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Paul Thek Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1933 - d. 1988

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        • PAUL THEK, THREE PUBLICATIONS
          Jun. 21, 2024

          PAUL THEK, THREE PUBLICATIONS

          Est: €150 - €300

          (1) Paul Thek & Edwin Klein, A document made by Paul Thek and Edwin Klein. Amsterdam/Stockholm, Stedelijk Museum/Moderna Museet, 1969. Softcover, 41 x 31 cm, 130 pp. Iconic large format artists' book, which contains photo-collages of newspaper articles, and b/w photos by Wim Davits, Edwin Klein, Tom Lenders, Max Natkiel and Jean-Paul Vroom. Slight wear to wrapper, some bubbly pages in the interior due to water damage (not affecting the image), else a fine copy. (2) Paul Thek. Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, 1969. Leporello, 27.5 x 20.5 cm, 8 pp. with b/w plates, loosely inserted sheet with biography in Dutch. SM catalogue Nr. 460. Designed by Wim Crouwel. Fine copy. (3) Paul Thek, Processions. Philadelphia, Institute of Contemporary Art/ University of Pennsylvania, 1977. Edited by Paul Thek and Suzanne Delehanty. Softcover, 31 x 23 cm, 74 pp. Exhibition catalogue documenting immersive installations such as The Tomb-Death of a Hippie (1967), The Procession/easter in a pear tree (1969), Ark, Pyramid (1972) and others. Very good copy, scarce. (total 3)

          Zwiggelaar Auctions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)
          Jun. 11, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)

          Est: £60,000 - £90,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Swimming series, 1969. Acrylic on newspaper, size 41,8 x 57,7 cm (16 1/2 x 22 3/4 inches). Signed and dated right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)
          Jun. 11, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)

          Est: £60,000 - £90,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Swimming series, 1969. Acrylic on newspaper, size 57,5 x 75,7 cm (22 2/3 x 29 3/4 inches). Signed and dated lower right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)
          Jun. 11, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)

          Est: £60,000 - £90,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Swimming series, 1969. Acrylic on newspaper, size 57,5 x 75,7 cm (22 2/3 x 29 3/4 inches). Unsigned.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)
          Jun. 11, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA/New York)

          Est: £60,000 - £90,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Swimming series, 1969. Acrylic on newspaper, size 57,5 x 75,7 cm (22 2/3 x 29 3/4 inches). Signed and dated lower right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek
          Apr. 10, 2024

          Paul Thek

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          Art House: The Collection of Chara Schreyer Peter Hujar 1934 - 1987 Paul Thek pigment print, the photographer's archive stamp, signed by Stephen Koch, Executor, signed by Gary Schneider, printer, and with the title, date, edition '3/10' and annotation 'EPHS 117GSP3' in pencil on the reverse framed, a Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich, label on the reverse image: 18½ by 12¼ in. (46.4 by 31.1 cm.) frame: 23 by 16¾ in. (58.4 by 42.5 cm.) Executed in 1967, printed posthumously in 2011. Please note that this lot will not be on view during the sale exhibition. It is located at our Long Island City, New York storage facility. If you would like to examine it in person before the sale please contact Anjli Patel at [email protected]

          Sotheby's
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)
          Feb. 27, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)

          Est: £40,000 - £60,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Ostrich in the Savannah, 1975. Acrylic on newspaper, size 58,5 x 73 cm (23 x 28 3/4 inches). Unsigned.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)
          Feb. 27, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)

          Est: £40,000 - £60,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Kite, 1975. Acrylic on newspaper, size 58,5 x 73 cm (23 x 28 3/4 inches). Signed lower right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)
          Feb. 27, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)

          Est: £40,000 - £60,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Mountains, 1975. Acrylic on newspaper, size 58,5 x 73 cm (23 x 28 3/4 inches). Signed and dated lower right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)
          Feb. 27, 2024

          Paul Thek, 1933-1988 (USA-New York)

          Est: £40,000 - £60,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988). Still Life, 1975. Acrylic on newspaper, size 58,5 x 73 cm (23 x 28 3/4 inches). Signed and dated lower right.

          Cultural Traditions
        • Untitled (Hand Drawing)
          Dec. 19, 2023

          Untitled (Hand Drawing)

          Est: $4,000 - $6,000

          Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Untitled (Hand Drawing) signed and dated ‘72 (lower right) graphite on paper 14 by 18⅞ in. 35.6 by 47.9 cm. Executed in 1972.

          Sotheby's
        • Hurrah Vacuii!!
          Nov. 16, 2023

          Hurrah Vacuii!!

          Est: $40,000 - $60,000

          Art House: The Collection of Chara Schreyer Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Hurrah Vacuii!! acrylic on canvas board  9 by 12 in. 23 by 30.5 cm. Executed circa 1988.

