Loading Spinner

János Thorma Sold at Auction Prices

Painter, Genre Painter

See Artist Details

0 Lots

Sort By:

Categories

    Auction Date

    Seller

    Seller Location

    Price Range

    to
    • Janos Thorma
      Apr. 16, 2024

      Janos Thorma

      Est: $2,500 - $3,500

      Hungarian, 1870-1937 The Red Umbrella, 1929 Signed THORMA (lr); inscribed in Hungarian and dated on the reverse Oil on canvas 23 3/4 x 29 3/4 inches (60.3 x 75.5 cm) (Frame: 35 1/2 x 41 1/4 inches)

      DOYLE Auctioneers & Appraisers
    • Janos Thorma
      Mar. 20, 2021

      Janos Thorma

      Est: $1,000 - $1,500

      Girl, Oil on wood, 55X42 cm, Signed.

      Tiroche Auction House
    • Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Portrait, Oil on Board.
      Nov. 19, 2020

      Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Portrait, Oil on Board.

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Portrait, Oil on Board. Signed. 50x39cm. Minor color peels to top left corner. Janos Thorma (1870-1937) was a Hungarian painter. A representative figure of the Nagybanya artists colony, which started in 1896, in Nagybanya, Austro-Hungary (today Baia Mare, Romania), He moved through different styles, shifted from the naturalism that was the aesthetic of the colony, to historical subjects, to romantic realism and to a Post-Impressionism style. His work is held by the Hungarian National Gallery, the Thorma Janos Muzeum, regional museums and private collectors. In 1966, the Hungarian National Gallery held a major commemorative exhibition, The Art of Nagybanya, commemorating the innovations of Thorma and fellow artists. In February 2013, it opens a major retrospective of more than 100 pieces of Janos Thorma's work, drawing from numerous institutions and private collectors in Europe. Janos Thorma was born in 1870 in Kiskunhalas, Austro-Hungary to Bela Thorma, a tax agency cashier, and his wife Gizella Fekete. The family moved to Agybanya when the youth was 14. He began to study art at Bertalan Szekely's drawing school. At the age of 18, he went to Munich, where he studied from 1888 to 1890 under the Hungarian painter, Simon Hollosy, who held free classes. Following a path similar to other young artists from Austro-Hungary, in 1891 and 1893–95, Thorma also went to Paris, where he studied at the Academie Julian. His first significant painting, Szenvedok (The Bereaved), was exhibited at the Budapest Art Gallery, then at the Paris Salon in 1894. In 1896, on the occasion of the millennium of the Magyars' conquest of Pannonia, he presented his painting about The 13 Martyrs of Arad, Aradi vertanuk (The Martyrs of Arad), which gained him nationwide renown in Hungary. Many of his early works were large canvases on historical themes. In 1896 he was one of the founders of the Nagybanya artists colony, whose members included Simon Hollosy, Karoly Ferenczy, and Istvan Reti, who achieved international recognition. From 1902-27, he was a teacher at the Nagybanya Painters' Association, becoming its president in 1917. In 1898 Thorma began to paint Talpra magyar! (Rise up, Hungarian!), on which he worked intermittently almost to his death. His first paintings were naturalistic, and an early inspiration was Jules Bastien-Lepage. Thorma used the artist's most popular work, the Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, in 1892 as a model in his own painting of Iren Biltz. Thorma's painting had the characteristic atmosphere of Art Nouveau. As a young man, Thorma felt that naturalism offered him too little to achieve his goals as a painter, and he was inspired by German romanticism (as shown in his The Bereaved, 1892) and French classicism (The Martyrs of Arad, 1893–94). In 1897, following a long trip to Western Europe, Thorma painted several Biblical subjects, including Bekesseg veletek – "Pax vobiscum", which show the influence of Rembrandt. After 1900, Thorma's work turned toward realism: Kocsisok kozott (Among the Coachmen) (1902); Oktober elsejen (On the First of October) (1903); Kartyazok (The Card-Players, 1904). In 1906-07 he showed influence from Spanish sources in his Ciganyutca (The Gypsies Street, 1907). He also was inspired by the French painter, Paul Gauguin, as shown in Husveti kenyerszenteles (The Blessing of the Bread) and Templombamenok (People Going toward Church), both circa 1910. After 1920 Thorma developed his own en plein air style, based on his substantial knowledge of painting. He used certain elements of neo-classicism in such works as Tavasz (Spring, 1920) and Furdes utan (After Bathing, 1928). In the last decade of his life, he painted impressionistic landscapes and portraits. In 1918 he took his historical works to Hungary, as he expected Romania to be invaded at the end of World War I. He stored them in Debrecen. After the Treaty of Trianon, when the Nagybanya region was incorporated to the Kingdom of Romania, only Thorma remained in the town; the other Hungarian painters left. The government encouraged him to continue the naturalistic "official Nagybanya school, " although his own work had developed in quite different ways. In September 1929, Thorma, aged 59 and until then a bachelor, married Margit Kiss, a painting disciple and distant relative. He died in Baia Mare eight years later. Since the late twentieth century, and the opening of the Eastern Bloc, there has been renewed attention given to the innovations of the Naybanya artists. In collaboration with other institutions, the Hungarian National Gallery has organized a major retrospective of Thorma's work, consisting of more than 100 pieces. Its title classifies him as a representative painter of the Barbizon school in Hungary. The exhibit opens in February 2013, through the collaboration of the "Art Museum in Nagybanya, the Janus Pannonius Museum in Pecs, the Mora Ferenc Museum in Szeged, the Deri Museum in Debrecen, the Herman Otto Museum in Miskolc, the Katona Jozsef Museum in Kecskemet, and the Thorma Janos Museum in Kiskunhalas, as well as Hungarian, German and Romanian private collectors. Source: Wikipedia.

