400,000 - $600,000

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Seville 1617 – 1682 Holy Family with a Young Saint John the Baptist oil on canvas canvas: 30 ⅞ by 37 in.; 78.3 by 94.0 cm. framed: 43 ⅞ by 46 ¼ in.; 111.5 by 117.5 cm.

              Sotheby's
            • STUDIO OF BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (SEVILLE 1617-1682) The Infant Saint Jo
              Jan. 31, 2024

              STUDIO OF BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (SEVILLE 1617-1682) The Infant Saint Jo

              Est: $120,000 - $180,000

              STUDIO OF BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (SEVILLE 1617-1682) The Infant Saint John the Baptist with the Lamb oil on canvas 45 ½ x 33 in. (115.5 x 83.9 cm.)

              Christie's
            • F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The fruit seller, Lithography
              Dec. 30, 2023

              F. PILOTY (*1786) after MURILLO (*1618), The fruit seller, Lithography

              Est: €300 - €400

              Ferdinand Piloty sen. (1786 Homburg - 1844 Munich) after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618 Seville - 1682 ibid.): The fruit seller A girl counts the money she has earned with her comrade, 19th century, Lithography Technique: Lithography on Paper Inscription: Signed below the image on the left and right. The original painting is in the Munich Pinakothek. The print is from the publication series 'Königlich Baierischer Gemälde-Saal zu München und Schleissheim'. This publication summarises the royal collection lithographically. The series was published between 1810 and 1816, with Piloty and Strixner providing the largest number of lithographs. Date: 19th century Description: The poorly dressed girl is sitting on a staircase with her companion. They count the pennies in their hands. In front of them is a basket filled with grapes. Although the children are poorly dressed and seem to live on the streets, they appear healthy and well-fed. Murillo, who mostly captured children and beggar figures in supposed everyday situations, presents an idealised image of poverty. Keywords: Simplicity, everyday life, idealised naturalism, poverty, street children, idyll of poverty, idyll, grapes, children, child life, child poverty, Alte Pinakothek, Staatsgemäldesammlung, Munich, 19th century, Baroque, Genre, Spain,

              Fichter Kunsthandel
            • Bartolomé Esteban Pérez Murillo (copia da) (Siviglia, 1617 - Siviglia) Madonna del latte olio su tela cm 161x110; con cornice cm 198x144
              Dec. 19, 2023

              Bartolomé Esteban Pérez Murillo (copia da) (Siviglia, 1617 - Siviglia) Madonna del latte olio su tela cm 161x110; con cornice cm 198x144

              Est: €8,000 - €12,000

              Bartolomé Esteban Pérez Murillo (copia da) (Siviglia, 1617 - Siviglia) Madonna del latte olio su tela cm 161x110; con cornice cm 198x144Copia del dipinto conservato presso ala Galleria Corsini di Roma. Le due figure, rese nella loro fattezza "popolana" fecero sì dare all'opera il soprannome di Madonna Zingara, come la definì Carl Justi nel 1892

              Gliubich Casa d'Aste
            • BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO Y TALLER Seville (1618 / 1682) "The Child Jesus asleep on the cross"
              Dec. 18, 2023

              BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO Y TALLER Seville (1618 / 1682) "The Child Jesus asleep on the cross"

              Est: €10,500 - €14,000

              Oil on canvas. Old collection labels attached to the frame of the work. Label of the Delegated Board of Seizure and Protection and Salvage of the Artistic Treasure (inv. no. 8107. Almazan, no. 25) Origin: - Duquesa Viuda de Medinaceli Collection, no. 438 "A sleeping child." - Duke of Almazan Collection. - Spanish private collection. The iconographic theme of this painting representing "The Child Jesus asleep on the cross" enjoyed enormous diffusion during the 17th century because it perfectly combined, in the same image, the candor and tenderness of the Divine Infant with the tragic feeling that anticipates the cross on which he rests and which serves as a prelude to the future Passion. Murillo created a prototype that enjoyed enormous success and this fact led to different replicas being made in his workshop like the one shown here, intended mostly for private homes, where apart from their decorative beauty, they offered incentives for its admiration and affection towards the innocent figure of the sleeping Baby Jesus, who was considered protector of the children of the house. The present work, according to a report by Enrique Valdivieso, can be considered a creation of Murillo with the collaboration of the assistants in his workshop and repeats the autograph model that is preserved in the Wernher Collection in Lutton Hoo (England). Attached is a report on the painting made by Enrique Valdivieso dated in Seveilla on January 6, 2014. Measurements: 42 x 61 cm.

              Ansorena
            • After Bartolome Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682) Oil on Canvas, Ca. 19th Century, "Las Contadoras De Dinero", H 38.25" W 31"
              Dec. 15, 2023

              After Bartolome Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682) Oil on Canvas, Ca. 19th Century, "Las Contadoras De Dinero", H 38.25" W 31"

              Est: $750 - $1,250

              Oval-shaped composition. After Murillo, depicting a young man and woman counting coins. Stretched canvas, no frame. Provenance: Property from a Bloomfield Hills, MI private collector.

