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John (1938) Ward Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1938 - d. 2023

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          • John Ward 'Tulip' vessel, circa 1985
            Oct. 03, 2023

            John Ward 'Tulip' vessel, circa 1985

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            John Ward 'Tulip' vessel, circa 1985 Stoneware, mottled white, light green and brown glazes. 22.5 x 24 x 20.5 cm Impressed with artist's seal.

            Bonhams
          • JOHN WARD (BRITISH B.1938-2023) Preview: Barley Mow Centre
            Aug. 23, 2023

            JOHN WARD (BRITISH B.1938-2023) Preview: Barley Mow Centre

            Est: £2,000 - £4,000

            JOHN WARD (BRITISH B.1938-2023) Preview: Barley Mow Centre JOHN WARD (BRITISH B.1938-2023): a studio pottery hand-built stoneware vase, with a white and green circular radiating design, impressed with JW to base. 12cm high x 10.5cm wide Note: With a gallery label to Peter Dingley Gallery Stratford-on-Avon affixed to side

            Chiswick Auctions
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A MATT BROWN ORANGE AND TURQUOISE-GREEN VASE
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A MATT BROWN ORANGE AND TURQUOISE-GREEN VASE

            Est: £1,200 - £1,800

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A MATT BROWN ORANGE AND TURQUOISE-GREEN VASEStoneware, impressed with JW sealHeight: 21cm (8¼ in.)Provenance: By repute Ian Courcoux, Hampshire Most likely acquired from the above by the present owners At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A BLACK AND WHITE VASE
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A BLACK AND WHITE VASE

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A BLACK AND WHITE VASEStoneware, matt white and black glaze, Impressed with JW seal Height: 23cm (9 in.)Provenance:Private CollectionAt the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE WHITE 'SHOULDER POT'
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE WHITE 'SHOULDER POT'

            Est: £6,000 - £8,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE WHITE 'SHOULDER POT'Stoneware, the flattened form rising to a tapering neck with gently dipped rim, impressed with JW seal Height: 43cm (18 7/8 in.)Provenance: Victoria and Albert Museum, Crafts Council Shop, London Private Collection (acquired from the above on 5th September 1989, no. 17)Compare with a similar example illustrated by Emma Crichton-Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 95 At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE BROWN 'SHOULDER POT'
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE BROWN 'SHOULDER POT'

            Est: £5,000 - £8,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE BROWN 'SHOULDER POT'Stoneware, the flattened form rising to a tapering neck with gently dipped rim, with impressed JW sealHeight: 49cm (19¼ in.) Provenance: Oxford Gallery, Oxford Private Collection (acquired in December 1993)Compare with a similar example illustrated by Emma Crichton-Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p.68 and p. 94At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE 'TULIP' VASE
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE 'TULIP' VASE

            Est: £2,500 - £3,500

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE 'TULIP' VASEStoneware, covered in streaked white and pale blue glazes, impressed with JW sealHeight: 30cm (11 7/8 in.)Provenance:Private CollectionAt the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A GREEN AND MATT WHITE BOWL
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A GREEN AND MATT WHITE BOWL

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A GREEN AND MATT WHITE BOWLImpressed with JW seal Height: 20cm (7 7/8 in.)Provenance:Private CollectionAt the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE BROWN GLAZED BOWL
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE BROWN GLAZED BOWL

            Est: £1,200 - £1,800

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE BROWN GLAZED BOWLStoneware, impressed with JW seal27 x 34.5cm (10 5/8 x 13 1/2 in.)Provenance: Beaux Arts, BathPrivate Collection (acquired from the above on 13th September 1991)Compare with a similar example illustrated, Emma Crichton-Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p.73At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A GLOBULAR SQUARE NECKED VASE
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A GLOBULAR SQUARE NECKED VASE

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A GLOBULAR SQUARE NECKED VASEStoneware, covered in streaked white and pale blue glaze, impressed with JW sealHeight: 38cm (15 in.)Provenance: Private Collection, Peter Dingley Private Collection (acquired from the above in 5th October 1991)Compare with a similar example illustrated by Emma Crichton-Miller,The Pottery of John Ward, p. 62 shown in situ at the Peter Dingwall Gallery Exhibition, 1987At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE VESSEL
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE VESSEL

            Est: £7,000 - £10,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE VESSELStoneware, with soft white and mottled green glazes over a textured surface, flattened with bands of concentric rings following the contours of the form front and back, with angled cut rim, impressed with JW sealHeight: 46cm (18 in.)Provenance:Private CollectionCompare with a similar example illustrated by Emma Crichton-Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p.86At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE GREEN AND BROWN BOWL
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE GREEN AND BROWN BOWL

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE GREEN AND BROWN BOWLStoneware with textured surface, impressed with JW seal24 x 41cm (9½ x 16 1/8 in.)Provenance: Amalgam Art Ltd, Barnes Private Collection (acquired from the above on 13th May 1993)At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A MATT BLUE VASE
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A MATT BLUE VASE

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A MATT BLUE VASEStoneware, impressed with JW seal Height: 25cm (9 7/8 in.)Provenance:Courcoux & Courcoux, Hampshire Private Collection (Acquired from the above on 22nd February 1991)At the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE VESSEL
            Jul. 11, 2023

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023), A LARGE VESSEL

            Est: £5,000 - £7,000

            λ JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1938-2023)A LARGE VESSELStoneware, of flattened disc form with tapering neck, matt white glaze with radiating green lines, impressed with JW sealHeight: 35.5cm (14 in.)Provenance:Private CollectionCompare with a similar example illustrated by Emma Crichton-Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p.66 and on the coverAt the age of 28 John Ward applied to Camberwell School of Arts & Crafts. He was initially drawn to this particular college as he knew that Lucie Rie and Hans Coper were visiting tutors and after having seen their works at pottery exhibitions in London he was keen to learn more. Ward said 'Lucie Rie's work, which I first saw in a sunlit exhibition room, glowed with its light, life and colour.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 33Ward's life in metropolitan London certainly paved the way for his career in ceramics but it was his move to Pembrokeshire with his family in 1979 which allowed him to take up a slower pace of life, surrounded by serenity and nature. Ward was inspired by the sudden change in colours he witnessed from the city to the coast. The monumental rock formations teetering on the edge of cliffs reiterated the energy and power of nature. His fascination with light and the way in which it fell through the trees making shapes and patterns on the woodland floor were certainly all influential in the development of both his design and form. He hand-built his pots using strips of clay to build vessels of design over function. Cutting and re-joining sections of clay resulted in beautiful unique forms, experimenting also with textured surfaces. The works he created drew inspiration from architectural design, nature's elements found on the shoreline and historic roman vessels. Ward was fascinated by the self-containment of a single vessel combined with the dynamism of design which created an object full of energy and yet 'a still point of the turning world.'John Ward,' Emma Crichton -Miller, The Pottery of John Ward, p. 12In 1982 John Ward had his first one-man show at the Peter Dingley Gallery. This exhilarating body of work showcased his wide variety of new forms, including gourd-shaped vessels, double-grooved bowls, square necks and flanged bowls. Ward set himself off on a journey to find 'rightness' which to him was the perfect balance between form, achieved through quality of clay, and decoration, through the experimentation of glazes. Included in this private collection of works by John Ward we are able to identify examples of many of his favourite glazes including three green and white pots with geometric glazes, striking black, tantalising blue and innocent white, like porcelain. Important examples of Ward's ceramics can be found in the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford and The Museum of Modern Art in New York.

            Dreweatts 1759 Fine Sales
          • John Ward 'Bud pot', circa 1985
            Jun. 07, 2023

            John Ward 'Bud pot', circa 1985

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            John Ward 'Bud pot', circa 1985 Stoneware, the diagonally cut neck rim with extending impressed grooves to the shoulder, mottled cream, green and brown matt glazes over a softly textured surface. 32 cm high Underside with impressed artist's seal.

            Bonhams
          • JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL
            Apr. 22, 2023

            JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL

            Est: $2,000 - $3,000

            JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL, slightly leaning deep form with an asymmetric rim, having matte black and white glaze. Impressed "JW" to underside. Fourth quarter 20th/early 21st century. 5 3/4" H, 6" D rim.  Catalogue Note: Described as one of Britain's foremost potters, John Ward was born in Islington, North London, in 1938. Ward came to his career in ceramics later in life, having first worked as a cameraman at the BBC. Heavily influenced by the simple forms of ancient Chinese and Egyptian pottery, as well as the clean linear decoration of early Cypriot and Persian bowls, Ward constructed his pottery using the coiling method. Ward passed away on February 14 at the age of 84. John Ward obituary  

            Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
          • JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL
            Apr. 22, 2023

            JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL

            Est: $3,000 - $5,000

            JOHN WARD (ENGLISH, 1938-2023) STUDIO POTTERY STONEWARE BOWL, rounded form with two sides slightly indented, featuring a matte green and white bull's eye design. Impressed "JW" to underside. Fourth quarter 20th/early 21st century. 6 5/8" H, 8 1/4" D rim.  Catalogue Note: Described as one of Britain's foremost potters, John Ward was born in Islington, North London, in 1938. Ward came to his career in ceramics later in life, having first worked as a cameraman at the BBC. Heavily influenced by the simple forms of ancient Chinese and Egyptian pottery, as well as the clean linear decoration of early Cypriot and Persian bowls, Ward constructed his pottery using the coiling method. Ward passed away on February 14 at the age of 84.  John Ward obituary

            Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
          • § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)
            Dec. 13, 2022

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938) JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938): A studio pottery hand built stoneware vase, 1985, with black and white geometric decoration, impressed artists monogram to base 13cm high

            Chiswick Auctions
          • § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)
            Dec. 13, 2022

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938) JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938): A studio pottery hand built stoneware Tulip vase, 1992, with mottled green spotting on a white ground, impressed artists mongram to base 19.5cm high

            Chiswick Auctions
          • § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)
            Dec. 13, 2022

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938)

            Est: £1,500 - £2,500

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938) JOHN WARD (BRITISH b.1938): A studio pottery hand built stoneware vase, circa 1987, matt green pitted glaze, with incised linework, impressed artists monogram to base 17cm high No signs of chips, cracks or signs of restoration when under a UV light. Pitting in the glaze from the firing. One or two very minor surface scratches, other than that in good condition.

            Chiswick Auctions
          • John Ward Bud pot, circa 1990
            Nov. 29, 2022

            John Ward Bud pot, circa 1990

            Est: £1,200 - £1,800

            John Ward Bud pot, circa 1990 Stoneware, mottled green and brown on a white ground, of globular form with diagonally cut rim. 20.8cm high Impressed with artist's seal.

            Bonhams
          • John Ward Vessel, circa 1985
            Nov. 29, 2022

            John Ward Vessel, circa 1985

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            John Ward Vessel, circa 1985 Stoneware, mottled brown glazes, incised linear decoration following the contours of the curved cut rim. 17.5cm high Impressed with artist's seal.

            Bonhams
          • § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware vessel with dipped rim,
            Oct. 27, 2022

            § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware vessel with dipped rim,

            Est: £500 - £800

            § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware vessel with dipped rim, decorated with a mottled white glaze, impressed seal to underside 15cm high

            Cheffins
          • § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware bowl,
            Oct. 27, 2022

            § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware bowl,

            Est: £500 - £800

            § John Ward (1938-), a stoneware bowl, the mottled white glaze over a lightly textured body, impressed seal marks to underside 11.5 x 11.5cm

            Cheffins
          • John Ward (b. 1938) Vessel glazed earthenware 14 in. (35.5 cm.) high; 13 in
            May. 25, 2022

            John Ward (b. 1938) Vessel glazed earthenware 14 in. (35.5 cm.) high; 13 in

            Est: £5,000 - £8,000

            John Ward (b. 1938) Vessel glazed earthenware 14 in. (35.5 cm.) high; 13 in. (33 cm.) wide; 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.) deep

            Christie's
          • *John Ward (b.1938),
            May. 17, 2022

            *John Ward (b.1938),

            Est: £4,000 - £6,000

            *John Ward (b.1938), *John Ward (b.1938), a black and white ceramic bowl with lugs, signed with artist's monogram 'JW', with a scalloped base, 13cm high 13.5cm diameter Provenance: The Stour Gallery, 2011. *Artist's Resale Right may apply to this lot.

            Sworders
          • John Ward (British, b. 1938) Two Vases Glazed stoneware 3 x 3-3/4 inches (7.6 x
            May. 04, 2022

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Two Vases Glazed stoneware 3 x 3-3/4 inches (7.6 x

            Est: $800 - $1,200

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Two Vases Glazed stoneware 3 x 3-3/4 inches (7.6 x 9.5 cm) (each) Each impressed with artist's seal to underside In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries - Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey - he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 4-1/2 x 4-3/8 x 3-1/2 inches
            May. 04, 2022

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 4-1/2 x 4-3/8 x 3-1/2 inches

            Est: $800 - $1,200

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 4-1/2 x 4-3/8 x 3-1/2 inches (11.4 x 11.1 x 8.9 cm) Artist's seal impressed to underside In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries - Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey - he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 8-3/4 x 9-1/2 x 7-3/4 inches
            May. 04, 2022

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 8-3/4 x 9-1/2 x 7-3/4 inches

            Est: $4,000 - $6,000

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 8-3/4 x 9-1/2 x 7-3/4 inches (22.2 x 24.1 x 19.7 cm) Underside impressed with artist's seal In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries - Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey - he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel
            Apr. 29, 2022

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel impressed artist's seal, stoneware with green and umber glazes (23cm high, 21cm wide (9in high, 8.25in wide))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel
            Apr. 29, 2022

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel impressed artist's seal, stoneware with green and umber glazes (21cm high, 19cm wide (8.25in high, 7.5in wide))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel
            Apr. 29, 2022

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel

            Est: £600 - £800

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel impressed artist's seal, mottled white glaze, and black interior (14.5cm high, 13.3cm wide (5.75in high, 5.25in wide))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 10-3/4 x 9-1/2 inches (27.3 x
            Jan. 27, 2022

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 10-3/4 x 9-1/2 inches (27.3 x

            Est: $2,000 - $3,000

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 10-3/4 x 9-1/2 inches (27.3 x 24.1 cm) Underside impressed with artist's seal In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries – Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey – he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • John Ward (British, b.1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 15-3/4 x 11-1/4 x 7 inches (40
            Jan. 27, 2022

            John Ward (British, b.1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 15-3/4 x 11-1/4 x 7 inches (40

            Est: $3,000 - $5,000

            John Ward (British, b.1938) Vase Glazed stoneware 15-3/4 x 11-1/4 x 7 inches (40.0 x 28.6 x 17.8 cm) Underside impressed with artist's seal In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries – Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey – he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vessel Glazed stoneware 10 x 9-1/4 inches (25.4 x 2
            Jan. 27, 2022

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vessel Glazed stoneware 10 x 9-1/4 inches (25.4 x 2

            Est: $2,000 - $3,000

            John Ward (British, b. 1938) Vessel Glazed stoneware 10 x 9-1/4 inches (25.4 x 23.5 cm) Underside impressed with artist's seal In contrast to many of his contemporaries, John Ward (British, b. 1938) has remained committed to traditional, functional forms, particularly bowls and vases. Instead of questioning or obliterating functionality, Ward considers these forms to be repositories of endless possibilities. With influences ranging from ancient Chinese and Egyptian pre-glaze pottery to the works of his contemporaries – Hans Coper, Lucie Rie, and Ian Godfrey – he creates hand-built, functional forms that are at once recognizable yet complex and sculptural. Ward's works often feature dynamic cut-away rims and ridges or facets achieved by cutting and reattaching elements, usually complimented by striped or geometric surface decoration. John Ward's works are held in the collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Ashmolean Museum, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. HID01801242017

            Heritage Auctions
          • JOHN WARD (B. 1938) VESSEL 21.5 cm. (81/2 in.) high
            Dec. 09, 2021

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) VESSEL 21.5 cm. (81/2 in.) high

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) VESSEL 21.5 cm. (81/2 in.) high

            Christie's
          • JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 24 cm. (91/2in.) high
            Dec. 09, 2021

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 24 cm. (91/2in.) high

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 24 cm. (91/2in.) high

            Christie's
          • JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 32 cm. (12 5/8in.) high
            Dec. 09, 2021

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 32 cm. (12 5/8in.) high

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            JOHN WARD (B. 1938) BUD POT 32 cm. (12 5/8in.) high

            Christie's
          • John Ward Vase, circa 1990
            Jun. 03, 2021

            John Ward Vase, circa 1990

            Est: £6,000 - £8,000

            John Ward Vase, circa 1990 Stoneware, black and white geometric design. 26.5cm high Impressed artist's JW seal. For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          • § JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1917-2007) UZES
            Apr. 30, 2021

            § JOHN WARD (BRITISH 1917-2007) UZES

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            signed (lower right), pen and ink and watercolour (Dimensions: 31cm x 47cm (12in x 18.5in)) (31cm x 47cm (12in x 18.5in)) Footnote: Exhibited: J. S. Maas & Co. Ltd, John Ward 1985, no.63.

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • *John Ward (b.1939),
            Feb. 16, 2021

            *John Ward (b.1939),

            Est: £300 - £500

            *John Ward (b.1939), *John Ward (b.1939), a stoneware vase in a light green and rust brown spotted glaze, with impressed artist's mark, 21.5cm wide, 24cm high *Artist's Resale Right may apply to this lot.

            Sworders
          • John Ward Vessel, 1988
            Dec. 08, 2020

            John Ward Vessel, 1988

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            John Ward Vessel, 1988 Stoneware, matt glaze in pale green and brown banded pattern. 22cm high Impressed artist's JW seal. For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          • John Ward Vase, 1989
            Dec. 08, 2020

            John Ward Vase, 1989

            Est: £2,000 - £3,000

            John Ward Vase, 1989 Stoneware, matt glazed pale green and brown geometric pattern 25.5cm high Impressed artist's JW seal. For further information on this lot please visit the Bonhams website

            Bonhams
          • John Ward (b.1938). A hand-built stoneware vase, 21cm high
            Dec. 08, 2020

            John Ward (b.1938). A hand-built stoneware vase, 21cm high

            Est: £1,000 - £1,500

            John Ward (b.1938). A hand-built stoneware vase, with asymmetric rim, rust graduating to duck egg blue, impressed mark, 21cm high

            Gorringes
          • John Ward (b.1938), a studio pottery sto
            Dec. 05, 2020

            John Ward (b.1938), a studio pottery sto

            Est: £3,000 - £5,000

            † John Ward (b.1938), a studio pottery stoneware vase, circa 2012, rounded beaker form with cleft rim, incised banded design in orange over a cream ground, artist seal mark, 21cm high

            Kinghams Auctioneers
          • JOHN WARD (B.1943) LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPH
            Oct. 24, 2020

            JOHN WARD (B.1943) LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPH

            Est: $100 - $200

            Framed photographic print, Landscape, John Ward (American, b.1943), c.1981, portfolio numbered 37/ 50, sight: approx 18.25"h, 22.75"w, overall: approx 25.25"h, 29.5"w, 8.25lbs Start Price: $80.00

            Austin Auction Gallery
          • § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel
            Oct. 23, 2020

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel

            Est: £700 - £900

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vessel impresssed maker's mark, mottled white glaze (10.5cm high, 9cm wide (4.1in high, 3.5in wide))

            Lyon & Turnbull
          • § John Ward (British 1938-) Vase
            Oct. 23, 2020

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vase

            Est: £800 - £1,200

            § John Ward (British 1938-) Vase impressed artist's seal, in black and white (7cm high, 7cm across (2.75in high, 2.75in across))

            Lyon & Turnbull
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