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Thomas (1840) Nast Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, Caricaturist, Illustrator, Cartoonist, b. 1840 - d. 1902

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                • Antique Thomas Nast (American, 1840) Framed Pencil Illustration
                  Jun. 20, 2024

                  Antique Thomas Nast (American, 1840) Framed Pencil Illustration

                  Est: $100 - $1,000

                  DESCRIPTION: Thomas Nast (American, 1840-1902) framed pencil illustration sketch depicting a male and female figures with a child on a walking stroll, and a servant behind them. All figures are dressed in Regency fashions. Signed T. Nast . Called the "Father of the American Cartoon," Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was an influential caricaturist and political cartoonist. Remembered for his Civil War illustrations in Harper's Weekly. CIRCA: Late 19th Century ORIGIN: USA DIMENSIONS: H: 4 1/4" W: 7 1/4" Frame: H: 13 1/2" W: 16" CONDITION: Good overall condition. The paper has an original stain. Unless otherwise stated, all information provided is the opinion of our specialists. Should you have any specific questions regarding the condition of this lot, please use the ask question button or send us an email.

                  Akiba Galleries
                • Attributed to Thomas Nast (America, 1840-1902) Oil on Panel, "Self Portrait", H 18.25" W 24"
                  May. 17, 2024

                  Attributed to Thomas Nast (America, 1840-1902) Oil on Panel, "Self Portrait", H 18.25" W 24"

                  Est: $800 - $1,200

                  Unsigned. Standing caricature figure of the artist with a painters palette in hand, a cat in his pocket, another cat and a puppy at his feet. Kennedy Galleries, Inc. New York, N.Y. label on verso of board. Provenance: Collection of a prominent, Grosse Pointe Park, MI collector of American art.

                  DuMouchelles
                • Thomas Nast (Ger 1840-1902) Print and Check 1891
                  May. 10, 2024

                  Thomas Nast (Ger 1840-1902) Print and Check 1891

                  Est: $50 - $150

                  Antique Items from Thomas Nast's collection Include print (*NOTE Change/not an Artist Proof) of "Boys Spying on Santa Claus" 1886 and autographed check from "Thomas Nast's own collection" as stated on reverse of frame. Nast was the cartoonist and artist who created the modern image of Santa Claus.

                  Keystone Auctions LLC
                • Thomas Nast. New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast
                  Mar. 01, 2024

                  Thomas Nast. New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast

                  Est: $300 - $600

                  New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast Engraving with vignette views of New York City's Central Park in Summer after Thomas Nast image. for 'Harper's Weekly,' August 27, 1864. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American editorial cartoonist dubbed the "father of the American cartoon." He rose to prominence with his influential illustrations in Harper's Weekly, especially during the Civil War and Reconstruction era. Nast's work played a pivotal role in shaping public opinion, notably in exposing the corruption of "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall political machine in New York. Additionally, he's credited with popularizing the modern image of Santa Claus, and while he didn't originate symbols like the Democratic donkey, the Republican elephant, or Uncle Sam, his renditions deeply ingrained them in American culture. Whether through the jolly figure of Santa or the dignified representation of Columbia as the U.S.'s spirit, Nast's iconic imagery has left an indelible mark on the nation's consciousness. Frame: 26.75" x 20.75" Visible 21" x 14.75" SHIPPING: Collective HUDSON does NOT offer in-house shipping. For a list of shippers, please click here. We have a few shippers who operate on the east coast with competitive pricing: Andrew Prial, Paul Bzwadka, and Joe Garden. These names are listed on our site.   All items are sold as is. Conditions of the items are generally commensurate with age and use. Please examine the photos carefully and do not hesitate to ask questions. You are also welcome to visit us from Wednesday to Sunday, 11 AM to 4 PM, by making an appointment.

                  Collective Hudson, LLC
                • Group of Four American Engravings
                  Jan. 25, 2024

                  Group of Four American Engravings

                  Est: $100 - $200

                  Group of Four American Engravings comprising "Battle of Lake Erie", by Thomas Phillibrown (Fl. 1856-1866) after William Henry Powell (1823-1879), published by Johnson & Miles, New York; "Battle of Lookout Mountain", after Thomas Nast (1840-1902); "The Attack on Fort Sumter" and "Defense of the Liberty Pole in New York"

                  Abell Auction
                • THOMAS NAST (GERMAN, 1840-1902) FRAMED HARPER'S WEEKLY
                  Dec. 15, 2023

                  THOMAS NAST (GERMAN, 1840-1902) FRAMED HARPER'S WEEKLY

                  Est: $50 - $200

                  THOMAS NAST (GERMAN, 1840-1902) FRAMED HARPER'S WEEKLY Eleven (11) identically framed political cartoons by Nast for Harper's Weekly.

                  Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers
                • Thomas Nast. New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast
                  Dec. 08, 2023

                  Thomas Nast. New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast

                  Est: $300 - $600

                  New York City engraving "Central Park in Summer" Antique hand colored engraving 1864 after Thomas Nast Engraving with vignette views of New York City's Central Park in Summer after Thomas Nast image. for 'Harper's Weekly,' August 27, 1864. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American editorial cartoonist dubbed the "father of the American cartoon." He rose to prominence with his influential illustrations in Harper's Weekly, especially during the Civil War and Reconstruction era. Nast's work played a pivotal role in shaping public opinion, notably in exposing the corruption of "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall political machine in New York. Additionally, he's credited with popularizing the modern image of Santa Claus, and while he didn't originate symbols like the Democratic donkey, the Republican elephant, or Uncle Sam, his renditions deeply ingrained them in American culture. Whether through the jolly figure of Santa or the dignified representation of Columbia as the U.S.'s spirit, Nast's iconic imagery has left an indelible mark on the nation's consciousness.

                  Collective Hudson, LLC
                • Thomas Nast (1840-1902): Girls with Dolls: A Pair
                  May. 18, 2023

                  Thomas Nast (1840-1902): Girls with Dolls: A Pair

                  Est: $8,000 - $12,000

                  Thomas Nast (1840-1902): Girls with Dolls: A Pair Two oil on board, 1863, both signed 'Th. Nast' and dated lower right, with labels from Windsor & Newton. Both 10 1/2 x 7 1/2 in., 15 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (frame). Note: Known primarily as a cartoonist, Thomas Nast's works in oil are lesser-known and much rarer on the market. In his illustration work, Nast advocated for the abolition of slavery and opposed segregation and violence against minority groups. The subject depicted here is quite unusual and progressive for its time, and is illustrative of Nast's sympathies towards Black Americans.

                  STAIR
                • Thomas Nast German/American, 1840-1902 Compliments of the Season, 1895
                  Sep. 28, 2022

                  Thomas Nast German/American, 1840-1902 Compliments of the Season, 1895

                  Est: $500 - $800

                  Thomas Nast German/American, 1840-1902 Compliments of the Season, 1895 Signed Th: Nast and dated 1895. (ur); inscribed "Here's to your good health / and your families' and / may you live long and / prosper" / Th: Nast / 1895 on a card affixed to the recto 10 x 6 5/8 inches (25.4 x 16.8 cm) Provenance: Christie's, New York, Mar. 18, 1987, lot 100 C Property from a Manhattan Apartment Decorated by Markham Roberts

                  DOYLE Auctioneers & Appraisers
                • 1867 Harper's Weekly Thomas Nast Cartoon - Tammany Hall
                  Mar. 08, 2022

                  1867 Harper's Weekly Thomas Nast Cartoon - Tammany Hall

                  Est: $300 - $400

                  **Originally Listed At $300** Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902). "The Government of the City of New York," Harper's Weekly Magazine, February 9, 1867, p. 88. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast's view of New York city council under influence of Tammany Hall, the caption reading, "A Chance to Steal Without the Risk of the Penitentiary - The Government of the City of New York - What that "Ere" Honorable Body will Come To." Note "FIGHT" and "STEAL" encircled in the upper left and right corners respectively. A fascinating glimpse at this episode of American history, set in a custom mat and frame. Size of image: 13.5" W x 9" H (34.3 cm x 22.9 cm) Size of visible page: 14.75" W x 9.625" H (37.5 cm x 24.4 cm) Size of frame: 21" W x 16" H (53.3 cm x 40.6 cm) Tammany Hall was the primary political machine of the Democratic Party that controlled New York City and New York State politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. Best known for helping Irish immigrants rise in American politics, it was also known for corruption, especially under William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid 19th century. Fiona Deans Halloran describes this cartoon in "Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons" (2012) as follows, "On the left, a man wields a dagger in a bar fight. On the far right, a man spits into a large, ornate spittoon. In the forefront, slouch lantern-jawed Irishmen holding guns and drinking liquor. Sitting above all of this, surveying the domain, is a heavy-set man with a large revolver. Above his head is a plaque that reads, "The Steal Ring," and across the arched top of the drawing runs an explanatory line, "A chance to steal without the risk of the penitentiary." If Nast intended the seated man to be Tweed, there is no sign of it. He is a symbol rather than a caricature." Provenance: private New Jersey, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #161939

                  Artemis Gallery
                • 1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall
                  Oct. 14, 2021

                  1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall

                  Est: $400 - $600

                  **Originally Listed At $300** Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902). "The Government of the City of New York," Harper's Weekly Magazine, February 9, 1867, p. 88. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast's view of New York city council under influence of Tammany Hall, the caption reading, "A Chance to Steal Without the Risk of the Penitentiary - The Government of the City of New York - What that "Ere" Honorable Body will Come To." Note "FIGHT" and "STEAL" encircled in the upper left and right corners respectively. A fascinating glimpse at this episode of American history, set in a custom mat and frame. Size of image: 13.5" W x 9" H (34.3 cm x 22.9 cm) Size of visible page: 14.75" W x 9.625" H (37.5 cm x 24.4 cm) Size of frame: 21" W x 16" H (53.3 cm x 40.6 cm) Tammany Hall was the primary political machine of the Democratic Party that controlled New York City and New York State politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. Best known for helping Irish immigrants rise in American politics, it was also known for corruption, especially under William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid 19th century. Fiona Deans Halloran describes this cartoon in "Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons" (2012) as follows, "On the left, a man wields a dagger in a bar fight. On the far right, a man spits into a large, ornate spittoon. In the forefront, slouch lantern-jawed Irishmen holding guns and drinking liquor. Sitting above all of this, surveying the domain, is a heavy-set man with a large revolver. Above his head is a plaque that reads, "The Steal Ring," and across the arched top of the drawing runs an explanatory line, "A chance to steal without the risk of the penitentiary." If Nast intended the seated man to be Tweed, there is no sign of it. He is a symbol rather than a caricature." Provenance: private New Jersey, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. PLEASE NOTE: Due to recent increases of shipments being seized by Australian & German customs (even for items with pre-UNESCO provenance), we will no longer ship most antiquities and ancient Chinese art to Australia & Germany. For categories of items that are acceptable to ship to Australia or Germany, please contact us directly or work with your local customs brokerage firm. Display stands not described as included/custom in the item description are for photography purposes only and will not be included with the item upon shipping. #161939

                  Artemis Gallery
                • 1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall
                  Jun. 24, 2021

                  1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall

                  Est: $600 - $900

                  Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902). "The Government of the City of New York," Harper's Weekly Magazine, February 9, 1867, p. 88. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast's view of New York city council under influence of Tammany Hall, the caption reading, "A Chance to Steal Without the Risk of the Penitentiary - The Government of the City of New York - What that "Ere" Honorable Body will Come To." Note "FIGHT" and "STEAL" encircled in the upper left and right corners respectively. A fascinating glimpse at this episode of American history, set in a custom mat and frame. Size of image: 13.5" W x 9" H (34.3 cm x 22.9 cm) Size of visible page: 14.75" W x 9.625" H (37.5 cm x 24.4 cm) Size of frame: 21" W x 16" H (53.3 cm x 40.6 cm) Tammany Hall was the primary political machine of the Democratic Party that controlled New York City and New York State politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. Best known for helping Irish immigrants rise in American politics, it was also known for corruption, especially under William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid 19th century. Fiona Deans Halloran describes this cartoon in "Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons" (2012) as follows, "On the left, a man wields a dagger in a bar fight. On the far right, a man spits into a large, ornate spittoon. In the forefront, slouch lantern-jawed Irishmen holding guns and drinking liquor. Sitting above all of this, surveying the domain, is a heavy-set man with a large revolver. Above his head is a plaque that reads, "The Steal Ring," and across the arched top of the drawing runs an explanatory line, "A chance to steal without the risk of the penitentiary." If Nast intended the seated man to be Tweed, there is no sign of it. He is a symbol rather than a caricature." Provenance: private New Jersey, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #161939

                  Artemis Gallery
                • Nast, Thomas. (1840-1902): Original Cabinet Photograph
                  May. 19, 2021

                  Nast, Thomas. (1840-1902): Original Cabinet Photograph

                  Est: $150 - $200

                  Original cabinet photograph of the German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon." Likely photographed by Sarony of New York and o n an original mount, slightly trimmed at the lower edge, removing the photographer's imprint; otherwise in fine condition. 4.25 x 6.5 inches (10.7 x 16.4 cm).

                  Schubertiade
                • Thomas Nast (American, 1840-1902) The Little Zouave, 1862 Oil on canvas 23 x 23
                  May. 14, 2021

                  Thomas Nast (American, 1840-1902) The Little Zouave, 1862 Oil on canvas 23 x 23

                  Est: $3,000 - $5,000

                  Thomas Nast (American, 1840-1902) The Little Zouave, 1862 Oil on canvas 23 x 23 inches (58.4 x 58.4 cm) Signed and dated lower right PROVENANCE: Collection of J.N. Bartfield Galleries; Capsule Gallery Auction, New York, February 20, 2020, lot 12; Private collection, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. HID01801242017

                  Heritage Auctions
                • 1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall
                  May. 13, 2021

                  1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall

                  Est: $600 - $900

                  Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902). "The Government of the City of New York," Harper's Weekly Magazine, February 9, 1867, p. 88. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast's view of New York city council under influence of Tammany Hall, the caption reading, "A Chance to Steal Without the Risk of the Penitentiary - The Government of the City of New York - What that "Ere" Honorable Body will Come To." Note "FIGHT" and "STEAL" encircled in the upper left and right corners respectively. A fascinating glimpse at this episode of American history, set in a custom mat and frame. Size of image: 13.5" W x 9" H (34.3 cm x 22.9 cm) Size of visible page: 14.75" W x 9.625" H (37.5 cm x 24.4 cm) Size of frame: 21" W x 16" H (53.3 cm x 40.6 cm) Tammany Hall was the primary political machine of the Democratic Party that controlled New York City and New York State politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. Best known for helping Irish immigrants rise in American politics, it was also known for corruption, especially under William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid 19th century. Fiona Deans Halloran describes this cartoon in "Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons" (2012) as follows, "On the left, a man wields a dagger in a bar fight. On the far right, a man spits into a large, ornate spittoon. In the forefront, slouch lantern-jawed Irishmen holding guns and drinking liquor. Sitting above all of this, surveying the domain, is a heavy-set man with a large revolver. Above his head is a plaque that reads, "The Steal Ring," and across the arched top of the drawing runs an explanatory line, "A chance to steal without the risk of the penitentiary." If Nast intended the seated man to be Tweed, there is no sign of it. He is a symbol rather than a caricature." Provenance: private New Jersey, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #161939

                  Artemis Gallery
                • Thomas Nast, Two Wood Engravings from Harper's Weekly
                  Apr. 17, 2021

                  Thomas Nast, Two Wood Engravings from Harper's Weekly

                  Est: $200 - $300

                  Thomas Nast (1840 - 1902) Two Wood Engravings from Harper's Weekly "The Pirates," Under False Colors. - Can They Capture the Ship of State?, 1870 wood engraving on paper From Harper's Weekly 15 1/8 x 22 1/8 in. (38.42 x 56.20 cm.), Frame: 24 3/4 x 32 x 1 1/2 in. (62.87 x 81.28 x 3.81 cm.) The Key-Note of the Campaign, 1872 wood engraving on paper From Harper's Weekly 15 1/8 x 21 5/8 in. (38.42 x 54.93 cm.), Frame: 24 7/8 x 31 3/8 x 1 1/2 in. (63.18 x 79.69 x 3.81 cm.) A Private Family Foundation* *All proceeds of sale from this artwork benefit a private charitable foundation (501c3) dedicated to supporting local arts communities and families in need.

                  Santa Fe Art Auction
                • 1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall
                  Apr. 01, 2021

                  1867 Thomas Nast Harper's Weekly Cartoon - Tammany Hall

                  Est: $600 - $900

                  Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902). "The Government of the City of New York," Harper's Weekly Magazine, February 9, 1867, p. 88. Political cartoonist Thomas Nast's view of New York city council under influence of Tammany Hall, the caption reading, "A Chance to Steal Without the Risk of the Penitentiary - The Government of the City of New York - What that "Ere" Honorable Body will Come To." Note "FIGHT" and "STEAL" encircled in the upper left and right corners respectively. A fascinating glimpse at this episode of American history, set in a custom mat and frame. Size of image: 13.5" W x 9" H (34.3 cm x 22.9 cm) Size of visible page: 14.75" W x 9.625" H (37.5 cm x 24.4 cm) Size of frame: 21" W x 16" H (53.3 cm x 40.6 cm) Tammany Hall was the primary political machine of the Democratic Party that controlled New York City and New York State politics from the 1790s to the 1960s. Best known for helping Irish immigrants rise in American politics, it was also known for corruption, especially under William M. "Boss" Tweed in the mid 19th century. Fiona Deans Halloran describes this cartoon in "Thomas Nast: The Father of Modern Political Cartoons" (2012) as follows, "On the left, a man wields a dagger in a bar fight. On the far right, a man spits into a large, ornate spittoon. In the forefront, slouch lantern-jawed Irishmen holding guns and drinking liquor. Sitting above all of this, surveying the domain, is a heavy-set man with a large revolver. Above his head is a plaque that reads, "The Steal Ring," and across the arched top of the drawing runs an explanatory line, "A chance to steal without the risk of the penitentiary." If Nast intended the seated man to be Tweed, there is no sign of it. He is a symbol rather than a caricature." Provenance: private New Jersey, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #161939

                  Artemis Gallery
                • THOMAS NAST (German/American, 1840-1902)
                  Dec. 05, 2020

                  THOMAS NAST (German/American, 1840-1902)

                  Est: $300 - $500

                  THOMAS NAST (German/American, 1840-1902), group of (4) framed, handcolored Christmas engravings, to include: ''The Same Old Christmas Story Over Again...''; ''Merry Christmas.''; ''Merry Old Santa Claus''; and ''And He Whistled and shouted and Called some by Name- 'Now Dasher!, Now Dancer!, Now Prancer and Vixen! On! Come On! Doner and Blizten!'', with labels from The Old Print Shop to verso. Crease folds, waving, toning, some mat burn. Largest sight 20-3/4''h, 14-1/4''w.

                  South Bay Auctions Inc
                • Harper's Weekly - "Negro Regiment in Action"
                  Nov. 15, 2020

                  Harper's Weekly - "Negro Regiment in Action"

                  Est: $500 - $700

                  "Negro Regiment in Action" (from "Harper's Weekly") March 14, 1863. Original wood engraving was done by Thomas Nast (German, 1840 - 1902). This image appears to have been hand watercolored. This image depicts the Battle of Island Mound, the first Civil War battle to include African-American troops. In that battle, the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteers triumphed over a band of pro-Confederate guerrillas in Bates County, Missouri on October 29, 1862. Piece has not been examined outside of frame. Image Size: 13.5 x 20.5 in. Overall Framed Size: 22.5 x 29.5 in. Framed behind glass.

                  Helmuth Stone
                • Thomas Nast Note signed , PSA Slabbed & Graded NM-MT 8
                  Feb. 26, 2020

                  Thomas Nast Note signed , PSA Slabbed & Graded NM-MT 8

                  Est: $200 - $300

                  Nast Thomas Thomas Nast , PSA Slabbed & Graded NM-MT 8   A short note and signed by German-American cartoonist Thomas Nast (1840-1902) as "Hoping that the fair may be a / great success, I remain / Yours truly / Th: Nast". PSA slabbed and graded NM-MT 8. The bottom edge of the paper slip is unevenly trimmed, else near fine. A few words of writing also appears verso. Slab measures 7.25" x 4.25".   This item comes with a Certificate from John Reznikoff, a premier authenticator for both major 3rd party authentication services, PSA and JSA (James Spence Authentications), as well as numerous auction houses.   WE PROVIDE IN-HOUSE SHIPPING WORLDWIDE!

                  University Archives
                • Thomas Nast - The Little Zouave
                  Feb. 11, 2020

                  Thomas Nast - The Little Zouave

                  Est: $2,500 - $5,000

                  Lot 12 Thomas Nast German/American (1840-1902) The Little Zouave (1862) oil on canvas signed lower right 23 x 23 inches Provenance: From the collection of J.N. Bartfield Galleries

                  Capsule Gallery Auction
                • Cartoonist THOMAS NAST - Check Signed
                  Feb. 02, 2020

                  Cartoonist THOMAS NAST - Check Signed

                  Est: $150 - $250

                  Thomas Nast (1840-1902) German-born editorial cartoonist. Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. 8” x 3” check signed, First National Bank, March 31, 1893. Light cancellation does not touch the signature.

                  The Written Word Autographs
                • Thomas Nast
                  Nov. 15, 2018

                  Thomas Nast

                  Est: $100 - $200

                  Thomas Nast American political cartoonist and illustrator (1840–1902) best known for devising the donkey and elephant symbols of the Democratic and Republican parties and the familiar “American” version of Santa Claus. Signed card Ma"Thomas Nast March 10, 1873" Minimum Bid: USD 100

                  One of a Kind Collectibles Auctions, LLC
                • Abraham Lincoln Union Christmas Dinner Thomas Nast
                  Aug. 29, 2018

                  Abraham Lincoln Union Christmas Dinner Thomas Nast

                  Est: $50 - $500

                  Framed original page from Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864. By Thomas Nast (1840-1902) In this poignant image of reconciliation, President Lincoln invites the South to join the Union at the symbolic banquet table. Sight measures 16" x 22". Housed in frame measuring 23" x 29". Good / fair overall condition with some edge wear, discoloration, tape residue. Hill Auction Gallery Will not ship. Will refer local third party shippers.

                  Hill Auction Gallery
                • THOMAS NAST ENGRAVING FOR HARPER'S WEEKLY 1867
                  Aug. 19, 2018

                  THOMAS NAST ENGRAVING FOR HARPER'S WEEKLY 1867

                  Est: $300 - $400

                  THOMAS NAST ENGRAVING FOR HARPER'S WEEKLY 1867: Dated January 12, 1867, This Harper's weekly wood engraved scene titled,? Slavery is dead? by Thomas Nast (1840-1902), whom was a prolific American political cartoonist. Also included is a receipt dated June 2, 1812 and reads, "Received of the public accountant the sum of two hundred pounds on account of the captured Negros for which I have signed three receipts of which this is the second. Approx. Frame Approx. 20.25" h x 20.25" w.

                  Burchard Galleries Inc
                • THOMAS NAST (GERMAN/AMERICAN, 1840-1902) SKETCH
                  Jul. 29, 2018

                  THOMAS NAST (GERMAN/AMERICAN, 1840-1902) SKETCH

                  Est: $400 - $600

                  THOMAS NAST (GERMAN/AMERICAN, 1840-1902) SKETCH "Betty Bringing Water" Ink on paper satirical sketch of a slave girl; Signed lower right "Th. Nast" in ink; Inscribed on front of drawing "Mercer PA June 16th Betty Bringing Water"; not framed; Thomas Nast was born in Germany in 1840. In 1846, at the age of 6, he moved to New York. During the 19th Century, he was the cartoonist that created Satirical art drawings that critiqued slavery & crime. Nast joined the staff of Harper's Weekly in 1862. He worked there as an artist for 25 years. By the 1870's his efforts were focused on political cartoons. He's well known for his Abraham Lincoln sketches (His earliest works) and the widely accepted version of the modern day American Santa Claus ; Condition - Slight discoloration to paper, slight rip in paper 4" long in center of paper (does not reach the edges) ; Measures: 7"H x 4"W

                  Ascendant Auction Galleries
                • 19th Century Steel Engraving of a Thomas Nash Sketch of Moses on Mount Nebo
                  Mar. 03, 2018

                  19th Century Steel Engraving of a Thomas Nash Sketch of Moses on Mount Nebo

                  Est: $300 - $600

                  Wonderful 19th century steel engraving by renowned American Engraver R. Kupfer (New York, active 1860–1870) | Engraving is of a the famous Thomas Nast (1840 – 1902) sketch entitled “Moses on Mount Nebo” (bible book plate) | Matted under glass in a custom silver wood frame | Measures 11″ X 14″ Image Only | Complete History of the Engraving is attached to the reverse | Engraving has some toning on edges consistent with age. Kupfer's engravings are owned and displayed at the world's finest museums. eg. The MET.

                  Worthington Galleries
                • Lot Of (5) ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Small Nast Cartoons Signed In Images Lampooning Politics Remainder of Page with vintage Ads
                  Feb. 20, 2018

                  Lot Of (5) ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Small Nast Cartoons Signed In Images Lampooning Politics Remainder of Page with vintage Ads

                  Est: $100 - $150

                  Bidders will note that lot(s) with very low Staring Bids & lots where the per item cost is $1-$5, should in no way see those Starting Bids or per item cost of $1-$5 as the Book Barn's judgment on the value of the item(s) contained in the lot(s). We have been in the Used/OP book business for 30+ years & have a LOT of inventory, with more piling up weekly. (Sometimes it seems to us that books breed at night, so there are always more of them over time!) These low Starting Bid/low per item lot(s) are meant to lower our inventory by providing bidders the opportunity to buy material at a low prices—we call it the "Eek" price; as in "Eek! That's all in sold for?" Our lack of storage is your opportunity to buy material at a low price. Lot Of (5) ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Small Nast Cartoons Signed In Images Lampooning U. S. & World Politics. The remainder of each Page covered with vintage Advertisements. Suitable for framing. Each Nast Cartoon is signed in image. Cartoons are on both sides of each page. Cartoon are From February 13, February 20, March 13, March 20, & March 27, 1886 Issues of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock Cartoons as shown in scan(s). The images mock U. S. Politics & Policy & occasionally World Politics & Policy. The Nast cartoon images measure approximately 94 1/2 inches high X 4 1/2 inches wide plus borders with the vintage ads taking up the rest of the page in various sizes. Left edge shows removal marks/chipping, other edges show various kinds of wear/closed tears. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Cartoons signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the pieces are Good Plus Condition. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VATERLAND & MOTHER COUNTRY ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning German Militarism
                  Feb. 20, 2018

                  DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VATERLAND & MOTHER COUNTRY ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning German Militarism

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Thomas Nast Cartoon, Signed In Image, Lampooning German Militarism. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From February 13, 1886 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock Cartoon, from that Harper's Weekly issue, Titled: "THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN VATER LAND & MOTHER COUNTRY." As shown in scan(s). The image mocks the Militarism Of German & their persecution of Poland with a caricature Of Bismarck trampling the right of Poles living on German territory. The image measures approximately 9 inches high X 7 inches wide plus Text borders discussing The new english cabinet of Gladstone with small portraits of influential members. Left edge shows removal marks/chipping, other edges show light wear NOT extending into image, which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Very Good Condition. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "AN UNNECESSARY BURDEN" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning Congressional Spending
                  Feb. 20, 2018

                  "AN UNNECESSARY BURDEN" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning Congressional Spending

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Woodblock Art Cartoon, Signed In Image, Lampooning Congressional Spending. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From December 18, 1886 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Front Page woodblock Cartoon With Harper’s Masthead, from that Harper's Weekly issue, Titled: "AN UNNECESSARY BURDEN." As shown in scan(s). The image mocks the Congressional Spending attempts to out spend tax revenues & then need to raise taxes. Some things NEVER change. The image measures approximately 12 inches high X 9 inches wide plus borders & Harper's Weekly masthead. Left edge shows removal marks/chipping, other edges show light wear with tiny closed tears NOT extending into image, which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Condition. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "LIKE CROMWELL—NOT" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning President Cleveland
                  Feb. 20, 2018

                  "LIKE CROMWELL—NOT" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Cartoon Signed In Image Lampooning President Cleveland

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Woodblock Art Cartoon, Signed In Image, Lampooning President Grover Cleveland. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From March 13, 1886 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Front Page woodblock Cartoon With Harper’s Masthead, from that Harper's Weekly issue, Titled: "LIKE CROMWELL—NOT "LIKE CHARLES THE FIRST MR. EDMUNDS!" As shown in scan(s). The image mocks President Cleveland dressed as Oliver Cromwell claiming his sole responsibility is to the people while the Democratic Party in (secret) "Star Chamber" plots Politics-as-usual. The image measures approximately 11 1/2 inches high X 9 inches wide plus borders & Harper's Weekly masthead. Left edge shows removal marks/chipping, other edges show light wear with closed tear at bottom to title but NOT extending into image & closed tear on right edge also NOT into image, both will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Condition. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "NOW LET MAYOR HEWITT PROVE THE POWER OF MAN OVER BEAST" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Democratic Party Corruption Cartoon
                  Jan. 29, 2018

                  "NOW LET MAYOR HEWITT PROVE THE POWER OF MAN OVER BEAST" ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Democratic Party Corruption Cartoon

                  Est: $50 - $75

                  ANTIQUE 1886 Harper's Weekly Full Page Thomas Nast Image Signed Cartoon Lampooning A Recently Elected NYC Mayor’s Attempt to Rein in Democratic Party Corruption. It is suitable for framing. It is the front page of the Noverber 13, 1886 Issue of Harper's Weekly. The Portrait is Titled: "NOW LET MAYOR HEWITT PROVE THE POWER OF MAN OVER BEAST". The image measures approximately 11 inches high X 9 inches wide plus borders & Harper's Weekly Masthead. Edges show general handling wear & Harper's Weekly volume removal marks along one side, short closed tears at margins which DO NOT affect image & will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Overall the piece is Good Condition. This cartoon is directed at The Democratic Party's general corruption & the attempt by the "swallowtail" faction to clean up & reform the party. In 1886, Hewitt was elected mayor of NYC when Tammany Hall—which had resumed its control of the Democratic Party in the city—arranged for Hewitt to get the Democratic nomination, despite his being the leader of the anti-Tammany "Swallowtails" of the party. Croker needed a strong candidate to oppose the United Labor Party candidate, political economist Henry George who Tammany feared might reorganize politics in the city along class lines, rather than along ethnic lines from which Tammany drew its power. Hewitt, as Nast feared, was not successful as a mayor, due both to his unpleasant character and nativist beliefs: he refused, for instance, to review the St. Patrick's Day Parade, a decision that alienated most of the Democratic power base. Hewitt also refused to allow Tammany the control of patronage they wanted, and Croker saw to it that Hewittt was not nominated for a second term. Of course corrupt Democrats were one of Nast's pet peeves—-many Republicans were as bad if not worse. Mostly it shows that little has changed in NYC politics in the 130+ years since Nast crusaded for better clean government. As Kurt Vonnegut might say "and so it goes." Abram Stevens Hewitt (1822-1903) was a teacher, lawyer, an iron manufacturer, US Congressman, and Mayor Of NYC. He is best known for planning the financing and construction of the 1st subway line of the NYC Subway, for which he is considered the "Father of the New York City Subway System". Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • (2)FRAMED COLOR LITHOGRAPHS U.S. GRANT & R. E. LEE
                  Jan. 20, 2018

                  (2)FRAMED COLOR LITHOGRAPHS U.S. GRANT & R. E. LEE

                  Est: $300 - $500

                  (lot of 2) Framed lithographs: (1) "U.S. Grant", after an illustration and an original paintring c. April 4, 1864 by the political cartoonist Thomas Nast (German-American, 1840-1902), sight: 26"h, 19.5"w, overall: 34.5"h, 28.5"w; (1) "Gen. Robert E. Lee", based upon a photograph by Matthew Brady about April 16, 1865, from an engraving by J.C. McRae c. 1867, sight: 26"h, 19.5"w, overall: 35.5"h, 29.5"w, total: 24lbs Start Price: $200.00

                  Austin Auction Gallery
                • Thomas Nast, Am., 1840-1902, Santa Claus's Evening
                  Nov. 25, 2017

                  Thomas Nast, Am., 1840-1902, Santa Claus's Evening

                  Est: $3,000 - $5,000

                  Thomas Nast, American, 1840-1902, Santa Claus's Northstar's Evening Sleigh Ride, oil on mill board, signed lower right Th. Nast. and dated 1866. The painting is set in a moonlit winter's snowy landscape with a white bearded Santa and his reindeer following the North Star home as Christmas morning dawns. NOTE: "Thomas Nast’s first major depiction of Santa Claus in Harper’s Weekly (appearing in the postdated December 29, 1866 issue). Although other artists of the period sketched Santa Claus, Nast stands apart from the rest for his role in creating and popularizing the modern image of the Christmas figure" Robert C. Kennedy Copyright 2001 The New York Times Company and HarpWeek. Provenance: From the personal collection of Wynne Carson of Philadelphia and Old San Juan Puerto Rico through her mother, Marian S. Carson. The Library of Congress's Americana collection of Marian Sadtler Carson (1905-2004) spans the years 1656-1995 with the bulk of the material dating from 1700 to 1876. The collection includes more than 10,000 historical letters and manuscripts, broadsides, photographs, prints and drawings, books and pamphlets, maps, and printed ephemera from the colonial era through the 1876 centennial of the United States.It is believed to be the most extensive existing private collection of early Americana. (FTHA9000) [TC]

                  Litchfield Auctions
                • A. THOMAS NAST (1840-1902, NY & NJ), EDITORIAL
                  Nov. 25, 2017

                  A. THOMAS NAST (1840-1902, NY & NJ), EDITORIAL

                  Est: $500 - $800

                  CARTOON SHOWING A WOMAN RIDING A TIGER, BUT IS THEN EATEN BY HIM. SIGNED LOWER RIGHT, DATED 1888 AND REMARQUED WITH THE ARTIST'S COMPLIMENTS. SIGHT SIZE 15 1/4" X 11 1/4". OVERALL FRAMED 17 1/2" X 13 1/2".

                  Marion Antique Auctions
                • THOMAS NAST ORIGINAL SKETCH & PRINT
                  Oct. 14, 2017

                  THOMAS NAST ORIGINAL SKETCH & PRINT

                  Est: $300 - $600

                  Thomas Nast (1840-1902) Original sketch dome in 1900 along with cartoon print. All framed. 16"x13". Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon".[1] He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus (based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann) and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party (GOP). Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam (the male personification of the American people), Columbia (the female personification of American values), or the Democratic donkey,[2] though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886.

                  Milestone Auctions
                • Thomas Nast published pen and ink political illustration of William Newell
                  Jun. 14, 2017

                  Thomas Nast published pen and ink political illustration of William Newell

                  Est: $1,000 - $1,500

                  Nast Thomas 1840 - 1902 Thomas Nast published pen and ink political illustration of William Newell, politician and founder of the Coast Guard Illustration original art. Pen and Ink on scratchboard, 10.25" x 14.25". Detail is so incredibly fine that his mustache appears three dimensional. Soft soiling/handling marks. Several intact tears with tiny chips which were rudimentarily repaired to verso. Overall presents very well. Faint pencil marks. Signed by Thomas Nast lower left "Th Nast". Thomas Nast was considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. While there, Nast quickly made a name for himself as a political cartoonist, focusing on such topics as the Civil War, slavery and corruption. Nast would also become known for the modern representation of Santa Claus as a jolly, rotund man living at the North Pole. Mostly known as a cartoon crusader against corruption, Nast used his fantastic images to help remove William Magear "Boss" Tweed and his peers from power. Tweed ran the Democratic Party in New York. In September 1871, Nast depicted Tweed, New York Mayor A. Oakey Hall and several others as a group of vultures surrounding a corpse labeled "New York." The cartoon supposedly upset Tweed so much that he offered Nast a bribe of $500,000 (100 times Nast's annual salary at the time) to leave town. Nast refused and continued to draw attention to Tweed's misdeeds. This spectacular inked political cartoon of William Newell has him appearing quite dapper in a proper double breasted suit while holding a book with N.J. on the cover (perhaps a book on NJ state law?) Newell was a politician, who was a three-term member of the United States of Representatives, served as a Republican as the 18th Governor of New Jersey, and as the 11th Governor of the Washington Territory from 1880-1884. He is probably best known for, and was most proud of, the Newell Act, which created the United States Life-Saving Service (a Federal agency that grew out of private and local humanitarian efforts to save the lives of shipwrecked mariners and passengers). This effort ultimately became formally the United States Coast Guard in 1915. Under this Act, the humble beginnings started with a series of light house stations that were set up between Sandy Hook and Little Egg Harbor. Each station was equipped with a cannon that could shoot a line out to a ship for aiding in rescue efforts. The service was extended from Long Island Long Island to Cape May, and after rescuing 200 passengers and crewmembers from the Scottish brig Ayrshire, it was extended over the entire East Coast. Highly detailed and vibrantly inked. Although unclear which publication this was ultimately included in, Thomas Nast was a regular contributor to Harpers Weekly for over 25 years. Signed by Nast lower right, this large spectacular piece is in collectible condition and would display beautifully framed.

                  University Archives
                • Thomas Nast "Colorado Silver Teller" published pen + ink political comic art
                  Jun. 14, 2017

                  Thomas Nast "Colorado Silver Teller" published pen + ink political comic art

                  Est: $800 - $1,000

                  Nast Thomas 1840 - 1902 Thomas Nast "Colorado Silver Teller" published pen and ink political comic illustration Illustration original art. Pen and Ink on scratchboard, on bristol board, 10.25" x 14.25" . Detail is so incredibly fine that his hair appears three dimensional. Soft soiling/handling marks. Adhered to a backing board. Signed by Thomas Nast lower right "Th Nast", and captioned below on the backing board as "The Silver Teller from Colorado". Thomas Nast was considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine. While there, Nast quickly made a name for himself as a political cartoonist, focusing on such topics as the Civil War, slavery and corruption. Nast would also become known for the modern representation of Santa Claus as a jolly, rotund man living at the North Pole. Mostly known as a cartoon crusader against corruption, Nast used his fantastic images to help remove William Magear "Boss" Tweed and his peers from power. Tweed ran the Democratic Party in New York. In September 1871, Nast depicted Tweed, New York Mayor A. Oakey Hall and several others as a group of vultures surrounding a corpse labeled "New York." The cartoon supposedly upset Tweed so much that he offered Nast a bribe of $500,000 (100 times Nast's annual salary at the time) to leave town. Nast refused and continued to draw attention to Tweed's misdeeds. This spectacular inked political cartoon of Henry Moore Teller has him neatly depicted in a proper suit looking decidedly stern, staunchly holding his arms behind his back. This political cartoon captioned "The Silver Teller from Colorado" was referencing Teller's connection with the 'Free Silver' question doing much in and out of Congress with tongue and pen. He was instrumental in securing a declaration in favor of bimetallism, and he was a conspicuous actor in the prolonged fight in the Senate against its unconditional repeal following the 1892 Republican National Convention. The decision thus made was to indefinitely keep the gold standard intact and, in response, Teller and 24 others marched out of the convention. As a staunch supporter of bimetallism, along with being a prominent figure, he joined the other leading Silver Republicans and became leader of the Silver Republican Party. However, as bimetallism increasingly fell out of national politics, the party lost much of its influence and many Silver Republicans returned to the Republican Party. Unlike them however, Teller never returned to the Republican Party. Teller returned to the Senate in 1885 and served as Colorado's Democratic senator for the remainder of the time until 1909. Highly detailed and vibrantly inked. Although unclear which publication this was ultimately included in, Thomas Nast was a regular contributor to Harpers Weekly for over 25 years. Signed by Nast lower right, this large spectacular piece is in collectible condition and would display beautifully framed.

                  University Archives
                • Thomas Nast Original Pen and Ink Drawing by the 19th Century's Greatest Political Cartoonist
                  May. 24, 2017

                  Thomas Nast Original Pen and Ink Drawing by the 19th Century's Greatest Political Cartoonist

                  Est: $1,500 - $1,800

                  Original Pen and Ink Drawing by the 19th Century’s Greatest Political Cartoonist********** NAST, THOMAS. (1840-1902). German-born, American political cartoonist. Signed drawing. (“Th. Nast”). 1p. Oblong narrow 4to. N.p., (May 22, 1886). The original artwork for a cartoon published in the May 22, 1886 issue of Harper’s Weekly, the subject of which is the Austrian-American anarchist JOHANN MOST (1846-1906), radical mentor of Emma Goldman. Most is depicted hiding underneath his bed clutching a trumpet and manuscript (“‘I am not only there. But I am very much there!’ Herr Most.”) as a detective stands in a doorway and points accusingly at him. ********** Nast was a prolific and influential political cartoonist whose newspaper and magazine career began in the 1850s. Best known for lampooning New York’s Tammany Hall and Boss Tweed, he also created the Republican Party’s elephant symbol and popularized depictions of the Democratic donkey, Santa Claus, Uncle Sam, and Columbia, the female personification of America. In his later years he published the short-lived Republican journal, Nast’s Weekly. ********** Most endured a difficult childhood and oppressive apprenticeship with a bookbinder to become a zealous atheist and, after reading the works of Karl Marx and other socialists, an advocate of revolutionary socialism. After editing several socialist newspapers in Austria and serving jail time, he was expelled for speaking out against the Austrian government. Returning to his native Germany, he served two terms in the German Reichstag. However, after repeated arrests for advocating violence as a means of advancing revolution, he was exiled from Germany as well. Most began to drift away from socialism to fully embrace anarchism, founding the anarchist newspaper Freiheit (Freedom) in 1879. After his outspoken politics made him unwelcome in France and led to his imprisonment in England, he immigrated to the United States in 1882, where he was hailed as a hero by New York’s anarchist movement and where he embarked on a cross-country lecture tour, before returning to writing and publishing anarchist literature. ********** “In 1884, Most began working at a dynamite factory in New Jersey, and the next year published a pamphlet instructing anarchists on how to destroy the country’s infrastructure and exterminate its bourgeoisie. It was appropriately titled Revolutionary War Science: A Little Handbook of Instruction in the Use and Preparation of Nitroglycerine, Dynamite, Gun-Cotton, Fulminating Mercury, Bombs, Fuses, Poisons, etc., etc. At 10¢ a copy, the terrorist manual sold quickly in New York, was republished throughout the country, and inspired Emma Goldman to move to New York City (in 1889) and become Most’s protégée. The vast majority in the labor and socialist movements, however, rejected Most’s violent methods and distanced themselves from him. Yet in the press, including the cartoons of Thomas Nast… and Joseph Keppler of Puck, Most represented the typical radical,” (“When His Skin Is Not In Danger, and--When It Is,” www.nytimes.com, Kennedy). ********** Most delivered a speech “on April 22, 1886 at Germania Hall in New York City in which he endorsed arson and murder for political purposes,” and for which he was charged with incitement to riot, (ibid.). “On May 1 detectives broke into Most’s quarters and put him under arrest. The following day large newspaper headlines proclaimed that he had been ‘captured in a house of prostitution’ and that he ‘had taken refuge under a bed to escape arrest.’ He was sent to Blackwell’s Island for a year,” (Johann Most, Goldman). Our original Nast cartoon depicts this climactic event. ********** During 1885 and 1886, the United States saw an increase in labor strikes, which led to confrontations between laborers and the police culminating in Chicago’s Haymarket Riot, the May 4, 1886 bombing at a union rally just three days after Most’s arrest that killed seven policeman and four civilians. Although the bomber’s identity was never discovered, seven anarchists were tried for conspiracy including an associate of Most, August Spies, one of four executed for the bombing – an event widely considered a gross miscarriage of justice. ********** “On May 14, [Most] was released on bail, but was rearrested for a speech condemning the hanging of the Haymarket defendants and warning that the ‘day of revolution is not far off; and when it comes, see that you are ready to resist and kill those hirelings of capitalists.’ Most insisted that he was merely making a prediction, not encouraging violence. A jury, however, found him guilty and New York’s highest court eventually upheld the decision after its appeal.” (Kennedy op. cit.). ********** Our cartoon is the second of two panels in which Nast portrays Most as a coward “who trumpets his call for class warfare (top) when he is not personally in danger, but cravenly hides under his bed (bottom) when the police arrive to arrest him,” (ibid.). ********** Drawn on thick paper stock with very minor discoloration along the left edge and in fine condition. Pencil notations and mounting traces on the verso. Archivally matted and framed with a reproduction self-portrait of Nast. [lhaarts]

                  Lion Heart Autographs
                • NAST, THOMAS. 1840-1902. Group of 2 original ink and graphite on scratchboard illustrations:
                  Mar. 08, 2017

                  NAST, THOMAS. 1840-1902. Group of 2 original ink and graphite on scratchboard illustrations:

                  Est: $1,200 - $1,800

                  NAST, THOMAS. 1840-1902. Group of 2 original ink and graphite on scratchboard illustrations: 1. 365 x 258 mm, [c.1880], mounted on board, titled on the mount: "The Silver Teller from Colorado," signed ("Th. Nast"), being a portrait of Henry Moore Teller, very good condition, mount with wear. 2. 555 x 365 mm, [c.1880], mounted to board, signed ("Th. Nast"), being a portrait of an unknown subject, tears to scratchboard, mount worn. Provenance: From the collection of M.B. Goldstone. A nice group of two Nast caricatures. Henry M. Teller served as one of the first senators from Colorado. He served a total of 4 terms. He also served as Secretary of Interior under Chester Arthur.

                  Bonhams
                • "THE DEAD BEAT" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Democratic Party Corruption Of Boss Tweed
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "THE DEAD BEAT" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Democratic Party Corruption Of Boss Tweed

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1871 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From December 23, 1871 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "THE DEAD BEAT" Image measures approximately 13 1/2 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders. Edges show light general handling wear from age, light edge chipping with small loss, & removal marks from the Harper's volume, all of which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Condition. Nast in this cartoon is satirizing & savaging the Tammany Hall Democratic Machine & William M "Boss" Tweed. At this time the New York Times & Nast's Harper's Weekly were beginning to have success in exposing the corruption of Tweed. Tweed's corruption began being revealed in The New York Times and Harper's Weekly, in no small part due to Nast's efforts like the one here. Regarding Nast's cartoons, Tweed reportedly said, "Stop them damned pictures. I don't care so much what the papers say about me. My constituents don't know how to read, but they can't help seeing them damned pictures!" The notorious William Marcy "Boss" Tweed boss of NYC's Democratic machine (Tammany Hall) had finally gone a bribe too far & would fall after a trial in November 1873 resulted in convictions on 204 of 220 counts. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "BEWARE OF FOREIGN TRAMPS" ANTIQUE 1880 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Irish & Democrat Corruption
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "BEWARE OF FOREIGN TRAMPS" ANTIQUE 1880 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Irish & Democrat Corruption

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1880 Woodblock Portrait. It is suitable for framing. It is the front page of the January 24, 1880 Issue of Harper's Weekly. The Portrait is Titled: "BEWARE OF FOREIGN TRAMPS". The image measures approximately 11 inches high X 9 inches wide plus borders & Harper's Weekly Masthead. Edges show general handling wear & Harper's Weekly volume removal marks along one side, which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Overall the piece is Good Condition. This cartoon is directed at several of Nast's pet peeves, the Irish immigrants who also were mostly Catholic, mostly supported Tammany Hall in NYC, & finally the Democratic Party. This was in Nast's eyes a "Trifecta of Evil" of sorts. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: We do all our own shipping. We will combine shipping on multiple items, where possible to save the wining bidder on shipping costs. Shipping will be added to winning bidder's invoice for item(s) won. Media Mail postage from USPS will be used for shipping in the United States for those items allowed. Lowest alternative cost shipping will be billed for items not allowed by USPS to be shipped by Media Mail. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are available at added expense at the bidders request. You also agree to pay any applicable taxes and/or customs/import duties. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "NOT AN APPETIZER" ANTIQUE 1880 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Democratic Party On Jackson Day
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "NOT AN APPETIZER" ANTIQUE 1880 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning The Democratic Party On Jackson Day

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1880 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From February 7, 1880 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "NOT AN APPETIZER." Image measures approximately 11 1/2 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders. Edges show light general handling wear from age & removal from the Harper's volume, all of which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Plus Condition. Each year on January 8th, the date of the beginning of the Battle of New Orleans, the Democratic Party held a dinner in honor of Andrew Jackson who commanded the Americans at the victory. For the dinner to be held January 8, 1880, Charles O'Connor was invited to speak to Democratic Party chances in the coming presidential nomination season. Apparently O'Conor declined saying in part, "…I am constrained to regard it as absolutely impossible that any one called a Democrat should prevail in this conflict…" Nast in this cartoon is satirizing the plight of the Democratic Party in the embarrassing revelation contained in this letter. He shows Andrew Jacksons with his sword thus trough the letter while democratic attendees hide under the table. In the sub-text to the title Jackson says in disgust: "By the Eternal, no more Eight of January Dinners for me!" Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "WITH THE UTMOST RESPECT"—OUR ARTIST AS THE GOOD (?) SAMARITAN" ANTIQUE 1876 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning A Publishing Rival
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "WITH THE UTMOST RESPECT"—OUR ARTIST AS THE GOOD (?) SAMARITAN" ANTIQUE 1876 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning A Publishing Rival

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1876 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From December 30, 1876 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "WITH THE UTMOST RESPECT"—OUR ARTIST AS THE GOOD (?) SAMARITAN." Image measures approximately 11 inches high wide X 9 1/2 inches wide plus borders. Edges show light general handling wear from age & removal from the Harper's volume, all of which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Plus Condition. Nast in this cartoon is satirizing a publishing rivals condescending editorial policies. He is pictured as the good samaritan, delivering "Blue Pills" to "His Royal Highness, the editor of The Nation to be taken before writing editorials for the plebeians." The Nation is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the U. S., and the most widely read weekly journal of progressive political and cultural news, opinion and analysis. It was founded in 1865, as a successor to Garrison's The Liberator, with the stated mission to "make an earnest effort to bring to the discussion of political and social questions a really critical spirit, and to wage war upon the vices of violence, exaggeration, and misrepresentation by which so much of the political writing of the day is marred." Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?" ANTIQUE 1872 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Boss Tweed & Tammy Hall Democrats
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?" ANTIQUE 1872 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Boss Tweed & Tammy Hall Democrats

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1872 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From May 18, 1872 Issue of Harper's Weekly. It is the front page of the, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO ABOUT IT?" Image measures approximately 11 1/2 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders & Harper's Weekly Masthead. Edges show light general handling wear from age & removal from the Harper's volume, all of which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Plus Condition. Nast in this cartoon is satirizing & savaging J. T. Hoffman who rightly or wrongly was associated with the notorious William Marcy "Boss" Tweed boss of NYC's Democratic machine (Tammy Hall) & a Hoffman supporter for NY Governor. J. T. Hoffman was elected governor in 1868, the last NYC Mayor to accomplish this feat and the last NYC Mayor to be elected to higher office. Hoffman's election was aided by Tammy Hall under the leadership of its boss William Tweed. Later on the fact that Hoffman had aid from Tweed, and his voter majority was so large for that time, would be recalled as proof that the Governor was a member of the notorious Boss Tweed Ring. In actuality, while Tweed did frequently see Hoffman in Albany on various votes and projects, it was no more than any other major Democrat in NY State. Tweed aided Hoffman in getting re-elected in 1870. Shortly afterwards a new City Charter was enacted which granted more local autonomy to NYC. Such reform had been discussed for decades, but Tweed with Hoffman's aid brought it to fruition. Just at this point Tweed's corruption began being revealed in The New York Times and Harper's Weekly, in no small part due to Nast's efforts like the one here. The new Charter was discredited as being planned for more municipal corruption. At this time Hoffman was also considering seriously to run for the Presidency in 1872, and Tweed was to be his manager. Tweed, in actuality, had little interest in national affairs, and while he might have considered the possible National corruption pickings greater than NYC's, he also was aware of the bad publicity such scandals had brought on the Grant Administration. As it turned out, the Tweed scandals wrecked Hoffman's chances. Hoffman, his reputation ruined by the connections with Tweed, did not seek further political office. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "THE FIELD OF SMOKE" ANTIQUE 1878 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Politicians & Dueling
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "THE FIELD OF SMOKE" ANTIQUE 1878 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Politicians & Dueling

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1878 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From December 14, 1878 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "THE FIELD OF SMOKE". Image measures approximately 14 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders. Edges show light general handling wear from age & removal from the Harper's volume, all of which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Plus Condition. Nast in this cartoon is satirizing, duels, the French politicians, & American politicians. In the sub-text under the title a figure representing the French Nation tells Gambetta not to duel. What if, she says, The American Politicians were to duel for calling each other names? Nast leaves the impression that there would be so many duels that there would be no american politicians left. Horror of horrors, sounds good to me! Léon Gambetta (1838-1882) was a French statesman, prominent during and after the Franco-Prussian War. After the French defeat in that war, Gambetta helped campaign for a republic but conservatives like Oscar Bardi de Fourtou (1836-1897) who was a French career politician blocked his views. De Fourtou served as Minister Of Transport, Minister of Interior, and Minister of Public Instruction, in which he "carried out aggressively conservative policies by dismissing certain liberal professors and re-establishing censorship." In the Chamber of Deputies Leon Gambetta accused Fourtou of lying when he alleged that the republican party opposed every republican principle that was not antiquated. This led to a duel with pistols at 30 paces between the two. The duel was fought by Oscar Bardi de Fourtou and Léon Gambetta in a field outside Paris, but neither party was injured. Nast in this cartoon is satirizing, duels, the French politicians, & American politicians. In the sub-text under the title a figure representing the French Nation tells Gambetta not to duel. What if, she says, The American Politicians were to duel for calling each other names? Nast leaves the impression that there would be so many duels that there would be no american politicians left. Horror of horrors, sounds good to me! Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

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                • "THE JOINT HIGH COMMISSION" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Confederate Raider "Alabama" Talks
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "THE JOINT HIGH COMMISSION" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Confederate Raider "Alabama" Talks

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1871 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From March 11, 1871 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "THE JOINT HIGH COMMISSION". Image measures approximately 14 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders. Edges show chipping with loss/several short closed tears that extend into the print edge, which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Condition. In early 1871, the British government sent Sir John Rose to the U.S. to ascertain whether negotiations to settle the Northwestern boundary dispute would be acceptable to President Grant. The U.S. government through the adroit and diplomatic abilities of Grant's Secretary of State, cordially received his advances and, on January 26, the British Minister at Washington formally proposed the appointment of a joint high commission to meet in Washington to resolve the dispute. The U. S. readily consented, provided that the differences growing out of the Civil war be among the subjects to be considered. The Civil War claims were primarily those of the Confederate commerce raiders that Britain allowed to be built & outfitted in violation of their own neutrality laws. The claims were collectively named, "The Alabama Claims" after the Confederate raider Alabama commanded by Confederate Admiral Raphael Semmes, the most famous of all the British built Confederate raiders. The British government promptly accepted the American proviso and the president appointed commissioners as did the British Government. Nast's cartoon reflects the hope that the Anglo-American differences can be settled by the commission along the lines of peace & justice. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

                  The Book Barn
                • "H.G. DIOGENES HAS FOUND THE HONEST MAN" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Horace Greeley
                  Dec. 29, 2016

                  "H.G. DIOGENES HAS FOUND THE HONEST MAN" ANTIQUE 1871 Thomas Nast Image Signed Harper's Weekly Cartoon Lampooning Horace Greeley

                  Est: $35 - $75

                  Antique 1871 Thomas Nast Woodblock Art. It is suitable for framing. Signed in image. Thomas Nast Full Page Woodblock Political Cartoon From December 9, 1871 Issue of Harper's Weekly. Interior Page woodblock cartoon, of that Harper's Weekly issue. Image Titled: "H. G. DIOGENES HAS FOUND THE HONEST MAN". Image measures approximately 14 inches high wide X 9 inches wide plus borders. Edges show light handling wear, one short closed tear, & several small foxing spots, which will be covered by the mat when framed. Paper is lightly age toned but not brittle. Signed in image: "TH. NAST." Overall the piece is Good Condition. Nast rips satirically into the new Liberal Republican Party which was founded by Horace Greely, who would be its first & only presidential candidate, & Carl Schurz. Schurz was a Swiss born American who had served in various posts under Republicans but like Greeley thought that Reconstruction should be over as the South had paid its debt. The cartoon has Horace "Diogenes" Greeley finding his honest man, who is Schurz. This was in the run up to the Liberal Republican Party convention where Greeley would be nominated to face Grant in the 1872 election. The anti-Greeley campaign in 1872 was famously and effectively summed up in the cartoons of Nast such as this one, whom Grant later credited with a major role in his re-election. Nast's cartoons showed Greeley giving bail money for Jefferson Davis, throwing mud on Grant, and shaking hands with John Wilkes Booth across Lincoln's grave. His mercilessness may have contributed to Greely's demise. Greeley was devastated at his defeat & became increasingly unhinged. He found himself unable to sleep after November 13 (a week after the election) & remained under medical care. At the recommendation of a family physician, Greeley was sent to the asylum of Dr. George S. Choate. There, he continued to worsen, and died on November 29, 1872. Thomas Nast (1840-1902) was a German-born American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist considered to be the "Father of the American Cartoon". He was the scourge of Democratic Representative "Boss" Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic party political machine & of the Democratic Party in general whom he considered pro-South traitors. He was also strongly anti-Irish & anti-Catholic Church, since in the 19th century the Irish strongly supported the Democratic Party & were predominately Catholic. Nast considered the Catholic Church as a threat to American values. According to his biographer, Fiona Deans Halloran, Nast was "intensely opposed to the encroachment of Catholic ideas into public education". Among his notable works were the creation of the modern version of Santa Claus----based on the traditional German figures of Sankt Nikolaus and Weihnachtsmann----and the political symbol of the elephant for the Republican Party. Contrary to popular belief, Nast did not create Uncle Sam----the male personification of the American people----or Columbia----the female personification of American values----or the Democratic donkey, though he did popularize these symbols through his artwork. Nast was associated with the magazine Harper's Weekly from 1859 to 1860 and from 1862 until 1886. It has been argued by eminent historians that as a political cartoonist, Thomas Nast wielded more influence than any other artist of the 19th century. He not only enthralled a vast audience with boldness and wit, but swayed it time and again to his personal position on the strength of his visual imagination. President Lincoln called Nast "our best recruiting sergeant" for one of his most celebrated cartoons "Compromise with the South", which was directed against those in the North who opposed the prosecution of the American Civil War, as well as, for drawing battlefields in border and southern states. President Grant attributed his victory in 1868 to "the sword of Sheridan and the pencil of Thomas Nast." In the 1872 presidential campaign, Nast's ridicule of Horace Greeley's candidacy was especially merciless. After Grant's victory in 1872, Mark Twain wrote the artist a letter saying: "Nast, you more than any other man have won a prodigious victory for Grant----I mean, rather, for Civilization and Progress." As a crusading civil reformer he helped destroy the corrupt "Boss" Tweed Ring that swindled NYC of millions of dollars. His impact on American public life was formidable enough to profoundly affect the outcome of every presidential election during the period 1864 to 1884. ALL ITEMS ARE GUARANTEED TO BE ACCURATELY DESCRIBED, NOT DEFECTIVE, & GENUINE. PLEASE NOTE: Shipping will be billed to winning bidder by Last Chance Auctions in their billing for item(s). Media Mail postage is shown for shipping in the United States. Foreign winning bidders will pay postage based on their countries small/medium/large Flat Rate box postage rates & weight of the package. Other types of postage are avaible at added expense at the bidders request. A Tracking Number will be provided to buyer. Insurance is mandatory on packages over $100 USD and will be added to postage charges when applicable.

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