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Hernando Ruiz Ocampo Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1911 - d. 1978

Poverty and suffering are often depicted by distorted shapes in Hernando Ruiz Ocampo's abstract paintings. These pieces of Hernando Ruiz Campo's artwork were created after WWII had left the artist's homeland in devastation. Ocampo's early paintings were often panned by viewers who didn't understand his need for escapism, but they introduced the Philippines to the Neo-Realist art movement.

Hernando Ruiz Ocampo paintings for sale offer bright yellows, purples, and greens that were present in traditional Filipino art during Ocampo's career. In the 50s, Hernando Ruiz Ocampo's abstract paintings took on a more positive outlook when he began painting domestic still life images, such as pottery, fruit, and fish. One of his largest projects was the painting of the Imelda Marcos Monument in the Philippines Cultural Center. Escape reality by viewing artists' mind-bending abstract paintings for sale through Invaluable.

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          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Dreams
            Dec. 02, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Dreams

            Est: ₱8,000,000 - ₱10,400,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE DON VICENTE “TIKING” H. LOPEZ, JR. COLLECTION Dreams signed and dated 1961 (lower left) and titled (verso) oil on canvas 28” x 22” (71 cm x 56 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist WRITE UPOriginal, daring, and above all, steadfast in his commitment to his art, Hernando Ruiz Ocampo at 50 was the most important artist of his generation; and his paintings destined to be as immediate and relevant as when they were first painted decades before. But it was not necessarily pre-ordained by his background. Ramon Villegas would write in his staccato style, “He was born in 1911, in the populous district of Sta. Cruz, Manila. Due to financial problems, the family moved from Gagalangin, Tondo — a petit bourgeois district — to Maypajo, around 1917. Maypajo was already on the city outskirts, located just after the boundary of Manila, in the adjoining municipality of Caloocan, where the Katipunan had deep roots in the lower classes. “Ocampo’s Maypajo, near the crossroads of Monumento and Sangandaan, was famed for one of Manila’s cabarets. There, as his biographer Angel de Jesus says, Ocampo “learned the rough spots of life”. “Ocampo, as a boy, started out shining shoes for the cabaret customers. By the age of 17, he had become the cashier there. The artist would talk of his experiences there, his dalliances with the dancers. H.R. later painted one of those wasted women beside a wilted flower, still at work in the early morning hours. “The family could only afford a high school education for the young Hernando at the Young Man’s Catholic Association (YMCA), Manila. Yet his father Emilio, a local leader of the Nacionalista Party, wanted his son to study law in preparation for a political career. In 1928. following his father’s wishes, Hernando enrolled in the pre-law course in San Juan de Letran, on an athletic scholarship. After a year he left Letran for the Far Eastern University, again staying only a year.” And then his life would take a different turn: After dropping out of law school, H.R. Ocampo would find his way into the company of an avant-garde group of writers — the Veronicans — and from there it was a short skip and jump to the fast and furious world of poets, journalists and most, importantly, artists. In 1951, at age 40, H.R. would found the most influential artists group that the Philippines would ever see, the Neo-Realists. He would also find himself at ground zero of the Philippine Art Gallery, the first-ever to champion the cause of abstract art. In just ten short years, he and his his band of brothers would dominate the Filipino art scene. H.R. himself would receive award after award. But in 1961, H.R. himself was what his biographer de Jesus would call his “Transitional Stage”. While he had gone from one triumph after another, in his deliberate fashion, he was pondering his next move. At this crossroads, his works would move from the flat perspectives of his post-war works towards his “Mutants Period” of the mid-Sixties which were a commentary on the nuclear war and aliens that the world obssesed about. At the tail end of the 1950s, Ocampo joined Philprom (Philippine Promotions Bureau) then the Philippines’ largest advertising agency, where he became a top administrative officer. And with it, Villegas says, pop culture would become more and more visible in his art. The sharp contrasts between light and shadow for example, Villegas would note, was the influence of the photography of Richard Avedon (1923-2004), the mixedmedia works of Andy Warhol (1928-2007), as well as the pop and 60s psychedelic art. Speaking in an interview in 1961, Ocampo “resolved to devote more time to painting again.” Turning 50 that year, the Art Association of the Philippines honored him with a retrospective. It is precisely in this year that we find the work he called “Dreams”, its title penciled in in his own hand at the back of the painting. A purposeful intellectual, H.R. Ocampo had an interest in Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud and art critics had commented on the subconscious aspects of his work and their hidden messages. His use of color and shape, in particular tapped into this world. With ‘Dreams’, Ocampo distills the essence of human hopes and ambitions, portraying them as dynamic energy bursting to be set free from all limits.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract
            Dec. 02, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract

            Est: ₱240,000 - ₱312,000

            Abstract signed and dated 1971 (lower left) oil on board 11” x 8 1/2” (28 cm x 22 cm) PROVENANCE: Private collection, Sweden WRITE UPA renowned member of the Thirteen Moderns, Hernando R. Ocampo (also known as H.R. Ocampo) was an influential abstractionist force. H.R. made headlines when he won first prize at the 1951 Art Association of the Philippines (AAP) competition. Ocampo painted with his distinct and famous color scheme, which critic Ricaredo Demetillo described as “rich” with “pure greens, warm reds and oranges, lovely purples and juicy yellows.” This striking color scheme is notable with this untitled 1971 piece. Using deep browns, oranges, green, and teal, Ocampo mesmerizes with his mastery of hues and color shades. (Hannah Valiente)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱40,000 - ₱52,000

            a.) Untitled signed and dated 1975 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm) b.) Untitled signed and dated 1964 (lower right) graphite on paper 11” x 14” (28 cm x 36 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Oct. 21, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Groin handsigned and dated 1970 with dedication to Rod Paras-Perez (lower right) artist proof silkscreen 19” x 14” (48 cm x 36 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Dilemma
            Sep. 09, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Dilemma

            Est: ₱8,000,000 - ₱10,400,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Dilemma signed and dated 1958 (lower right) oil on canvas 24" x 32" (61 cm x 81 cm) The work at hand, Dilemma, falls squarely into the characteristic motifs of the period, the mask and the shield. It is a sinuous allegory of temptation — the twinheaded snakes with a scorpion tale that have already captured three manlike shapes; other men struggle to flee and take refuge in a mountain of reflective, mirrored vanity or arrogant flight. The ‘highly organic composition in fluid, organic forms and scintillating colors’ was achieved, notes art critic Rod Paras-Perez of HR’s inimitable style, “through the use of broken color strokes, juxtaposed very much like the Impressionists.” Always, as in this work with fascinating combinations of shade and hue, H.R. Ocampo would triumph “in no longer attaining a semblance of reality nor the capture of atmospheric effects… but to intensify colors and make them vibrate with feelings.” In this regard, Dilemma captures the brave spirit of a new Filipino generation. Most senior in their respective organizations, we won their deep professional respect simply by having Larry beat the daylights out of them at the poker table. “When martial law came, I became Secretary of the newly created Department of Public Information in addition to being Press Secretary, and Larry became in addition to his old job the Director of the Bureau of National and Foreign Information (BNFI). It was here where he first unleashed his creativity as an information manager.” Lorenzo “Larry” J. Cruz, was none other than the son of E. Aguilar Cruz, journalist, artist and the man who conjured up the name “Neo-Realists” for the abstractionist elite led by his closest friend Hernando R. Ocampo and whose home was the legendary Philippine Art Gallery. Fely would recall that their home and Larry’s would be used interchangeably for artists’ gatherings as well as painting sessions, making alive the promise of the Filipino ‘Young Turks’ in arts and letters. The artists would include not only H.R. Ocampo and Cesar Legaspi but also Jose Joya and Malang Santos, whose wife had put up a gallery of her own. The work at hand, Dilemma, falls squarely into the characteristic motifs of the period, the mask and the shield. It is a sinuous allegory of temptation — the twinheaded snakes with a scorpion tale that have already captured three manlike shapes; other men struggle to flee and take refuge in a mountain of reflective, mirrored vanity or arrogant flight. The ‘highly organic composition in fluid, organic forms and scintillating colors’ was achieved, notes art critic Rod Paras-Perez of HR’s inimitable style, “through the use of broken color strokes, juxtaposed very much like the Impressionists.” Always, as in this work with fascinating combinations of shade and hue, H.R. Ocampo would triumph “in no longer attaining a semblance of reality nor the capture of atmospheric effects… but to intensify colors and make them vibrate with feelings.” In this regard, Dilemma captures the brave spirit of a new Filipino generation.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

            Untitled signed and dated 1997 (lower right) ink on paper 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱50,000 - ₱65,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE JENY LOPEZ COLLECTION Untitled signed and dated 1977 (lower right) ink on paper 11 1/2” x 8 1/2” (29 cm x 22 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jul. 29, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Untitled signed and dated 1949 (lower right) watercolor on paper 18” x 24” (46 cm x 61 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jun. 17, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE DON BENITO LEGARDA JR. COLLECTION Untitled I, II, III signed and dated 1967 (lower right) each oil on paper 10" x 7 1/2" (25 cm x 19 cm) each The acclaimed abstractionist Hernando R. Ocampo was regarded as an artist who used an intellectual approach in his masterpieces. He was able to create novel imagery and symbolism through abstraction after he abandoned his pre-war and post-war figurations. His art is described to be “abstract compositions of biological forms that seemed to oscillate, quiver, inflame and multiply,” like mutations. A remarkable illustration of his revered mode of abstraction is these three pieces dated 1967. Organic symbols find their way into these works of Ocampo, adding to the complexity of the surface meanings of the canvases. However, the said details are more than just ornamental marvels and are considered a personal and substantial reaction to the stimuli and environment that the artist engaged. Still, despite his habit of drawing inspiration from his surroundings, his art is anything but derivative. In Ocampo’s works, colors take the center stage. The ‘60s was the decade when his art shifted from neorealism to abstract non-configurative. His works were characterized by biomorphic shapes colored in hues of green, red, orange, yellow, blue, and brown. His interlocking forms and distinct color palette have given rise to a unique visual language that is notably and completely Ocampo’s. (P.I.R.)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jun. 17, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱500,000 - ₱650,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE ZITA FELICIANO COLLECTION Second Week of November signed and dated 1975 (lower right and verso) acrylic on board 20" x 15" (51 cm x 38 cm) An icon in abstract expressionism, Hernando R. Ocampo’s artistic approach was purely subjective, inspirational, and emotional at times. He also often underwent a process of cerebral contemplation in the act of creation. An idea, often occurring out of the blue, was drawn more in detail as it developed and those that have grown out of the idea were erased. Then, on blank sheets of paper, the artist played the motifs against each other, tracing the best arrangement on a new paper sheet later. Afterwards, he would transfer the arrangement onto canvas and map every area of color on it. Although his paintings are chromatic rather than tonal, as soon as he painted an area, the original colors and additional colors come in a tonal connection with each other. Ocampo, who created oeuvres that were original and truly Filipino, was indeed special, for he was a self-taught local artist who had never studied abroad and whose exposure to art was only through reading materials. In the words of H.R. Ocampo: The Artist as Filipino author, Angel de Jesus, “The life of H. R. Ocampo has been as colorful as his paintings. It has been a full life, richly lived… The only original talent that the Philippines has produced, he epitomizes in every sense the artist as Filipino.” (P.I.R.)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Feb. 18, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱4,000,000 - ₱5,200,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Evensong signed and dated 1972 (lower right); signed again and titled (verso) oil on canvas 24" x 32" (61 cm x 81 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist In 1972, Hernando R. Ocampo — perhaps the most intellectual of Filipino painters —was at the height of his powers. Two decades earlier he had put together the most important and influential group of abstractionists of the mid-century, who would be dubbed the ‘Neo-Realists.’ Of all of them, however, H.R. would steadfastly refuse to pursue foreign training; but that is not to say that his art was fated to be confined only on Philippine shores. In 1967, he would exhibit eight paintings at the IX Bienal de Sao Paolo in Brazil. Two years later, he would represent the Philippines with three works at the Festival International de la Peinture in France, and in 1970, bring more artworks to hugely popular Expo ’70 in Osaka, Japan. In the same period, he would be commissioned to paint the now world-famous Genesis that would be transformed into the striking tapestry of the Main Theater of the Cultural Center of the Philippines which opened its doors in 1970. Just two years ago H.R. Ocampo has been recognized as a pioneer of surrealism, and is among the featured artists at the landmark exhibition “Surrealism: Beyond Borders” at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The show has since traveled to the Tate Modern in 2022, making Ocampo rather belatedly one of the most exhibited Filipino artists in international museums and therefore the best known. Evensong, named after the church service held at sunset and consisting of canticles and psalms, is a suitably literate title for Ocampo the newspaperman and writer. It is also as he would best describe this season of his work as a musical symphony. The greens of varying shades seem to soar and fly off the canvas, reaching for the skies and a sublime, serene peace and joy

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Feb. 18, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱5,000,000 - ₱6,500,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Festival signed and dated 1978 (lower right); inscribed "Pls. ring me tonight / Reggie" (verso) oil on canvas 30" x 40" (76 cm x 102 cm) PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Manila LITERATURE: De Jesus, Angel G. H.R. Ocampo: The Artist as Filipino. Quezon City: Heritage Publishing, 1979. Illustrated on page 174 with painting description on page 175. According to Hernando R. Ocampo’s biographer, Angel G. de Jesus, in his book on the artist titled H.R. Ocampo: The Artist as Filipino, the eminent modernist “roughly outlines the period of his art into the following: “Aping Amorsolo Period” (1929 – 1934; characterized by the emulation of Amorsolo’s works); “Proletarian Period” (1934 – 1945; characterized by paintings of “poverty-stricken humanity, driftwood of the ebbing tide of war); “Transitional Period” (1945 – 1963; marked Ocampo’s maturation as he transitioned into non-objective painting, the simplification of forms and figures); “Mutants Period” (1963 – 1968; paintings of “symbols of mutants, fantasies on the havoc wrought by nuclear warfare” inspired by the American 1957 sci-fi film The Beginning of the End); and finally the “Visual Melody Period” (1968 – 1978; characterized by “pure painting, something akin to chamber music). This particular piece, titled Festival, belongs to Ocampo’s “Visual Melody Period.” The book Kayamanan: Biographies of Philippine Visual Artists further describes this period where Ocampo “brought back tonalities and organic shapes into his abstract designs, creating a richer form of abstraction.” Seemingly antithetical to the work’s evocative title is Ocampo’s application of a muted monochromatic palette. Albeit known for his vivid and dynamic palette, this work is one of those pieces by Ocampo in which he veers away from his trademark identity as a foremost Filipino colorist. But Ocampo’s use of a monochromatic palette proves that he is a master of the exuberant. Ocampo evokes the gaiety of a festival through his undulating lines and sinuous curves, engendering an animated spectacle of merrymaking. Here, Ocampo’s monochromatic forms engage in a sublime visual dance, a confluence of expressions wrought in natural, uninhibited strokes. One can imagine a harmonious convergence of festival dancers frolicking on the streets, and everyone is in high spirits. It is as if the dancers flow harmoniously—lively, agile, and virtually acrobatic—extolling the praises of their native land. Festival is among Ocampo’s last works, having been painted in 1978, the year of his passing. Two years before his death, Ocampo was bequeathed the highest cultural award, the “Diwa ng Lahi,” by the City of Manila during the 1976 Araw ng Maynila festivities. Ocampo was posthumously conferred the title of National Artist for Visual Arts in 1991. (A.M.)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 – 1978)
            Jan. 21, 2023

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 – 1978)

            Est: ₱70,000 - ₱91,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 – 1978) Abstract signed and dated 1961 (lower right) pentel pen on paper 10” x 8” (25 cm x 20 cm) Accompanied by a certificate issued by National Museum Philippines confirming the authenticity of this lot

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled I and II
            Dec. 03, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled I and II

            Est: ₱600,000 - ₱780,000

            Untitled I and II signed and dated 1968 (lower right) each oil on wood 11" x 8 1/2" (28 cm x 21 cm) each PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist H.R. Ocampo created a visual language that cannot be mistaken for anyone else’s. He showed dynamic elements that might become part of any number of visually logical arrays vigorously sought by a desiring eye, such as how these pieces were presented in a mix of variation of orange and blue where the colors are given harmonic sequences of carefully arranged tones and intensities hence the viewer is left in awe to such masterpiece, a genius abstract discretion. Jonathan L. Beller, in his Nationalism in Scenes and Spaces of H.R. Ocampo, even described Ocampo’s paintings as, “paintings seeking the liberation of vision through the deification of the visible object… If objectivity and objectification are precisely the removal of agency from living beings, the formal decodification of the very process of objectification returns power to the viewer, allowing the eye to dance in a relatively free quest for new orders and meanings as it has a chance to create itself outside of any narrative schema.”

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Color Study
            Dec. 03, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Color Study

            Est: ₱180,000 - ₱234,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE SENATOR LETICIA RAMOS SHAHANI COLLECTION Color Study signed and dated 1956 (lower right) oil on paper 11 1/2" x 9" (29 cm x 23 cm) H.R. Ocampo's emotionally charged abstraction pieces are profound results of his everyday observations of what surrounded him, from Philippine flora and fauna, as well as animals to rain and sunshine. Though despite his habit of drawing inspiration from his surroundings, Ocampo's works are anything but derivative. His assemblage of interlocking shapes and unique color palette has birthed a unique visual language that is characteristically and distinctly his. His art is far from merely decorative masterpieces and are considered personal and substantial reactions to the stimuli and environment that the artist busied himself with.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Oct. 22, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱80,000 - ₱104,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE ZAFFY LEDESMA COLLECTION Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) a) Abstract signed and dated 1977 (lower left) ink on paper 30” x 22 1/4” (76 cm x 56 cm) b) Abstract signed and dated 1976 (lower right) 30” x 22 1/4” (76 cm x 56 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911–1978)
            Oct. 22, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911–1978)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            PROPERTY FROM THE ZAFFY LEDESMA COLLECTION Hernando R. Ocampo (1911–1978) a) Abstract signed and dated 1951 (lower right) graphite on brown paper 10” x 8” (25 cm x 20 cm) b) Untitled signed and dated 1961 (lower right) graphite on brown paper 9 1/2” x 7 1/2” (24 cm x 19 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Oct. 22, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled signed and dated 1978 (lower left) black marker on paper 10 1/2” x 8” (26 cm x 20 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Oct. 22, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled signed and dated 1976 (lower left) mixed media on canvas 7” x 5 1/2” (18 cm x 14 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • LOT WITHDRAWN
            Oct. 21, 2022

            LOT WITHDRAWN

            Est: ₱15,000 - ₱19,500

            LOT WITHDRAWN

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract
            Sep. 10, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract

            Est: ₱4,600,000 - ₱5,980,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstract signed and dated 1974 (lower right) oil on masonite board 40" x 30" (102 cm x 76 cm) H.R. Ocampo was among the trailblazing artists of his generation that saw the potential of art as not only a reflection of the human experience against the backdrop of Modernism, but as a genuine tool for emancipation and change. Ocampo’s practice was something beyond just mere artistic experimentation, but was tempered by the complex and turbulent nature of his active years. From his early works that brought about social awareness during the aftermath of World War II and challenged the novel sort of colonization brought about by power- shifts that defined the middle of the twentieth century, to his transitional period that saw Ocampo venture into different forms of art and media such as short-form literature and film, the artist’s life and experiences are storied to say the least. But it was his abstract works that undoubtedly left an indelible mark on the world of Philippine art. Ocampo’s works were unapologetically Filipino in both their scope and approach. These pieces were inspired by the tropical lushness of the country. From the Philippines’ temperate and ideal climate, to the diverse flora and fauna that call the archipelago home, Ocampo made sure that the beauty and wonder of the homeland always shone through. Even compared to his foreign and international counterparts, Ocampo’s works were distinct in their practice and form; further solidifying his distinctly Filipino identity. This particular 1974 piece is emblematic of his abstract works at its peak. Created after his induction into the Order of the National Artists as a National Artist for the Visual Arts, the work not does not only evokes distinctly local imagery and scenes, but also showcases a sense of unity that aptly shows how all of these elements come together to create something uniquely ours. From its shades of blue and green that seemingly conjure up images of tides, coastal waters, and the deep blue of the ocean that are commonplace in the country, to the lush and almost passionate hues of orange and red that reflect the iconic Filipino sunrises and sunsets, the work is undoubtedly in a class of its own as it attempts to display Ocampo at his finest.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Abstract ca. 1960
            Sep. 10, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Abstract ca. 1960

            Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) a) Abstract ca. 1960 oil on board 10 1/2" x 8 1/4" (27 cm x 20 cm) b) Abstract ca. 1960 oil on board 10 3/4" x 8" (27 cm x 20 cm) PROPERTY FROM THE JOSE ZAIDE COLLECTION Acclaimed for his method of abstraction, Hernando R. Ocampo was regarded as an artist who used an intellectual approach in his masterpieces. He was able to create novel imagery and symbolism through the alchemy of paint after he abandoned his pre-war and post-war figurations. His art is described to be "abstract compositions of biological forms that seemed to oscillate, quiver, inflame and multiply," like mutations. A remarkable illustration of his revered mode of abstraction are these two pieces done in oil on board. Organic symbols find their way into these works of Ocampo, adding to the complexity of the surface meanings of the canvases. However, the said details are more than just ornamental marvels and are considered a personal and substantial reaction to the stimuli and environment that the artist engaged. Still, despite his habit of drawing inspiration from his surroundings, his art is anything but derivative. In Ocampo’s works, colors take the center stage. The chromatic scale gradually moves from one tone to the other — hues of yellow, the color which he personally calls his “life force,” and orange are carefully balanced with the darker shades. His interlocking forms and distinct color palette have given rise to a unique visual language that is notably and completely Ocampo’s. (P.I.R.)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Fifty-Five "A"
            Sep. 10, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Fifty-Five "A"

            Est: ₱10,000,000 - ₱13,000,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Fifty-Five "A" signed and dated Manila 1955 (lower left) oil on canvas 37 1/2" x 25 3/4" (95 cm x 65 cm) PROPERTY FROM THE JOSE ZAIDE COLLECTION A Gift to the Man Who Understood H. R. Ocampo : His Best Friend, Jose F. Zaide by LISA GUERRERO NAKPIL J ose F. Zaide was decidedly a gentlemen of the old school: The younger brother of the eminent historian Gregorio F. Zaide; he, too, was steeped in the elegant living and genteel lifestyle of the town of Pagsanjan, Laguna, where he was born and spent his early youth. Both men would figure in the newspapers of their day; Gregorio contributing a prodigious flow of historical articles to the newspapers of post-war Manila; Jose, becoming a more serious journalist. He would meet H.R. Ocampo, not as a student in the University of Sto. Tomas, but while Jose was working for the Elizalde daily, The Philippines Herald. At the time, H.R. had also begun working at PhilProm Ad Agency. The two hit it off almost immediately and Zaide would become one of H.R.’s closest confidantes. He would rely on his advice on certain delicate matters and Zaide would judiciously acquire several works by H.R. through the years. Like so many newspapermen of the time, Zaide entered the world of public service and would become a diplomat. He would be posted in various European capitals, from the Hague to various German cities. To be sure, H. R. Ocampo who was as multi-faceted as he had careers and talents, had many friends. To H.R., the newspaperman — he was the entertainment writer and later, editor of This Week Magazine — he had many journalists as drinking buddies and co-conspirators. There were also show-business folk from his beat, such as the director Ramon Estella. Many of them would form the core of the Neo-Realists at the start of the 1950s, such as Manansala and the columnist E. Aguilar Cruz. There were also friends made in the advertising business, such as Cesar Legaspi; and there were also literary types and fellow intellectuals. Jose Zaide would fall into this category and his family recalls that special bond from hours spent discussing the fine arts in the context of European traditions. Zaide would stop writing when he entered the world of foreign affairs. He would, however, come out of ‘retirement’ to write this moving eulogy to his old friend, Hernando R. Ocampo. It was described as “a tribute and evocation” published on December 30, 1978 in the Philippine Daily Express, after Ocampo’s passing on December 28th. It best describes the beauty and verve of the work at hand that once belonged to the man who understood H.R. Ocampo most of all, none other than his best friend. (The following article is a tribute to and evocation of the art of the celebrated Filipino artist who died Dec. 28, 1978. - Editor. Reprinted from the Daily Express newspaper, Dec. 30, 1978.) It was the French impressionist, Edgar Degas, master of the human figure in movement, who said: “The air we see in the paintings of Old Masters is never the air we breathe.” In a special way, this elegant formulation by the 19th- century French master fairly summed up the writer's impression after two visits last November to the three months’ retrospective exhibition of the works of painter Hernando R. Ocampo at the Museum of Philippine Art on Roxas Boulevard. Opening last October 5 and on view through the end of the year, the event certainly is the biggest retrospective show ever mounted as homage to a major Filipino artist. Assembling nearly one hundred canvases, mostly in oil, with a few sprinkling of acrylics. the exhibition chronicled Ocampo's four decades of struggle as an artist; from his lean, hungry days in the mid-thirties through his golden decades of the 60s and 70s. Freely Acknowledging his debt to the German artist Paul Klee and the Bauhaus school as one of the dominant influences on him as a painter, Ocampo is also heir to the great colorists of the past. A close look at his oeuvre and the cognoscenti couldn’t escape the feeling that there is more to his pictures than meets the eye. For if one looks longer, more visual images come to the surface. He manages to express volume and light in his own way by a system of superimposed glazes of pure colors and tone relations, where each color temperature correspond to a mood both of the physical world and the world of painting. Again his subjects emerge from forms that jostle and slide into a pattern like an avalanche. For a man so dedicated to trapping elusive motion, he successfully sets up some kind of visual dialogue between canvas and its observer so that only the most resistant can fail to come away from that encounter without a freshened perception of what “the essential life of color is.” Indeed, Ocampo's best works are notable for their evocation of a special magic marvelously distilled, a badge of quality that is his special strength. This quality, strongly suggestive of influences of Klee and Kandinsky might perhaps be best described in Bauhuasian vernacular as “a gift of complexity.” In a manner of speaking, his pictorial images function, for both eye and mind, on more than a single level of perception. To the uninitiated, his canvases might appear to be lyrical effusions but in reality, they do abound in metaphysical and psychological scenarios. There is much more in the pictures of this inspired eclectic than meets the impatient eye. His works generally divide into those full of melody, tenderness and beauty as well as those which contain pity for man and his condition. Eminently complementing his endowments as an artist is his quality as a person — warm and affable, indeed a human being of exceptional qualities. For instance, when our conversation touched on the works of Cesar Legaspi who, he opined, seems to be in his prime. “I have a feeling,” Ocampo told us, that Legaspi is painting better than I could possibly do today.” Needless to say, as father of the Philippine abtract movement whose germinal seeds began to sprout over three decades ago, Ocampo’s towering prestige as an artist of talent and integrity has been established beyond question. Along with equally bigname artists like Vicente Manansala, Legaspi, and Diosdado Lorenzo, this tight coterie of artists has long dominated the Philippine art scene and is generally acclaimed as precursor of the most vital strain of contemporary Filipino modem art. Not only that but the trail-blazing activities of Ocampo, Manansala et al have provided the yeast which has since spawned a rising breed of promising. talented young artists whose prodigious works, to their lasting credit, have contributed in no small measure towards enlivening the pervading cultural and artistic landscape in the Philippines today. It certainly is a hallmark of Ocampo's integrity as an artist that when he sauntered off into the sunset serenely at the age of 67, he had just about come to terms with himself in a resolute undertaking to commit his art wholeheartedly in celebrating life — its delights and iniquities. In the course of a chance conversation with the writer last November in his modest Maypajo residence, he casually let on that he was "now painting songs or visual melodies praising God and celebrating the sheer joy of living.” Somehow, his avowed commitment as an artist on the side of life reminded us of a thoughtful remark made by the First Lady Imelda Romualdez Marcos in late September 1976. Discoursing on the role of art in building a better society, she said, “I am persuaded that the function of art, all art for that matter, is to improve life and not debase it.” In a more meaningful sense, the cosmos of the painter Ocampo attest to the validity of certain half-forgotten social truths, namely the power of art to ennoble man. EXPLORING THE COSMOS OF PAINTER H.R. OCAMPO by JOSE F. ZAIDE

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978)
            Jul. 30, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978)

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978) Untitled signed and dated 1974 (lower right) pen and ink in paper 11 1/2” x 8” (28 cm x 20 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978)
            Jul. 30, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978)

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978) a) Abstraction signed and dated 1972 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm) b) Abstraction signed and dated 1972 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm) c) Abstraction signed and dated 1974 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm) d) Abstraction signed and dated 1972 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm) e) Untitled signed and dated 1972 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm) f) Untitled signed and dated 1972 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 10” x 8 1/4” (25 cm x 21 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jul. 29, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱10,000 - ₱13,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Children Playing hand signed and dated 1977 (lower right) aqua tint, edition 26/30 12” x 9” (30 cm x 23 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jun. 11, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱600,000 - ₱780,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled signed and dated 1975 (lower right) oil on board 14 1/2" x 13" (37 cm x 33 cm) PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Manila H.R Ocampo is a visual artist that is considered one of the formative figures of neo-realism. He was one of the members of the pre-war Thirteen Moderns and a member of the Saturday Group with artists Vicente Silva Manansala and Cesar Legaspi. Ocampo’s works transitioned from neorealism to non-objective art. His works are characterized with the image breaking down into its simplest form, creating shapes that mimic a puzzleshaped pattern which highlights Ocampo’s method which is to outline and put a number on each shape then fill it with a specific color corresponding to the assigned numbers. His artistic method is shown in this painting, where we can see each shape in pattern between the colors black, shades of gray and white. (M.D.V.)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jun. 11, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱7,000,000 - ₱9,100,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Hat Weavers signed and dated Manila 1940 (lower right) oil on canvas Size: 19 1/4" x 26 1/8" (48 cm x 66 cm) PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION LITERATURE: Beller, Jonathan. Acquiring Eyes: Philippine Visuality, Nationalist Struggle, and the World Media System. Ateneo de Manila University Press. Quezon City. 2006. Featured on the book cover; Page 104 with a black and white illustration listed as "Fig. 6" on the book plates. De Jesus, Angel G. H.R. Ocampo: The Artist as Filipino. Heritage Publishing House. Quezon City. 1979. Page 99 with an illustration on page 98. Duldulao, Manuel D. The Philippine Art Scene. Maber Books, Inc. Manila. 1977. Full-color illustration on page 114. Tiongson, Nicanor G., ed. Artista ng Bayan 1991. Cultural Center of the Philippines. Manila. 1991. Black-and-white illustration on page 25. It was an important export of the Philippines, until so often happens, the original materials and ingenuity of the Filipino is taken over by the workers from another country. Hat weaving would have a steady run until the start of the Second World War. In the 1940s, it had started to become antiquated but was still, for H.R. Ocampo, the city-dweller from Maypajo, Caloocan, a perfect device to express that H.R. himself would call his “proletariat period”, dedicated to portraying the working class who had become commodities, or commodified, in fact, de-humanized — anonymous — just like the hats they wove. The pretty pastel colors H.R. uses are in marked contrast to its message. In a sense it is a pictorial companion to a short story he wrote in this period, called “Rice and Bullets”, which puts together the imagery of the food of life and the fodder of death. H.R. was very much the iconoclast — the man who liked to upend the establishment and established beliefs. And here, you can see his subversion of the norm. Beller has a wonderful way of describing this painting “The very representation of these figures shows that they are caught in a new logic.They may have eyes to weave hats but they cannot see themselves with the eyes of modernity and history, eyes that see them as materials with which to weave the future.” ___ Hernando R. Ocampo was named Philippine National Artist for the Visual Arts in 1991.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jun. 11, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱4,000,000 - ₱5,200,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) "Analogy" (B) signed and dated 1969 (lower left and verso) oil on canvas 32" x 24" (81 cm x 61 cm) PROPERTY FROM THE DON EUGENIO LOPEZ JR. COLLECTION PROVENANCE: Acquired directly from the artist The Manila Electric Company (Meralco) LITERATURE: Archipelago (The International Magazine of the Philippines), Volume I, No. 2, February 1974. Full-color illustration on the cover; ‘Cover Note’ description of the artwork, page 7. Aquino, Glenna, Budji: Design Journey, Published by Reyes Publishing, Quezon City, 2019. Full color illustration, pages 140-141. Hufana, Alejandrino G., ed. Pamana 13 June 1974: A Cultural Quarterly Published by the Cultural Center of the Philippines. Cultural Center of the Philippines. Manila. 1974. Listed on page 19 as no. '290' under the artist's list of paintings (under Meralco) Tiongson, Nicanor G., ed. Artista ng Bayan 1991. Cultural Center of the Philippines. Manila. 1991. Listed on page 37 as no. '291' under the artist's "List of Paintings (Partial)". In the 1960s, he would represent the Philippines at the Sao Paolo Bienal and the Festival International de la Peinture in Chateau Musee in Grimaldi, France. By then he had evolved into the most influential force in Philippine art. By the time the work ‘Analogy B’ was painted, H.R. was in the thick of what he himself described as his ‘Visual Melody’ period, which would span from 1968 to his last days. His chronicler, Angel de Jesus, would say, “what he does (at this stage) is to create pure painting, something akin to chamber music.” Archipelago would put it more succinctly, “This painting entitled Analogy, by Hernando R. Ocampo is considered a rarity by those who know the artist’s preference for a wide palette of tropical colors. Only two colors, red and blue, are here delineated to their analogies, making this at least a very unusual work for this foremost Filipino colorist… This painting comes from the collection of the Manila Electric Company.” Selected by the visionary collector Don Eugenio “Geny” Lopez, Jr. Analogy B is most certainly a sophisticated opus; its reds and blues recall the grandest analogies — for H.R, was also a writer steeped in metaphors — of our Philippine flag and all the emotions of patriotism and history that stirs with it. The waving strands of the nation’s banners, alternating in war and peace, blood and water, past and future, are powerful symbols of the times, then and now.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Nude
            Apr. 23, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Nude

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude signed and dated 1975 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 12” x 17 1/2” (30 cm x 44 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract)
            Apr. 23, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract)

            Est: ₱30,000 - ₱39,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract) signed and dated 1976 (lower right) each pen and ink on paper 11” x 8” (28 cm x 20 cm) each

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract) oil on wood
            Mar. 05, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract) oil on wood

            Est: ₱200,000 - ₱260,000

            a) Untitled (Abstract) b) Untitled (Abstract) oil on wood a) signed and dated 1974 (lower right) a) oil on wood b) Oil on paper a) 12" x 9" (30 cm x 23 cm) b) 12" x 9" (30 cm x 23 cm) PROVENANCE Private Collection, Makati City H.R. Ocampo's emotionally charged abstraction pieces are profound results of his everyday observations of what surrounded him, from Philippine flora and fauna, as well as animals to rain and sunshine. Though despite his habit of drawing inspiration from his surroundings, Ocampo's works are anything but derivative. His assemblage of interlocking shapes and unique color palette has birthed a unique visual language that is characteristically and distinctly his. His art is far from merely decorative masterpieces and are considered personal and substantial reactions to the stimuli and environment that the artist busied himself with.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - JC
            Mar. 05, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - JC

            Est: ₱4,000,000 - ₱5,200,000

            JC signed and dated 1950 (lower right) 28" x 22" (71 cm x 56 cm) PROPERTY FROM THE GAUDENCIO BRASEROS LONTOK OF LIPA COLLECTION Acquired directly from the Artist, and from thence by descent to his daughter Criselda Lontok Fernandez Not too many people realize that Hernando R. Ocampo was not only a painter but also a writer and a journalist. He would be the editor of the Manila Chronicle’s Sunday Magazine from 1950 to 1953 as well as radio show producer and a movie scriptwriter. He was also an active member of the “civil society” of that time, participating not only in the Art Association of the Philippines and the Philippine Art Gallery as well as the Boy Scouts and the Community Chest. His interest in the brotherhood of man is evident in the work “JC” which is a capsule history of this civic organization, the Jaycees, in the Philippines. The Philippine Jaycees, or the Junior Chamber International Philippines, was formally founded in 1948 in Manila. In a year’s time, it had spread like wildfire, and would have 22 chapters in all the major cities of the country. Its first national convention was ion 1949, and Ramon V. del Rosario would be elected the first president. In short order, by 1950, the Philippines had so impressed the international Jaycee organization that it was agreed that the 5th World Congress would take place in Manila — Mr. del Rosario would be voted in as the first Filipino world president. It was in step with the mood of Manila in the mid- century: Boundless energy and optimism. Mr. Gaudencio “Didi” Braseros Lontok was the prototypical Jaycee, young, talented, and enterprising — and eager to take his rightful place in the arena of international business. (He was engaged in putting together deals for American sanitary paper products.) The entrepreneur collected and drove sports cars, often at a breakneck pace around Batangas. Both Braseros and Lontok are old families from what was once the coffee capital of the world. Guadencio was one of the founders of the Jaycee chapter in Lipa City; and was also involved in the milestone 1950 World Congress. This unique piece would pass on directly to his daughter, the noted fashion designer Criselda Lontok Fernandez. For the work at hand, created in that momentous year, HR Ocampo’s official biographer, Angel de Jesus, would call this period as pivotal. It was after all at the very boundary of HR’s ‘proletarian’ period immediately post-war and what HR would call his “transitional” period. In this era, HR would present figurative works but with “faces without features to depict a certain universal humanity.” It would be in tune with the message of brotherly love portrayed in this work. In line with HR’s artistic progression, de Jesus would recount that Ocampo would simplify figures and natural objects, “eliminating details of the human anatomy, disregarding perspective and his forms became increasingly distorted. HR would thus become the Philippines’ foremost proponent of the use of color, and certainly its most expert. In “JC”, the hues are true to this period, with his recognizable greens, reds and blues of the time. Its timeless motifs make it a moving classic.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jan. 29, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstraction 63 signed and dated June 17, 1976 (lower right) watercolor on paper 21” x 14” (53 cm x 36 cm) PROPERTY FORMERLY FROM THE FLOY AGUENZA COLLECTION

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jan. 29, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱40,000 - ₱52,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled signed and dated 1970 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 9” x 7 1/4” (23 cm x 18 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)
            Jan. 29, 2022

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978)

            Est: ₱70,000 - ₱91,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Untitled signed and dated 1949 (lower right) watercolor on paper 17 1/2” x 22” (44 cm x 56 cm) PROVENANCE Private Collection, Pampanga

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) "Mutants" - A
            Dec. 04, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) "Mutants" - A

            Est: ₱12,000,000 - ₱15,600,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) "Mutants" - A signed (lower right and verso) and dated 1964 (lower right) oil on canvas 40" x 30" (102 cm x 76 cm) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist, from Gallery 7 (which H.R. Ocampo co-owned) by Frederic and Siena Ossorio and thence by descent LITERATURE Patrick Flores, Art after War : 1948-1969, Published by Strathmore Managemnet Inc., Page 185, Black and White Photograph, captioned “Philippine modernists posing with their artworks.” Frederic Eugene Ossorio was born in Manila, on July 13, 1919, the younger brother of Alfonso who is better known in collectors’ circles. Alfonso would become a friend of Jackson Pollock and a member of the Abstract Expressionists. He would hold court with members of the New York’s art world at his legendary estate “The Creeks” in East Hampton. Another brother Robert would found the Manhattan Festival Ballet company. Robert Ossorio would begin life reportedly as a sickly child and would turn to dance lessons to build his body up. It would become a lifelong obsession and he would reach some success, performing in Hollywood musicals and New York ballets. He would be in the same orbit as avant-garde choreographer Merce Cunningham and would be known as an almost omnipresent behind-thescenes figure who would support ailing dancers and cultural causes discreetly. Their mother Maria Paz, “Pacita” Yangco was one of the daughters of Don Luis Ronquillo Yangco, who in his heyday was dubbed ‘The King of the Pasig River and Manila Bay”, thanks to a fleet of 148 ships, 12 Chinese junks and a steamboat that docked all over the Philippines. The pater of the family was Don Miguel Jose Ossorio whose family was also of substantial means, since he was sent to be educated in St. Edmund’s in Ware, England, the oldest Catholic school in that country and afterwards at the Christian Brothers School in Gibraltar, which educated only the children of the well-to-do. Don Miguel would wed Pacita in 1910 and appears to have struck out on his own in the shipping business, with his own freighters operating between the Philippines and the rest of the Pacific islands. He would soon find his metier, which was sugar — first establishing the North Negros Sugar Company in 1917, followed in 1919 by the Victorias Milling Corporation, both in Negros Occidental. Victorias would eventually become one of the world’s biggest sugar refineries. Not much remains on record about Pacita apart from a delicious footnote in the Rolls-Royce records of July 1934 of her purchasing an extremely rare and expensive Phantom II Continental Sedaca coupe, with the annotation, “Madame Ossorio, who maintains a residence at the prestigious Dorchester Hotel, purchased the Rolls-Royce through London agent Captain H.R. Owen and specified that her car be built “for use in the UK mainly touring at comparatively high speed.” She would, of course, need the automobile to tool around the country to visit her sons. Frederic, like all his brothers, would be sent to study in English boarding schools in Bath and Malvern; and then go on for higher education in the United States. He would earn a degree in European History at Yale University and go on to the Harvard Business School when after just one year, war would break out and he would quit to enlist. He would wind up as part of the unit celebrated in film as “The Monuments Men”, members of the U.S. army who would rescue important works of art from the Germans during and immediately after World War II. He would be credited for assisting in the recovery of Van Gogh’s Field of Poppies near Auvers-Sur-Oise, from the Lauffen Salt Mines in Austria where it was secreted along with other artistic treasures pillaged by the Nazis. The Van Gogh work is doubly significant because it is among the last that was ever painted by this artist. Frederic would return to Manila after the War to head the sugar enterprise Victorias Milling Company founded by his father. The family followed paternalistic practices and even determined that they would compensate all their workers the three years that the enterprise had stopped business during the Japanese occupation. While it is his brother Alfonso who is more famous for painting the mural of the “Angry Christ” by which title the Church of St. John the Worker has become world-renowned (thanks to coverage by Life Magazine), it was Frederic’s brainchild to actually build the church as a way of bringing the community together after the trials of the war. He selected the foreign architect, Antonin Raymond, to design it and can also be credited for its avant-garde character. He flew in his brother to create the motif for the altar; while in the sanctuary, another florid work of art, a diptych painted by Belgian ecclesiastical artist, Countess Adelaide de Bethune is to be found. Frederic would move back to the United States in the late 1960s, serving on the board of his family’s sugar corporation in the country while still maintaining close ties with the Philippines. He would also continue to pursue his abiding interest in art, collecting works not only by his brother but other significant artists of the 20th century. With his wife Siena, he would later donate various artworks in their collection to the university museums of Harvard, Vassar and Yale as well as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Smithsonian Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. Nobody could be as diametrically opposite to the Ossorio brothers than the artist and writer Hernando Ruiz Ocampo. Born in Sta. Cruz, Manila in 1911, he would find himself shunted off with his family to Maypajo, north of Manila, due to his father’s reversal of fortune. At the time, Maypajo was a colorful district renowned for its tulisanes (bandits) and honkytonks. At age seven as legend had it, H.R. was a working urchin on the sidewalk, offering shoeshines to the customers of the tawdry cabaret in town. He would eventually take a job as the cashier in the establishment. (The painting titled Sideshow that recently went to auction at León Gallery is a throwback to his memories of this time.) He would drop into —and out — of different colleges, eventually signing up for a writing course in 1930 with Manuel E. Arguilla, a newspaperman. It would be a serendipitous connection because Arguilla would eventually marry the not-yet-famous Lyd who would go on to found the Philippine Art Gallery (PAG) after the war. It would be the only venue for abstract art in the entire country. In the meantime, HR would find a role-model in his mentor Manuel and soon joined a group called the Veronicans which counted as members NVM Gonzalez, Francisco Arcellana (who would later become an influential art critic) and Angel de Jesus (who would become a lifelong friend and his biographer.) H.R. would evolve into a journalist, having his start as associate editor of the Herald Mid-Week Magazine before the war and also as a scriptwriter for Fernando Poe Sr. and even a director of stage shows in the Lyric, Capitol, and Avenue theaters. He would begin to attract attention by winning prizes at the annual competitions put up by the then-fledgeling Art Association of the Philippines. At the very first contest in 1948, Carlos V. Francisco would take top prize for the classic Kaingin; H.R. brought up the rear with Nude with Candle with Flower, placing 6th. There was no other way but up. By 1950 he would claim both first and second place for Arabesque and Man and Carabao, respectively — and was ready to break out of the confines of conventional painting dominated by Fernando Amorsolo. That same year, he would lead a group composed of Manansala,, Legaspi, Tabuena, Oteyza, and Estella into the fray with a first landmark exhibition at the Manila Hotel. Their co-conspirator, fellow writer, E. Aguilar Cruz, would give them the name famous till today, the Neo-Realists. The objective was to create a whole new way of looking at the world, their imaginations seared and forever changed by the desolation and trauma of World War II. Ocampo was becoming so famous that the French government offered him a grant to study art in Paris, which he declined. To his dying day, HR would steadfastly refuse to travel, although his works would travel far and wide, including the PAG’s very first New York show, the Philippine Cultural Exhibition, organized by Lyd Arguilla. He had become, after all, one of the stalwarts in that influential gallery. (In the 1960s, he would represent the Philippines at the Sao Paolo Bienal and the Festival International de la Peinture in Chateau Musee in Grimaldi, France.) The year this work was painted, 1965, HR would forge ahead in another career — establishing an artspace of his own called Gallery 7, at the Merchandise Mart in Makati. The ‘magnificent seven’ behind its name were HR, Manansala, Yonzon, Malang, Ang Kiukok, Rafael Asuncion and Ong Bungian. Its inaugural show was on April 7th of that year. They are featured in a commemorative photograph of the occasion — H.R. proudly presenting his Mutant A, his commentary on nuclear warfare. Beside him is Vicente Manansala; Ang Kiukok sits on the step in front of them; Malang is in the foreground. Gallery 7 would be the first artists collaborative gallery. This dramatic H. R. Ocampo is endowed with impeccable provenance, having been acquired by Frederick E. Ossorio (1919 - 2005) at the inaugural exhibit of HR Ocampo’s Gallery 7. He is furthermore listed in the biography, titled H.R. Ocampo : The Artist as Filipino by Angel G. de Jesus (1979) as part of the list of H.R.’s key collectors on page 204; the list was made by the artist himself and culled by De Jesus from that personal register. HR’s most authoritative biographer, De Jesus, would also record that the artist would identify the years 1964 to 1968 his Mutants Period. Given the title and date of this work, we can presume that it is among the first in this series. The entire era, according to De Jesus, was inspired by the film The Beginning of the End, which started HR “painting symbols of mutants, and fantasies of the havoc wrought by nuclear warfare.” Depicting the era called the Atomic Age, “The Beginning of the End was a sci-fi movie that involved a female reporter who would not take ‘no’ for an answer and her undercover work to expose scientific experiments that would create killer mutants. This would have resonated with H.R, in many ways, as a relentless newspaperman himself. In the work at hand, earth’s natural vista of green becomes transformed by what looks like a nuclear conflagration. Two human figures appear to have become balls of fire while volcanoes erupt behind them, rivulets of lava stream relentlessly towards the viewer. While H.R. spins this cautionary tale of science gone astray, he cannot help himself by creating a hypnotically beautiful landscape.

            Leon Gallery
          • H. R. Ocampo (Phillipino, 1911 - 1978), 'Children Playing', Aquatint in Green and Yellow, ed. 27/30, Framed: 18-1/4 x 13-7/8 in
            Oct. 19, 2021

            H. R. Ocampo (Phillipino, 1911 - 1978), 'Children Playing', Aquatint in Green and Yellow, ed. 27/30, Framed: 18-1/4 x 13-7/8 in

            Est: $20 - $40

            H. R. Ocampo (Phillipino, 1911 - 1978), 'Children Playing', Aquatint in Green and Yellow, ed. 27/30, Framed: 18-1/4 x 13-7/8 in

            Weschler's
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstraction in Red and Black
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstraction in Red and Black

            Est: ₱100,000 - ₱130,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstraction in Red and Black signed and dated 1978 (lower right) acrylic on board 14” x 10” (36 cm x 25 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude signed (lower right) pen and ink on paper 9” x 7” (23 cm x 18 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude

            Est: ₱35,000 - ₱45,500

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude signed and dated 1975 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 12” x 17 1/2” (30 cm x 44 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Femme
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Femme

            Est: ₱20,000 - ₱26,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Femme signed and dated 1976 (lower right) sketch pen and ink on paper 11 1/2” x 8 1/2” (29 cm x 22 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude

            Est: ₱60,000 - ₱78,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Nude signed and dated 1978 (lower left) pen and ink on paper 21 1/2” x 14 1/2” (55 cm x 37 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando Ocampo (1911-1978) Mariwasa Garden
            Oct. 16, 2021

            Hernando Ocampo (1911-1978) Mariwasa Garden

            Est: ₱25,000 - ₱32,500

            Hernando Ocampo (1911-1978) Mariwasa Garden signed and dated 1957 (lower right) pen and ink on paper 8” x 11” (20 cm x 28 cm)

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Pastoral
            Sep. 11, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Pastoral

            Est: ₱3,000,000 - ₱3,900,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Pastoral signed (lower right) ca. 1930 oil on canvas 20" x 24" (74 cm x 61 cm)   P 3,000,000 provenance Acquired directly from the Artist and thence by descent literature Jaime Laya, “From Inspiration to Reality : The Cultural Center Curtain”, from Wala Lang, Manila Bulletin, May 10, 2021. Illustrated in color.     In this distinctively Filipino Pastoral is found the unmistakable intersection of two important nationalists’ lives. The first was the statesman Lorenzo Martinez Tanada (1898-1992) who was witness to the Philippines’ political milestones, born at the twilight of the Spanish empire, raised through American rule and an architect of the end of the Marcos regime. Tañada was a fiscal of the city of Manila in 1929 and a founder of the Civil Liberties Union of the Philippines, fighting for workers’ rights and their freedom of speech. He was next part of the guerrilla group “Free Philippines” during World War II; and wrote in an underground newspaper during the Japanese occupation. He became a judge in post-war Manila and presided in the Filipino People’s Court that tried collaborators. In 1947, Tañada ran for the Senate and topped the election. He ran successfully four more times in 1953, 1959 and 1965. He helped secure the release of Ninoy Aquino in 1980 and began the clamor against the U.S. Bases in 1983. Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978) was, on the other hand, was born in Sta. Cruz, Manila. He drifted from a year at the Letran law school to the Commerce department of FEU, winding up in the creative writing class of Manuel Arguilla, and becoming a self-taught painter, becoming after the War, the ringleader of the avant-garde group called the Neo-Expressionists. H.R. had an enormously colorful life, seemingly the opposite of the venerable Lorenzo ‘Tanny’ Tañada. H.R. started life as a 12-year old shoeshine boy, then a gopher, finally a cashier at the Maypajo Cabaret in Caloocan. He worked at the Philippine Education Company (PECO) and became associate editor for the Herald newspaper’s Mid-Week Magazine in 1938. Tañada’s life was just as swashbuckling. He, too, ran in the same journalistic and artistic circles that featured not just H.R. Ocampo but also Lyd Arguilla (founder of the Philippine Art Gallery and Manuel’s widow), as well as Vicente Manansala and the other PAG stalwarts. This would have been the moment when the work may have changed hands as either a gift or a happy purchase; in either case, it was a meaningful gesture of friendship. In Pastoral, the mystic Mt. Banahaw looms, a peaceful blue shrouded in clouds, hiding the fact that it is an extinct volcano. Beneath it is a bucolic scene of twin nipa huts, symmetrical with a pair of coconut palms. Two women wash their laundry in a small pond; a line of colorful clothes dries near their home. Is it an accident that H.R. depicts a scene with which Tañada would have been keenly familiar? Tanny, after all, was born and grew up in Quezon province where Mt. Banahaw guards its boundaries. It’s a memento of the golden days before the War. H.R. was arrested on trumped-up charges in 1945, falsely accused of being a collaborator. (A jealous boyfriend had caught him kissing his girl, so the story goes.) He was let off and never actually came before the war crimes court that Tañada ran. One wonders what would have happened if he had. He would emerge from that false imprisonment a friend of Claro M. Recto and would eventually join his braintrust. Tañada would eventually run as Recto’s vice-president in 1957. The three men intersected in an agenda that was pro-people, pro-poor and anti-imperialist. Jaime Laya deems it, “The earliest Ocampo work I know,” and continues, “is in the Amorsolo tradition. Writing in his opinion column, Wala Lang in the Manila Bulletin (May 12, 2021), he notes, “Entitled Pastoral, it is a typical landscape but literally in a different light. His later work continued to be inherently representational but seen through shifting lenses. It is a remarkable progression, from representational that over five decades became almost—just almost—abstract.” Pastoral thus remains a reminder of the friendship between two men, giants in each of their spheres.    

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo(1911 - 1978) Homage to the Heroes of 1896
            Sep. 11, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo(1911 - 1978) Homage to the Heroes of 1896

            Est: ₱6,000,000 - ₱7,800,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Homage to the Heroes of 1896 signed and dated 1976 (lower right) oil on canvas 36” x 48” (91 cm x 122 cm) P 6,000,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by Floy Aguenza   H.R. Ocampo’s emotionally charged abstraction pieces are profound results of his everyday observations in what surrounded him, from Philippine flora and fauna as well as animals to rain and sunshine. Though despite his habit of drawing inspiration from his surroundings, Ocampo’s works are anything but derivative. His assemblage of interlocking shapes and unique color palette has birthed a unique visual language that is characteristically and distinctly his. His art is far from merely decorative masterpieces and are considered personal and substantial reactions to the stimuli and environment that the artist busied himself with. In this piece titled Homage to the Heroes of 1896, one can easily see the affinity and respect Ocampo had for the storied heroes of the Philippines. Rendered in a variety of red and orange tones, Ocampo’s piece can be seen as an interpretation of the energetic will that animated our forefathers towards the fight for freedom and independence. It’s various orange tones can be seen as a representation of the fiery zeal of the revolution. While it's red components can be seen as both the blood spilled by the countless sacrifices made by the Filipino revolutionaries and as the fervent spirit that continues to unify us today. Ocampo's work is a synthesis of the ideals of our history's heroes and the realities of their insurmountable sacrifices.

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo(1911 - 1978) Abstraction 63
            Sep. 11, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo(1911 - 1978) Abstraction 63

            Est: ₱300,000 - ₱390,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstraction 63 signed and dated June 17, 1976 (lowe r right) watercolor on paper 21" x 14" (53 cm x 36 cm) P 300,000 PROVENANCE Private Collection, Manila   H.R. Ocampo created a visual language that cannot be mistaken for anyone else’s. He showed dynamic elements that might become part of any number of visually logical arrays vigorously sought by a desiring eye such as how Abstraction 63 was presented in a mix of variation of orange and blue where the colors are given harmonic sequences of carefully arranged tones and intensities hence the viewer is left in awe to such masterpiece, a genius abstract discretion. Jonathan L. Beller in his Nationalism in Scenes and Spaces of H.R. Ocampo, even described Ocampo’s paintings as, “are paintings seeking the liberation of vision through the deification of the visible object… If objectivity and objectification are precisely the removal of agency from living beings, the formal decodification of the very process of objectification returns power to the viewer, allowing the eye to dance in a relatively free quest for new orders and meanings as it has a chance to create itself outside of any narrative schema.”

            Leon Gallery
          • Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract in Green
            Jul. 16, 2021

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) - Abstract in Green

            Est: ₱70,000 - ₱91,000

            Hernando R. Ocampo (1911 - 1978) Abstract in Green signed and dated 1974 (lower right) watercolor on paper 11” x 8” (28 cm x 20 cm)

            Leon Gallery
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