      Pasarel
    • JANOS THORMA (HUNGARIAN 1870-1937)
      Jul. 25, 2020

      JANOS THORMA (HUNGARIAN 1870-1937)

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      JANOS THORMA (HUNGARIAN 1870-1937) Pair of Figures Outside Žažar oil on canvas 55 x 65 cm (21 5/8 x 25 5/8 in.) signed lower right CONDITION Observed in frame, the work is in overall very good condition. Small areas of fine and stable craquelure, mainly to the coat. Small paint chip lower left. Canvas slightly loose on stretcher. Inspection under UV light shows no apparent areas of restoration. N.B. All lots are sold in as-is condition at the time of sale. Please note that any condition statement regarding works of art is given as a courtesy to our clients in order to assist them in assessing the condition. The report is a genuine opinion held by Shapiro Auctions and should not be treated as a statement of fact. The absence of a condition report or a photograph does not preclude the absence of defects or restoration, nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. Shapiro Auctions, LLC., including its consultants and agents, shall have no responsibility for any error or omission.

      Shapiro Auctions LLC
    • Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.
      Jul. 02, 2020

      Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.

      Est: $6,000 - $10,000

      Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas. Signed. Framed. 50x70cm. Frame:64x84cm. Janos Thorma (1870-1937) was a Hungarian painter. A representative figure of the Nagybanya artists colony, which started in 1896, in Nagybanya, Austro-Hungary (today Baia Mare, Romania), He moved through different styles, shifted from the naturalism that was the aesthetic of the colony, to historical subjects, to romantic realism and to a Post-Impressionism style. His work is held by the Hungarian National Gallery, the Thorma Janos Muzeum, regional museums and private collectors. In 1966, the Hungarian National Gallery held a major commemorative exhibition, The Art of Nagybanya, commemorating the innovations of Thorma and fellow artists. In February 2013, it opens a major retrospective of more than 100 pieces of Janos Thorma's work, drawing from numerous institutions and private collectors in Europe. Janos Thorma was born in 1870 in Kiskunhalas, Austro-Hungary to Bela Thorma, a tax agency cashier, and his wife Gizella Fekete. The family moved to Agybanya when the youth was 14. He began to study art at Bertalan Szekely's drawing school. At the age of 18, he went to Munich, where he studied from 1888 to 1890 under the Hungarian painter, Simon Hollosy, who held free classes. Following a path similar to other young artists from Austro-Hungary, in 1891 and 1893–95, Thorma also went to Paris, where he studied at the Academie Julian. His first significant painting, Szenvedok (The Bereaved), was exhibited at the Budapest Art Gallery, then at the Paris Salon in 1894. In 1896, on the occasion of the millennium of the Magyars' conquest of Pannonia, he presented his painting about The 13 Martyrs of Arad, Aradi vertanuk (The Martyrs of Arad), which gained him nationwide renown in Hungary. Many of his early works were large canvases on historical themes. In 1896 he was one of the founders of the Nagybanya artists colony, whose members included Simon Hollosy, Karoly Ferenczy, and Istvan Reti, who achieved international recognition. From 1902-27, he was a teacher at the Nagybanya Painters' Association, becoming its president in 1917. In 1898 Thorma began to paint Talpra magyar! (Rise up, Hungarian!), on which he worked intermittently almost to his death. His first paintings were naturalistic, and an early inspiration was Jules Bastien-Lepage. Thorma