Loading Spinner

Daniel O'Neill Sold at Auction Prices

Painter

Daniel (Dan) O'Neill (1920 – March 9, 1974) was a Romantic painter born in Belfast, Ireland. The son of an electrician, and himself an electrician by trade, he was largely self-taught, although he briefly attended Belfast College of Art life classes, before working with and studying under fellow Belfast artist Sidney Smith. He quickly developed an expressionist technique, and strong romanticism, with imagery, often full of pathos, evoking the themes of love, life and death.[1][2]

The start of his painting career coincided with the outbreak of World War II and after the 1941 Belfast Blitz he salvaged wood and experimented with wood carving. O'Neill's first exhibition was at the Mol Gallery in Belfast in 1941. Within five years, Dublin art dealer Victor Waddington became involved, resulting in O'Neill having a regular income which allowed him to give up his day-job as an electrician, and focus on painting full-time.[2] In 1946 he sold 21 pictures out of 23 at an exhibition at the Waddington Galleries in Dublin and from then on exhibited regularly.[3] In 1949 he visited Paris and was influenced by Georges Rouault, Maurice de Vlaminck and Maurice Utrillo. A number of works followed on which his reputation largely rests, including: Place du Tertre (1949), The Blue Skirt (1949), Knockalla Hills, Donegal (1951) and Birth (1952). His later work, largely brighter in colour, was seen by critics as less successful.[1] In 1951 his work was shown in the Tooth Galleries, London and he also exhibited there with Colin Middleton in 1954.[3]

In the 1950s, O'Neill moved from Belfast to Conlig, County Down, where there was a small artist's colony that also included George Campbell and Gerard Dillon.[2] Along with Colin Middleton, Gerard Dillon and George Campbell he was one of a group of artists who respected each other’s work and kept in touch over the course of their careers.[3] However, after the closure of the Waddington Gallery in Dublin, O’Neill found it difficult to exist as a painter.[4] He lived in London from 1958 to 1971 and his work in this period was increasingly introspective and often desolate.[2] In 1970 George McClelland invited O’Neill to exhibit a one-man show, Recent Paintings, at his Belfast gallery, and provided O'Neill with accommodation and a studio to work in. It was his first one-man show in 18 years and was a complete sell out. However, this return to good fortune was not sustained as McClelland Galleries was badly affected by the civil unrest in Belfast in the early 1970s.[4] O'Neill returned to Belfast in 1971, where he died in 1974.[2]

During his lifetime, O'Neill's works were primarily exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy. More recently, some of his paintings were shown at the Irish Museum of Modern Art as part of a 2005 exhibition of Northern Irish artists.

His work is represented in many collections including the Ulster Museum, Queen's University Belfast and the Hugh Lane Municipal Gallery, Dublin.[3]

Read Full Artist Biography

0 Lots

Sort By:

Categories

          Auction Date

          Seller

          Seller Location

          Price Range

          to
          • DANIEL O'NEILL R.H.A (1920-1974) La Vieille Maison
            Apr. 05, 2024

            DANIEL O'NEILL R.H.A (1920-1974) La Vieille Maison

            Est: €4,000 - €8,000

            DANIEL O'NEILL R.H.A (1920-1974) La Vieille Maison Huile sur panneau d'isorel signé en bas à droite et contresigné au dos sur une étiquette Dimensions : 41,5 x 51 cm Provenance : - Christie's, Londres lot 149 vente du 27 septembre 1991 - Collection privée Monte-Carlo Accompagné de la facture d'achat et des document de transport Peintre romantique ou expressionniste d’origine irlandaise, Daniel O’Neill reçoit une éducation artistique auprès de Sidney Smith au Belfast College of Art même s'il reste largement autodidacte. Il initie sa carrière artistique en peignant penant son temps libre et il faut attendre la fin de la guerre pour qu’O’Neill puisse enfin vivre de sa peinture, après avoir obtenu un contrat d’exposition à la galerie de Victor Waddington à Dublin qui l’exposera durant une grande partie de sa carrière. En 1949, O’Neill se rend à Paris où il subit l’influence directe de George Rouault, Maurice de Vlaminck et Maurice Utrillo. Dès cette époque, il conçoit les éléments de sa peinture qui feront son succès : des iconographies pleines de sentiments, évoquant la mort ou l’amour, avec une technique expressionniste inspirée des peintres français. A la fin des années 50 et suite à la fermeture de la Waddington Gallery de Dublin, O’Neill déménage à Londres, où il reste jusqu’en 1971. Sa vie est extrêmement difficile et il ne connaît pas le succès d’auparavant. Cela se ressent fortement dans ses œuvres, de plus en plus introspectives et marquées par une désolation absolue. Aujourd’hui, les œuvres d’O’Neill font la fierté de l’Ulster Museum de Belfast et le peintre jouit d’une grande notoriété posthume à l’international.

            Accademia Fine Art
          • Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso
            Mar. 27, 2024

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Solitude , Lough Neagh Oil on board, 25.4 x 35.56cm (10 x 14'') Signed Provenance: Collection of Robert Jackson, Belfast. Bequeathed to the present owner, c. 1990. This work is very similar in subject matt
            Mar. 27, 2024

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Solitude , Lough Neagh Oil on board, 25.4 x 35.56cm (10 x 14'') Signed Provenance: Collection of Robert Jackson, Belfast. Bequeathed to the present owner, c. 1990. This work is very similar in subject matt

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Solitude , Lough Neagh Oil on board, 25.4 x 35.56cm (10 x 14'') Signed Provenance: Collection of Robert Jackson, Belfast. Bequeathed to the present owner, c. 1990. This work is very similar in subject matter and style to another painting by the artist titled Sunday and sold in these rooms in 2022, which also had a pair of female figures at the centre of the composition. These works are looser in their handling of the paint, and in this instance, he is using quick and broad sweeps of colour to indicate the dresses of the two standing figures. He has used an artist sponge to create texture for the leaves of the trees in the background, while other areas have very light touches of paint, with multiple layers of colour visible. Solitude is a vivid and arresting landscape scene which sees O’Neill using a bright tonal palette, somewhat uncharacteristic for him as an artist. Two figures stand with their backs to us, unclear if they are stopping to admire the view across the water to the mountains in the distance. We are not sure if they have noticed the reclining figure to the left-hand side of composition. She is depicted in the position of a reclining classical nude, her head resting on one hand and the other holding what appears to be book. As has been noted with many of O’Neill’s works there is a strangeness or enigma to them. He does not give us much in way of narrative content and the title of work, may reflect the solitary nature of the reading figure, but her relaxed pose feels also at odds in relation to the two other women within this empty landscape. Brian Fallon remarked of Daniel O’Neill, ‘he is an excellent Landscapist. But in the Yeatsian way - there is more imagination than topography’ and concluded that O’Neill’s best works ‘are charged with that mysterious and unquantifiable quality which gives Art its purpose.’ Niamh Corcoran, February 2024

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) The Little River Oil on board, 45 x 60cm (17¾ x 23½) Signed
            Mar. 27, 2024

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) The Little River Oil on board, 45 x 60cm (17¾ x 23½) Signed

            Est: €7,000 - €10,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) The Little River Oil on board, 45 x 60cm (17¾ x 23½) Signed

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) JULIE
            Mar. 11, 2024

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) JULIE

            Est: €20,000 - €30,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) JULIE oil on canvas titled on reverse h:21  w:17 in. In portraiture, with notable exceptions, the probing of the sitter's personality or psychological disposition is a relatively recent approach ushered in by the Romantic movement in the 19th century and later explored by expressionist artists in the 20th century with the focus on the inner life of the individual. O'Neill, throughout his career, painted many portraits of women. Drawing on both Italianate and primitive traditions he often set his subjects within a domestic setting, at times in a classical three quarter pose, sometimes with a view beyond the interior. By contrast, on occasions, and for more expressive power, he drew upon the stylistic characteristics of mannerist art - elongated figure, confrontational pose, heightened, emotive, less naturalistic colours. O'Neill clearly was also aware of the influence of the art of other cultures, which was having such an influence in the development of modernism, in the work of Picasso, Gauguin and Modigliani which he would have seen in Paris and in London. 'Julie' is a fine example of this tendency in his portraiture. As with most portraits by O'Neill, whether depicting a bride, actress or model, he captures a brooding presence. Often his female studies are taken out of time, sometimes by the use of historical costume. With 'Julie' there is more of a confident, confrontational presence. The disposition of her elegant fore-square arms registering a proud strength of character. The background is spare and neutral - a light blue with underpainting breaking through. The figure is simply conceived and sculptural with little evidence of his trade mark impasto. Unlike many of his more decorative portraits the subject's clothes are plain and understated, rendered in light blue and white, in contrast to her dark skin - depicted by way of tones of brown and orange. Her earrings and necklace are the only concession to the decorative. Her brooding, assured face tilts away from the gaze of the artist and in turn the viewer; her left arm raised in what might be seen as a defensive gesture of self-assurance. 'Julie' then, in style and treatment, is markedly different from the usual range of O'Neill's portraits. Prof. Liam Kelly, February 2024

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) SUNSHOWER
            Mar. 11, 2024

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) SUNSHOWER

            Est: €20,000 - €30,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) SUNSHOWER oil on panel signed lower right; titled on reverse h:14  w:21 in. Figures in a landscape is a recurring theme in the work of Dan O'Neill where, often, he registers a symbiotic, at times, unsettled and unsettling, relationship between figure and the natural environment. In 'Sunshower' a mother shelters her two children by her 'Madonna' blue cloak in the foreground of lush green/dark green vegetation. Her features are reminiscent of the peasant faces of the family at dinner in Van Gogh's 'Potato Eaters', a work essentially about the dignity of labour. O'Neill would most likely have seen works by Van Gogh during his sojourn in Paris (1948/9) and also at the Van Gogh exhibition in London's Tate Gallery in 1948. It may be observed, as well, that he painted a number of works as a homage to the Dutch artist, notably 'On reading' Dear Theo''. The landscape here recedes by way of a series of oblique sections of land with some denuded and declamatory trees. There is a glimpse of the gable end of a white washed rural cottage in the background while the painting culminates in the depiction of a warm grey moisture-laden sky. Light is the great protagonist at work in this complex and dramatic composition. It lights up the stern face of the mother and is, at its most luminous, as it washes in orange and yellow pigment across what would appear to be a cornfield, ready for harvest. The bare branched trees conspire within the scenography. O'Neill produced a number of paintings of Harvest time. In 'Harvester's Picnic', lot 40, Whyte’s, 27 September 2021, the moon lights up a stretch of the harvested cornfield. A standing female, in profile, stares out into the distant night. Like 'Sunshower' it teeters on the verge of the surreal, creating a magical, ominous atmospheric mood - a visionary dreamtime landscape. 'Sunshower' is a fine example of the artist's work - multi-layered and psychologically charged and complex. Prof. Liam Kelly, February 2024

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Girl in a Landscape Oil on board, 35 x 45cm (13¾ x 17¾) Signed Daniel O’Neill had a knack for producing iconic images with a wistful, melancholy quality. Even this sunny painting, with its bright colours and
            Dec. 06, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Girl in a Landscape Oil on board, 35 x 45cm (13¾ x 17¾) Signed Daniel O’Neill had a knack for producing iconic images with a wistful, melancholy quality. Even this sunny painting, with its bright colours and

            Est: €25,000 - €35,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Girl in a Landscape Oil on board, 35 x 45cm (13¾ x 17¾) Signed Daniel O’Neill had a knack for producing iconic images with a wistful, melancholy quality. Even this sunny painting, with its bright colours and a smiling subject, has an inward, reflective mood. The girl of the title gazes not back at the viewer but off to the side, downwards, absorbed in her own thoughts. Her elongated neck and head are sculpturally simplified in a manner influenced by Cubism. Like the the trees and vegetation, she is dramatically lit by a setting sun. As is often the case, there is an acidic edge to O’Neill’s palette as the sun’s rays elicit incendiary hues. The girl’s vivid red skirt, and even her hair have a fiery intensity and her slight smile, together with her stance, suggests a rueful sadness, a musing on - what Love, life, loss A skilled textural painter, O’Neill suggests inner agitation with the jagged rhythms of thick paintwork in the landscape, set against flat glazes of pigment. One of Northern artists known as ‘The Belfast Boys’, O’Neill was born into a Catholic Belfast family and apprenticed as an electrician, but was set on becoming an artist. Eventually the indispensable dealer Victor Waddington took him on and he pursued his artistic vocation. His early work, of bomb-damaged Belfast, is understandably dark and ominous in mood, but the dark undercurrent always remained. Karen Reihill, who has worked and published extensively on O’Neill and his fellow artists, has written a highly sympathetic though always level-headed account of his often troubled life. Prone to periods of depression and despair, he was tall, good-looking and attractive. He was also given to falling madly in love, but could be difficult to live with. A 1948 stay in Paris was enormously important. He adored the bohemian atmosphere and was greatly influenced by Fauvism and School of Paris painting in general. Reihill details how, in London in the late 1950s, he found himself out of fashion as moody existentialism gave way to international abstraction and, in time, Pop, in the art world. But the appeal of his work endured and, by the time of his sadly early death, it had gained renewed popularity. Aidan Dunne, November 2023

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920 – 1972) The Road to Rostrevor Oil on board 46 x 61.4cm (18 x 24”) Signed; Inscribed with title verso Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin, framing label verso Belfast painter Daniel O’Neill made the decision to paint
            Dec. 06, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 – 1972) The Road to Rostrevor Oil on board 46 x 61.4cm (18 x 24”) Signed; Inscribed with title verso Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin, framing label verso Belfast painter Daniel O’Neill made the decision to paint

            Est: €8,000 - €12,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 – 1972) The Road to Rostrevor Oil on board 46 x 61.4cm (18 x 24”) Signed; Inscribed with title verso Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin, framing label verso Belfast painter Daniel O’Neill made the decision to paint full time in 1945 having worked as an electrician in the Belfast shipyards. He first exhibited with Victor Waddington in Dublin in 1946, and later with the Dawson Gallery in the 1960s. He moved to London in the late 1950s, finally returning to Belfast in 1969, where he continued to paint his highly recognisable portraits and landscapes. The evocative style and intense colours used by O’Neill make for poignant and expressive pictures, and he has often been described as a romantic painter. In the present work, a pure landscape set in county Down, O’Neill uses thick impastoed brushstrokes to capture the rich vegetation, rendered in muted yellows, greens, russets and ochre tones, against the brooding backdrop of the Mournes. The application of quick upright strokes creates a sense of movement in the image, we can almost feel and hear the poplar trees swaying in the wind. Brian Fallon remarked of Daniel O’Neill, ‘he is an excellent Landscapist. But in the Yeatsian way - there is more imagination than topography’ and concluded that O’Neill’s best works ‘are charged with that mysterious and unquantifiable quality which gives Art its purpose.’

            Adam's
          • Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Boat on Thames Oil on board, 30 x 40cm (11¾ x 15¾) Signed
            Dec. 06, 2023

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Boat on Thames Oil on board, 30 x 40cm (11¾ x 15¾) Signed

            Est: €6,000 - €8,000

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Boat on Thames Oil on board, 30 x 40cm (11¾ x 15¾) Signed

            Adam's
          • DANIEL O'NEILL (1920-1974)
            Nov. 07, 2023

            DANIEL O'NEILL (1920-1974)

            Est: €8,000 - €12,000

            Saskia. Exhibited: Irish Living Art Exhibition 1956. Signed bottom left. Oil on board. Framed. Provenance: The Dr. Kevin Moynihan Collection, Macroom, Co. Cork. Approximate Time: 12:11 Lot No: 180

            Sheppards
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN
            Oct. 02, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN oil on board signed lower left; titled on reverse h:20  w:27 in. Provenance: Morgan O'Driscoll, 22 January 2018, lot 9; Private collection; Whyte's, 28 November 2022, lot 41; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FIGURES IN A LANDSCAPE
            Oct. 02, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FIGURES IN A LANDSCAPE

            Est: €2,000 - €3,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FIGURES IN A LANDSCAPE oil on board signed lower right h:7.25  w:9.75 in. Provenance: Acquired directly from the artist by the current owner's mother The artist met the first owner of this work met in 1969 at a Belfast clinic where she was then working and where O’Neill was undergoing treatment for alcoholism. In a written account of their meeting, she recalled that O’Neill was “quietly spoken and unassuming in his manner; we managed to build up a good rapport quite readily and he was able to converse freely with me”. They discussed O’Neill’s early years and frequently spoke of painting. O’Neill amused her with anecdotes about his career, such as his mother’s reaction to an early painting of a nude – “Oh Dan, cover her up” – to which request he complied; the resulting work, The Blue Skirt is now in the Ulster Museum. As their friendship grew O’Neill presented a number of impromptu gifts, including a William Conor sketch and two landscape paintings of his own. He asked his new confidante to sit for a portrait, to which she agreed. During one of the portrait sittings, she was accompanied by her then nine year old son. O’Neill encouraged the young boy to do some painting of his own, and promised that one day he would paint a clown for him. Some months later O’Neill telephoned to say he was unable to complete the portrait, and had instead transformed the work into a clown; this too he presented as a gift. In a series of letters to the owner, O’Neill gave news of his progress in the studio, telling her he had been “painting mostly at nights when everything is still and quiet”. An old transistor radio kept him company and he painted to the music of Brahms, Debussy, Mozart, Schubert and Sibelius. Most significantly he credited his return to painting to their friendship. “You without knowing it have given me the most priceless gift possible for any one person to give and this I have recently realised myself – that is the will to paint”.

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso
            Sep. 27, 2023

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O’Neill (1920 - 1974) Lot and his Daughters Oil on board, 53 x 70.5cm (20 x 24) Signed Provenance: Unidentified exhibition label, no.21 with title verso

            Adam's
          • O'neill, Daniel - West Country
            Jun. 20, 2023

            O'neill, Daniel - West Country

            Est: $10,000 - $15,000

            O'neill, Daniel (1920-1974) West Country Description: Oil on panel signed on lower right D O'Neill, label of Galerie d'art Waddington Dimension (PO): 14'' x 18'' Dimension (CM): 35 x 46 cm Condition report: Upon request, We will gladly answer all your inquiries in a detailed manner.

            Champagne Auctions
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a Ruff Collar Oil on board, 60 x 49.5cm (24 x 19½) Signed Provenance: With Jorgensen Gallery, Dublin, label verso Art historian Dr. S.B. Kennedy reckoned that the remarkable art dealer Victor Waddington,
            May. 31, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a Ruff Collar Oil on board, 60 x 49.5cm (24 x 19½) Signed Provenance: With Jorgensen Gallery, Dublin, label verso Art historian Dr. S.B. Kennedy reckoned that the remarkable art dealer Victor Waddington,

            Est: €40,000 - €60,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a Ruff Collar Oil on board, 60 x 49.5cm (24 x 19½) Signed Provenance: With Jorgensen Gallery, Dublin, label verso Art historian Dr. S.B. Kennedy reckoned that the remarkable art dealer Victor Waddington, a central figure in the development of Irish 20th century art, “almost certainly” subsidised Daniel O’Neill’s sojourn in Paris towards the end of the 1940s. The stay was vital for the artist. He stayed in Montmartre and lapped up the atmosphere of the culturally rich, economically quite impoverished, bohemian locality. Kennedy notes the influence of two Maurices on his work: de Vlaminck and Utrillo. Their influence is perceptible thereafter in his strongly stated draughtsmanship and bold use of colour. Rather than being drawn into Cubism and its offshoots, as was the case with many other Irish artists who took the Parisian route, O’Neill worked throughout his life in the representational tradition, though with a certain level of flexibility. That is, he wouldn’t be out of place in the context of the English Neo-romantic artists who flourished at the time. He had a good sense for the drama of a composition - at one point he designed sets for Synge’s Playboy at the Abbey. His work is often notable for its wistful, yearning quality, which, together with his great technical skill, has made it particularly popular with a wide audience. Paintings of individual female subjects number among his best works. This timeless painting is one of them. Against a clear, cloudy background, the young woman looks dreamily at the viewer. She seems lost in her own thoughts and memories, a little melancholy, though a smile plays at the edges of her lips. Elaborately, stylishly dressed in several layers and colours, she sports a generous ruff. That, with the rest of her costume, and a certain otherworldly cast to the lighting, tends to place her back in time, through the centuries. O’Neill embellishes fine layers of oil with applications of pure, bright pigment, giving the image a jewel-like shimmer. Born in Belfast, the son of an electrician, he followed his father into the trade, working for the corporation’s transport department and the shipyards. But even in his early teens he was drawn to art, studying books in the library and attending night classes at technical college. At work he opted for night shifts, painting during daylight. He was taken up by the fine painter and muralist Sidney Smith and befriended Gerard Dillon, exhibiting with him in Dublin in 1943. Victor Waddington’s support gave him the chance to establish himself as an artist. Aiden Dunne, April 2023

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Interior with Figure Oil on board, 40 x 30cm (15¾ x 19¾) Signed Provenance: With the Waddington Galleries Inc., Montreal, Canada, label verso Belfast painter Daniel O'Neill made the decision to paint full time in
            May. 31, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Interior with Figure Oil on board, 40 x 30cm (15¾ x 19¾) Signed Provenance: With the Waddington Galleries Inc., Montreal, Canada, label verso Belfast painter Daniel O'Neill made the decision to paint full time in

            Est: €8,000 - €12,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Interior with Figure Oil on board, 40 x 30cm (15¾ x 19¾) Signed Provenance: With the Waddington Galleries Inc., Montreal, Canada, label verso Belfast painter Daniel O'Neill made the decision to paint full time in 1945 having worked as an electrician in the Belfast Shipyards. He first exhibited with Victor Waddington in 1946, and later with the Dawson Gallery in Dublin in the 1960s. He moved to London in the late 1950s, finally returning to Belfast in 1969, where he continued to paint his highly recognisable portraits of women and girls as well as his haunting figures in landscapes. The evocative style and intense colours used by O'Neill make for poignant and expressive pictures, and he has often been described as a romantic painter.

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Woman and Two Children
            Apr. 18, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Woman and Two Children

            Est: €15,000 - €25,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Woman and Two Children oil on board signed 'D O Neill' top right and titled verso h:46  w:35.50 cm. Provenance: Private Collection USA; These Auction Rooms, 30th April 2018 lot 34 where purchased by the present owner In this painting, O'Neill depicts a woman holds a baby swaddled in white. In front of the woman can be seen the head and shoulders of a young girl. In the background are suggestions of architectural forms; perhaps a church interior. The baby is dressed in what could be Christening robes, and the sense of timelessness conveyed in the painting is not unlike that of a Greek or Russian icon. The theme of motherhood, of women and their children, occurs constantly in the art of Daniel O'Neill. Born in 1920, the son of an electrician, he trained in that same trade, working for a time in the Belfast shipyards. He also worked as a housepainter, which taught him skills allowing him to experiment with colours and textures, as is evident in this work. His upbringing, in a city of close-knit families and traditional roles, filters through in O'Neill's paintings, which celebrate the lives of humble and unpretentious people. Unable to afford to attend art college as a full time student, O'Neill took evening classes in life drawing at the Belfast College of Art, where he became friendly with fellow-artist Gerard Dillon, and worked for a time in the studio of Sidney Smith, another evening student at the College of Art. The first exhibition of O'Neill's paintings was held in 1941, at the Mol Gallery in Belfast, and shortly afterwards he was taken on by the Victor Waddington Gallery in Dublin, which allowed him to paint full time. In 1949, he visited Paris, seeing at first hand the work of painters such as Vlaminck and Utrillo. The influence of these artists is also a key to understanding O'Neill's art. Not long after he moved with his wife and child to Conlig, Co Down, where George Campbell and Gerard Dillon were also living. Having become a member of the Ulster Contemporary Group, in 1958 O'Neill moved to London, and also travelled on the Continent. A decade later he was in Dublin, designing stage sets for Sean O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock. In the early 1970's he returned to Belfast, but the outbreak of the 'Troubles' affected him badly, as did the resulting closure of the McClelland Gallery, where his paintings were shown. He died in 1974, aged just fifty-four. Peter Murray, March 2023

            Morgan O'Driscoll
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Morning
            Apr. 18, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Morning

            Est: €25,000 - €35,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Morning oil on board signed 'D O'Neill' lower right and titled verso h:51  w:68.70 cm. Provenance: Sotheby's, London, 30th October 2007 lot 8; deVere's, Dublin, 10th June 2008 lot 52; Private Collection In the foreground of this classic painting by O'Neill, stands the solitary and enigmatic figure of a dark-haired young woman, wearing a white blouse and red dress, her hands clasped together. The young woman's face is in shadow. Behind her, in the distance, are huddled three women and a child. Beyond is a vividly coloured coastal landscape, with blue sea in the far distance. Using a palette knife, and applying colour directly from the tube, O'Neill achieves spectacular effects, with alternating bands of blue and green pigment suggesting the landscape, and heavily textured paint suggesting bright sun hidden behind clouds, lighting up the cobalt blue sea in the background. O'Neill often gave his paintings titles that evoke time or place, such as Sunday Afternoon or Sunday Morning. The vibrant colours, evoking the painterly style of Jack B. Yeats, suggest that this is a relatively late work in the artist's career. Born in 1920 in Belfast, O'Neill trained as an electrician before working for a time in the shipyards and as a housepainter. Always interested in art, he attended evening classes at the Belfast College of Art, where he became friendly with Gerard Dillon and Sidney Smith. The first exhibition of O'Neill's paintings was held in 1940 in Belfast, and shortly afterwards he began to show with the Waddington Gallery in Dublin. In 1949, he visited Paris, seeing at first hand the work of painters such as Vlaminck and Utrillo, whose work he had, up to that time, known almost entirely through reproductions in art magazines, and admiring their use of palette knife rather than brush. In the early 1950s, after some years in London, O'Neill returned to Ireland, where, along with Dillon and George Campbell, he became a member of the Ulster Contemporary Group. With his wife and child he settled in the village of Conlig, Co Down, where Campbell and Dillon were also living. Always a restless spirit, in 1958 O'Neill moved back to London. However a successful exhibition of his work, held at the McClelland Galleries in Belfast in 1970, prompted him to return to Northern Ireland, but not long afterwards the gallery was forced to close as a result of 'The Troubles'. O'Neill died in 1974, aged just 54. Peter Murray, March 2023

            Morgan O'Driscoll
          • § DANIEL O'NEILL (IRISH, 1920-1974)
            Mar. 29, 2023

            § DANIEL O'NEILL (IRISH, 1920-1974)

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            § DANIEL O'NEILL (IRISH, 1920-1974) DANIEL O'NEILL (IRISH, 1920-1974) Rural landscape with cottages signed 'D O'Neill' (lower right) oil on board 35.3 x 53.3 cm. (14 x 21 in.) Provenance Acquired by the family of the present owner, circa 1960, thence by descent ARR Daniel O'Neill was known for his expressionistic style and his contribution to the development of the Irish art scene with his distinctive use of colour and form. O'Neill's work was deeply influenced by the landscape and people of his native Ireland. He often depicted scenes from everyday life, focusing on the struggles and hardships of the Irish people. His paintings were characterized by the use of vivid colours and bold, expressive brushstrokes, which helped to convey the emotional intensity of his subjects. The artist was also an important figure in the Irish art world, and his work helped to inspire a new generation of Irish artists. He was a member of the influential Dublin-based group, the White Stag Group, which included other important Irish artists such as Louis le Brocquy and Patrick Scott.

            Chiswick Auctions
          • O'Neill, Daniel - Evening
            Mar. 28, 2023

            O'Neill, Daniel - Evening

            Est: $15,000 - $20,000

            O'Neill, Daniel (1920-1974) Evening Description: Oil on board, signed on lower left D O'Neill, label of Waddington's Galleries Inc Dimension (PO): 18" x 24" Dimension (CM): 46 x 61 cm Condition report: Upon request, We will gladly answer all your inquiries in a detailed manner.

            Champagne Auctions
          • O'Neill, Daniel - Tomorrow's a new day
            Mar. 28, 2023

            O'Neill, Daniel - Tomorrow's a new day

            Est: $10,000 - $15,000

            O'Neill, Daniel (1920-1974) Tomorrow's a new day Description: Oil on board, signed on lower left D O'Neill Dimension (PO): 14" x 21" Dimension (CM): 35.5 x 53.5 cm Condition report: Upon request, We will gladly answer all your inquiries in a detailed manner.

            Champagne Auctions
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) MOTHER AND CHILD
            Mar. 06, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) MOTHER AND CHILD

            Est: €15,000 - €20,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) MOTHER AND CHILD oil on canvas laid on board signed lower left h:16  w:20 in. O'Neill was a consummate figurative artist often drawing upon the Italian tradition for his stylistic treatment of female figures; 'Mother and Child' is a recurrent theme in his work. He regularly painted females, taken out of time in historical and exotic clothing in both interior and landscape settings. The two figures in this painting have the appearance of native Americans, as their style of dress and dark complexion would imply. Gone are the richly textured displays of flowers and turbulent foreboding skies as in other works. In this painting everything is pared back to an essential presence. As far as I know O'Neill never visited North America, although Waddington exhibited his work in Montreal and Boston. It seems likely the composition of this painting was based on a travel photograph where the sitters originally posed for a photographer and O'Neill, in turn, saw the painterly possibilities and adopted and transformed it accordingly. The resulting work, at first, appears untypical of the artist, but on closer examination there are the characteristic stylised faces and the oval-shaped eyes. There is, too, the depiction of light on the mother's legs and arm, by way of his favoured tones of blue. We are no longer in a northern temperate climate which dissipates form and where skies are often in constant flux, as in Ireland, but in a climate that emphasises form. There is a stark contrast here between light and shade. The composition is simply rendered and structured. The horizon line is set low below a cloudless uniformly blue sky, allowing for focus on the two figures. Both figures are protected from the strong sunlight on an elevated desert-like, arid and sparse foreground. They sit under an awning with supporting poles which frame and shelter the central subjects in the composition. The mother wears a plain dress and head band and the child a more decorative dress. Both retain a dignified reserve, also typical of O'Neill, looking directly at the viewer - culturally rooted, proud and assured. Prof. Liam Kelly February 2023

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) OLD HOUSES, PAU
            Mar. 06, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) OLD HOUSES, PAU

            Est: €20,000 - €30,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) OLD HOUSES, PAU oil on board signed lower left; titled and with Dawson Gallery label on reverse h:24  w:20 in. Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin; Private collection; Adam's, 5 December 2006, lot 31; Private collection Exhibited: 'Daniel O'Neill', Dawson Gallery, Dublin, May 1971, catalogue no. 15 Early in his career O'Neill was introduced to French art - Cezanne, Picasso et al - by Sidney Smith and Gerard Dillon. He spent some months in France circa 1948/9, most likely encouraged and supported by Victor Waddington, painting street scenes in the bohemian Montmartre district of Paris. He he also travelled outside the French capital. 'Village in France' (Merrion Hotel collection, Dublin) is an example and depicts a street scene observed at a revealing obliquely orientated angle. He would, of course, have had the opportunity in Paris to view, at first hand, paintings by a number of modernist artists. It may be noted he paid homage to some of these artists, as in his painting 'Modigliani Land' (IMMA collection, Dublin). Pau, in southwest France, is close to Spain and located between the sea and the Pyrenees mountains. The composition of 'Old Houses, Pau' extends, by horizontally layered and ascending stages, from a river side view of houses and their brightly coloured reflections in the water to a panoramic view of the blue green mountains and luminous sky. Two cypress trees flank and contain the central focus of the 'flattened' semi-abstract forms of the houses - reminiscent of Paul Klee in their structural, cubistic depiction and phosphorescent colour range. There are many examples of O'Neill's interest in the structural build-up of architectural form, e.g. the buildings in 'Bunbeg Fishing Village', Co Donegal and urban paintings of the Belfast Blitz and later The Northern Irelandl 'Trouble's. It may be noted that there was influential 'give and take' between O'Neill and fellow northern artists Gerard Dillon, George Campbell and Colin Middleton. The latter was also fond of exploring the artistic rewards of the semi-abstract. O'Neill in 'Old Houses, Pau', with its textured mixture of abstraction and lush naturalism, clearly demonstrates the enabling benefits of his brief sojourn in France. Prof. Liam Kelly February 2023

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Indecision Oil on board, 75 x 85cm (34' x 29½) Signed upper right Provenance: Sale, these rooms 31st March 1999, lot 86 Exhibited: Irish Exhibition of Living Art, The National College of Art, Kildare Street, Dubli
            Mar. 01, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Indecision Oil on board, 75 x 85cm (34' x 29½) Signed upper right Provenance: Sale, these rooms 31st March 1999, lot 86 Exhibited: Irish Exhibition of Living Art, The National College of Art, Kildare Street, Dubli

            Est: €15,000 - €20,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Indecision Oil on board, 75 x 85cm (34' x 29½) Signed upper right Provenance: Sale, these rooms 31st March 1999, lot 86 Exhibited: Irish Exhibition of Living Art, The National College of Art, Kildare Street, Dublin, 16th August to 10th September 1950, catalogue no.74 Indecision is an extremely ambiguous and emotionally charged painting and reveals both O’Neill’s ambition and also his awareness of his contemporaries. Painted not long after O’Neill had travelled to Paris, where he had painted Place du Tertre (NMNI) and possibly also The Blue Skirt, which he exhibited the previous year at the Irish Exhibition of Living Art, Indecision appears to show a Belfast street scene. While birds often appeared in Colin Middleton’s paintings, often alongside female figures, and cats occurred in those of Gerard Dillon, animals are seen less regularly in O’Neill’s work. Indecision is a painting which fits more closely alongside those of his contemporaries than is usual, recalling the Belfast street scenes Middleton and Dillon had painted in the early 1940s; but the heightened emotional mood of the work is typical of O’Neill at this period. In part this mood is expressed through swirling passages of impasto and tenebrist lighting that set a dramatic tone and give an almost hallucinatory mood to the stark setting. This setting is highly theatrical; light pours from a streetlight and two illuminated windows in a building behind the girl (although she appears to be facing a light source as well). Her simplified, mask-like features prefigure similarly treated figures in a slightly later painting such as Birth (1952), as well as recalling O’Neill’s interest in painting puppets. This anonymity allows him to use the girl’s posture to express emotions of doubt and uncertainty, with her shoulders weighed down and her feet poised on the edge of the pavement and half in shadow, appearing to being about to carry her cat away from the brightly lit buildings behind her. The cat seems to capture something of the girl’s personality as well as her vulnerability and social isolation. Her pink-ish coat or cardigan recalls the red waistcoats that are so often worn by men in O’Neill’s early work, and along with her red beret the use of colour isolates her from the street scene behind. The exact nature of the situation appears elusive but it is interesting to note that in the 1940s O’Neill had exhibited paintings with titles such as Trapped, Reverberation and Meditation by the Sea, suggesting that he found these almost Victorian themes extremely stimulating in the subjects they suggested. Dickon Hall

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Snow, Co. Down Oil on board, 40 x 60cm (15¾ x 23½) Signed; Signed and inscribed with title verso
            Mar. 01, 2023

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Snow, Co. Down Oil on board, 40 x 60cm (15¾ x 23½) Signed; Signed and inscribed with title verso

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Snow, Co. Down Oil on board, 40 x 60cm (15¾ x 23½) Signed; Signed and inscribed with title verso

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape with Rocks, 1953 Oil on board, 41 x 61cm (16¼ x 24'') Signed Provenance: With Arthur Tooth & Sons, label verso.
            Dec. 07, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape with Rocks, 1953 Oil on board, 41 x 61cm (16¼ x 24'') Signed Provenance: With Arthur Tooth & Sons, label verso.

            Est: €3,000 - €5,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape with Rocks, 1953 Oil on board, 41 x 61cm (16¼ x 24'') Signed Provenance: With Arthur Tooth & Sons, label verso.

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE PIANIST
            Nov. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE PIANIST

            Est: €15,000 - €20,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE PIANIST oil on board signed upper right h:24  w:17.75 in. Provenance: de Veres, 22 June 2004, lot 60; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN
            Nov. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE, COUNTY DOWN oil on board signed lower left; titled on reverse h:20  w:27 in. Provenance: Morgan O'Driscoll, 22 January 2018, lot 9; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE CHRISTENING
            Nov. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE CHRISTENING

            Est: €8,000 - €12,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE CHRISTENING oil on board signed lower right h:12.75  w:9.50 in. Provenance: de Veres, 8 December 2010, lot 66; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FAUST, 1946
            Nov. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FAUST, 1946

            Est: €10,000 - €15,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) FAUST, 1946 oil on canvas signed upper right; titled and with dedication [To Victor Waddington Oct - 1946] on reverse h:14  w:18.25 in. Provenance: Collection of Victor Waddington; Adam's, 9 December 1998, lot 120; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE
            Nov. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE

            Est: €6,000 - €8,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE oil on board signed lower right; inscribed with artist's name, title, medium and number [69] on label on reverse h:14  w:18 in. Provenance: Morgan O'Driscoll, 24 September 2012, lot 21; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Study of a Woman Indian ink and wash, 23 x 14.5cm (9 x 5¾) Signed
            Sep. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Study of a Woman Indian ink and wash, 23 x 14.5cm (9 x 5¾) Signed

            Est: €3,000 - €5,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Study of a Woman Indian ink and wash, 23 x 14.5cm (9 x 5¾) Signed

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl in the Green Mask Oil on board, 46 x 37.5cm (18 x 14¾) Signed Provenance: With Oriel Gallery, Dublin; with Charles Gilmore, Holywood, Co. Down, where purchased by the present owners. Female figures are
            Sep. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl in the Green Mask Oil on board, 46 x 37.5cm (18 x 14¾) Signed Provenance: With Oriel Gallery, Dublin; with Charles Gilmore, Holywood, Co. Down, where purchased by the present owners. Female figures are

            Est: €15,000 - €20,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl in the Green Mask Oil on board, 46 x 37.5cm (18 x 14¾) Signed Provenance: With Oriel Gallery, Dublin; with Charles Gilmore, Holywood, Co. Down, where purchased by the present owners. Female figures are common in Belfast-born Daniel O’Neill’s oeuvre. His figures often inhabit an air of ambiguity, whether in full portrait or set in serene Irish landscapes. His female subjects are distinct, with their almond eyes cast in shadow, un-naturally slender yet elegant profiles, and dark features more akin to continental Europe than the island of Ireland. Conceptually adrift and open to interpretation, the portraits composed by the artist inhabit many credible subjective readings: maybe the women represent a sister lost in childhood - a life made all too short; the matriarchal anchor of the family, his mother, who creatively encouraged the young artist; relationships past, a marriage to end in divorce; or later in life the birth of his first child, a daughter. For the Catholic minority Belfast boy born into the Irish war of Independence, perhaps his figures were the representation of Ireland herself, mourning those lost in her name and the countless many who emigrated, never to return. Any one of these life story nodes, both personal and political, are credible interpretations of the artist’s work. Nevertheless, any resolve to these narrative uncertainties remains veiled by O’Neill himself and his untimely death in 1974. Remarking on the artist’s personality, Liam Kelly describes him as “something of a mystery man” - a trait of enigma that unfolds all too well on canvas. Although, less so often do his figures quite literally wear this mystery as Girl in the Green Mask does. The darkened green teal mask frames her distinctly O’Neill-style wide eyes, linking to her hairline and backdrop, all awash in darkened turquoise turned teal. The borders between the flattened background, long flowing hair and mask all become mediating zones rather than distinct boundaries. Girl in the Green Mask’s Delphian-like ambiguity seeks no resolve and instead gestures to an alluring melancholy in motion. Does her head tilt in sorrow or in comfort to greet the upward vitalic brush strokes of O’Neill’s flowers; do the flowers come to fall in her arms to embrace or drift upwards fleetingly; the far lines on the corner of her mouth signal a modest smile rising or one which is fading. Girl in the Green Mask is a melancholic pivoting point, but whether to or from is the punctum of unresolve. Aside from a few classes at Belfast College of Art, O’Neill was primarily self-taught and much is owed to the people and places that fostered his creativity into fruition. From his mother to a bygone bohemian Dublin, and not least of all people like Mr Jenkinson - the head of Belfast reference library. Jenkinson bent the rules in lending out O’Neill illustrated books over weekends, resulting in a young Irish artist’s introduction to the European Masters. A creative, fertile ground came to be when Sidney Smith opened up his studio to O’Neill. The result was a space for contemporaries such as Colin Middleton, Markey Robinson and Gerard Dillon to cross paths or creatively weave together as Dillon did in painting several portraits of O’Neill. Professional certainty was ascertained in the 1940s when Victor Waddington signed the artist to his Dublin gallery, allowing him to paint full time; the professional relationship would last until 1970. By his untimely passing in 1974, he had lived and worked in Belfast, Dublin, London, and Paris; exhibited in over twenty overseas group exhibitions; held solo shows in Dublin, Belfast, and Montreal; and had his first retrospective in 1952. In 2022, Karen Reihill curated the artist’s first retrospective in seventy years at Farmleigh Gallery, Dublin, showcasing work borrowed from collections of IMMA, the University of Limerick, and the Ulster Museum. Some work unseen by the public for over 50 years was opened to critics and audiences, old and new, welcoming new interpretations and further canonising the artist to the status of his contemporaries. Simon Bhuiyan, August 2022

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Portrait of Young Woman Oil on board, 45 x 35cm (17¾ x 13¾) Signed The epithet Romantic is often applied to the work of Daniel O’Neill, though that can be misleading. His paintings are indeed romantic, but not in t
            Sep. 28, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Portrait of Young Woman Oil on board, 45 x 35cm (17¾ x 13¾) Signed The epithet Romantic is often applied to the work of Daniel O’Neill, though that can be misleading. His paintings are indeed romantic, but not in t

            Est: €15,000 - €20,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920 - 1974) Portrait of Young Woman Oil on board, 45 x 35cm (17¾ x 13¾) Signed The epithet Romantic is often applied to the work of Daniel O’Neill, though that can be misleading. His paintings are indeed romantic, but not in the strict art historical sense of Romanticism and the Romantic movement. Rather they are romantic in the sense that Puccini’s La Bohème is romantic, evoking the bohemian life of artists in the Latin Quarter in Paris, a world of intense emotion and passionate creativity. O’Neill visited and loved this world in 1948, when he stayed in Montmartre, brilliantly capturing the atmosphere in one of his best known paintings, Place du Tertre (now in the Ulster Museum). But imaginatively, artistically, he always seemed to inhabit it. Born in Belfast, the son of an electrician, he followed his father into the trade, working for the corporation’s transport department and the shipyards. But even in his early teens he was drawn to art, studying books in the library and attending night classes at technical college. At work he opted for night shifts, painting during daylight. He was taken up by the fine painter and muralist Sidney Smith and befriended Gerard Dillon, exhibiting with him in Dublin in 1943. The great dealer Victor Waddington put him on contract two years later, establishing him as an artist. He had a natural instinct for simplified, stylised imagery, innate compositional ability, and an eye for drama (little wonder he was commissioned by the Abbey to design the set for a production of Synge’s Playboy). Dreamy melancholy is one of the defining moods of his work, a term that perfectly suits this outstanding, idealised study of a young woman. She looks not back at the viewer but is lost in her own thoughts. The agitated background unmistakably suggests a tempestuous inner life. Quite early on, Cecil ffrench Salkeld noted O’Neill’s exceptional skill at juggling contrasting paint textures in a single composition, marrying the vigorous impasto of brush and palette knife with soft, silky glazes. That skill is used to great effect here in the caressing dialogue between fabric and flesh, figure and ground. In addition, O’Neill illuminates his subject with the expertise of a Hollywood lighting cameraperson. Aidan Dunne, August 2022

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) A PROMISE MADE IS A DEBT UNPAID
            Sep. 26, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) A PROMISE MADE IS A DEBT UNPAID

            Est: €20,000 - €30,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) A PROMISE MADE IS A DEBT UNPAID oil on board signed lower right; titled on Dawson Gallery label on reverse h:18  w:24 in. Provenance: Dawson Gallery, Dublin; Collection of Dr John F. Boyle; de Veres, 3 October 2006, lot 27; Private collection Born in Belfast in 1920 Dan O'Neill was largely self-taught as a painter and along with fellow Northern Irish artists Gerard Dillon, Colin Middleton and George Campbell exhibited regularly in Belfast and particularly in Dublin with the Victor Waddington Gallery who, in the 1940s/50s, successfully promoted O'Neill's career at home and abroad, for example he was included in group exhibitions in Canada and the USA. Early in his career O'Neill had worked for a short time in the studio of Sidney Smith who, together with Gerard Dillon, introduced him to French art, inter alia Rouault, Cezanne and Picasso. He also visited Paris for the first time c.1948/49. It may be noted that Waddington also represented Jack B. Yeats; and O'Neill as well as Campbell made works as an homage to Yeats. The title of the painting 'A Promise Made is a Debt Unpaid' would appear to be a line of verse taken from Robert Service's somewhat melodramatic poem 'The Cremation of Sam McGee' from the collection 'Songs of a Sourdough' (1907). Service became known as 'The Bard of the Yukon' and the popular poem is about the death of a man prospecting for gold in Alaska and north west Canada. The narrator in the poem struggles with delivering on a promise he made to McGee that he would cremate his body rather than let him, as the prospector worried, be buried under snow and ice. The tone of the poem's development is one of tension, suspense and foreboding as well as perseverance - characteristics that often define O'Neill's work. Other lines in the poem, such as 'There are strange things done in the midnight Sun' and 'The marge (shore) of Lake Lebarge' would seem to also strike correspondences with the O'Neill painting. There are many examples in the artist's work of female figures on a beach, often in small groupings where the sea is often deployed as an atmospheric mood setting background element. This painting by the artist has two groups of female figures and a child standing on what appears to be a lake shore, all wearing plain, simple full-length dresses in light colours. The startled group in the foreground is composed of three figures, two of whom look anxiously towards the viewer; the other figure looks back towards a mid-distance group - a looking forward and a looking back. The orchestration and disposition of the figures set the framework for apprehension. The ominous 'Yeatsian' sky, with its investment in swirling liquid paint, what Calvin Bedient calls 'brush-storms', further conspires in the sense of premonition. By contrast the darker more textured landscape foreground is fired up by outbreaks and stretches of almost dayglo colours in red, orange and yellow. It may be noted that O'Neill often deployed a limited range of rich colours and impasto to invoke a visionary, unsettling atmosphere. As in other works O'Neill in this painting registers a profound presentiment of something out of time and 'off stage' which has unsettled the figures and disturbed the landscape - a promise made, a debt unpaid? Prof. Liam Kelly August 2022

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE WITH COTTAGES AND MOUNTAINS
            Jun. 06, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE WITH COTTAGES AND MOUNTAINS

            Est: €1,500 - €2,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) LANDSCAPE WITH COTTAGES AND MOUNTAINS watercolour signed lower right h:14  w:21.50 in.

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) PRISONER OF THE EARTH AND PENT BENEATH THE MOON
            Jun. 06, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) PRISONER OF THE EARTH AND PENT BENEATH THE MOON

            Est: €4,000 - €6,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) PRISONER OF THE EARTH AND PENT BENEATH THE MOON oil on canvas signed lower right; titled on reverse h:14  w:18 in. Provenance: de Veres, 21 November 2000, lot 393; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974) The Lighthouse Oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm (20 x 24”) Signed Provenance: With Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, label verso. The view is of Fanad Lighthouse on the Fanad Pen
            Jun. 01, 2022

            Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974) The Lighthouse Oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm (20 x 24”) Signed Provenance: With Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, label verso. The view is of Fanad Lighthouse on the Fanad Pen

            Est: €4,000 - €6,000

            Daniel O’Neill (1920-1974) The Lighthouse Oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm (20 x 24”) Signed Provenance: With Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, label verso. The view is of Fanad Lighthouse on the Fanad Pennisula in north Co. Donegal, a location where the artist is known to have worked.

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Oil on board, 43.5 x 58.8cm (17 x 23'') Signed; inscribed verso Provenance: With The Eakin Gallery, Belfast, where acquired by the present owner. Daniel O’Neill, the son of an electrician, was born in
            Jun. 01, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Oil on board, 43.5 x 58.8cm (17 x 23'') Signed; inscribed verso Provenance: With The Eakin Gallery, Belfast, where acquired by the present owner. Daniel O’Neill, the son of an electrician, was born in

            Est: €15,000 - €25,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Sunday Oil on board, 43.5 x 58.8cm (17 x 23'') Signed; inscribed verso Provenance: With The Eakin Gallery, Belfast, where acquired by the present owner. Daniel O’Neill, the son of an electrician, was born in Belfast and was largely self-taught despite having the opportunity, albeit a brief one, to attend Belfast College of Art. His early career as an artist was dominated by the onset of the Second World War and it was only in the later 1940s that O’Neill had the opportunity to travel to the Continent where he came across the work of the Fauvists and Expressionists who made a lasting impression on him. Daniel O’Neill’s paintings often contain a degree of enigma. It is for his figures in landscapes that perhaps he is best known, and it is the relationship between these two elements that evokes the unanswerable curiosity of the viewer. Sunday, a vividly colourful landscape that has as the centre of it’s composition two figures making their way across the picture plane, towards some trees and a graveyard beyond. O’Neill returned many times to female subjects within west of Ireland landscapes, using a stylised and idiosyncratic format, and often placing them within deserted open spaces, or as in this instance two brightly dressed women perhaps heading to mass or indeed to visit the graves of their forebears. While it is not typical of the artist to use such an array of bright colours, the palette chosen is made up of a striking variety of tones. O’Neill uses thick impastoed brushstrokes to capture the luscious vegetation, rendered in vivid yellows, greens, russets and purple tones. The application of quick upright strokes creates a sense of movement in the image, we can imagine the trees and gorse bushes swaying in the wind. Brian Fallon remarked of Daniel O’Neill, ‘he is an excellent Landscapist. But in the Yeatsian way - there is more imagination than topography’ and concluded that O’Neill’s best works ‘are charged with that mysterious and unquantifiable quality which gives Art its purpose.’ John Hewitt, writing on the subject of O’Neill’s impasto techniques, noted ‘the work has both a sensory as well as a sensual quality’. Commenting further he remarked, ‘through his poetry, he handles the great commonplace of being; birth, death, love, belief, wonder’. An exhibition, Daniel O’Neill: Romanticism and Friendships is currently running at Farmleigh Gallery, Phoenix Park, Dublin and finishes on June 6th.

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Homage to Gaston Debureau, 1945
            May. 10, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Homage to Gaston Debureau, 1945

            Est: $8,000 - $12,000

            Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Homage to Gaston Debureau, 1945 oil on board signed D. O'Neill and dated (upper left); inscribed with title (verso) 14 x 9 3/4 inches. We are grateful to Karen Reihill for her kind assistance with the cataloguing of the present lot. Exhibited: Dublin, National Gallery of Art, Irish Exhibition of Living Art, August 21 - September 2, 1945, cat no. 95

            Hindman
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape, Kerry
            Apr. 26, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape, Kerry

            Est: €15,000 - €25,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Landscape, Kerry oil on canvas signed lower right h:51.20  w:76.30 cm. Provenance: The Waddington Galleries Inc., Montreal (label verso); Private Collection A shaft of sunlight illuminates a beach in Kerry during a thunderstorm. In the background, dark clouds hover, with rain sheeting down onto a blue mountain range in the distance. The expanse of sea between beach and mountains is grey-green, with alternate bands of light and dark. A thin line, trimmed with white, indicates a wave lapping on the seashore. As with many works by Daniel O'Neill, detail has been pared down to a minimum and the painting hovers between representation and abstraction. The light yellow band of paint provides a focal point, while alternating bands of light and dark enhance the work's Romantic qualities. The skilful use of colour conveys an emotional feeling, while also representing a weather pattern typical in the West of Ireland. The location is probably near Ballyferriter, on the Dingle peninsula. The son of an electrician, Daniel O'Neill was born Belfast, in 1920. Leaving school early, although he too trained as an electrician, an early interest in art led him to take life drawing classes at the Belfast College of Art, where he became friends with fellow-artist Gerard Dillon. He also worked for a time with Sidney Smith. After being laid off in 1939, O'Neill found work as a housepainter in London. The following year he first exhibited at the Mol Gallery in Belfast, and in 1941 documented devastation in Belfast caused by a German air raid. Two years later, after his marriage to Eileen Lyle, O'Neill and Dillon had a two-person exhibition in Dublin, and he was taken on by the Victor Waddington Galleries, which provided him with a regular income. O'Neill and his family followed Dillon and George Campbell, settling in the village of Conlig, Co. Down. However, a restless spirit prevented him from staying long in any one place, and he spent much of his time in Dublin. In 1948, visiting Paris, O'Neill saw at first-hand the work of Vlaminck and Utrillo, painters he had admired via reproductions in art books. After the breakup of his marriage to Eileen, O'Neill was with Sheilagh Deacon for around a decade, and after that, lived in London with Maureen Boyce, who, although they never married, changed her name by deed poll to O'Neill. These women, and other family and friends, appear often in his paintings. In the 1960's he made several trips to Kerry, and in 1968 designed sets for Sean O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock at the Abbey Theatre. Two years later, his one-person exhibition at the McClelland Gallery in Belfast was a success, but the forced closure of the gallery the following year because of the 'Troubles' affected him badly. In 1974 O'Neill died, aged just fifty-four. His life and work are documented in a recent monograph by Karen Reihill, Daniel O'Neill, Romanticism & Friendships, published by the Frederick Gallery, Dublin. Peter Murray, March 2022

            Morgan O'Driscoll
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a flower Oil on board, 50 x 40cm (19.6 x 15.7) Signed Provenance: Purchased from the Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, by the mother of the current owner, c.1950s Female portraiture is a common theme
            Mar. 30, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a flower Oil on board, 50 x 40cm (19.6 x 15.7) Signed Provenance: Purchased from the Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, by the mother of the current owner, c.1950s Female portraiture is a common theme

            Est: €20,000 - €30,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Girl with a flower Oil on board, 50 x 40cm (19.6 x 15.7) Signed Provenance: Purchased from the Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, by the mother of the current owner, c.1950s Female portraiture is a common theme in Daniel O'Neill's work, often depicting these figures with similar attributes, large brown eyes, sallow skin, and dark hair, features which are thought to have derived from his first wife Eileen. In the present work, the figure dominates the picture frame, with all of the emphasis placed on her strikingly beautiful face and long jet-black hair. There is the sense that the landscape behind her is a backdrop rather than a scene in which she is set. She poses for the artist with her hands drawn together, holding a pink rose against her chest. O'Neill does not offer us much in the way of narrative content - who the figure is or where she is located. This work marries with other portrait scenes by O'Neill, often described as 'Spanish Women,' with characteristically continental features. His travels in Europe certainly sparked interest in Spanish culture and he depicted a quintessential figure of Spain The Matador in a work from 1949. However, in these portraits of female figures there is a sense that the women personify the general rather than the specific, as Arthur Armstrong remarked of O'Neill that he 'loved the society of beautiful women.' (Arthur Armstrong, 'Martello, RHA Special Issue' 1991, as quoted in Daniel O'Neill Romanticism & Friends, Karen Reihill, p. 74). Girl with a Flower is presented against a darkening evening sky, her blue dress mirroring the tones behind her. His deft use of colour, varying from dark green to lighter blue tones, especially around the head of the figure, allows him to subtly separate her from the background, as if she is emerging from it. His handling of the paint, the quick impastoed brushstrokes of her dress are in direct contrast to the smooth and almost flawless character of her skin. By positioning her in profile he accentuates her sharp jawlines and elongated neck, a style reminiscent of portraiture from the Romantic period. Niamh Corcoran, February 2022

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) GIRL WITH A TAMBOURINE
            Mar. 07, 2022

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) GIRL WITH A TAMBOURINE

            Est: €30,000 - €50,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) GIRL WITH A TAMBOURINE oil on board titled on reverse h:24  w:20 in. Provenance: Thought to have been purchased in the 1950's from the Victor Waddington Galleries by the late Nesbit Waddington of Beaulieu House, Drogheda, the previous owner's father; Adam's, 5 December 2006, lot 121; Private collection Traditionally western portraiture has been concerned with the representation of likeness whether idealised or naturalistic; social or political status and personality/identity. With notable exceptions the probing of the sitter's personality or psychological disposition is a relatively recent approach ushered in by the Romantic movement in the 19th century and later explored by Expressionist artists in the 20th century with the focus on the inner life of the individual especially by means of the self-portrait. Over the centuries portraiture has been deployed to commemorate, document and celebrate, taking many material forms - painting, drawing, sculpture, medals, stamps as well as photography and more recently video. We know Dan O'Neill was largely self taught, learning about art via books and journals and interaction with fellow artists, Gerard Dillon, George Campbell and Colin Middleton. He spent time in London and visited France. From his first important exhibition in 1946 with Victor Waddington in Dublin to his last major exhibition at the McClelland Galleries Belfast in 1970, he exhibited still lives, religious pictures, landscapes and many figure studies. Portraits of women constitute a sub-theme in the oeuvre of Dan O'Neill whether mother, wife, lover, muse with the penumbra of 'Madonna' often filtering through his imagery. With Girl with a Tambourine we have an almost full length portrait in which the subject's face demurely looks out with 'Picasso' eyes, cast a little downwards. Her face is partly in light and partly in shade. Light always plays an important role in O'Neill's painting. Most of her form is lit with a warm creamy light while at the top of the painting a glimpse of a more spiritual, perhaps ominous, light is revealed among nocturnal clouds. In this category of his work the background whether a view from an open window or a landscape plays an extended role. The circular form of the tambourine sets the circular compositional format. With Girl with a Tambourine the background setting, composed of a series of swirling green and blue abstract elements, is in flux and in contrast to the more contemplative figure. O'Neill often relied on rich colours and impasto with dark yellows, blues and greens to support a visionary quality in his work drawing from the example of the French artist Maurice Vlaminck. In the painting the girl wears a mantilla - traditional in Spain - covering her head, a sign of humility in the Catholic Church and often worn at Mass. It is an accessory that O'Neill often deploys, as in Echoes Past (Collection of IMMA) where the woman in more medieval costume strums a mandoline. I am not sure whether O'Neill visited Spain. However his friend, the artist George Campbell, was an aficionado of Spanish culture and music and they both made paintings of matadors. John Hewitt would cite El Greco as an influence on O'Neill's work. Girl with a Tambourine is a fine example of O'Neill's purposeful exuberant use of paint and the romantic leanings of the artist. Professor Liam Kelly February 2022

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Looking Westward Oil on board, 41.5 x 61.5cm (16 x 24'') Signed Provenance: With The Waddington Galleries, mounted, label verso; sale, de Vere's. O’Neill returned many times to female subjects within west of Irelan
            Dec. 08, 2021

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Looking Westward Oil on board, 41.5 x 61.5cm (16 x 24'') Signed Provenance: With The Waddington Galleries, mounted, label verso; sale, de Vere's. O’Neill returned many times to female subjects within west of Irelan

            Est: €25,000 - €35,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) Looking Westward Oil on board, 41.5 x 61.5cm (16 x 24'') Signed Provenance: With The Waddington Galleries, mounted, label verso; sale, de Vere's. O’Neill returned many times to female subjects within west of Ireland landscapes, using a stylised and idiosyncratic format, and often placing them within deserted open spaces, sometimes standing on the roadside, or as in this instance overlooking the shoreline. While it is not typical of the artist to use such an array of bright colours, the palette chosen is made up of a striking variety of tones. O’Neill uses the colour as line in the work, separating off the different sections of the composition. From the green and purple tones of the flowers, the sandy beach leading to the clear blue of the sea dotted with patches of white to represent the light reflecting off the surface. The background is dominated by varying tones of blue, moving seamlessly from sea, to mountains to sky. O’Neill uses thick impastoed brushstrokes to capture the luscious vegetation, rendered in green and purple tones. The application of quick upright strokes creates a sense of movement in the image, we can imagine the heather and gorse bushes swaying in the wind. It is a harmonious and peaceful landscape that is somewhat unsettled by the presence of the figures. We are not given much insight into who they are or who they are waiting for. The young woman positioned in the foreground looks not directly at the viewer but off to the horizon on the left. She is mirrored by a second figure who stands in profile, possibly an older woman, with a white scarf around her head and shoulders also looking out across the bay. This imagery is reminiscent of other artworks by Irish painters focused on women waiting, possibly for the return of husbands and sons, or representing the desire to leave, looking westward across Atlantic. Niamh Corcoran, November 2021

            Adam's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) INVENTED LANDSCAPE
            Nov. 29, 2021

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) INVENTED LANDSCAPE

            Est: €4,000 - €6,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) INVENTED LANDSCAPE oil on canvas signed lower left; titled on reverse; also with partial Associated American Artists [New York] label on reverse h:16  w:18 in.

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) BATHERS
            Nov. 29, 2021

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) BATHERS

            Est: €40,000 - €60,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) BATHERS oil on board signed lower right h:18  w:24 in. Provenance: Adam's, 1 October 2008, lot 98; Private collection Dan O'Neill, born in 1920, was one of a group of Northern Irish artists, including Gerrard Dillon, George Campbell and Colin Middleton, who were largely self-taught and who exhibited in Dublin at The Victor Waddington Gallery (1945 -70) and with the Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast. His last major exhibition in his native city was with The McClellland Gallery in 1970; George McClelland was also a major collector of his paintings. He was clearly attracted to the sea which often plays an atmospheric mood-setting role in many of his paintings. It may be noted that he lived in County Down for a period and painted Tyrella beach including The Black Rocks Of Tyrella, (late 1950s ) as well as works where the sea plays a dramatic role as in some of his County Donegal paintings. In many respects O'Neill is a consummate figurative artist. Portraits of women always remained an important subject for the artist throughout his career, although there are some self portraits as with the muse in Artist's Model (1948/49) or occasionally as a youthful narcissus. Often his female studies are taken out of time, sometimes by the use of historical costumes. Figures on a beach (single or in small groupings) allowed O'Neill to indulge in a more sensuous portrayal of the female figure. A relevant example would include Reclining Figure On The Beach, Tyrella, where the disposition of the young girl's fore-fronted reclining body is alluring. The Painting Bathers, for sale in this auction, shows a harmonious grouping of four female figures seated on an otherwise empty beach. The blue horizon line contributes to the stability of the composition while the tonal break in the sky is mood setting and a little foreboding. The harmony at work in the painting is induced by way of the semi-circular compositional arrangement and the easy languid dispositions of the figures in varying degrees of contraposto. Again they are lifted out of time: their clothing, rendered in places with the artist's trade mark impasto, is not contemporary and the general ambiance more Mediterranean than that of a colder northern temperate climate. We tend to associate the theme of 'bathers' ('Les Grandes Baigneuses') with early modernists working in France at the beginning of the 20th century and as such the painting recalls to some extent the joie de vivre of painters such as Renoir, Gauguin, Matisse and Picasso although in O'Neill's painting such association with Cote D'Azur hedonism is muted and restrained. Of course O'Neiil did spend several months in France circa 1948/9 and would have seen a range of such paintings. The ground sheet upon which the bathers are seated is shell-like as if transporting them, like Botticelli's Venus, from the sea onto the beach. The colour tints or hues of the pink, yellows and blues of the clothes are exquisite and together with the profiles of women appear more Italianate than French. The controlled orchestration of the variety of colours and forms contributes to the painting's classical elegance and repose and as such look more Venetian stylistically - a beautifully contrived moment out of time. Professor Liam Kelly

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE SALMON LEAP, BUNBEG, COUNTY DONEGAL
            Nov. 29, 2021

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE SALMON LEAP, BUNBEG, COUNTY DONEGAL

            Est: €4,000 - €6,000

            Daniel O'Neill (1920-1974) THE SALMON LEAP, BUNBEG, COUNTY DONEGAL oil on canvas signed lower left; titled on reverse h:20  w:24.25 in. Provenance: de Veres, 22 June 1999, lot 182; Private collection; Adam's, 30 September 2015, lot 34; Private collection

            Whyte's
          • Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Figure in Snow 51.4 x 76.7 cm. (20 1/4 x 30 1/4 in.)
            Nov. 24, 2021

            Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Figure in Snow 51.4 x 76.7 cm. (20 1/4 x 30 1/4 in.)

            Est: £12,000 - £18,000

            Daniel O'Neill (Irish, 1920-1974) Figure in Snow signed 'D O'NEILL' (lower left) oil on board 51.4 x 76.7 cm. (20 1/4 x 30 1/4 in.) For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          Lots Per Page: