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Breon O'Casey Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, b. 1928 - d. 2011

Breon O'Casey 1928-2011. Painter, printmaker, weaver, constructivist, jewellery maker and latterly a sculptor.

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          • Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) White Spots
            Nov. 29, 2023

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) White Spots

            Est: £1,500 - £2,000

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) White Spots signed and dated 'Breon O'Casey MMIV' (lower right); further signed, titled and dated 'Breon O'Casey./MMV/White Spots' (on backboard) acrylic on paper 26 x 40cm (10 1/4 x 15 3/4in).

            Bonhams
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Four Christmas Cards
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Four Christmas Cards

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Four Christmas Cards each inscribed by the Artist (to interior), gouache and collage on paper (the largest 11.5cm x 16.5cm (4 1/2in x 6 1/2in), all mounted together) Provenance: The Estate of an important St. Ives artist. Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Duo, 2009
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Duo, 2009

            Est: £7,000 - £9,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Duo, 2009 signed, titled and dated (to backboard), acrylic on board relief (39.3cm x 68.5cm (15 1/2in x 27in)) Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Small Figure
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Small Figure

            Est: £1,000 - £2,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Small Figure signed (to base), verdigris bronze on marble (bronze 10cm high (4in high), 12.7cm high (5in high) including base) Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Head
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Head

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Head stamped BOC, white metal on wooden stand (15.5cm high (6 1/8in high) excluding base; 20.5cm high (8in high) including base) Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Construction, 1966
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Construction, 1966

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Construction, 1966 signed, dated and inscribed to Pat & Roger with love (to postcard to reverse), oil on board assemblage (35.7cm x 29cm (14in x 11 1/2in) including frame) Provenance Gifted by the Artist to Roger and Pat Leigh, thence by descent; Askew Art, London; Private Collection, UK. Roger Leigh (1925-97), who previously owned this work, was one of Barbara Hepworth's assistants. Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird

            Est: £5,000 - £7,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird stamped BOC, white metal, in Perspex box on wooden stand (29.5cm high, 39.5cm wide, 7cm deep (11 5/8in high, 15 1/2in wide, 2 3/4in deep)) Provenance: Lynne Strover Gallery, Cambridge; Private Collection, UK. Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Landscape on Brown, 1997
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Landscape on Brown, 1997

            Est: £1,500 - £2,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Landscape on Brown, 1997 signed and dated in pencil (lower right), signed, titled and dated (to backboard), mixed media on paper (28.5cm x 40.5cm (11 1/4in x 16in)) Provenance Yew Tree Gallery, Cornwall. Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Divided Circles, 2003
            Oct. 27, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Divided Circles, 2003

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Divided Circles, 2003 signed and dated (lower right), inscribed PP I (lower left), lithograph on paper (sheet 83.7cm x 55.8cm (33in x 22 in); plate 62.8cm x 40cm (24 3/4 in x 15 3/4 in)) Provenance Stoneman Graphics Ltd, where acquired by the current owner, December 2008. Breon O’Casey was part of one of the later waves of young avant-garde artists drawn to the bustling fishing settlement of St Ives, arriving in his clapped-out orange Ford transit in 1959. A studio assistant of Denis Mitchell and of the inimitable Barbara Hepworth, O’Casey became a member of the Penwith Society of Arts and an active participant in the artistic life of the town. Highly productive and constantly experimental, O’Casey moved across different media with ease, with his visual language translating across such diverse artforms as painting, jewellery, printmaking, weaving and sculpture. This broad skillset made him relatively hard to pin down from a critical point of view and possibly explains why the spotlight took its time to home in on this fascinating and respected figure within the St Ives School. Since O’Casey’s death in 2011 however, curators and collectors have driven a wave of renewed appreciation of the work of this fascinating polymath. Unconstrained to one medium, simple shapes of undulating and geometric form recur across much of his work. So too does a distinctive palette of earthy brown tones disrupted by jewel-like reds, greens and blues. His reference points are diverse: from his family roots in the Celtic revival (his father was Irish dramatist Sean O’Casey) and his interest in ancient and non-Western culture (for example the Navajo-inspired geometric patterns which appear in his weaving), to the distilled modernist forms of the Bauhaus and the work of St Ives forebears like Ben Nicholson. One key recurring motif is the number three, which took on an almost magical quality for O’Casey. We can note this in the iconography of some of the pieces offered here. In the 1966 assemblage, Construction, we find three simple bands of colour reading as an abstracted, minimalistic take on a natural landscape, to the more monumental Duo, which places three band-like shapes to delineate space in the pictorial plane. Sculpture became an increasing preoccupation, with O’Casey commenting that it “…took the place of weaving and jewellery as the antidote to painting. At first as a sideline, a relief from the anxieties of paint. But gradually it has taken on a more important role and I can say now that it is at least as important to me as painting and I devote an equal amount of time and thought to it.” O’Casey also remarked that, unlike his wholly abstract work in two dimensions, he was almost always drawn to figuration in his sculptural work, very often depicting birds or animals. In the excellent examples offered here we find his deceptively simple balancing act between modern and ancient lexicons, as well as the sense of an artist revelling in the joy of his craft.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011)
            Oct. 03, 2023

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011)

            Est: £100 - £200

            BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) Untitled Linocut 1998 linocut on wove from the unnumbered edition of 200 printed by Hugh Stoneman sheet 16 x 16cm unframed ARR

            Chiswick Auctions
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Three Christmas Cards
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Three Christmas Cards

            Est: £600 - £800

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Three Christmas Cards each inscribed from the artist (inside the card), mixed media, mixed media with collage and linocut (11.5cm x 17.5cm (4 1/2in x 7in); 10cm x 17cm (4in x 6 3/4in); 19.5cm x 20cm (7 3/4in x 8in);) Qty: (3) Provenance The Estate of an important St. Ives artist. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card (Bird Design)
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card (Bird Design)

            Est: £400 - £600

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card (Bird Design) Inscribed (inside card), linocut (23cm x 15.5cm (9in x 6in)) Provenance The Estate of an important St. Ives artist. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Tie Designs
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Tie Designs

            Est: £500 - £800

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Tie Designs Mixed media and collage (28.5cm x 19cm (11 1/4in x 7 1/2in)) Provenance The Estate of an important St. Ives artist. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird in the Wood, 2008
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird in the Wood, 2008

            Est: £12,000 - £18,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bird in the Wood, 2008 signed, titled and dated (to reverse), acrylic on canvas (91cm x 121cm (35 3/4in x 47 5/8in)) Provenance Clark Art Ltd, Hale; Private Collection, UK. Literature Fallon, Brian, Breon O'Casey: A Decade, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1999, p. 63, illustrated. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Cockerel
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Cockerel

            Est: £4,000 - £6,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Cockerel stamped BOC (to base), bronze (9.3cm high, 7in wide (3 5/8in high, 2 3/4in wide)) Provenance Private Collection, London. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bather
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bather

            Est: £6,000 - £8,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Bather signed BOC and numbered I/V (to marble base), bronze (26.5cm high (10 1/2in high) excluding base) Provenance Private Collection, London. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Brooch
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Brooch

            Est: £500 - £800

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Brooch scratch initials BOC, white metal, square outline with triangular motifs (3.8cm wide (1 1/2in wide)) Provenance Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh, 1998. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings

            Est: £400 - £600

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings the first of pendent design with a coral bead, unmarked, yellow metal; the second of triangular outline, set with a green hardstone, unmarked, white metal (Lengths: 4cm and 0.9cm (1 1/2in and 2/5in)) Qty: (2) Provenance Private Collection, Scotland. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48. Please be aware that all Lots marked with the symbol Y may be subject to CITES regulations when exporting these items outside Great Britain. These regulations may be found at http://www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/imports-exports/cites We accept no liability for any Lots which may be subject to CITES but have not be identified as such.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings

            Est: £500 - £800

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Two Pairs of Earrings the first modelled in silver of cirular lattice design, hallmarked for Birmingham 1981, makers mark; the second of circular outline with beaded detail, makers mark only, white metal (lattice 3.5cm diameter (1 3/8in diameter); beaded 3cm diameter (1 1/8in diameter) approximately) Qty: (2) Provenance Private Collection, Scotland. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Necklace
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Necklace

            Est: £500 - £800

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Necklace unmarked, white metal (Length: 59cm (23 1/4in)) Provenance Private Collection, Scotland. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Boat, 1999
            Apr. 28, 2023

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Boat, 1999

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Boat, 1999 signed and dated in pencil in margin (lower right), numbered 11/15 (lower left), linocut on paper (45cm x 44cm (17 3/4in x 17 3/8in)) Provenance Private Collection, Scotland. ‘Breon O’Casey is a man for all seasons. He thinks and feels with his hands and moves with apparent ease from two-dimensional to three-dimensional activities, from one medium to another, without losing the artistic integrity of his intent. Breon O’Casey’s sensitive observations of life, art and nature inform his rich personal, visual language and beautifully balanced prose. His respect for his immediate environment and for tradition have enabled him to move forward with a confident, quiet ease, creating a refreshingly honest approach to art. He is an artist who is prepared to wait for the right shape, for the right brushstroke or the perfectly chosen word to express his meaning’. (Peter Murray (1)) Breon O’Casey was a true polymath and was possibly unique in the combination of skills he possessed over so many mediums in a single career. He was a painter, printmaker, weaver, sculptor and jewellery maker and it is hard to think of any other contemporary artist and maker who was so broadly talented. Son of the playwright Sean O’Casey (1880-1964), Breon spent most of his career in Cornwall, where he was closely associated with many of the painters, potters and sculptors of the St Ives movement. He arrived in the coastal town in the 1959 and served artistic apprenticeships under sculptors Barbara Hepworth and Denis Mitchell, and was friends with leading artists such as Peter Lanyon, John Wells and Tony O’Malley. In 1999 O’Casey recalled: ‘One day, watching television, some time in the late fifties, I saw a film about Alfred Wallis…the film incidentally showed St Ives and the studios of the artists living there. I realised it was the place for me. I owned a small orange Ford van. I packed the van and went. St Ives! In those days it was still a working fishing port, with tourism and artists tolerated, but kindly tolerated. Coming from Torquay, where I had felt like a rhinoceros walking along the streets, the relief of mingling with other crazy artists was enormous…I felt secure and there was a sort of electricity in the air.’ (2) O’Casey’s abstract style was poetic and focussed on discovering the simplicity of objects and forms. For him there was ‘nothing new under the sun, but an infinity of arrangements’ and when asked about objects that captivated him it was ‘not the wood, not the tree, but the leaf; not the distant view, but the hedge; not the mountain, but the stone’. He would return to geometric motifs and natural forms again and again throughout his career and considered himself a ‘traditional innovator’, fascinated by ancient, primitive and non-western art, but imbuing it with his own poetic sensibilities and discoveries through all the creative channels he explored. Although often overshadowed by his St Ives contemporaries, O’Casey’s legacy, talents and unique skills are now being reassessed, and greater importance given to his accomplishments beyond narrow and interlocked art circles. We are delighted to bring this collection of his work together to showcase many of the aspects of O’Casey’s prodigious artistic output, and to celebrate his significance as a true renaissance figure of British 20th-century art and craft. 1 / Peter Murray quoted in Sarah Coulson and Sophie Bowness, Breon O’Casey: An Anthology of his Writings, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Wakefield, 2005, p.3 2 / Breon O’Casey quoted in Brian Fallon and Breon O’Casey, Breon O’Casey¸ Scolar Press, Aldershot, 1999, p.48.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FUGUE II - 2010
            Apr. 04, 2023

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FUGUE II - 2010

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FUGUE II - 2010 Signed, inscribed and dated to the backboard, acrylic on board (34.5cm x 38cm (13.5in x 15in))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH, 1928-2011)
            Mar. 29, 2023

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH, 1928-2011)

            Est: £1,800 - £2,500

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH, 1928-2011) BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH, 1928-2011) Bird inscribed 'Dear Jane/A Merry Christmas &/A Happy New Year' (verso) collage, gouache and linocut 20 x 28.5 cm. (7 7/8 x 11 1/4 in.) ARR

            Chiswick Auctions
          • Breon O-Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008; bronze, signed with initials and numbered
            Dec. 08, 2022

            Breon O-Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008; bronze, signed with initials and numbered

            Est: £600 - £900

            Breon O-Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008; bronze, signed with initials and numbered from an edition of 28 'BOC XXI', H3 x W6.8 x D4.6 cm (ARR) Note: the artist created this work for the British Art Medal Society and was featured in their journal 'The Medal', no 54 (Spring 2009), shaping the form from pebbles picked up from the beach.

            Roseberys
          • Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, image size
            Nov. 30, 2022

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, image size

            Est: £100 - £200

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, image size 20" x 24" (51 x 61cm), from the estate of George Weissbort - Landlord to Breon O'Casey, circa 1950, (unframed).

            John Nicholson's Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers
          • Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in
            Nov. 30, 2022

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in

            Est: £100 - £200

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in pencil, image size 18" x 24" (46 x 61cm), from the estate of George Weissbort - Landlord to Breon O'Casey, circa 1950, (unframed).

            John Nicholson's Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers
          • Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in
            Nov. 30, 2022

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in

            Est: £100 - £200

            Attributed to Breon O'Casey (1928-2011), an untitled abstract composition, watercolour and gouache, signed in pencil, image size 15" x 21" (38 x 53cm), from the estate of George Weissbort - Landlord to Breon O'Casey, circa 1950, (unframed).

            John Nicholson's Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers
          • Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Bird 11cm (4 5/16in) high.
            Nov. 23, 2022

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Bird 11cm (4 5/16in) high.

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Bird signed with initials 'BOC' (to base) white metal 11cm (4 5/16in) high.

            Bonhams
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card
            Oct. 28, 2022

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card

            Est: £500 - £700

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Christmas Card inscribed 'A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year / love Breon and Doreen' in pen (to reverse), mixed media and collage (17.5cm x `11.5cm (6 7/8in x 4 1/2in))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Study for Éan Mór, circa 2006
            Oct. 28, 2022

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Study for Éan Mór, circa 2006

            Est: £6,000 - £8,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Study for Éan Mór, circa 2006 III/V, initialled and numbered (to underside of base), patinated bronze, marble base (20cm high, 20cm wide (7 7/8in high, 7 7/8in wide) excluding base) Provenance: When originally purchased from the artist, O'Casey sent a note explaining 'I enclose a token of thanks for all your trouble...It's a maquette of the big one...Breon'. The large scale Éan Mór is situated at Phoenix Park, Dublin. "It’s odd, but although my paintings are almost always abstract, my sculptures are almost always of some animal, bird or person. I don’t know why this is; but maybe painting is a language - a language writ on hardboard, paper or canvas. The language of colour and form - as John Wells says: “whereas sculpture is objects”. And an object, unless it be a stone, must be of something." (Breon O'Casey)

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011), RED BIRD
            Oct. 19, 2022

            λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011), RED BIRD

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011)RED BIRD BronzeInscribed with initials and numbered II/IX (on the underside of base)Height (including base): 25cm (9¾ in.)Provenance: Sale, Barbara Kirk Auctions, Penzance, date unknown

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011), UNTITLED
            Oct. 19, 2022

            λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011), UNTITLED

            Est: £1,500 - £2,500

            λ BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011)UNTITLED Oil on boardSigned and dated MMIV (verso)21 x 23cm (8¼ x 9 in.)UnframedPainted in 2004.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008;
            Oct. 11, 2022

            Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008;

            Est: £900 - £1,200

            Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011 - Men Bygham, 2008; bronze, signed with initials 'BOC XXI', H3 x W6.8 x D4.6 cm (ARR) Note: the artist created this work for the British Art Medal Society and was featured in their journal 'The Medal', no 54 (Spring 2009), shaping the form from pebbles picked up from the beach. Please refer to department for condition report

            Roseberys
          • Breon O'Casey (1928-2011)
            Oct. 04, 2022

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011)

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) ▴ Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Untitled signed and dated 'Breon O'Casey 1978' l.r., gouache 67 x 43cm Condition Report: Framed size 90 x 67cm Not viewed out of glazed frame. Paper taped to mount. Tape visible to lower edge. Paper cockled from thick gouache. Pin holes to upper corners.

            Sworders
          • St. Ives
            Sep. 23, 2022

            St. Ives

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            Property from the Collection of Denis Mitchell Breon O'Casey 1928 - 2011 St. Ives signed Breon O'Casey, titled and dated 1967 (on the reverse) oil on canvas unframed: 25.5 by 26.5cm.; 10 by 10½in. framed: 27 by 28cm.; 10½ by 11in. Executed in 1967. Bid on Sotheby's

            Sotheby's
          • Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Landscape
            Jul. 13, 2022

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Landscape

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Landscape signed, titled and dated 'Landscape'/Breon O'Casey. 1998' (on board verso) acrylic and relief on board 33 x 48.5cm (13 x 19 1/8in). For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          • Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011- Moon, 1999; linocut in colours on wove, signed, dated and num
            Jul. 05, 2022

            Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011- Moon, 1999; linocut in colours on wove, signed, dated and num

            Est: £500 - £700

            Breon O'Casey, British 1928-2011- Moon, 1999; linocut in colours on wove, signed, dated and numbered 3/15 in pencil, 64.5 x 50cm (framed) (ARR) Please refer to department for condition report

            Roseberys
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011)
            May. 26, 2022

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011)

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Comedians signed and dated 'Breon O'Casey MMI' (lower right); further signed, titled and dated to the backboard oil on paper 37.5 x 55.5cm Provenance: With Lynne Strover Gallery, Cambridge

            Cheffins
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011)
            May. 26, 2022

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011)

            Est: £1,500 - £2,500

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Eine kleine Nachtmusik signed and dated 'Breon O'Casey 1999' (lower right); further signed, titled and erroneously dated 1989 to the backboard oil on paper 38 x 55.5cm Provenance: With Lynne Strover Gallery, Cambridge

            Cheffins
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011), Bird,
            May. 26, 2022

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011), Bird,

            Est: £1,000 - £2,000

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011), Bird, white metal sculpture, impressed BOC mark to underside 27 x 40 x 7cm Provenance: With Lynne Strover Gallery, Cambridge

            Cheffins
          • Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Organic Forms (2002)
            Apr. 26, 2022

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Organic Forms (2002)

            Est: €1,500 - €2,500

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Organic Forms (2002) acrylic on paper signed lower right and dated 2002 h:37.50  w:56 cm. Provenance: Peppercanister Gallery, Dublin; Private Collection

            Morgan O'Driscoll
          • Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Deer Bronze, 35.5 x 11.5 x 30cm (14 x 4½ x 11¾''), raised on a limestone platform base Signed with initials and numbered 4/5
            Dec. 08, 2021

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Deer Bronze, 35.5 x 11.5 x 30cm (14 x 4½ x 11¾''), raised on a limestone platform base Signed with initials and numbered 4/5

            Est: €5,000 - €8,000

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Deer Bronze, 35.5 x 11.5 x 30cm (14 x 4½ x 11¾''), raised on a limestone platform base Signed with initials and numbered 4/5

            Adam's
          • Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Bird into Blue Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 122cm (36 x 48'') Signed, inscribed and dated 2008 on stretcher verso Provenance: With Peppercanister Gallery, Dublin. The son of playwright, Sean O’Casey, and actress,
            Dec. 08, 2021

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Bird into Blue Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 122cm (36 x 48'') Signed, inscribed and dated 2008 on stretcher verso Provenance: With Peppercanister Gallery, Dublin. The son of playwright, Sean O’Casey, and actress,

            Est: €8,000 - €12,000

            Breon O'Casey (1928-2011) Bird into Blue Acrylic on canvas, 91.5 x 122cm (36 x 48'') Signed, inscribed and dated 2008 on stretcher verso Provenance: With Peppercanister Gallery, Dublin. The son of playwright, Sean O’Casey, and actress, Eileen Reynolds, Breon O’Casey was born into an artistic family but he renounced the written word in favour of something more visceral. Studying first at the Anglo-French Art Centre in London, he then concluded his formal art training at Saint Martin’s School of Art. Perhaps his greatest education though came from working with his fellow artists in St. Ives, Cornwall. Breon O’Casey moved to St. Ives in 1959 and took up an apprenticeship with Denis Mitchell. He worked with Mitchell until 1961 when he then apprenticed under Barbara Hepworth. Mingling with the St. Ives community, O’Casey became adept in various media including jewellery making, printing and weaving. However, his true love was for painting and sculpture and it was to this that O’Casey dedicated the last decade of his life. Painted only a few years before he died, ‘Bird into Blue’ is indicative of a lifetime perfecting and playing with art and design. O’Casey was drawn to ancient and non-western art and this influence can clearly be seen in the primitive lack of perspective and flattened subject matter. Birds make frequent appearances in O’Casey’s work, his paintings picking them out as reduced and abstracted forms. Yet, despite this minimalistic approach, his birds are imbued with a personality that transcends their basic shape. Helena Carlyle, October 2021

            Adam's
          • § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Blue Moons, 2003
            Oct. 29, 2021

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Blue Moons, 2003

            Est: £600 - £900

            § Breon O'Casey (British 1928-2011) Blue Moons, 2003 10/15, signed, numbered and dated 'MMIII' in pencil (in the margin), linocut (46.5cm x 60cm (18.25in x 23.5in))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FRINGED NECKLACE
            Oct. 28, 2021

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FRINGED NECKLACE

            Est: £500 - £800

            § BREON O'CASEY (BRITISH 1928-2011) FRINGED NECKLACE stamped 'BOC', composed of a single row of hammered silver beads, between a graduated row of hammered ‘leaf’ pendants, to a hook clasp with facetted agate bead detail (Overall length: 40cm (15.7in) Overall length of longest drop: 5.5cm (2.1in)) Provenance: In Barns-Graham's notes on her collection she states she purchased one silver necklace by Breon O'Casey. In a later amendment to her will, she states she owned two leaf shaped necklaces by Breon O’Casey, the other was previously sold by the Trust.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Lost Hedge
            Jul. 21, 2021

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Lost Hedge

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            Breon O'Casey (British, 1928-2011) Lost Hedge signed, titled and dated 'Breon O'Casey./Lost hedge/MMIII' (on board verso) oil on board 34.5 x 46cm (13 9/16 x 18 1/8in). For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          • § BREON O’CASEY (1928–2011)
            Feb. 25, 2021

            § BREON O’CASEY (1928–2011)

            Est: £600 - £800

            BREON O’CASEY (1928–2011) October signed and dated Breon O'Casey '67 (lower right) oil on paper 25 x 30 cm (9 3/4 x 12 in)

            Chiswick Auctions
          • Breon O'Casey, British 1926-2011- Untitled, 1967; mixed media relief, signed and dated on the re
            Feb. 23, 2021

            Breon O'Casey, British 1926-2011- Untitled, 1967; mixed media relief, signed and dated on the re

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            Breon O'Casey, British 1926-2011- Untitled, 1967; mixed media relief, signed and dated on the reverse, 27 x22cm (ARR) Provenance: Gifted to the vendor's mother in 1967 Please refer to department for condition report

            Roseberys
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