used the artist's most popular work, the Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, in 1892 as a model in his own painting of Iren Biltz. Thorma's painting had the characteristic atmosphere of Art Nouveau. As a young man, Thorma felt that naturalism offered him too little to achieve his goals as a painter, and he was inspired by German romanticism (as shown in his The Bereaved, 1892) and French classicism (The Martyrs of Arad, 1893–94). In 1897, following a long trip to Western Europe, Thorma painted several Biblical subjects, including Bekesseg veletek – "Pax vobiscum", which show the influence of Rembrandt. After 1900, Thorma's work turned toward realism: Kocsisok kozott (Among the Coachmen) (1902); Oktober elsejen (On the First of October) (1903); Kartyazok (The Card-Players, 1904). In 1906-07 he showed influence from Spanish sources in his Ciganyutca (The Gypsies Street, 1907). He also was inspired by the French painter, Paul Gauguin, as shown in Husveti kenyerszenteles (The Blessing of the Bread) and Templombamenok (People Going toward Church), both circa 1910. After 1920 Thorma developed his own en plein air style, based on his substantial knowledge of painting. He used certain elements of neo-classicism in such works as Tavasz (Spring, 1920) and Furdes utan (After Bathing, 1928). In the last decade of his life, he painted impressionistic landscapes and portraits. In 1918 he took his historical works to Hungary, as he expected Romania to be invaded at the end of World War I. He stored them in Debrecen. After the Treaty of Trianon, when the Nagybanya region was incorporated to the Kingdom of Romania, only Thorma remained in the town; the other Hungarian painters left. The government encouraged him to continue the naturalistic "official Nagybanya school, " although his own work had developed in quite different ways. In September 1929, Thorma, aged 59 and until then a bachelor, married Margit Kiss, a painting disciple and distant relative. He died in Baia Mare eight years later. Since the late twentieth century, and the opening of the Eastern Bloc, there has been renewed attention given to the innovations of the Naybanya artists. In collaboration with other institutions, the Hungarian National Gallery has organized a major retrospective of Thorma's work, consisting of more than 100 pieces. Its title classifies him as a representative painter of the Barbizon school in Hungary. The exhibit opens in February 2013, through the collaboration of the "Art Museum in Nagybanya, the Janus Pannonius Museum in Pecs, the Mora Ferenc Museum in Szeged, the Deri Museum in Debrecen, the Herman Otto Museum in Miskolc, the Katona Jozsef Museum in Kecskemet, and the Thorma Janos Museum in Kiskunhalas, as well as Hungarian, German and Romanian private collectors. Source: Wikipedia.

      Pasarel
    • Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas
      Feb. 25, 2020

      Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas

      Est: €3,800 - €4,500

      Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas h:57 w: 46 cm. signed lower right Other Notes: Location: Israel. For estimated delivery time please contact us. Condition report available upon request.

      Matsart Auctioneers & Appraisers
    • Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas
      Dec. 18, 2019

      Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas

      Est: €3,800 - €4,500

      Thorma Janos 1870-1937 (Hungarian) Couple in a landscape oil on canvas h:57 w: 46 cm. signed lower right

      Matsart Auctioneers & Appraisers
    • Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.
      Oct. 30, 2019

      Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.