          Sotheby's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour, wax crayon and grap
          Jun. 29, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour, wax crayon and grap

          Est: £10,000 - £15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour, wax crayon and graphite on paper 23 7/8 x 18in. (60.7 x 45.7cm.)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour and graphite on pape
          Jun. 29, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour and graphite on pape

          Est: £10,000 - £15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Cityscape) watercolour and graphite on paper 24 x 18in. (60.8 x 45.7cm.)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Beach Grass) watercolour, wax crayon and gr
          Jun. 29, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Beach Grass) watercolour, wax crayon and gr

          Est: £10,000 - £15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (Beach Grass) watercolour, wax crayon and graphite on paper 18 3/4 x 23 7/8in. (47.7 x 60.5cm.)

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Cityscape Painting
          Apr. 30, 2023

          Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Cityscape Painting

          Est: $6,000 - $8,000

          Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Painting. Title - Cityscape with Rooftops. Watercolor and gouache painting on paper. Signed lower right Thek ‘79. Sight size of the painting measures 16.7 inches high, 21.8 inches wide. Frame measures 25.75 inches high, 31 inches wide. In good condition, tape hinged at top, not laid down. From the Water Mill, NY estate on Long Island of Academy Award nominated film director Anthony (Tony) Harvey (1930-2017). From Askart.com: The following review, by Holland Cotter, is from The New York Times, October 21, 2010 Paul Thek (1933-1988), the subject of a ragged, moving and much-anticipated retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, was only 54 when he died of AIDS in 1988. But by then he had already slipped through the cracks of art history. Or rather he had fallen into one of the deep trenches that divide that history into artificial islands with names like Pop and Minimalism. Thek came to art with so much going for him — talent, looks, energy and imaginative peculiarity — that for a decade or so he was an island unto himself, an archipelago even. In the early 1960s, when everyone else in New York was into hands-off fabrication and Benday dots, he was modeling hyper-realistic images of meat, raw and bleeding, from beeswax. Gross and funny, they had people buzzing. Then in 1967 Thek abruptly left for Europe and radically changed his art. Instead of sculpture, he created immense, collaborative, ephemeral environments from throwaway stuff: newspapers, candles, flowers, onions, eggs, sand. When their time was up, these works went into the rubbish bin. Thek, with his long blond hair and pied-piper charm, was a big success in Europe. Museums threw open their doors. He stayed for nine years. In 1976 he returned to New York and had a nasty shock. Almost no one here remembered the work he had done in the 1960s, or knew what he had been up to in Europe in the years since, or cared about what he was doing in the present. He had been away too long. The '60s were over. He had a few Manhattan gallery shows and a museum solo in Philadelphia, but people stayed away. Depressed and angry, he painted quick, small pictures in his East Village walk-up, smoked a lot of pot, cruised local parks and kept an obsessively confessional diary. To support himself, he bagged groceries in a supermarket, washed hospital floors. Europe was far, far away; 1980s New York, with its bottomless cash and gated art world, far too close. His memorial service at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery was a fair gauge of his stature. The church wasn't packed, but the eulogists — Robert Wilson, Susan Sontag — were stars. Sontag, an old friend, had dedicated her breakthrough book, Against Interpretation, to Thek in 1966. In 1989 she would dedicate another, AIDS and Its Metaphors, to his memory. Since his death Thek's reputation, always high in Europe, has grown in the United States. In the 1990s, a time of identity politics and AIDS, there were Thek shows, articles, books. In the early 2000s, with young artists interested in the quirky and the personal in art, his influence was strong and was acknowledged by older figures like Robert Gober and Mike Kelley. Now, finally, if with slightly behind-the-beat timing, comes Paul Thek: Diver, a Retrospective, at the Whitney. What do we find? Less than hoped for, perhaps, but more than anticipated: solid concentrations of the early sculptures and the later paintings; mere scraps of the great environments that came between. Do they add up to a career survey? With the help of documentary photographs, an accessible catalog, and an application of Thek's own definition of faith — Believing is seeing — they do. The beginnings of that career were ordinary. The artist was born George Joseph Thek — the Paul came later — to a middle-class Brooklyn family of German and Irish descent. His parents were Roman Catholic; the first art he saw was in churches. His connection to religion remained deep, and deeply conflicted. He studied painting at Cooper Union in the 1950s and at that time met Sontag, Eva Hesse and the photographer Peter Hujar. Thek was alert to the new art and artists around him: Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg and Robert Rauschenberg; later Joseph Beuys and Arte Povera. He readily spoke of their impact on him. He made a momentous first trip to Europe in 1962. He cried in front of van Goghs in Amsterdam, stood drop-jawed before Michelangelo in Rome. The major event, though, came when he and Hujar, traveling as lovers, stumbled on Capuchin catacombs in Sicily: caves packed with corpses encased in glass coffins and propped against walls. Hujar took photographs; Thek got ideas for a new kind of art. What resulted were the sculptures of meat and amputated limbs, which Thek sealed into sleek Formica and plexiglass containers, and in one instance into an Andy Warhol Brillo box turned on its side. Collectively called Technological Reliquaries, they were clearly sendups of Minimalism's industrial machismo and Pop's complicit consumerism — though at a time when a brutal war was building in Southeast Asia, they also hinted at larger politics. The culminating work from this period, The Tomb — Death of a Hippie, became Thek's most famous, and infamous, piece: it consisted of a full-size cast of his body laid out as if dead, surrounded by sacramental bowls and possible drug paraphernalia, inside a pink wooden pyramid. Readings of the image have been endless: it's a symbol of the putrefying ideals of the 1960s; it's a narcissistic joke. Whatever its meaning, the piece now exists only in photographs. Obituary from NY Times - Dec. 13, 2017: Anthony Harvey, Lion in Winter - Director and Kubrick Editor, Dies at 87. It might have gone down as the most ridiculous scene in the most audacious film that Anthony Harvey ever worked on, but at least as Mr. Harvey told the story, a momentous event in the real world kept it from the moviegoing public. It was an epic two minutes worth of pie throwing, and it was originally to be the ending of - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, - Stanley Kubrick's dark satire of the nuclear age. Mr. Harvey, the editor on that movie, was pretty pleased with the way the chaotic scene had come out. It was a brilliant piece of work, he once said. Who knows? I certainly thought it was. But the movie, which was scheduled for release in January 1964, was to receive its press premiere in late November 1963, right when all sorts of plans were thrown into turmoil by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. That ending, how it started, the George Scott character threw a custard pie to the Russian ambassador, and it missed and hit the president, Mr. Harvey told the film journalist Glenn Kenny in 2009. Columbia Pictures, he said, was very nervous about anything to show the president, any president in that state. As a result, the pie-throwing scene was scrapped. Others involved with the movie have over the years given different explanations for the changed ending, but in any case the airborne pies were replaced with the now familiar montage of nuclear explosions - set to Vera Lynn's rendition of the song We'll Meet Again, an unsettling ending instead of a slapstick one. Mr. Harvey would go on to become a director himself, teaming with Katharine Hepburn on several films, most notably The Lion in Winter (1968), for which he was nominated for an Oscar. He died on Nov. 23 at his home in Water Mill, on Long Island, at age 87. The Brockett Funeral Home confirmed the death. Mr. Harvey was born on June 3, 1930, in London. His father, Geoffrey Harrison, died when he was young, and after his mother, the former Dorothy Leon, remarried, he took the surname of his stepfather, Morris Harvey, an actor. He got an early taste of the movie business when he was cast in a small part in the 1945 film "Caesar and Cleopatra," which starred Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh, but his real entree came when he landed a job as an editor for the British filmmakers John and Roy Boulting. He learned the art of editing as it was done in predigital days, pasting countless film clips together by hand. He received his first film-editor credits in 1956, on a short called - On Such a Night and the feature Private's Progress, a war comedy. He was the editor on Kubrick's - Lolita in 1962, which led to the - Dr. Strangelove assignment, a difficult one that involved cutting between three concurrent story lines, one set in the war room of the American government. We had a huge kind of war room of our own in the cutting room, Mr. Harvey told Mr. Kenny, and we put up pieces of paper representing every sequence in different order. It was Kubrick, he said in a 1994 interview with The New York Times, who told Mr. Harvey that he was ready to direct. It was Kubrick, too, who gave him an important piece of advice: If an actor is giving a dazzling performance, hold on to that shot and resist the temptation to cut away to, for instance, the reactions of other characters in the scene. In 1966, Mr. Harvey directed - Dutchman, a short film based on a play by LeRoi Jones, who would become better known as Amiri Baraka. Peter O'Toole was impressed enough by that film that he recruited Mr. Harvey for - The Lion in Winter, in which Mr. O'Toole starred as Henry II opposite Katharine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitaine. Working with her is like going to Paris at the age of 17 and finding everything is the way you thought it would be, Mr. Harvey said. Hepburn won an Oscar for her performance, splitting the award with Barbra Streisand, who won for Funny Girl. Mr. Harvey also directed Hepburn in a well-regarded television adaptation of Tennessee William's - The Glass Menagerie in 1973. John J. O'Connor, reviewing that film in The Times, called it a special TV event, demanding attention. It won four Emmy Awards. But Mr. Harvey's output as a director was limited. His handful of theatrical releases included the comedy - They Might Be Giants in 1971, the drama Richard's Things in 1981 and another Hepburn vehicle, Grace Quigley, in 1985. That movie was poorly received, and Mr. Harvey retreated from film directing, returning only in 1994 for This Can't Be Love, a television movie starring Hepburn and Anthony Quinn. He retired to his Long Island home, which he had acquired three years earlier. He leaves no immediate survivors. Mr. Harvey was comfortable working in Hollywood but preferred life on the East Coast, where the film business was not quite so all-consuming. He told of once having surgery in a Los Angeles hospital. As I was coming to, he recalled, the anesthesiologist said, - I'm very anxious to get into movies.

          Myers Fine Art
        • Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Cityscape Painting
          Apr. 30, 2023

          Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Cityscape Painting

          Est: $6,000 - $8,000

          Paul Thek (American, 1933-1988) Painting. Title - Nocturnal Cityscape. Watercolor painting on paper. Signed lower right Thek 1979. Painting measures 23 high, 16.5 inches wide. Frame measures 27.5 inches high, 21.25 inches wide. Inscribed Harvey on the reverse of the painting. In good condition, not laid down. From the Water Mill, NY estate on Long Island of Academy Award nominated film director Anthony (Tony) Harvey (1930-2017). From Askart.com: The following review, by Holland Cotter, is from The New York Times, October 21, 2010 Paul Thek (1933-1988), the subject of a ragged, moving and much-anticipated retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, was only 54 when he died of AIDS in 1988. But by then he had already slipped through the cracks of art history. Or rather he had fallen into one of the deep trenches that divide that history into artificial islands with names like Pop and Minimalism. Thek came to art with so much going for him — talent, looks, energy and imaginative peculiarity — that for a decade or so he was an island unto himself, an archipelago even. In the early 1960s, when everyone else in New York was into hands-off fabrication and Benday dots, he was modeling hyper-realistic images of meat, raw and bleeding, from beeswax. Gross and funny, they had people buzzing. Then in 1967 Thek abruptly left for Europe and radically changed his art. Instead of sculpture, he created immense, collaborative, ephemeral environments from throwaway stuff: newspapers, candles, flowers, onions, eggs, sand. When their time was up, these works went into the rubbish bin. Thek, with his long blond hair and pied-piper charm, was a big success in Europe. Museums threw open their doors. He stayed for nine years. In 1976 he returned to New York and had a nasty shock. Almost no one here remembered the work he had done in the 1960s, or knew what he had been up to in Europe in the years since, or cared about what he was doing in the present. He had been away too long. The '60s were over. He had a few Manhattan gallery shows and a museum solo in Philadelphia, but people stayed away. Depressed and angry, he painted quick, small pictures in his East Village walk-up, smoked a lot of pot, cruised local parks and kept an obsessively confessional diary. To support himself, he bagged groceries in a supermarket, washed hospital floors. Europe was far, far away; 1980s New York, with its bottomless cash and gated art world, far too close. His memorial service at St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery was a fair gauge of his stature. The church wasn't packed, but the eulogists — Robert Wilson, Susan Sontag — were stars. Sontag, an old friend, had dedicated her breakthrough book, Against Interpretation, to Thek in 1966. In 1989 she would dedicate another, AIDS and Its Metaphors, to his memory. Since his death Thek's reputation, always high in Europe, has grown in the United States. In the 1990s, a time of identity politics and AIDS, there were Thek shows, articles, books. In the early 2000s, with young artists interested in the quirky and the personal in art, his influence was strong and was acknowledged by older figures like Robert Gober and Mike Kelley. Now, finally, if with slightly behind-the-beat timing, comes Paul Thek: Diver, a Retrospective, at the Whitney. What do we find? Less than hoped for, perhaps, but more than anticipated: solid concentrations of the early sculptures and the later paintings; mere scraps of the great environments that came between. Do they add up to a career survey? With the help of documentary photographs, an accessible catalog, and an application of Thek's own definition of faith — Believing is seeing — they do. The beginnings of that career were ordinary. The artist was born George Joseph Thek — the Paul came later — to a middle-class Brooklyn family of German and Irish descent. His parents were Roman Catholic; the first art he saw was in churches. His connection to religion remained deep, and deeply conflicted. He studied painting at Cooper Union in the 1950s and at that time met Sontag, Eva Hesse and the photographer Peter Hujar. Thek was alert to the new art and artists around him: Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenburg and Robert Rauschenberg; later Joseph Beuys and Arte Povera. He readily spoke of their impact on him. He made a momentous first trip to Europe in 1962. He cried in front of van Goghs in Amsterdam, stood drop-jawed before Michelangelo in Rome. The major event, though, came when he and Hujar, traveling as lovers, stumbled on Capuchin catacombs in Sicily: caves packed with corpses encased in glass coffins and propped against walls. Hujar took photographs; Thek got ideas for a new kind of art. What resulted were the sculptures of meat and amputated limbs, which Thek sealed into sleek Formica and plexiglass containers, and in one instance into an Andy Warhol Brillo box turned on its side. Collectively called Technological Reliquaries, they were clearly sendups of Minimalism's industrial machismo and Pop's complicit consumerism — though at a time when a brutal war was building in Southeast Asia, they also hinted at larger politics. The culminating work from this period, The Tomb — Death of a Hippie, became Thek's most famous, and infamous, piece: it consisted of a full-size cast of his body laid out as if dead, surrounded by sacramental bowls and possible drug paraphernalia, inside a pink wooden pyramid. Readings of the image have been endless: it's a symbol of the putrefying ideals of the 1960s; it's a narcissistic joke. Whatever its meaning, the piece now exists only in photographs. Obituary from NY Times - Dec. 13, 2017: Anthony Harvey, Lion in Winter - Director and Kubrick Editor, Dies at 87. It might have gone down as the most ridiculous scene in the most audacious film that Anthony Harvey ever worked on, but at least as Mr. Harvey told the story, a momentous event in the real world kept it from the moviegoing public. It was an epic two minutes worth of pie throwing, and it was originally to be the ending of - Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, - Stanley Kubrick's dark satire of the nuclear age. Mr. Harvey, the editor on that movie, was pretty pleased with the way the chaotic scene had come out. It was a brilliant piece of work, he once said. Who knows? I certainly thought it was. But the movie, which was scheduled for release in January 1964, was to receive its press premiere in late November 1963, right when all sorts of plans were thrown into turmoil by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. That ending, how it started, the George Scott character threw a custard pie to the Russian ambassador, and it missed and hit the president, Mr. Harvey told the film journalist Glenn Kenny in 2009. Columbia Pictures, he said, was very nervous about anything to show the president, any president in that state. As a result, the pie-throwing scene was scrapped. Others involved with the movie have over the years given different explanations for the changed ending, but in any case the airborne pies were replaced with the now familiar montage of nuclear explosions - set to Vera Lynn's rendition of the song We'll Meet Again, an unsettling ending instead of a slapstick one. Mr. Harvey would go on to become a director himself, teaming with Katharine Hepburn on several films, most notably The Lion in Winter (1968), for which he was nominated for an Oscar. He died on Nov. 23 at his home in Water Mill, on Long Island, at age 87. The Brockett Funeral Home confirmed the death. Mr. Harvey was born on June 3, 1930, in London. His father, Geoffrey Harrison, died when he was young, and after his mother, the former Dorothy Leon, remarried, he took the surname of his stepfather, Morris Harvey, an actor. He got an early taste of the movie business when he was cast in a small part in the 1945 film "Caesar and Cleopatra," which starred Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh, but his real entree came when he landed a job as an editor for the British filmmakers John and Roy Boulting. He learned the art of editing as it was done in predigital days, pasting countless film clips together by hand. He received his first film-editor credits in 1956, on a short called - On Such a Night and the feature Private's Progress, a war comedy. He was the editor on Kubrick's - Lolita in 1962, which led to the - Dr. Strangelove assignment, a difficult one that involved cutting between three concurrent story lines, one set in the war room of the American government. We had a huge kind of war room of our own in the cutting room, Mr. Harvey told Mr. Kenny, and we put up pieces of paper representing every sequence in different order. It was Kubrick, he said in a 1994 interview with The New York Times, who told Mr. Harvey that he was ready to direct. It was Kubrick, too, who gave him an important piece of advice: If an actor is giving a dazzling performance, hold on to that shot and resist the temptation to cut away to, for instance, the reactions of other characters in the scene. In 1966, Mr. Harvey directed - Dutchman, a short film based on a play by LeRoi Jones, who would become better known as Amiri Baraka. Peter O'Toole was impressed enough by that film that he recruited Mr. Harvey for - The Lion in Winter, in which Mr. O'Toole starred as Henry II opposite Katharine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitaine. Working with her is like going to Paris at the age of 17 and finding everything is the way you thought it would be, Mr. Harvey said. Hepburn won an Oscar for her performance, splitting the award with Barbra Streisand, who won for Funny Girl. Mr. Harvey also directed Hepburn in a well-regarded television adaptation of Tennessee William's - The Glass Menagerie in 1973. John J. O'Connor, reviewing that film in The Times, called it a special TV event, demanding attention. It won four Emmy Awards. But Mr. Harvey's output as a director was limited. His handful of theatrical releases included the comedy - They Might Be Giants in 1971, the drama Richard's Things in 1981 and another Hepburn vehicle, Grace Quigley, in 1985. That movie was poorly received, and Mr. Harvey retreated from film directing, returning only in 1994 for This Can't Be Love, a television movie starring Hepburn and Anthony Quinn. He retired to his Long Island home, which he had acquired three years earlier. He leaves no immediate survivors. Mr. Harvey was comfortable working in Hollywood but preferred life on the East Coast, where the film business was not quite so all-consuming. He told of once having surgery in a Los Angeles hospital. As I was coming to, he recalled, the anesthesiologist said, - I'm very anxious to get into movies.

          Myers Fine Art
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) graphite and watercolour on pape
          Mar. 01, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) graphite and watercolour on pape

          Est: £10,000 - £15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) graphite and watercolour on paper 24 x 18in. (61 x 46cm.)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) watercolour and graphite on pape
          Mar. 01, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) watercolour and graphite on pape

          Est: £10,000 - £15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (cityscape) watercolour and graphite on paper 24 x 18in. (61 x 46cm.)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (beach with figures) watercolour and graphit
          Mar. 01, 2023

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (beach with figures) watercolour and graphit

          Est: £12,000 - £18,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (beach with figures) watercolour and graphite on paper 18 x 24in. (46 x 61cm.)

          Christie's
        • 28 Paul Thek Etchings, Estate Stamped Edition
          Dec. 03, 2022

          28 Paul Thek Etchings, Estate Stamped Edition

          Est: $5,000 - $7,000

          Lot is comprised of the complete suite of small-format etchings from the artist's archive. Provenance: Brooke Alexander Gallery, New York, New York.

          Palm Beach Modern Auctions
        • Paul Thek, Untitled (Cell), 1984
          Dec. 02, 2022

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Cell), 1984

          Est: €50,000 - €60,000

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Cell), 1984

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Paul Thek, Untitled (Cityscape), 1987
          Dec. 02, 2022

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Cityscape), 1987

          Est: €40,000 - €50,000

          Signed and dated 'Thek 87'.

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Paul Thek, Untitled (Selfportrait, Ponza, Oct. 1970), 1970
          Dec. 02, 2022

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Selfportrait, Ponza, Oct. 1970), 1970

          Est: €25,000 - €30,000

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Selfportrait, Ponza, Oct. 1970), 1970

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Paul Thek, Spinning Top, 1969
          Dec. 02, 2022

          Paul Thek, Spinning Top, 1969

          Est: €30,000 - €40,000

          Paul Thek, Spinning Top, 1969

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Thek, Paul - 3 Original-Photographien, 1 Klappkart…
          Nov. 12, 2022

          Thek, Paul - 3 Original-Photographien, 1 Klappkart…

          Est: €160 - €240

          Thek, Paul 3 Original-Photographien, 1 Klappkarte und 1 Kataloge. 1968-1969. Der US-amerikanische Maler und Objektkünstler Paul Thek (1933-1988) arbeitete 1964 mit Andy Warhol zusammen und stellte unter anderem bei der 4. documenta, 1968 und der documenta 5, 1972 in Kassel aus. - I. 3 Original-Photographien. Vintage. Silbergelatine. Verso handschriftlich bezeichnet und mit Stempeln der Galerie Thelen und des Photographen R.L. Hilgering. "Ausstellung: Paul Thek, Sept-Okt. 68 'A procession in Honor of Aesthetic Progress' I. Phase". 24,5 x 16,5 cm (2) und 18 x 24,3 cm. Zeigt zwei Detailansichten und eine Gesamtansicht der Installation in der Galerie Thelen in Essen. - II. Klappkarte zur Ausstellung Galerie Thelen, Essen, 1969. - Erste Ausstellung Thelens in Deutschland und die zweite außerhalb der USA. - III. Illustriertes Leporello in 4 Segmenten mit eingelegtem Textblatt und Zettel. Zur Ausstellung Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 17.4.-1.6.1969. Mit 8 ganzseitigen Abbildungen. - Guter Zustand.

          Nosbüsch & Stucke GmbH
        • Paul Thek, Avoid Caesar and Stylistic Decisions (diptych), 1979
          Sep. 24, 2022

          Paul Thek, Avoid Caesar and Stylistic Decisions (diptych), 1979

          Est: $2,000 - $3,000

          Paul Thek (1933 - 1988) Avoid Caesar and Stylistic Decisions (diptych), 1979 ballpoint pen and watercolor on paper signed and dated lower left/right: Thek / '79

          Santa Fe Art Auction
        • [S AND 1970S] PAUL THEK & EDWIN KLEIN, A DOCUMENT MADE BY PAUL THEK AND EDWIN KLEIN
          Jun. 24, 2022

          [S AND 1970S] PAUL THEK & EDWIN KLEIN, A DOCUMENT MADE BY PAUL THEK AND EDWIN KLEIN

          Est: €150 - €300

          Amsterdam/Stockholm, Stedelijk Museum/Moderna Museet, 1969. Softcover, 41 x 31 cm, 130 pp. Large format artists' book, which contains photo-collages of newspaper articles, and b/w photos by Wim Davits, Edwin Klein, Tom Lenders, Max Natkiel and Jean-Paul Vroom. Iconic collaborative work created by the American artist Paul Thek (1933-1988) and the Dutch photographer and designer Edwin Klein (1946-) in conjunction with Thek's 1969 exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, and the Moderne Museet, Stockholm. A colour poster in serigraph, 40 x 58 cm, is inserted as issued. An extremely rare item in mint condition.

          Zwiggelaar Auctions
        • Untitled
          Jun. 10, 2022

          Untitled

          Est: €20,000 - €30,000

          Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Untitled signed and dated 71 ; inscribed on the reverse oil on canvas 20,5 x 25,5 cm ; 8 1/16 x 10 1/16 in. Executed in 1971. __________________________________________________________________________ Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Untitled signé et daté 71 ; inscrit au dos huile sur toile 20,5 x 25,5 cm ; 8 1/16 x 10 1/16 in. Exécuté en 1971. Bid on Sotheby's

          Sotheby's
        • Untitled
          Jun. 10, 2022

          Untitled

          Est: €20,000 - €30,000

          Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Untitled signed and dated 71 ; inscribed on the stretcher oil on canvas 20,5 x 25 cm ; 8 1/16 x 9 13/16 in. Executed in 1971. __________________________________________________________________________ Paul Thek 1933 - 1988 Untitled signé et daté 71 ; inscrit sur le châssis huile sur toile 20,5 x 25 cm ; 8 1/16 x 9 13/16 in. Exécuté en 1971. Bid on Sotheby's

          Sotheby's
        • Paul Thek and Edwin Klein, Artist book and documents, two
          Mar. 10, 2022

          Paul Thek and Edwin Klein, Artist book and documents, two

          Est: $300 - $500

          Paul Thek and Edwin Klein Artist book and documents, two 1969-73 bound printed paper Complete Lot Details Paul Thek: Art, Pyramid, Easter Paul Thek, Kunstmuseum Luzern, Luzern, Switzerland, 1973. A document made by Paul Thek and Edwin Klein Paul Thek and Edwin Klein, Stedelijk Museum and Moderna Museet, Amsterdam / Stockholm, 1969. A document made by Paul Thek and Edwin Klein Paul Thek and Edwin Klein, Stedelijk Museum and Moderna Museet, Amsterdam / Stockholm, 1969. This work will ship from Rago in Lambertville, New Jersey. condition: One large publication retains original exterior case, showing some minor tearing to securing tabs. Soft crease to exterior of other copy and minor wear to wraps of third book. Interiors are clean.

          Rago Arts and Auction Center
        • Paul THEK (1933-1988) American
          Feb. 11, 2022

          Paul THEK (1933-1988) American

          Est: $16,000 - $24,000

          Paul THEK (1933-1988) ; Sea ; 1975 ; acrylic on newspaper page / framed ; dimensions 27,8 x 26,5 cm (11 x 10 1/2 in.) ; frame size 41 x 39,3 cm (16 x 15 1/2 in.) ; signed, named and dated lower right corner ; Shipping to USA - DHL $300 , National post with tracking service $155 / Shipping to EU, Russia, Middle Assia - DHL $200 , National post with tracking service $85

          Art-Torg
        • Paul THEK (1933-1988) American
          Dec. 17, 2021

          Paul THEK (1933-1988) American

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          Paul THEK (1933-1988) ; Untitled ; 1970 ; acrylic on paper laid to canvas ; dimensions 60,7 x 46 cm (24 x 18 in.) ; signed lower right corner ; Shipping to USA - DHL $300 , National post with tracking service $155 / Shipping to EU, Russia, Middle Assia - DHL $200 , National post with tracking service $85

          Art-Torg
        • [CONCEPTUAL ART] PAUL THEK & EDWIN KLEIN, A DOCUMENT MADE BY PAUL THEK AND EDWIN KLEIN
          Dec. 09, 2021

          [CONCEPTUAL ART] PAUL THEK & EDWIN KLEIN, A DOCUMENT MADE BY PAUL THEK AND EDWIN KLEIN

          Est: €150 - €300

          Amsterdam/Stockholm, Stedelijk Museum/Moderna Museet, 1969. Softcover, 41 x 31 cm, 130 pp. Large format artists' book, which contains photo-collages of newspaper articles, and b/w photos by Wim Davits, Edwin Klein, Tom Lenders, Max Natkiel and Jean-Paul Vroom. Iconic collaborative work created by the American artist Paul Thek (1933-1988) and the Dutch photographer and designer Edwin Klein (1946-) in conjunction with Thek's 1969 exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, and the Moderne Museet, Stockholm. A colour poster in serigraph, 40 x 58 cm, is inserted as issued. Altogether an extremely rare item in mint condition.

          Zwiggelaar Auctions
        • Paul Thek, Untitled (Seascape with Rowboat), Around 1987
          Dec. 08, 2020

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Seascape with Rowboat), Around 1987

          Est: €40,000 - €50,000

          Paul Thek, Untitled (Seascape with Rowboat), Around 1987

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • PAUL THEK (AMERICAN, 1933-1988) EYE Etching: 8 x 10 in. (paper), 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (image)
          Oct. 07, 2020

          PAUL THEK (AMERICAN, 1933-1988) EYE Etching: 8 x 10 in. (paper), 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (image)

          Est: $500 - $700

          PAUL THEK (AMERICAN, 1933-1988) EYE Etching: 8 x 10 in. (paper), 3 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (image) Framed; lower right "George Paul Thek Estate" stamp; lower left numbered in pencil: 3/25 Provenance: Rick Collar Collection

          Potomack Company
        • Paul Thek, Untitled, 1975/1992
          Jun. 19, 2020

          Paul Thek, Untitled, 1975/1992

          Est: €18,000 - €20,000

          Each numbered and with embossed stamp "GEORGE PAUL THEK ESTATE". Edition George Paul Thek Estate, New York (each with embossed stamp). Numbered IX/XII. One of 12 roman numbered examples (+25 +6 A.P.). The etchings were printed in 1992 by the estate of the artist.

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Paul Thek, Untitled, 1971
          Nov. 29, 2019

          Paul Thek, Untitled, 1971

          Est: €30,000 - €40,000

          In 1969, Paul Thek began his “Newspaper Paintings”, loose series of works in gouache or oil paint on newspaper pages, mostly the International Herald Tribune, and continued these into the 1980s. In the early works from 1969 to 1971, idyllic summery motifs dominate such as “Diver”, views of a lonely swimmer or diver in endless blue, “Island”, island silhouettes on the horizon above a wide expanse of water, or “Red Men by Sea”, a wave breaking on the beach: Thek paints them as a series, whereby the individual motifs become components of visualized sequences of movement or time, and incorporates them partly into his extensive spatial installations. In the “Newspaper Paintings”, the mass medium newspaper, with its serious or banal contents, is superimposed by the often puzzling, exuberantly fantastical motif worlds of the artist. The documentation of the disdainful everyday serves as a foundation for a pastel-coloured dimension which appears timelessly beautiful. Diverse, esoteric motifs are also found in the early works, such as the dinosaurs, which Thek depicted several times in the soft, chalky blue and pink tones of the early series. The greatest possible contrasts come into conflict here: pastose, colour-intense painting and brittle, fragile newspaper, archaic creatures and human civilization, primeval times millions of years ago, and the present situation, death and life. Thek's examination of the thematic complexes of time and transience which runs through his entire work, takes many forms. RefZei191119

          Kunsthaus Lempertz KG
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) Two men throwing words at each other huile sur toile dans un cadre de l'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.
          Jun. 05, 2019

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Two men throwing words at each other huile sur toile dans un cadre de l'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.

          Est: €25,000 - €35,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Two men throwing words at each other titré '"TWO MEN THROWING WORDS AT EACH OTHER"' (en bas au centre) huile sur toile dans un cadre de l'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm. Réalisé en 1980. titled '"TWO MEN THROWING WORDS AT EACH OTHER"' (lower center) oil on canvas in artist's frame with lighting 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 x 5 ½ in. Executed in 1979-1980.

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) This won't take a minute huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.
          Jun. 05, 2019

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) This won't take a minute huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.

          Est: €25,000 - €35,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) This won't take a minute titré '"THIS WONT TAKE A MINUTE"' (en bas au centre); signé et daté 'Thek 80' (sur le châssis) huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm. Réalisé en 1979-1980. titled '"THIS WONT TAKE A MINUTE"' (lower center); signed and dated 'Thek 80' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas in artist's frame with lighting 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 x 5 ½ in. Executed in 1979-1980.

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) Boy Flipping huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.
          Jun. 05, 2019

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Boy Flipping huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm.

          Est: €25,000 - €35,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Boy Flipping signé et daté 'Thek '79' (sur le châssis) huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 34 x 14 cm. Réalisé en 1979-1980. signed and dated 'Thek '79' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas in artist's frame with lighting 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 x 5 ½ in. Executed in 1979-1980.

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) Me and you huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 35 x 14 cm.
          Jun. 05, 2019

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Me and you huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 35 x 14 cm.

          Est: €25,000 - €35,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Me and you titré '"ME YOU"' (en haut au centre); signé et daté 'Thek '79' (sur le châssis) huile sur toile dans un cadre d'artiste avec éclairage 27 x 35 x 14 cm. Réalisé en 1979-1980. titled '"ME YOU"' (upper center); signed and dated 'Thek '79' (on the stretcher) oil on canvas in artist's frame with lighting 10 5/8 x 13 5/8 x 5 ½ in. Executed in 1979-1980.

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - From the series: The Personal Effects of the Pied Piper
          Oct. 18, 2018

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - From the series: The Personal Effects of the Pied Piper

          Est: €3,000 - €5,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) From the series: The Personal Effects of the Pied Piper bronze à patine noire; en neuf parties neuf éléments: le plus petit: 0.4 x 3.5 x 16 cm. (nine elements the smallest: 1/8 x 1 3/8 x 6 ¼ in.) le plus grand: 30 x 17.5 x 16.5 cm. (the biggest: 11 ¾ x 6 7/8 x 6 ½ in.)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - Untitled (five works on newspaper)
          Oct. 18, 2018

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - Untitled (five works on newspaper)

          Est: €5,000 - €7,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (five works on newspaper) acrylique sur papier journal chaque: 58 x 85 cm. (each: 22 7/8 x 33 ½ in.) (6)

          Christie's
        • PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - Untitled (bridge)
          Oct. 18, 2018

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) - Untitled (bridge)

          Est: €10,000 - €15,000

          PAUL THEK (1933-1988) Untitled (bridge) huile sur toile 30 x 39.5 cm. (11 ¾ x 15 ½ in.)

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) - Untitled
          Mar. 06, 2018

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) - Untitled

          Est: £150,000 - £200,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Untitled acrylic on newspaper, in four parts each: 24 ½ x 35in. (62 x 89cm.)

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) - Revised Ark
          Mar. 01, 2018

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) - Revised Ark

          Est: $8,000 - $12,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Revised Ark graphite and watercolor on paper 18 1/8 x 24 in. (46 x 61 cm.)

          Christie's
        • Paul Thek (1933-1988) Untitled (Fish)
          May. 18, 2017

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Untitled (Fish)

          Est: $15,000 - $20,000

          Paul Thek (1933-1988) Untitled (Fish) latex 2 1/8 x 17 1/2 x 4 in. (5.3 x 44.4 x 10 cm.)

          Christie's
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