              DuMouchelles
            • After Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682) Oil on Canvas 19th C., "The Little Fruit Seller", H 8.25" W 6.75"
              Dec. 14, 2023

              After Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Spanish, 1617-1682) Oil on Canvas 19th C., "The Little Fruit Seller", H 8.25" W 6.75"

              Est: $40 - $125

              Mid 19th copy of the 17th c. original. 19th c. wood and gesso frame. Provenance: From the Estate of Prominent Collector, Leon Zielinski, Macomb County, MI

              DuMouchelles
            • Follower of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 – 1682); 18th century- 19th century. “Saint Rose of Lima and the Child.” Oil on canvas. It has faults and restorations. It has a 19th century frame.
              Dec. 13, 2023

              Follower of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 – 1682); 18th century- 19th century. “Saint Rose of Lima and the Child.” Oil on canvas. It has faults and restorations. It has a 19th century frame.

              Est: €1,500 - €2,000

              Follower of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682); 18th - 19th century. "Saint Rose of Lima and Child". Oil on canvas. It presents faults and restorations. It has a 19th century frame. Measurements: 83 x 62 cm; 93 x 71, 5 cm (frame). Devotional scene in which a saint is represented holding the Child Jesus in her arms as a maternity. Specifically, it is Isabel de Flores Oliva (Lima, 1586-1617), better known as Saint Rose of Lima, was a Peruvian saint, a Dominican mystic canonised in 1671. She is the first saint of America, patron saint of Lima and Peru since 1669, and of the New World and the Philippines since 1670. In 1615, Dutch corsairs decided to attack the city of Lima, and the news soon spread among the population. In response, Rosa gathered the women of Lima in the church to pray for the salvation of Lima. The saint went up to the altar and, cutting off her clothes and rolling up her sleeves, placed her body to defend Christ in the tabernacle. Mysteriously, the captain of the Dutch fleet died on his ship a few days later, which led to the withdrawal of the ships. In Lima, everyone attributed the miracle to Rosa, which is why she is often depicted facing the sea, praying to God for protection against the corsairs. The technical characteristics of the piece are similar to those of Murrillo's heir work. Formally, it stands out both in its close and human interpretation, clearly Counter-Reformationist, and in its expressive intensity, which connects directly with popular fervour through a language based on knowledge of the Italian and Flemish schools. Thus, the figures are eminently classical, as are the gestures and the faces, which are slightly idealised.

              Setdart Auction House
            • BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The Inspiration of St. Thomas Aquinas", ca. 1650. Oil on canvas. Certified by Enrique Valdivieso.
              Dec. 13, 2023

              BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The Inspiration of St. Thomas Aquinas", ca. 1650. Oil on canvas. Certified by Enrique Valdivieso.

              Est: €230,000 - €250,000

              BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The Inspiration of St. Thomas Aquinas", ca. 1650. Oil on canvas. Certified by Enrique Valdivieso. Published in the Catalogue Raisonné of Murillo, E. Valdivieso. Ed. El Viso, 2010, nº32, p. 284. Paired with a "San Buenaventura". It has an export permit dated July 2023. Measurements: 96 x 68 cm; 122 x 95 cm (frame). Murillo created this painting in his mature stage, when his influential style was fully established. In this composition, Saint Thomas Aquinas takes on a monumental scale. His face illuminated by an amber light from above, he takes his pen and prepares to write in the sacred book. The solar-shaped medallion radiating from his chest symbolizes the Holy Spirit as the inspirer of his writing. The thick white robe absorbs the reflections of divine light. His beardless face, with soft, pearly flesh, shines with ecstatic rapture. The distinctive signs of Murillo's work can also be seen in the chromatic warmth and sweetened naturalism of his language. The close and human interpretation of the character, clearly counter-reformist, is also characteristic of the maestro. Little is known about Murillo's childhood and youth, except that he was orphaned by his father in 1627 and his mother in 1628, which is why he became the guardian of his brother-in-law. Around 1635 he must have begun his apprenticeship as a painter, most likely with Juan del Castillo, who was married to a cousin of his. This work and artistic relationship would last about six years, as was common at that time. After his marriage, in 1645, began what would be a brilliant career that progressively made him the most famous and sought-after painter in Seville. The only trip of which there is evidence that he made is documented in 1658, the year in which Murillo was in Madrid for several months. It can be thought that at court he maintained contact with the painters who lived there, such as Velázquez, Zurbarán and Cano, and that he had access to the collection of paintings in the Royal Palace, a magnificent subject of study for all those artists who passed through the court. Despite the few documentary references regarding his years of maturity, we know that he enjoyed a comfortable life, which allowed him to maintain a high standard of living and several apprentices. Having become the city's first painter, surpassing even Zurbarán in fame, motivated his desire to raise the artistic level of local painting. For this reason, in 1660 he decided, together with Francisco Herrera el Mozo, to found a painting academy of which he was the main promoter.

              Setdart Auction House
            • BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Christ Carrying the Cross". Oil on canvas. Attached expert opinion issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso.
              Dec. 13, 2023

              BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Christ Carrying the Cross". Oil on canvas. Attached expert opinion issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso.

              Est: €50,000 - €55,000

              BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "Christ Carrying the Cross". Oil on canvas. Attached expert opinion issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso. It has repainting and restorations. It has a label on the back of the Inventory of the Bilbao Museum collection. Measurements: 164 x 111 cm; 181.5 x 128.5 cm (frame). Bibliography: -Inventory of the Convent of La Merced in Seville in 1732. -Antonio Ponz in his Viaje de España, published in 1886, (volume IX, page 108). -Félix González de León Noticia artística de Sevilla (1844, volume 1, page 156). Provenance: -Convent of La Merced in Seville, 1732. -Private collection, Madrid. From the beginning of the 19th century. There are two paintings of Christ on the Ascent to Calvary by Murillo with a similar model and composition in the figure of Christ in this scene, although larger in size and with the inclusion of Mary in both. The first is in the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the second is in the Thomas Henry Museum in Chesburg. The aesthetic and technical similarities indicate that this work was probably executed by Murillo in the 1660s-1670s. In the words of the expert Valdivieso, "It should be pointed out that this painting may fairly certainly be the one that was inventoried in the convent of La Merced in Seville in 1732 in the following terms: "un Jesús nazareno... con moldura es de Dn Bme Morillo" ("a Jesus of Nazareth... with moulding is by Dn Bme Morillo"). This work is also cited by Antonio Ponz in his Viaje de España, published in 1886, (volume IX, page 108) and also by Félix González de León Noticia artística de Sevilla (1844, volume 1, page 156). Very notable in this version of Murillo's Christ of Nazareth is the spiritual balance shown in his face, which, as usual in this artist, replaces the expression of pain, which he must have felt in this moment of his passion, with an expression of intense gentleness that shows a total and serene acceptance of his destiny in such a pathetic moment. Murillo is at pains to point out that Christ, despite bearing the cross with great effort, cannot prevent his physical resistance from abandoning him and causing his knees to bend towards the ground. His hands are perfectly depicted, one holding the weight of the cross on his shoulder and the other resting on the ground to prevent his body from slumping. This bodily movement causes a series of folds on his dark tunic, which the artist resolves with perfection. In this type of painting Murillo perfectly translates the thinking of the Church, which, through painful scenes, moved the viewer to feel a deep compassion for Christ's suffering and to arouse the idea that he suffered and died to redeem mankind from its sins. Also interesting for intensifying the drama of this scene is Murillo's depiction of a stormy background of clouds in alternating shades of white and grey, reinforcing the painful episode Christ is suffering and thus intensifying the expressive intensity of his pain". Considered by some to be the painter who best defines the Spanish Baroque, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo exerted a notable influence on his Sevillian contemporaries and, after his death, his influence can be found in other schools even to the present day, especially in the field of religious art. In the 18th century his language and iconographic formulas were widely followed and repeated, and during the Romantic period numerous copies of his works were made. However, it was in the Baroque period of the 18th century that the importance of his influence, spread by his numerous disciples and followers, was most evident. In fact, in that century he was the best known and most appreciated Spanish painter outside Spain, the only one of whom Sandrart includes a biography in his "Academia picturae eruditae", a work dating from the end of the 17th century. In the last decades of the 17th century, Murillo's emotional, sweet and delicate sentimentality prevailed in Seville over the more dramatic one of Valdés Leal, hence the predominance of his influence in the following century. As time went on, however, we find an increasingly superficial influence, focused on imitating models and compositions but leaving aside his plastic language in favour of formulas more typical of the new century.

              Setdart Auction House
            • Workshop of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - Cadiz, 1682), 17th century. "Dolorosa". Oil on canvas. Attached report confirming the authorship of Murillo's workshop, issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso.
              Dec. 13, 2023

              Workshop of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - Cadiz, 1682), 17th century. "Dolorosa". Oil on canvas. Attached report confirming the authorship of Murillo's workshop, issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso.

              Est: €7,000 - €8,000

              Workshop of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - Cadiz, 1682), 17th century. "Dolorosa". Oil on canvas. Attached report confirming the authorship of Murillo's workshop, issued by Don Enrique Valdivieso. The original canvas is preserved. It has perforations and faults. It has a frame from the beginning of the 20th century. Measurements: 95 x 68 cm; 110 x 83 cm (frame). The Marian invocation of the Dolorosa, especially popular during the Spanish Baroque period, reached the highest expressive quotas in Murillo's hand by bringing closeness and intimacy to the dramatic episode of the Passion. In the present canvas, the theme is imbued with great feeling and artistic quality. Aesthetically the work is very close to the painting of the Dolorosa by the Sevillian painter, now in the Museo del Prado collection. There are clear similarities in the expressive recollection, the fleshy half-open lips, the shining eyes on the threshold of weeping.... Here, however, we see Mary almost full-length, the light sliding over her soft features, the light work emphasising the nuances of sustained pain, as opposed to the half-light that envelops the figure and gives it sculptural consistency, with the broad interplay of the intense blue of the cloak, the red of the tunic and the white veil. We can appreciate the type of Virgin, of great gentleness and naturalism, typical of the master, as well as a chromaticism based on subtle gradations that manage to create a masterly aerial perspective, accompanied by the use of transparent tones and resplendent luminous effects. Also typical of the master is his close and human, counter-reformist interpretation, as well as his expressive intensity, which connects directly with popular fervour through a language based on his knowledge of the Italian and Flemish schools. Little is known of Murillo's childhood and youth except that he lost his father in 1627 and his mother in 1628, for which reason he was taken into the care of his brother-in-law. Around 1635 he must have begun his apprenticeship as a painter, most likely with Juan del Castillo, who was married to a cousin of his. This working and artistic relationship lasted about six years, as was customary at the time. After his marriage in 1645 he embarked on what was to be a brilliant career that gradually made him the most famous and sought-after painter in Seville. The only trip he is known to have made is documented in 1658, when Murillo was in Madrid for several months. It is conceivable that while at court he kept in touch with the painters who lived there, such as Velázquez, Zurbarán and Cano, and that he had access to the collection of paintings in the Royal Palace, a magnificent subject of study for all the artists who passed through the court. Despite the few documentary references to his mature years, we know that he enjoyed a comfortable life, which enabled him to maintain a high standard of living and have several apprentices. Having become the city's leading painter, surpassing even Zurbarán in fame, he was determined to raise the artistic level of local painting. In 1660 he decided, together with Francisco Herrera el Mozo, to found an academy of painting, of which he was the main driving force.

              Setdart Auction House
            • BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (SIVIGLIA 1618 - CADICE 1682) BOTTEGA/ALLIEVO DI
              Dec. 05, 2023

              BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBAN MURILLO (SIVIGLIA 1618 - CADICE 1682) BOTTEGA/ALLIEVO DI

              Est: €3,500 - €5,500

              Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Siviglia 1618 - Cadice 1682) bottega/allievo di Annunciazione Olio su tela 126 x 104 cm L'opera di eccelsa qualità riprende l'Annunciazione di Murillo conservata al Prado di Madrid e realizzata circa nel 1660. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Seville 1618 - Cadiz 1682) workshop/student of Annunciation Oil on canvas 126 x 104 cm The artwork of excellent quality takes up Murillo's Annunciation preserved in the Prado in Madrid and created around 1660.

              Lucas Aste
            • Santo Tomás de Villanueva repartiendo su ropa entre los pobres
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Santo Tomás de Villanueva repartiendo su ropa entre los pobres

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en Museo de Arte de Cincinnati de Ohio en Estados Unidos.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Ángel de la guarda
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Ángel de la guarda

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1665 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en la Catedral de Sevilla.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Santo Tomás de Villanueva dando limosna
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Santo Tomás de Villanueva dando limosna

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1668-1669 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en el Museo de Bellas Artes de Sevilla.

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Inmaculada Concepción
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Inmaculada Concepción

              Est: -

              Firmada en el reverso: "Arroyo". Se trata de un fragmento de la "Inmaculada Concepción del Escorial" realizada entre 1660 y 1665 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en el Museo del Prado (Madrid).

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Niños comiendo uvas y melón
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Niños comiendo uvas y melón

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1645-1650 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en La Alte Pinakothek (Antigua Pinacoteca) de Múnich (Alemania).

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Los vendedores de fruta
              Nov. 29, 2023

              Los vendedores de fruta

              Est: -

              Copia de obra original realizada hacia 1665 por Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (Sevilla, 1617 - 1682) que se conserva en La Alte Pinakothek (Antigua Pinacoteca) de Múnich (Alemania).

              Isbilya Subastas
            • San José con el Niño Jesús
              Nov. 29, 2023

              San José con el Niño Jesús

              Est: -

              .

              Isbilya Subastas
            • Bartolomé Esteban MURILLO Séville, 1617 - 1682 Saint Jean l'Evangéliste Toile
              Nov. 22, 2023

              Bartolomé Esteban MURILLO Séville, 1617 - 1682 Saint Jean l'Evangéliste Toile

              Est: €300,000 - €400,000

              Bartolomé Esteban MURILLO Séville, 1617 - 1682 Saint Jean l'Evangéliste Toile (Restaurations anciennes) Saint John the Evangelist, canvas, by B. E. Murillo h: 103 w: 83 cm Provenance : Collection des barons Solvay, Bruxelles (comme attribué à Van Dyck) ; Donné en cadeau de mariage aux parents du propriétaire actuel en 1946 ; Collection particulière, Belgique Commentaire : La redécouverte de cette œuvre inédite constitue un ajout important à notre connaissance de l'œuvre de Bartolomé Esteban Murillo. Vers 1645, à l'approche de ses trente ans, l'artiste se détache de ses premières œuvres marquées par le réalisme et le caravagisme de José de Ribera, de Zurbarán et de José de Castillo, et fait évoluer la peinture sévillane dans une direction baroque empruntée aux peintres anversois du XVIIe siècle, tel Rubens (ce n'est d'ailleurs pas un hasard si, au XXe siècle, ce tableau passait chez ses propriétaires comme une œuvre flamande). Il s'impose alors sur la scène sévillane avec ses premiers grands chefs-d'œuvre : la 'Cuisine des Anges' et le célèbre 'Jeune mendiant', tous deux conservés au musée du Louvre. L'apôtre Jean est ici représenté à mi-corps, saisi par l'inspiration, au moment où il rédige le début de son évangile : on peut déchiffrer assez clairement sur le livre qu'il tient sur ses genoux les phrases "In principio erat Verbum, Et Verbum erat Apud Deum. Et Deus erat Verbum. Hoc erat in principio apud Deum. Omnia per ipsum factasunt" ("En principe, le Verbe existait et le Verbe était avec Dieu. Il était au début avec Dieu et tout a été fait par lui"). La lumière divine lui donne son inspiration et divise le fond en deux zones distinctes, éclairant le visage du jeune apôtre et laissant l'aigle, son attribut iconographique, dans l'ombre. Ce coup de projecteur, le clair-obscur sont d'origine caravagesque, tout comme le beau drapé rouge vermillon, structuré, aux plis creusés. L'artiste s'inspire encore de Ribera et de Zurbaran, mais il n'en retient pas l'écriture graphique, les détails hyperréalistes. Le livre n'est pas décrit feuille par feuille, usées, comme chez les peintres naturalistes. Les boucles des cheveux ou la moustache sont juste brossées (là où un disciple de Caravage aurait détaillé chaque poil). Il idéalise le visage de son modèle, ose le vert foncé de sa tunique et le rouge intense de son manteau. L'accord coloré subtil apparaîtra une fois le tableau nettoyé de ses vernis jaunis. Au début du XVIIe siècle, en Espagne et particulièrement à Séville, une importante production artistique représentant le collège apostolique avec les douze apôtres, dite 'apostolado', est illustrée par Greco, Ribera et le jeune Velásques1. Ces séries servent ainsi de modèles aux peintres souhaitant représenter des saints en mi-corps. Chacune comprenait la figure de saint Jean l'Evangéliste, qui par sa jeunesse, détonnait dans l'ensemble de vieillards. Parmi les trois 'apostolados' de Ribera2, citons le 'saint Jean' (Paris, musée du Louvre (fig.1)), une de ses œuvres de jeunesse, exécutée à Rome vers 1607-1608. Certains de ces ensembles sont même envoyée depuis l'étranger en Espagne, comme ceux de Rubens (Prado (fig.2)) ou de Van Dyck. Une autre source de notre œuvre se trouve dans la 'Vision de saint Jean à Patmos' de Diego Velásquez en 1619 (Londres, National Gallery (fig.3)) que Murillo pouvait voir au couvent des Carmélites de Séville. Le saint y est représenté assis, un livre ouvert sur ses genoux, écrivant le contenu de sa révélation céleste. Le professeur Navarette Prieto propose de situer notre toile vers 1650-1655, c'est-à-dire après sa première réalisation importante, le cycle du petit cloitre des franciscains de Séville (" el Clautro Chico ", 1645-1647), dispersée entre plusieurs musées, et qui impose le jeune peintre dans la capitale andalouse3. Le 'Jeune Mendiant endormi' du musée du Louvre (fig.4) est daté de 1647-1648 4. Ces succès lui amènent de nombreuses commandes de particuliers des figures de saints indépendants ou ses premières Madone5. L'évolution de la couche picturale sur notre toile, notamment les micro-craquelures6, sont identiques à celles qu'on peut voir dans les grands formats de la série monastique, celui conservé à Bayonne (fig.5) ou la " 'Cuisine des Anges' " du Louvre, datée de 1646. La matière n'a pas encore la lumière diffuse, vénitienne, scintillante du Murillo baroque de milieu du siècle ; elle est relativement épaisse, grasse, comme dans les tableaux caravagesques, et déjà fluide, enlevée, à la flamande. On perçoit la liberté, une virtuosité baroque, une aisance à peindre, à rendre une expression de surprise et de concentration mêlés, nouvellement acquise par le jeune peintre. Une reprise de qualité inférieure, ou une copie, de plus petit format (toile, 71x53 cm), a été vendue à Londres chez Sotheby's le 7 décembre 2016 sous le numéro 28. Nous remercions le professeur Enrique Valdivisio d'avoir confirmé le caractère autographe de notre toile sur photographie numérique par échange de mails en avril 2023. Nous remercions le professeur Benito Navarete Prieto d'avoir confirmé le caractère autographe de notre toile, après un examen de visu, le 17 mai 2023. . Voir le catalogue de l'exposition : 'Dans la poussière de Séville. Sur les traces du Saint Thomas de Velázquez', Orléans, Musée des Beaux-Arts, 2021 (sous la direction de Guillaume Kientz et Corentin Dury) 2. Apostolado dit aux cartels, Apostalado du Prado et Apostalado Cucina - Gavotti. Voir le catalogue de l'exposition 'Ribera à Rome, autour du premier Apostolado', Rennes, musée des Beaux-Arts, 7 novembre 2014-8 février 2015, Strasbourg, musée des Beaux-Arts, 28 février -31 mai 2015 (sous la direction de Dominique Jacquot, Guillaume Kazerouni et Guillaume Kientz). 3. Catalogue de l'exposition El Joven Murillo, Bilbao, Museo de Bellas Artes, 19 octobre 2009-17 janvier 2010, Séville, Museo de Bellas Artes, 18 février-30 mai 2010, p. 211-245. 4. Datation retenue sur le site des collections du musée du Louvre. 5. La 'Vierge du Rosaire', 1648-1659, Castres, musée Goya ; 'La Vierge du Rosaire', composition différente de la précédente, Madrid, Museo nacional del Prado, la 'Sainte Famille au petit oiseau', Madrid, Museo nacional del Prado. 6. Par exemple autour des yeux et du nez, ou la main qui tient la plume. Estimation 300 000 - 400 000 €

              Artcurial
            • attrib Bartolome Murillo Portrait of a Cardinal
              Nov. 12, 2023

              attrib Bartolome Murillo Portrait of a Cardinal

              Est: $800 - $1,200

              attributed MURILLO, Bartolome Esteban, (Spanish, 1617-1682): Portrait of a Catholic Cardinal holding a letter from Rome, Oil/Canvas, no visible signature, possibly hidden in letter, 35.75" x 28.75", framed 42.75" x 35.75". Condition: Paint flake and loss, craquelure, inpaint, sold with all faults.

              Amero Auctions
            • BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO Seville (1618) / (1682) "Embrace of the Child Jesus and Saint Juanito"
              Nov. 07, 2023

              BARTOLOME ESTEBAN MURILLO Seville (1618) / (1682) "Embrace of the Child Jesus and Saint Juanito"

              Est: €36,000 - €48,000

              Oil on canvas On the back, attached to the frame, old collection label and commercial numbers inscribed on the frame and canvas. Origin: - Madrid, convent of barefoot Carmelites of San Hermenegildo? – United States, private collection; Fairfield Auction (Connecticut, United States), January 15, 2012, lot 112; - Madrid, private collection. Reference bibliography: - Ponz, A., Viaje de España, vol. V, Joaquín Ibarra, Madrid, 1783, 35, p. 277; - Polentinos, Count of., “The Convent of San Hermenegildo in Madrid. List of the collection of paintings found in the Convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid with the expression of their authors and rate or value of each one”, Bulletin of the Spanish Excursion Society, 1933, no. 36; - Valdivieso, E., Murillo. Critical catalog, 3 vol., Madrid, 1981; - Navarrete Prieto, B., Andalusian painting of the 17th century and its recorded sources, Madrid, 1998, p. 290-293, fig. 631; - Valdivieso, E., Murillo., Catalog raisonné of paintings, El Viso, Madrid, 2012; - Pérez Sánchez, A. and Navarrete Prieto, B., The young Murillo, cat. Expo., Museum of Fine Arts of Bilbao and Junta de Andalucía, 2009; - Hereza, P., Corpus Murillo. Paintings, drawings. Commissions, Seville City Council, ICAS, 2019. This charming painting shows one of the most frequent iconographic themes in Spanish baroque painting: the meeting between Jesus and Saint John the Baptist in their childhood. This matter, even though it contradicted the Holy Scriptures, since the cousins ​​did not get to know each other until they were adults, had enormous dissemination thanks to the fact that they connected with the popular religiosity of the time, since it combined in the same image the candor and other values ​​associated with the world of childhood with a latent tragic feeling that anticipated the events that were going to unfold in the adult life of Christ. Therefore, this iconography achieved a perfect balance that emphasized both the human condition of the characters represented and the spiritual one. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, in his paintings, was a true master in creating this type of images that perfectly combined tangible reality with a visionary and spiritual atmosphere. These iconic works by Murillo enjoyed great popularity, as they were liked by both secular and ecclesiastical clientele and also by the popular classes, thus managing to perpetuate themselves over time. A representative example is that of the Children of the Shell, preserved in the Museo Nacional del Prado, which shares the theme with the work that we present here and in which we propose Murillo as its author. The scene takes place in a landscape of lush vegetation, with a large sky of white clouds, in which we find the Child Jesus with Saint John merged in a loving embrace. The latter is represented prostrate and with its two iconographic attributes par excellence: the cross with a ribbon and the lamb. In the aforementioned phylactery, normally, there is the inscription “ECCE AGNUS DEI”, which proclaims the Child Jesus as the “lamb of God”. However, the small size of the painting prevents the inclusion of the aforementioned text, something totally unnecessary here due to the presence of the lamb itself in a foreground that contemplates the happy meeting of the Divine Infant with his cousin. The restoration to which the work has recently been subjected and the studies that have been carried out allow it to be technically related to other works by Murillo with similar characteristics that served the painter as previous studies or as models to be shown to clients before carrying out the work. charge. In the radiographic study, a very accentuated contrast can be seen due to the abundant use of lead white, sometimes mixed, and very dense pigments. A small correction or pentimento is also observed, something quite common in the works of the Sevillian painter, which is manifested in the notable modification of the position of the foot of Saint John located in the foreground. Another characteristic element in his works is the background cloudscape resolved through energetic and broad brushstrokes, in which the abundant charge of white lead produces an intense light vibration. As Benito Navarrete pointed out, it is worth remembering the way in which Murillo resorted to prints by Guido Reni, as is the case in this case, in which Reni is in turn inspired by an earlier model by Carracci (See Navarrete 1998, p. 290, fig. 631). Despite being a sketch, it has not been able to be directly related to any known work of the painter so, possibly, it may be the study of a commission that did not materialize. There is also no certain information about its remote origin, although it should be noted that it could be the work of Murillo mentioned by Ponz that was in the convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid. This is described with the theme of Jesus the Child and Saint John, indicating that both figures were “embracing”; a description that matches this painting. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. something here totally unnecessary due to the presence of the lamb itself in the foreground that contemplates the happy meeting of the Divine Infant with his cousin. The restoration to which the work has recently been subjected and the studies that have been carried out allow it to be technically related to other works by Murillo with similar characteristics that served the painter as previous studies or as models to be shown to clients before carrying out the work. charge. In the radiographic study, a very accentuated contrast can be seen due to the abundant use of lead white, sometimes mixed, and very dense pigments. A small correction or pentimento is also observed, something quite common in the works of the Sevillian painter, which is manifested in the notable modification of the position of the foot of Saint John located in the foreground. Another characteristic element in his works is the background cloudscape resolved through energetic and broad brushstrokes, in which the abundant charge of white lead produces an intense light vibration. As Benito Navarrete pointed out, it is worth remembering the way in which Murillo resorted to prints by Guido Reni, as is the case in this case, in which Reni is in turn inspired by an earlier model by Carracci (See Navarrete 1998, p. 290, fig. 631). Despite being a sketch, it has not been able to be directly related to any known work of the painter so, possibly, it may be the study of a commission that did not materialize. There is also no certain information about its remote origin, although it should be noted that it could be the work of Murillo mentioned by Ponz that was in the convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid. This is described with the theme of Jesus the Child and Saint John, indicating that both figures were “embracing”; a description that matches this painting. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. something here totally unnecessary due to the presence of the lamb itself in the foreground that contemplates the happy meeting of the Divine Infant with his cousin. The restoration to which the work has recently been subjected and the studies that have been carried out allow it to be technically related to other works by Murillo with similar characteristics that served the painter as previous studies or as models to be shown to clients before carrying out the work. charge. In the radiographic study, a very accentuated contrast can be seen due to the abundant use of lead white, sometimes mixed, and very dense pigments. A small correction or pentimento is also observed, something quite common in the works of the Sevillian painter, which is manifested in the notable modification of the position of the foot of Saint John located in the foreground. Another characteristic element in his works is the background cloudscape resolved through energetic and broad brushstrokes, in which the abundant charge of white lead produces an intense light vibration. As Benito Navarrete pointed out, it is worth remembering the way in which Murillo resorted to prints by Guido Reni, as is the case in this case, in which Reni is in turn inspired by an earlier model by Carracci (See Navarrete 1998, p. 290, fig. 631). Despite being a sketch, it has not been able to be directly related to any known work of the painter so, possibly, it may be the study of a commission that did not materialize. There is also no certain information about its remote origin, although it should be noted that it could be the work of Murillo mentioned by Ponz that was in the convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid. This is described with the theme of Jesus the Child and Saint John, indicating that both figures were “embracing”; a description that matches this painting. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. A small correction or pentimento is also observed, something quite common in the works of the Sevillian painter, which is manifested in the notable modification of the position of the foot of Saint John located in the foreground. Another characteristic element in his works is the background cloudscape resolved through energetic and broad brushstrokes, in which the abundant charge of white lead produces an intense light vibration. As Benito Navarrete pointed out, it is worth remembering the way in which Murillo resorted to prints by Guido Reni, as is the case in this case, in which Reni is in turn inspired by an earlier model by Carracci (See Navarrete 1998, p. 290, fig. 631). Despite being a sketch, it has not been able to be directly related to any known work of the painter so, possibly, it may be the study of a commission that did not materialize. There is also no certain information about its remote origin, although it should be noted that it could be the work of Murillo mentioned by Ponz that was in the convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid. This is described with the theme of Jesus the Child and Saint John, indicating that both figures were “embracing”; a description that matches this painting. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. A small correction or pentimento is also observed, something quite common in the works of the Sevillian painter, which is manifested in the notable modification of the position of the foot of Saint John located in the foreground. Another characteristic element in his works is the background cloudscape resolved through energetic and broad brushstrokes, in which the abundant charge of white lead produces an intense light vibration. As Benito Navarrete pointed out, it is worth remembering the way in which Murillo resorted to prints by Guido Reni, as is the case in this case, in which Reni is in turn inspired by an earlier model by Carracci (See Navarrete 1998, p. 290, fig. 631). Despite being a sketch, it has not been able to be directly related to any known work of the painter so, possibly, it may be the study of a commission that did not materialize. There is also no certain information about its remote origin, although it should be noted that it could be the work of Murillo mentioned by Ponz that was in the convent of Discalced Carmelites in Madrid. This is described with the theme of Jesus the Child and Saint John, indicating that both figures were “embracing”; a description that matches this painting. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm. Also very revealing is the fact that the Inventory of the convent drawn up in 1787 mentions this work as a “sketch one foot high”, measurements that also conform to those of this work, being valued at 2,800 reales, along with another work of the Virgin and Child of the same size; a high valuation that suggests that the painting must have been an original by the Sevillian as it was especially appreciated for its notable quality. Measurements: 27.5 x 19.5 cm.

              Ansorena
            • Continental Painted Porcelain Plaque
              Oct. 26, 2023

              Continental Painted Porcelain Plaque

              Est: $300 - $500

              Continental Painted Porcelain Plaque depicting "The Vision of St. Anthony of Padua" after Esteban Murillo (1617-1682); unsigned

              Abell Auction
            • A large painting after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 'Mother and Child' oil on canvas. (W:108 x 156 cm)
              Oct. 25, 2023

              A large painting after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 'Mother and Child' oil on canvas. (W:108 x 156 cm)

              Est: €200 - €300

              A large painting after Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, 'Mother and Child' oil on canvas.  Dimensions: (W:108 x H:156 cm)

              Flanders Auctions
            • School of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBÁN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 – 1682). “The miracle of the loaves and fishes.” Oil on canvas.
              Oct. 18, 2023

              School of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBÁN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 – 1682). “The miracle of the loaves and fishes.” Oil on canvas.

              Est: €1,200 - €1,500

              School of BARTOLOMÉ ESTEBÁN MURILLO (Seville, 1617 - 1682). "The miracle of the loaves and fishes". Oil on canvas. Measurements: 57 x 131 cm; 64 x 137 cm (frame). This work follows the models of the painting created by the Sevillian master Murillo between 1669-1670. The Miracle of the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes is currently housed in the Church and Hospital of Santa Caridad in Seville. The original piece was commissioned by Don Miguel de Mañara. Little is known of Murillo's childhood and youth, except that he lost his father in 1627 and his mother in 1628, which is why he was taken into the care of his brother-in-law. Around 1635 he must have begun his apprenticeship as a painter, most likely with Juan del Castillo, who was married to a cousin of his. This working and artistic relationship lasted about six years, as was customary at the time. After his marriage in 1645 he embarked on what was to be a brilliant career that gradually made him the most famous and sought-after painter in Seville. The only trip he is known to have made is documented in 1658, when Murillo was in Madrid for several months. It is conceivable that while at court he kept in touch with the painters who lived there, such as Velázquez, Zurbarán and Cano, and that he had access to the collection of paintings in the Royal Palace, a magnificent subject of study for all the artists who passed through the court. Despite the few documentary references to his mature years, we know that he enjoyed a comfortable life, which enabled him to maintain a high standard of living and have several apprentices. Having become the leading painter in the city, surpassing even Zurbarán in fame, he was determined to raise the artistic level of local painting. In 1660 he decided, together with Francisco Herrera el Mozo, to found an academy of painting, of which he was the main driving force.

              Setdart Auction House
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