      Est: $6,000 - $12,000

      Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas. Signed. Framed. 50x70cm. Frame:64x84cm. Janos Thorma (1870-1937) was a Hungarian painter. A representative figure of the Nagybanya artists colony, which started in 1896, in Nagybanya, Austro-Hungary (today Baia Mare, Romania), He moved through different styles, shifted from the naturalism that was the aesthetic of the colony, to historical subjects, to romantic realism and to a Post-Impressionism style. His work is held by the Hungarian National Gallery, the Thorma Janos Muzeum, regional museums and private collectors. In 1966, the Hungarian National Gallery held a major commemorative exhibition, The Art of Nagybanya, commemorating the innovations of Thorma and fellow artists. In February 2013, it opens a major retrospective of more than 100 pieces of Janos Thorma's work, drawing from numerous institutions and private collectors in Europe. Janos Thorma was born in 1870 in Kiskunhalas, Austro-Hungary to Bela Thorma, a tax agency cashier, and his wife Gizella Fekete. The family moved to Agybanya when the youth was 14. He began to study art at Bertalan Szekely's drawing school.  At the age of 18, he went to Munich, where he studied from 1888 to 1890 under the Hungarian painter, Simon Hollosy, who held free classes. Following a path similar to other young artists from Austro-Hungary, in 1891 and 1893–95, Thorma also went to Paris, where he studied at the Academie Julian. His first significant painting, Szenvedok (The Bereaved), was exhibited at the Budapest Art Gallery, then at the Paris Salon in 1894. In 1896, on the occasion of the millennium of the Magyars' conquest of Pannonia, he presented his painting about The 13 Martyrs of Arad, Aradi vertanuk (The Martyrs of Arad), which gained him nationwide renown in Hungary. Many of his early works were large canvases on historical themes. In 1896 he was one of the founders of the Nagybanya artists colony, whose members included Simon Hollosy, Karoly Ferenczy, and Istvan Reti, who achieved international recognition. From 1902-27, he was a teacher at the Nagybanya Painters' Association, becoming its president in 1917. In 1898 Thorma began to paint Talpra magyar! (Rise up, Hungarian!), on which he worked intermittently almost to his death. His first paintings were naturalistic, and an early inspiration was Jules Bastien-Lepage. Thorma used the artist's most popular work, the Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, in 1892 as a model in his own painting of Iren Biltz. Thorma's painting had the characteristic atmosphere of Art Nouveau. As a young man, Thorma felt that naturalism offered him too little to achieve his goals as a painter, and he was inspired by German romanticism (as shown in his The Bereaved, 1892) and French classicism (The Martyrs of Arad, 1893–94). In 1897, following a long trip to Western Europe, Thorma painted several Biblical subjects, including Bekesseg veletek – "Pax vobiscum", which show the influence of Rembrandt. After 1900, Thorma's work turned toward realism: Kocsisok kozott (Among the Coachmen) (1902); Oktober elsejen (On the First of October) (1903); Kartyazok (The Card-Players, 1904). In 1906-07 he showed influence from Spanish sources in his Ciganyutca (The Gypsies Street, 1907). He also was inspired by the French painter, Paul Gauguin, as shown in Husveti kenyerszenteles (The Blessing of the Bread) and Templombamenok (People Going toward Church), both circa 1910.  After 1920 Thorma developed his own en plein air style, based on his substantial knowledge of painting. He used certain elements of neo-classicism in such works as Tavasz (Spring, 1920) and Furdes utan (After Bathing, 1928). In the last decade of his life, he painted impressionistic landscapes and portraits. In 1918 he took his historical works to Hungary, as he expected Romania to be invaded at the end of World War I. He stored them in Debrecen. After the Treaty of Trianon, when the Nagybanya region was incorporated to the Kingdom of Romania, only Thorma remained in the town; the other Hungarian painters left. The government encouraged him to continue the naturalistic "official Nagybanya school," although his own work had developed in quite different ways. In September 1929, Thorma, aged 59 and until then a bachelor, married Margit Kiss, a painting disciple and distant relative. He died in Baia Mare eight years later. Since the late twentieth century, and the opening of the Eastern Bloc, there has been renewed attention given to the innovations of the Naybanya artists. In collaboration with other institutions, the Hungarian National Gallery has organized a major retrospective of Thorma's work, consisting of more than 100 pieces. Its title classifies him as a representative painter of the Barbizon school in Hungary. The exhibit opens in February 2013, through the collaboration of the "Art Museum in Nagybanya, the Janus Pannonius Museum in Pecs, the Mora Ferenc Museum in Szeged, the Deri Museum in Debrecen, the Herman Otto Museum in Miskolc, the Katona Jozsef Museum in Kecskemet, and the Thorma Janos Museum in Kiskunhalas, as well as Hungarian, German and Romanian private collectors. Source: Wikipedia.

      Pasarel
    • Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.
      Sep. 12, 2019

      Janos Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas.

      Est: $6,000 - $12,000

      Janos Thorma (Hungary, 1870-1937) - Couple, Oil on Canvas. Signed. Framed. 50x70cm. Frame:64x84cm. Janos Thorma (1870-1937) was a Hungarian painter. A representative figure of the Nagybanya artists colony, which started in 1896, in Nagybanya, Austro-Hungary (today Baia Mare, Romania), He moved through different styles, shifted from the naturalism that was the aesthetic of the colony, to historical subjects, to romantic realism and to a Post-Impressionism style. His work is held by the Hungarian National Gallery, the Thorma Janos Muzeum, regional museums and private collectors. In 1966, the Hungarian National Gallery held a major commemorative exhibition, The Art of Nagybanya, commemorating the innovations of Thorma and fellow artists. In February 2013, it opens a major retrospective of more than 100 pieces of Janos Thorma's work, drawing from numerous institutions and private collectors in Europe. Janos Thorma was born in 1870 in Kiskunhalas, Austro-Hungary to Bela Thorma, a tax agency cashier, and his wife Gizella Fekete. The family moved to Agybanya when the youth was 14. He began to study art at Bertalan Szekely's drawing school.  At the age of 18, he went to Munich, where he studied from 1888 to 1890 under the Hungarian painter, Simon Hollosy, who held free classes. Following a path similar to other young artists from Austro-Hungary, in 1891 and 1893–95, Thorma also went to Paris, where he studied at the Academie Julian. His first significant painting, Szenvedok (The Bereaved), was exhibited at the Budapest Art Gallery, then at the Paris Salon in 1894. In 1896, on the occasion of the millennium of the Magyars' conquest of Pannonia, he presented his painting about The 13 Martyrs of Arad, Aradi vertanuk (The Martyrs of Arad), which gained him nationwide renown in Hungary. Many of his early works were large canvases on historical themes. In 1896 he was one of the founders of the Nagybanya artists colony, whose members included Simon Hollosy, Karoly Ferenczy, and Istvan Reti, who achieved international recognition. From 1902-27, he was a teacher at the Nagybanya Painters' Association, becoming its president in 1917. In 1898 Thorma began to paint Talpra magyar! (Rise up, Hungarian!), on which he worked intermittently almost to his death. His first paintings were naturalistic, and an early inspiration was Jules Bastien-Lepage. Thorma used the artist's most popular work, the Portrait of Sarah Bernhardt, in 1892 as a model in his own painting of Iren Biltz. Thorma's painting had the characteristic atmosphere of Art Nouveau. As a young man, Thorma felt that naturalism offered him too little to achieve his goals as a painter, and he was inspired by German romanticism (as shown in his The Bereaved, 1892) and French classicism (The Martyrs of Arad, 1893–94). In 1897, following a long trip to Western Europe, Thorma painted several Biblical subjects, including Bekesseg veletek – "Pax vobiscum", which show the influence of Rembrandt. After 1900, Thorma's work turned toward realism: Kocsisok kozott (Among the Coachmen) (1902); Oktober elsejen (On the First of October) (1903); Kartyazok (The Card-Players, 1904). In 1906-07 he showed influence from Spanish sources in his Ciganyutca (The Gypsies Street, 1907). He also was inspired by the French painter, Paul Gauguin, as shown in Husveti kenyerszenteles (The Blessing of the Bread) and Templombamenok (People Going toward Church), both circa 1910.  After 1920 Thorma developed his own en plein air style, based on his substantial knowledge of painting. He used certain elements of neo-classicism in such works as Tavasz (Spring, 1920) and Furdes utan (After Bathing, 1928). In the last decade of his life, he painted impressionistic landscapes and portraits. In 1918 he took his historical works to Hungary, as he expected Romania to be invaded at the end of World War I. He stored them in Debrecen. After the Treaty of Trianon, when the Nagybanya region was incorporated to the Kingdom of Romania, only Thorma remained in the town; the other Hungarian painters left. The government encouraged him to continue the naturalistic "official Nagybanya school," although his own work had developed in quite different ways. In September 1929, Thorma, aged 59 and until then a bachelor, married Margit Kiss, a painting disciple and distant relative. He died in Baia Mare eight years later. Since the late twentieth century, and the opening of the Eastern Bloc, there has been renewed attention given to the innovations of the Naybanya artists. In collaboration with other institutions, the Hungarian National Gallery has organized a major retrospective of Thorma's work, consisting of more than 100 pieces. Its title classifies him as a representative painter of the Barbizon school in Hungary. The exhibit opens in February 2013, through the collaboration of the "Art Museum in Nagybanya, the Janus Pannonius Museum in Pecs, the Mora Ferenc Museum in Szeged, the Deri Museum in Debrecen, the Herman Otto Museum in Miskolc, the Katona Jozsef Museum in Kecskemet, and the Thorma Janos Museum in Kiskunhalas, as well as Hungarian, German and Romanian private collectors. Source: Wikipedia.

      Pasarel
    • An Intimate Moment
      Oct. 07, 2018

      An Intimate Moment

      Est: Ft2,800,000 - Ft4,000,000

      signed lower right: Thorma

      Kieselbach
    • Nymph in the Grove
      Oct. 07, 2018

      Nymph in the Grove

      Est: Ft4,000,000 - Ft6,500,000

      signed lower left: Thorma

      Kieselbach
    • Thorma János (1870-1937): Red haired woman, 1927
      May. 14, 2018

      Thorma János (1870-1937): Red haired woman, 1927

      Est: €6,430 - €9,646

      Signed bottom right: Thorma János 1927 VI./ ..

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Young Girl (The Purple Dress), 1929
      May. 13, 2018

      Young Girl (The Purple Dress), 1929

      Est: Ft3,000,000 - Ft6,000,000

      signed lower left: Thorma

      Kieselbach
    • Janos Thorma (1870-1937), Portrait of a Scholar
      Apr. 30, 2018

      Janos Thorma (1870-1937), Portrait of a Scholar

      Est: $600 - $1,000

      Technique: Oil on canvas Signature: Signed Dimensions: 50 x 42 cm Condition: No condition report available for this sale. If interested, please make a special request via e-mail. Provenance: The estate of Dr. Eliyahu Yuval.

      Hammersite
    • Nagybány in Winter with the István Tower in the Background
      Dec. 18, 2017

      Nagybány in Winter with the István Tower in the Background

      Est: Ft400,000 - Ft600,000

      signed lower left: Thorma

      Kieselbach
    • Thorma János (1870-1937): Sitting woman, c. 1930
      Dec. 17, 2017

      Thorma János (1870-1937): Sitting woman, c. 1930

      Est: €8,065 - €11,290

      Oil on wood Signed bottom left: Thorma

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Girl in a Striped Dress (Girl with a Cat), 1927
      Oct. 08, 2017

      Girl in a Striped Dress (Girl with a Cat), 1927

      Est: Ft2,000,000 - Ft3,000,000

      Signed lower right: Thorma

      Kieselbach
    • Nude with veil (On the Waterfront)
      May. 15, 2017

      Nude with veil (On the Waterfront)

      Est: €5,806 - €8,065

      Oil on wood

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Thorma János (1870-1937)
      May. 30, 2016

      Thorma János (1870-1937)

      Est: €2,580 - €3,225

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Nude towards Oil on paperboard 50x36,5 cm Signed bottom left: Thorma

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Thorma János (1870-1937) In the atelier
      Oct. 05, 2015

      Thorma János (1870-1937) In the atelier

      Est: €4,762 - €6,349

      Thorma János (1870-1937) In the atelier Oil on canvas 79,5x68 cm Signed bottom left: Thorma János Starting Price 2,381 EUR

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Thorma János (1870-1937) Girl on a hillside, 1927
      May. 18, 2015

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Girl on a hillside, 1927

      Est: €3,279 - €4,918

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Girl on a hillside, 1927 Oil on paperboard 55,5x68 cm Signed bottom left: Thorma János 1927. V / 16. * PLEASE NOTE: Starting Bid EUR 2131

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Thorma János (1870-1937), Kiss (Zeus and Dione)
      Dec. 13, 2014

      Thorma János (1870-1937), Kiss (Zeus and Dione)

      Est: €3,934 - €5,246

      Thorma János (1870-1937), Kiss (Zeus and Dione), Oil on canvas, 59x49 cm, Signed bottom right: Thorma Starting Bid EUR 1967

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937): Landscape with figures
      Apr. 14, 2014

      János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937): Landscape with figures

      Est: -

      Oil on board, 55,5x67,5 cm. Signed: Thorma János

      Inter-Art Budapest Auctions
    • János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870 - 1937): Working on the land
      May. 30, 2013

      János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870 - 1937): Working on the land

      Est: -

      Oil on board, 55 x 67 cm. Signed.

      Inter-Art Budapest Auctions
    • Thorma János (1870-1937) Lady with parasol
      May. 13, 2013

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Lady with parasol

      Est: Ft2,000,000 - Ft3,000,000

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Lady with parasol Oil on canvas 60,5x75,5 cm Signed bottom right: Thorma Please Note: Starting Price HUF 1200000

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Thorma János (1870-1937) - Autumn in Baia-Mare
      Oct. 19, 2012

      Thorma János (1870-1937) - Autumn in Baia-Mare

      Est: Ft1,000,000 - Ft1,400,000

      Thorma János (1870-1937) Autumn in Baia-Mare Oil on canvas 60x78,5 cm Signed bottom right: Thorma Starting Price 600,000 HUF

      Virág Judit Gallery
    • Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) FEMME DE PROFIL Huile sur toile
      Mar. 23, 2010

      Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) FEMME DE PROFIL Huile sur toile

      Est: €1,000 - €1,500

      Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) FEMME DE PROFIL Huile sur toile signée en bas à droite: "THORMA" Oil on canvas signed lower right: "THORMA" Height: 16,97 Width: 23,17 in. h: 43,50 w: 59,40 cm

      Artcurial
    • Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) DEUX FEMMES Huile sur carton fort
      Mar. 23, 2010

      Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) DEUX FEMMES Huile sur carton fort

      Est: €800 - €1,000

      Janos THORMA (Kiskunhalas, 1870 - Nagybanya, 1937) DEUX FEMMES Huile sur carton fort signé en bas à droite: "THORMA", contresigné et annotation au dos: "Varlat ?: ThormaJanos" Oil sur mill board signed lower right: "THORMA", countersigned and inscription on the reverse: "Varlat ?: ThormaJanos" Height: 13,26 Width: 19,31 in. h: 34 w: 49,50 cm

      Artcurial
    • Thorma, Janos (1870 - 1937) Girls by the Waterside
      Dec. 14, 2007

      Thorma, Janos (1870 - 1937) Girls by the Waterside

      Est: -

      Thorma, Janos (1870 - 1937) Girls by the Waterside Starting price: 1.000.000 Ft

      Kieselbach
    • Thorma Janos
      Jan. 20, 2007

      Thorma Janos

      Est: $1,500 - $2,000

      Female Portrait,signed

      Tiroche Auction House
    • Thorma Janos
      Jan. 20, 2007

      Thorma Janos

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      Landscape,signed

      Tiroche Auction House
    • János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937)
      Apr. 27, 2006

      János Thorma (Hungarian, 1870-1937)

      Est: £300 - £500

      The dancer signed 'THORMA' (lower right) oil on canvas 39 x 31 in. (99.1 x 78.7 cm.)

      Christie's
    Lots Per Page: