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George W. Waters Sold at Auction Prices

Landscape painter, Portrait painter, b. 1832 - d. 1912

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    • George Waters, Grape Vine Cove, Gloucester, MA, Oil
      Feb. 13, 2024

      George Waters, Grape Vine Cove, Gloucester, MA, Oil

      Est: $400 - $600

      Property from the Estate of Richard Ellis, Savannah, GA Description: George Waters (NY, 1832-1912), Grape Vine Cove, Gloucester, MA, Oil on Paper on Canvas, signed lower right, a seascape, old label with title taped to verso, with linen surround in a giltwood frame. Frame size: 10 3/4 in. x 15 3/4 in. Measurements: Height: by sight, 6 5/8 in. x Width: 11 5/8 in. Condition: Overall good condition, canvas punctured with associated loss of paint upper right corner, small chip and some rubbing along upper edge, some other minor losses to paint, in need of cleaning, wear to frame with loss to gilt. Notice to bidders: The absence of a condition report does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections, or the conditions of aging. PHOTOS MAY ALSO ACT AS A CONDITION REPORT. Please review all photos closely prior to bidding. Complete condition reports are available by request, no later than 24 hours prior to the live auction. All lots are offered and sold 'AS IS’, and Everard Auctions will not provide refunds based on condition. Timepiece movements, lighting and electrics have not been tested, and art has not been examined out of the frame unless otherwise stated. We do not guarantee the condition of frames. By placing a bid, either in person, by phone, absentee or via the Internet, you signify that you agree to be bound by the conditions of sale. Everard Auctions does not provide any shipping or packing services. We recommend that all potential buyers obtain pack/ship estimates prior to bidding. Please contact us for a list of recommended shippers.

      Everard Auctions and Appraisals
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912), Lake George
      Sep. 29, 2023

      George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912), Lake George

      Est: $3,000 - $5,000

      Oil on canvas. Signed and dated 'G. W. Waters' (lower right). George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832 in the small upstate community of Coventry in Chenango County, NY. He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had his first exhibit when one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, George and his wife, Sarah, moved upstate in 1861 to the small city of Elmira where they settled and raised a family. In 1869, George was chosen to be the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Although Waters traveled to Europe both in 1880 and 1886, the travels with the most profound impact on his artwork were in and around the countryside and wilderness areas of the northeast. The artist made frequent trips to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and to the lakes and woods of northern New York State. From pencil sketches made during his travels, Waters would translate these to landscape paintings upon returning to his studio. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from his position at Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912), Black Mountain, Lake George
      Sep. 29, 2023

      George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912), Black Mountain, Lake George

      Est: $2,000 - $4,000

      Oil on canvas. Signed and dated 'G. W. Waters/05' (lower right). George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832 in the small upstate community of Coventry in Chenango County, NY. He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had his first exhibit when one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, George and his wife, Sarah, moved upstate in 1861 to the small city of Elmira where they settled and raised a family. In 1869, George was chosen to be the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Although Waters traveled to Europe both in 1880 and 1886, the travels with the most profound impact on his artwork were in and around the countryside and wilderness areas of the northeast. The artist made frequent trips to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and to the lakes and woods of northern New York State. From pencil sketches made during his travels, Waters would translate these to landscape paintings upon returning to his studio. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from his position at Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Seascape
      Sep. 29, 2023

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Seascape

      Est: $800 - $1,200

      Oil on canvas. Signed and dated 'G.W. Waters/05' (lower right). George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832 in the small upstate community of Coventry in Chenango County, NY. He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had his first exhibit when one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, George and his wife, Sarah, moved upstate in 1861 to the small city of Elmira where they settled and raised a family. In 1869, George was chosen to be the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Although Waters traveled to Europe both in 1880 and 1886, the travels with the most profound impact on his artwork were in and around the countryside and wilderness areas of the northeast. The artist made frequent trips to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and to the lakes and woods of northern New York State. From pencil sketches made during his travels, Waters would translate these to landscape paintings upon returning to his studio. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from his position at Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912.

      Cottone Auctions
    • PRINT ON CANVAS AFTER GEORGE W. WATERS
      Jun. 06, 2023

      PRINT ON CANVAS AFTER GEORGE W. WATERS

      Est: $150 - $200

      PRINT ON CANVAS AFTER GEORGE W. WATERS (U.S.A., 1832-1912) "Watkins Glen" Rainbow Fall and "Bridal Veil." Printed name lower left, artist copyright label attached verso. 20" x 14" (image), 27.5" x 21.5" (period gilt wood frame).

      O'Gallerie
    • George W. Waters, Adirondack Landscape
      Nov. 29, 2022

      George W. Waters, Adirondack Landscape

      Est: $1,000 - $2,000

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Hudson River School oil on canvas depicting an autumnal landscape, possibly Lake George, signed "G W Waters" l.r., housed in a fine custom giltwood frame, 9" x 14" canvas, 13" x 17 3/4" framed.

      Old Kinderhook Auction Company
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (AMERICAN, 1832–1912) BLACK MOUNTAIN, LAKE GEORGE
      Jun. 06, 2022

      GEORGE W. WATERS (AMERICAN, 1832–1912) BLACK MOUNTAIN, LAKE GEORGE

      Est: $4,000 - $6,000

      George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912) Black Mountain, Lake George Signed and dated 'G. W. Waters/75' bottom right, oil on canvas 12 x 22 in. (30.5 x 55.9cm) Provenance Covington Fine Arts Gallery, Inc. Tucson, Arizona. Acquired directly from the above on November 30, 1994. Collection of Dr. Douglas S. Holsclaw, Jr., Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania. Frame: 22 x 31 3/4 x 5 in. The unlined canvas in overall very good condition. With minor inpainting along the right outer edge of the work, and at bottom left corner. With some purplish dots at bottom right corner: due to the pigments used, and not a sign of restoration. See specialist's pictures for more details.

      Freeman's
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912)
      Jun. 26, 2021

      GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912)

      Est: $500 - $1,000

      "Bucolic Landscape" oil on canvas board 9 x 12 inches. signed. framed 13 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches (overall)

      John McInnis Auctioneers
    • GEORGE WATERS, American (1832-1912), Lake George in Autumn, oil on canvas, signed lower right "G.W. Waters", 12 x 19 1/2 inches
      Nov. 19, 2020

      GEORGE WATERS, American (1832-1912), Lake George in Autumn, oil on canvas, signed lower right "G.W. Waters", 12 x 19 1/2 inches

      Est: $3,000 - $5,000

      GEORGE WATERS American (1832-1912) Lake George in Autumn oil on canvas, signed lower right "G.W. Waters" 12 x 19 1/2 inches Provenance: Private Collection, New York. Other Notes: Framed dimensions - 18 x 26 x 2 1/4 inches tags: 19th century, Adirondack scene, oil painting, landscape

      Shannon's
    • George W. Waters Landscape Oil on Canvas, 1876
      Jul. 12, 2020

      George W. Waters Landscape Oil on Canvas, 1876

      Est: $3,000 - $5,000

      George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912) "Bringing the herd back from pasture" Hudson River School oil on canvas depicting shepherd with cows in mountainous summer landscape with river, signed and dated "G. W. Waters 1876" in lower center, set in gilt foliate frame. Image: 25" H x 43" W; frame: 39" H x 57.25" W x 4.5" D.

      Auctions at Showplace
    • Antique Maritime Shipwreck Oil on Canvas by G.W. Waters
      May. 30, 2020

      Antique Maritime Shipwreck Oil on Canvas by G.W. Waters

      Est: $600 - $800

      An antique oil on canvas painting by G.W.Waters (American 1832-1912) depicts a ship in rough seas on a moonlit night, signed lower right as photographed, seated in giltwood frame, 19th century. Measures - 22"h x 28"w x 3.5"d overall ; 12"h x 18"w sight. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: George Wellington Waters was born on March 31, 1832 in the small upstate community of Coventry in Chenango County, NY. He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had his first exhibit when one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, George and his wife, Sarah, moved upstate in 1861 to the small city of Elmira where they settled and raised a family. In 1869, George was chosen to be the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Although Waters traveled to Europe both in 1880 and 1886, the travels with the most profound impact on his artwork were in and around the courtrysides and wilderness areas of the northeast. The artist made frequent trips to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and to the lakes and woods of northern New York State. From pencil sketches made during his travels, Waters would translate these to landscape paintings upon returning to his studio. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from his position at Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912. (White Mountain Art). ***IN-HOUSE SHIPPING & DELIVERY QUICK QUOTES AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST***

      Winfield Auction Gallery
    • George W. Waters Landscape Oil on Canvas, 1876
      Apr. 05, 2020

      George W. Waters Landscape Oil on Canvas, 1876

      Est: -

      George W. Waters (American, 1832–1912) "Bringing the herd back from pasture" Hudson River School oil on canvas depicting shepherd with cows in mountainous summer landscape with river, signed and dated "G. W. Waters 1876" in lower center, set in gilt foliate frame. Image: 25" H x 43" W; frame: 39" H x 57.25" W x 4.5" D.

      Auctions at Showplace
    • George Waters (1832 - 1912), full moonlit seascape with lighthouse, oil on canvas, signed lower left G.W. Waters, Doyle label on bac...
      Jan. 01, 2020

      George Waters (1832 - 1912), full moonlit seascape with lighthouse, oil on canvas, signed lower left G.W. Waters, Doyle label on bac...

      Est: $400 - $800

      George Waters (1832 - 1912), full moonlit seascape with lighthouse, oil on canvas, signed lower left G.W. Waters, Doyle label on back. 7 3/4" x 5 1/2".

      Nadeau's Auction Gallery
    • GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"
      Dec. 15, 2019

      GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"

      Est: $600 - $900

      GEORGE W. WATERS (NEW YORK, 1832-1912) OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18" An oil on canvas painting by George W. Waters depicting a wooded landscape. Signed lower right. Framed.

      DuMouchelles
    • GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"
      Oct. 20, 2019

      GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"

      Est: $1,000 - $1,500

      GEORGE W. WATERS (NEW YORK, 1832-1912) OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18" An oil on canvas painting by George W. Waters depicting a wooded landscape. Signed lower right. Framed.

      DuMouchelles
    • GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"
      Aug. 18, 2019

      GEORGE W. WATERS OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18"

      Est: $1,500 - $2,500

      GEORGE W. WATERS (NEW YORK, 1832-1912) OIL ON CANVAS H 24" W 18" :An oil on canvas painting by George W. Waters depicting a wooded landscape. Signed lower right. Framed.

      DuMouchelles
    • Large 19th Century Portrait Oil Painting of Madonna and Child by George W. Waters
      Oct. 13, 2018

      Large 19th Century Portrait Oil Painting of Madonna and Child by George W. Waters

      Est: $3,500 - $5,000

      Remarkable Large 19th Century original portrait oil painting by renowned American artist George W. Waters (1832 - 1912) | The Painting is a unique depiction by Water's of a Madonna and Child | There is an original paper label on the verso attached to the original stretcher bars from George Water's studio in Elmira, New York; The label says "Paintings - G. W. Waters - Portraits & Landscapes - 135 Waters Street, Elmira, New York | Painting is housed in the original amazing ornate custom gesso wood frame | Dimensions: 36.0" W x 41.0" H x 5.0" D | | George W. Waters (1832-1912) lived and worked in Elmira, New York, for most of his adult life. Inspired by nature's gentle beauty, Waters set out to record the world around him: hills covered in autumn hues; apple trees blossoming in spring; cattle grazing beside a river; ocean waves in moonlight. He traveled throughout the northeast to sketch the river valleys, mountain ranges, and coastlines before returning to his studio in Elmira to paint. Many of his works were done on commission by or sold to private collectors outside the area, some as far away as Wisconsin, and he exhibited his works regularly and with considerable acclaim. Yet, the people of Elmira were always his most supportive public. The city newspapers heralded the activities and achievements of "Elmira's own artist" by reporting visits to his studio to describe works in progress, pronouncing what new paintings were on view where, and welcoming the artist back from his sketching trips. George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832, in the small New York community of Coventry in Chenango County. (The middle initial "W" is a matter of conjecture. Most sources list "Wattles" but "Wellington" has also been suggested.) He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He attended the Franklin-Delaware Literary Institute and later taught there. In the course of his teaching, Waters met Sarah Sherman Betts and the two were married in November 1856. In pursuit of his artistic vocation, George and Sarah Waters moved to New York City but Waters quickly tired of city life and desired to be closer to the natural subjects he loved so well. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, in 1861 George and Sarah moved to the small but thriving city of Elmira, where they settled and raised a family: Mabel, born 1862; Jean, born 1865; Charles, born 1869; and George Jr., born 1877. In 1869, Waters was named the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Waters traveled to Europe, first in 1880 and again in 1886 with his family. They went to Germany and Switzerland where the artist made hundreds of pen, pencil, and watercolor studies to use as source material for works painted subsequent to his trips. The trips with the most significant impact on his artwork, however, were those made to the countryside and wilderness areas of the Northeast. Waters made frequent trips, both sketching trips, with his family as well as with other artists, to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and the lakes and river valleys of New York State, especially the Chemung Valley. Upon returning to his studio, he translated his sketches into landscape paintings, "portraits of the land" that captured a devoted and appreciative audience. The 1870s and 1880s were transition years for landscape painters. Growing disenchantment with the Hudson River School by the general public and art critics fostered a reappraisal in style and approach by artists. Increasing urbanization and industrialization of the East Coast spawned a growing interest in pastoral landscapes that depicted the pre-industrial past. Artists began to paint highly detailed, often identifiable scenes of the domesticated rural east, scenes that often illustrated man's occupation of and partnership with the land. Waters' sympathies and his approach to painting align him with this second generation of the Hudson River School. Like John F. Kensett, James M. Hart, William Hart, William Trost Richards, and James Hope, Waters chose to preserve on canvas the intimate and approachable scenery found in the northeast. He was praised for his detailed paintings of specific, identifiable sites, for his palette of rich glowing colors, and his skill for capturing different seasons and unusual light effects. Proud of their hometown artist, Elmira writers often compared the works of Waters to those of his better-known contemporaries. In 1880, a writer in The Free Press noted that, "The picture is essentially American in all its particular, in design and treatment, and should give Mr. Waters a reputation beside James Hart, Bierstadt, or Frederick [sic] Church." The superb value of Waters' works—during his lifetime, none sold for more than $1,000 and most sold for less—was not lost on his public. In 1882, a writer in the Elmira Daily Advertiser observed that, "…if you could just put James Hart or Frederic Church on one corner of the canvas, it would be worth, or could be sold for about $5,000 and it wouldn't be any better than it is now…." In 1882, noted author and part-time Elmira resident Samuel Clemens commissioned a painting of a ship at sea engulfed in flames. After receiving the work, Clemens sent a note thanking Waters for his rendering of "the splendid horror": I was tired of the monotony of mildness: mildness of color, mildness of scenery, mildness of situation, mildness of circumstances…. Eternal peace, repose, comfort, absence of suffering—absence of sorrow, absence of excitement—a pallid, inane tranquility—as if that were all of life. You have faithfully reproduced the splendid horror I had in mind; and to me there is a satisfaction in these leaping flames and these ruddy waves, and the awful distress of these shipwrecked poor devils, which no amount of painted peace and pictured serenity can give. Like most artists of the nineteenth century, Waters relied on portraiture to supplement his income. Waters' ability to produce near-perfect likenesses of his sitters ensured a steady stream of commissions. In 1877, New York City patron John H. Johnston—an admirer of the works of the painter George Waters and the poet Walt Whitman—commissioned the former to make a portrait of the latter. During the many sittings, the two became friends and Whitman readily agreed to a few extra sittings so that Waters could make a portrait for his own collection. Other portrait commissions included New York Governor Lucius Robinson and Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall, and numerous prominent Elmirans, such as the writer Samuel Clemens and Reverend Thomas K. Beecher. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912 in Elmira, New York.  Adapted by Rachael Sadinsky from her essays in the exhibition brochure George W. Waters, 1832-1912 (Elmira, NY: Arnot Art Museum, 1989). Dimensions: 36.0" W x 41.0" H x 5.0" D Artist or Maker: George Wellington Waters (1832 - 1912) Medium: Oil on Canvas Date: 19th Century Notes: American

      Worthington Galleries
    • Large 19th Century Original Oil Painting of Madonna and Child by George W. Waters
      Jul. 21, 2018

      Large 19th Century Original Oil Painting of Madonna and Child by George W. Waters

      Est: $5,000 - $8,000

      Remarkable Large 19th Century original oil painting attributed to renowned American artist George W. Waters (1832 - 1912) or his studio | Painting depicts a Madonna and Child | There is an original paper label on the verso attached to the original stretcher bars from George Water's studio in Elmira, New York; The label says "Paintings - G. W. Waters - Portraits & Landscapes - 135 Waters Street, Elmira, New York | Painting is housed in the original amazing ornate custom gesso wood frame | Dimensions: 36.0" W x 41.0" H x 5.0" D | | George W. Waters (1832-1912) lived and worked in Elmira, New York, for most of his adult life. Inspired by nature's gentle beauty, Waters set out to record the world around him: hills covered in autumn hues; apple trees blossoming in spring; cattle grazing beside a river; ocean waves in moonlight. He traveled throughout the northeast to sketch the river valleys, mountain ranges, and coastlines before returning to his studio in Elmira to paint. Many of his works were done on commission by or sold to private collectors outside the area, some as far away as Wisconsin, and he exhibited his works regularly and with considerable acclaim. Yet, the people of Elmira were always his most supportive public. The city newspapers heralded the activities and achievements of "Elmira's own artist" by reporting visits to his studio to describe works in progress, pronouncing what new paintings were on view where, and welcoming the artist back from his sketching trips. George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832, in the small New York community of Coventry in Chenango County. (The middle initial "W" is a matter of conjecture. Most sources list "Wattles" but "Wellington" has also been suggested.) He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He attended the Franklin-Delaware Literary Institute and later taught there. In the course of his teaching, Waters met Sarah Sherman Betts and the two were married in November 1856. In pursuit of his artistic vocation, George and Sarah Waters moved to New York City but Waters quickly tired of city life and desired to be closer to the natural subjects he loved so well. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, in 1861 George and Sarah moved to the small but thriving city of Elmira, where they settled and raised a family: Mabel, born 1862; Jean, born 1865; Charles, born 1869; and George Jr., born 1877. In 1869, Waters was named the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Waters traveled to Europe, first in 1880 and again in 1886 with his family. They went to Germany and Switzerland where the artist made hundreds of pen, pencil, and watercolor studies to use as source material for works painted subsequent to his trips. The trips with the most significant impact on his artwork, however, were those made to the countryside and wilderness areas of the Northeast. Waters made frequent trips, both sketching trips, with his family as well as with other artists, to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and the lakes and river valleys of New York State, especially the Chemung Valley. Upon returning to his studio, he translated his sketches into landscape paintings, "portraits of the land" that captured a devoted and appreciative audience. The 1870s and 1880s were transition years for landscape painters. Growing disenchantment with the Hudson River School by the general public and art critics fostered a reappraisal in style and approach by artists. Increasing urbanization and industrialization of the East Coast spawned a growing interest in pastoral landscapes that depicted the pre-industrial past. Artists began to paint highly detailed, often identifiable scenes of the domesticated rural east, scenes that often illustrated man's occupation of and partnership with the land. Waters' sympathies and his approach to painting align him with this second generation of the Hudson River School. Like John F. Kensett, James M. Hart, William Hart, William Trost Richards, and James Hope, Waters chose to preserve on canvas the intimate and approachable scenery found in the northeast. He was praised for his detailed paintings of specific, identifiable sites, for his palette of rich glowing colors, and his skill for capturing different seasons and unusual light effects. Proud of their hometown artist, Elmira writers often compared the works of Waters to those of his better-known contemporaries. In 1880, a writer in The Free Press noted that, "The picture is essentially American in all its particular, in design and treatment, and should give Mr. Waters a reputation beside James Hart, Bierstadt, or Frederick [sic] Church." The superb value of Waters' works—during his lifetime, none sold for more than $1,000 and most sold for less—was not lost on his public. In 1882, a writer in the Elmira Daily Advertiser observed that, "…if you could just put James Hart or Frederic Church on one corner of the canvas, it would be worth, or could be sold for about $5,000 and it wouldn't be any better than it is now…." In 1882, noted author and part-time Elmira resident Samuel Clemens commissioned a painting of a ship at sea engulfed in flames. After receiving the work, Clemens sent a note thanking Waters for his rendering of "the splendid horror": I was tired of the monotony of mildness: mildness of color, mildness of scenery, mildness of situation, mildness of circumstances…. Eternal peace, repose, comfort, absence of suffering—absence of sorrow, absence of excitement—a pallid, inane tranquility—as if that were all of life. You have faithfully reproduced the splendid horror I had in mind; and to me there is a satisfaction in these leaping flames and these ruddy waves, and the awful distress of these shipwrecked poor devils, which no amount of painted peace and pictured serenity can give. Like most artists of the nineteenth century, Waters relied on portraiture to supplement his income. Waters' ability to produce near-perfect likenesses of his sitters ensured a steady stream of commissions. In 1877, New York City patron John H. Johnston—an admirer of the works of the painter George Waters and the poet Walt Whitman—commissioned the former to make a portrait of the latter. During the many sittings, the two became friends and Whitman readily agreed to a few extra sittings so that Waters could make a portrait for his own collection. Other portrait commissions included New York Governor Lucius Robinson and Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall, and numerous prominent Elmirans, such as the writer Samuel Clemens and Reverend Thomas K. Beecher. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912 in Elmira, New York.  Adapted by Rachael Sadinsky from her essays in the exhibition brochure George W. Waters, 1832-1912 (Elmira, NY: Arnot Art Museum, 1989).

      Worthington Galleries
    • George Wattles Waters Shipwreck on Rock Painting
      Jun. 09, 2018

      George Wattles Waters Shipwreck on Rock Painting

      Est: $1,000 - $2,000

      Oil on canvas painting of a shipwreck on coastal rocks by well-listed artist Waters (American, 1832-1912). Signed lower right. Professional cleaning and two patches visible on un-relined back. Painting measures about 16-1/2" x 28" visible in spectacular gilt gesso frame measuring 30" x 42".

      Blackwell Auctions LLC
    • 19th Century Original George Wellington Waters Oil Painting
      Mar. 03, 2018

      19th Century Original George Wellington Waters Oil Painting

      Est: $3,000 - $6,000

      Large 19th Century original oil painting by George Wellington Waters (American, 1832-1912). The beautiful painting depicts a woman caring for a young child | There is an original paper label on the verso from Water’s studio in Elmira, New York | Painting has some wear consistent with age and use | Painting is housed in an amazing ornate cream colored antique frame | Dimensions: 36.0″ W x 41.0″ H x 5.0″ D. George W. Waters (1832-1912) lived and worked in Elmira, New York, for most of his adult life. Inspired by nature’s gentle beauty, Waters set out to record the world around him: hills covered in autumn hues; apple trees blossoming in spring; cattle grazing beside a river; ocean waves in moonlight. He traveled throughout the northeast to sketch the river valleys, mountain ranges, and coastlines before returning to his studio in Elmira to paint. Many of his works were done on commission by or sold to private collectors outside the area, some as far away as Wisconsin, and he exhibited his works regularly and with considerable acclaim. Yet, the people of Elmira were always his most supportive public. The city newspapers heralded the activities and achievements of “Elmira’s own artist” by reporting visits to his studio to describe works in progress, pronouncing what new paintings were on view where, and welcoming the artist back from his sketching trips. George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832, in the small New York community of Coventry in Chenango County. (The middle initial “W” is a matter of conjecture. Most sources list “Wattles” but “Wellington” has also been suggested.) He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He attended the Franklin-Delaware Literary Institute and later taught there. In the course of his teaching, Waters met Sarah Sherman Betts and the two were married in November 1856. In pursuit of his artistic vocation, George and Sarah Waters moved to New York City but Waters quickly tired of city life and desired to be closer to the natural subjects he loved so well. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, in 1861 George and Sarah moved to the small but thriving city of Elmira, where they settled and raised a family: Mabel, born 1862; Jean, born 1865; Charles, born 1869; and George Jr., born 1877. In 1869, Waters was named the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Waters traveled to Europe, first in 1880 and again in 1886 with his family. They went to Germany and Switzerland where the artist made hundreds of pen, pencil, and watercolor studies to use as source material for works painted subsequent to his trips. The trips with the most significant impact on his artwork, however, were those made to the countryside and wilderness areas of the Northeast. Waters made frequent trips, both sketching trips, with his family as well as with other artists, to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and the lakes and river valleys of New York State, especially the Chemung Valley. Upon returning to his studio, he translated his sketches into landscape paintings, “portraits of the land” that captured a devoted and appreciative audience. The 1870s and 1880s were transition years for landscape painters. Growing disenchantment with the Hudson River School by the general public and art critics fostered a reappraisal in style and approach by artists. Increasing urbanization and industrialization of the East Coast spawned a growing interest in pastoral landscapes that depicted the pre-industrial past. Artists began to paint highly detailed, often identifiable scenes of the domesticated rural east, scenes that often illustrated man’s occupation of and partnership with the land. Waters’ sympathies and his approach to painting align him with this second generation of the Hudson River School. Like John F. Kensett, James M. Hart, William Hart, William Trost Richards, and James Hope, Waters chose to preserve on canvas the intimate and approachable scenery found in the northeast. He was praised for his detailed paintings of specific, identifiable sites, for his palette of rich glowing colors, and his skill for capturing different seasons and unusual light effects. Proud of their hometown artist, Elmira writers often compared the works of Waters to those of his better-known contemporaries. In 1880, a writer in The Free Press noted that, “The picture is essentially American in all its particular, in design and treatment, and should give Mr. Waters a reputation beside James Hart, Bierstadt, or Frederick [sic] Church.” The superb value of Waters’ works—during his lifetime, none sold for more than $1,000 and most sold for less—was not lost on his public. In 1882, a writer in the Elmira Daily Advertiser observed that, “…if you could just put James Hart or Frederic Church on one corner of the canvas, it would be worth, or could be sold for about $5,000 and it wouldn’t be any better than it is now….” In 1882, noted author and part-time Elmira resident Samuel Clemens commissioned a painting of a ship at sea engulfed in flames. After receiving the work, Clemens sent a note thanking Waters for his rendering of “the splendid horror”: I was tired of the monotony of mildness: mildness of color, mildness of scenery, mildness of situation, mildness of circumstances…. Eternal peace, repose, comfort, absence of suffering—absence of sorrow, absence of excitement—a pallid, inane tranquility—as if that were all of life. You have faithfully reproduced the splendid horror I had in mind; and to me there is a satisfaction in these leaping flames and these ruddy waves, and the awful distress of these shipwrecked poor devils, which no amount of painted peace and pictured serenity can give. Like most artists of the nineteenth century, Waters relied on portraiture to supplement his income. Waters’ ability to produce near-perfect likenesses of his sitters ensured a steady stream of commissions. In 1877, New York City patron John H. Johnston—an admirer of the works of the painter George Waters and the poet Walt Whitman—commissioned the former to make a portrait of the latter. During the many sittings, the two became friends and Whitman readily agreed to a few extra sittings so that Waters could make a portrait for his own collection. Other portrait commissions included New York Governor Lucius Robinson and Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall, and numerous prominent Elmirans, such as the writer Samuel Clemens and Reverend Thomas K. Beecher. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912 in Elmira, New York. Adapted by Rachael Sadinsky from her essays in the exhibition brochure George W. Waters, 1832-1912 (Elmira, NY: Arnot Art Museum, 1989).

      Worthington Galleries
    • George Wellington Waters19th Century Oil Painting
      Dec. 03, 2017

      George Wellington Waters19th Century Oil Painting

      Est: $2,000 - $4,000

      Large 19th Century original oil painting by George Wellington Waters (American, 1832-1912). The beautiful painting depicts a woman caring for a young child | There is an original paper label on the verso from Water’s studio in Elmira, New York | Painting has some wear consistent with age and use | Painting is housed in an amazing ornate cream colored antique frame | Dimensions: 36.0″ W x 41.0″ H x 5.0″ D. George W. Waters (1832-1912) lived and worked in Elmira, New York, for most of his adult life. Inspired by nature’s gentle beauty, Waters set out to record the world around him: hills covered in autumn hues; apple trees blossoming in spring; cattle grazing beside a river; ocean waves in moonlight. He traveled throughout the northeast to sketch the river valleys, mountain ranges, and coastlines before returning to his studio in Elmira to paint. Many of his works were done on commission by or sold to private collectors outside the area, some as far away as Wisconsin, and he exhibited his works regularly and with considerable acclaim. Yet, the people of Elmira were always his most supportive public. The city newspapers heralded the activities and achievements of “Elmira’s own artist” by reporting visits to his studio to describe works in progress, pronouncing what new paintings were on view where, and welcoming the artist back from his sketching trips. George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832, in the small New York community of Coventry in Chenango County. (The middle initial “W” is a matter of conjecture. Most sources list “Wattles” but “Wellington” has also been suggested.) He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He attended the Franklin-Delaware Literary Institute and later taught there. In the course of his teaching, Waters met Sarah Sherman Betts and the two were married in November 1856. In pursuit of his artistic vocation, George and Sarah Waters moved to New York City but Waters quickly tired of city life and desired to be closer to the natural subjects he loved so well. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, in 1861 George and Sarah moved to the small but thriving city of Elmira, where they settled and raised a family: Mabel, born 1862; Jean, born 1865; Charles, born 1869; and George Jr., born 1877. In 1869, Waters was named the first director of the art department of Elmira College. Waters traveled to Europe, first in 1880 and again in 1886 with his family. They went to Germany and Switzerland where the artist made hundreds of pen, pencil, and watercolor studies to use as source material for works painted subsequent to his trips. The trips with the most significant impact on his artwork, however, were those made to the countryside and wilderness areas of the Northeast. Waters made frequent trips, both sketching trips, with his family as well as with other artists, to the White Mountains, the Adirondacks, and the lakes and river valleys of New York State, especially the Chemung Valley. Upon returning to his studio, he translated his sketches into landscape paintings, “portraits of the land” that captured a devoted and appreciative audience. The 1870s and 1880s were transition years for landscape painters. Growing disenchantment with the Hudson River School by the general public and art critics fostered a reappraisal in style and approach by artists. Increasing urbanization and industrialization of the East Coast spawned a growing interest in pastoral landscapes that depicted the pre-industrial past. Artists began to paint highly detailed, often identifiable scenes of the domesticated rural east, scenes that often illustrated man’s occupation of and partnership with the land. Waters’ sympathies and his approach to painting align him with this second generation of the Hudson River School. Like John F. Kensett, James M. Hart, William Hart, William Trost Richards, and James Hope, Waters chose to preserve on canvas the intimate and approachable scenery found in the northeast. He was praised for his detailed paintings of specific, identifiable sites, for his palette of rich glowing colors, and his skill for capturing different seasons and unusual light effects. Proud of their hometown artist, Elmira writers often compared the works of Waters to those of his better-known contemporaries. In 1880, a writer in The Free Press noted that, “The picture is essentially American in all its particular, in design and treatment, and should give Mr. Waters a reputation beside James Hart, Bierstadt, or Frederick [sic] Church.” The superb value of Waters’ works—during his lifetime, none sold for more than $1,000 and most sold for less—was not lost on his public. In 1882, a writer in the Elmira Daily Advertiser observed that, “…if you could just put James Hart or Frederic Church on one corner of the canvas, it would be worth, or could be sold for about $5,000 and it wouldn’t be any better than it is now….” In 1882, noted author and part-time Elmira resident Samuel Clemens commissioned a painting of a ship at sea engulfed in flames. After receiving the work, Clemens sent a note thanking Waters for his rendering of “the splendid horror”: I was tired of the monotony of mildness: mildness of color, mildness of scenery, mildness of situation, mildness of circumstances…. Eternal peace, repose, comfort, absence of suffering—absence of sorrow, absence of excitement—a pallid, inane tranquility—as if that were all of life. You have faithfully reproduced the splendid horror I had in mind; and to me there is a satisfaction in these leaping flames and these ruddy waves, and the awful distress of these shipwrecked poor devils, which no amount of painted peace and pictured serenity can give. Like most artists of the nineteenth century, Waters relied on portraiture to supplement his income. Waters’ ability to produce near-perfect likenesses of his sitters ensured a steady stream of commissions. In 1877, New York City patron John H. Johnston—an admirer of the works of the painter George Waters and the poet Walt Whitman—commissioned the former to make a portrait of the latter. During the many sittings, the two became friends and Whitman readily agreed to a few extra sittings so that Waters could make a portrait for his own collection. Other portrait commissions included New York Governor Lucius Robinson and Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall, and numerous prominent Elmirans, such as the writer Samuel Clemens and Reverend Thomas K. Beecher. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912 in Elmira, New York. Adapted by Rachael Sadinsky from her essays in the exhibition brochure George W. Waters, 1832-1912 (Elmira, NY: Arnot Art Museum, 1989).

      Worthington Galleries
    • George Wattles Waters Shipwreck on Rock Painting
      Nov. 18, 2017

      George Wattles Waters Shipwreck on Rock Painting

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      Oil on canvas painting of a ship wreck on coastal rocks by well-listed artist Waters (American, 1832-1912). Signed lower right. Professional cleaning and two patches visible on un-relined back. Painting measures about 16-1/2" x 28" visible in spectacular gilt gesso frame measuring 30" x 42".

      Blackwell Auctions LLC
    • GEORGE WELLINGTON WATERS (American 1832 - 1912). ROUGH SEAS, signed lower right. Oil on canvas.
      Apr. 23, 2017

      GEORGE WELLINGTON WATERS (American 1832 - 1912). ROUGH SEAS, signed lower right. Oil on canvas.

      Est: $700 - $900

      GEORGE WELLINGTON WATERS (American 1832 - 1912). ROUGH SEAS, signed lower right. Oil on canvas - Framed, 13 1/2 in. x 10 1/2 in.

      Sloans & Kenyon
    • George W. Waters, Boating on Lake George, Oil Painting
      Jan. 28, 2017

      George W. Waters, Boating on Lake George, Oil Painting

      Est: $8,000 - $12,000

      Boating on Lake George. George W. Waters (1832-1912). Oil on canvas, 1883. Signed and dated lower right: "G.W. Waters / 83". 18 x 30 inches. Provenance: private collection, Ithaca, New York George W. Waters was born in Coventry, New York, in 1832 and studied art in New York, Dresden, and Munich. Waters is known for his landscapes, many of which he made during trips to the Adirondacks, the White Mountains, and other areas in New Hampshire. He is also known for his portraits, particularly those of Walt Whitman and Joseph Jefferson as “Rip Van Winkle.” He maintained a teaching job as director of the art department at Elmira College in Elmira, New York, from 1869 to 1903, with only brief intervals of travel in 1880 and 1886. He was able to paint in Europe thanks to the aid of wealthy patrons. Boating on Lake George likely depicts a hazy day on the famous Adirondack lake. While the scene cannot be positively identified, it shows all the characteristics of the section of the lake called the Narrows, where mountains rise up from the granite banks of the lake, and many small, densely forested islands appear. The disc of the sun glows through the haze, suffusing the sky with warmth and glowing in the lake below. Waters’ broad, smooth paint handling was suited to this light effect, and brings an appealing calm to the image, while the scale of the tiny figure rowing a boat in relation to the surrounding mountains suggests the power and majesty of the site. Waters was a member of the Salmagundi Club, Century Association, and the Amateur Art Association, New York. He exhibited his work at the National Academy of Design, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Boston Art Club, Black and White Exhibitions of the Salmagundi Sketch Club, and in Buffalo, New York; Kansas City, Missouri; Detroit, Michigan; and Denver, Colorado. His work is housed in the Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland; and the Arnot Art Museum in Elmira, New York.

      Arader Galleries
    • GEORGE W. WATERS, American (1832-1912), "View on Lake George", oil on canvas, signed and dated "1881" lower right., 12 x 20 inches
      Oct. 27, 2016

      GEORGE W. WATERS, American (1832-1912), "View on Lake George", oil on canvas, signed and dated "1881" lower right., 12 x 20 inches

      Est: $4,000 - $6,000

      GEORGE W. WATERS American (1832-1912) "View on Lake George" oil on canvas, signed and dated "1881" lower right. 12 x 20 inches Provenance: The Albany Gallery, Albany, New York; Private Collection, Florida. Other Notes: Tags: Landscape, Hudson River School, 19th Century

      Shannon's
    • George Waters (American, 1832-1912) Cows in a stream
      Nov. 14, 2015

      George Waters (American, 1832-1912) Cows in a stream

      Est: $500 - $800

      Sgn. lower left, G.W. Waters. Oil on canvas.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George Waters (American, 1832-1912) "Red Astrachan Apples"
      Nov. 14, 2015

      George Waters (American, 1832-1912) "Red Astrachan Apples"

      Est: $500 - $800

      Sgn. & titled on reverse, dated 1907. Oil on canvas.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 River Landscape in Summer
      Oct. 07, 2015

      George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 River Landscape in Summer

      Est: $1,500 - $2,500

      George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 River Landscape in Summer Signed G. W. Waters (ll) Oil on canvas 24 x 18 inches C 

      Doyle New York
    • GEORGE W. WATERS, OIL ON PANEL COASTAL SCENE PAINTING
      Aug. 23, 2015

      GEORGE W. WATERS, OIL ON PANEL COASTAL SCENE PAINTING

      Est: $1,000 - $3,000

      GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912), OIL ON PANEL PAINTING DEPICTING COASTAL SCENE IN MOONLIGHT SIGNED LOWER RIGHT G W WATERS 1883; 25.5"H X 13.25"W IMAGE, 30.5"H X 18"W OVERALL

      Clements
    • ATTRIBUTED TO GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912): MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE
      Mar. 14, 2015

      ATTRIBUTED TO GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912): MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE

      Est: $2,000 - $4,000

      ATTRIBUTED TO GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912): MOUNTAIN LANDSCAPE Oil on canvas, unsigned, lined. 40 x 30 in., 48 x 37 in. (frame). Provenance: Jervis Langdon, Elmira, New York; Frank Speno, Ithaca, New York; thence by descent.

      STAIR
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Lake George
      Feb. 21, 2015

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Lake George

      Est: $5,000 - $8,000

      Sgn. Lower right, G. W. Waters. Oil on canvas.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Rocky Meadow with View to the Sea, Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r., identified on a label from the Cr
      Jan. 23, 2015

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Rocky Meadow with View to the Sea, Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r., identified on a label from the Cr

      Est: $4,000 - $6,000

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Rocky Meadow with View to the Sea Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r., identified on a label from the Crane Collection, Wellesley, Massachusetts, affixed to the back of the frame. Oil on canvas, 18 x 30 in. (45.5 x 76.5 cm), framed. Condition: Lined, scattered retouch, craquelure.

      Skinner
    • George W. Waters (1832-1912) Autumn landscape with cows
      Oct. 18, 2014

      George W. Waters (1832-1912) Autumn landscape with cows

      Est: $1,500 - $2,500

      Sgn. Lower right, G.W. Waters. Oil/canvas.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George Waters (American, 1832-1912) View Near Elmira, NY
      Oct. 18, 2014

      George Waters (American, 1832-1912) View Near Elmira, NY

      Est: $1,500 - $2,500

      Sgn. Lower right, George Waters, 1907. Oil/canvas.

      Cottone Auctions
    • George W. Waters, (American, 1832-1912), Night Sails
      Jul. 25, 2014

      George W. Waters, (American, 1832-1912), Night Sails

      Est: $700 - $900

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Night Sails oil on canvas signed Waters (lower right) 12 x 18 inches.

      Hindman
    • G.W. Waters, Sunset Morse lake.
      May. 17, 2014

      G.W. Waters, Sunset Morse lake.

      Est: $7,000 - $9,000

      Waters, George W. (New York, 1832-1912). Sunset Morse Lake, Adirondack's. c. 1882. Signed l.l., G.W. Waters, and dated. 28 1/2" x 40 3/4".

      Quinn's Auction Galleries
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Landscape with Lumber Mill, Signed "GWWaters" l.l., Condition: Lined, retouch, craquelure, surf
      May. 16, 2014

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912), Landscape with Lumber Mill, Signed "GWWaters" l.l., Condition: Lined, retouch, craquelure, surf

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Landscape with Lumber Mill Signed "GWWaters" l.l. Oil on canvas, 12 x 20 1/4 in. (30.5 x 51.4 cm), framed. Condition: Lined, retouch, craquelure, surface grime.

      Skinner
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (American, 1832-1912) BOAT ON BEACH WITH SUNRISE
      Aug. 20, 2013

      GEORGE W. WATERS (American, 1832-1912) BOAT ON BEACH WITH SUNRISE

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      Oil on canvas Housed in its original gesso decorated gilt frame with corner losses Signed lower left "Waters 69" SIZE: 12" x 20". Overall: 20-1/4" x 27-1/2". CONDITION: Light craquelure, very good with some minor spot touch-up. 9-29379

      James D. Julia
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (American, 1832-1912) Painting
      Apr. 07, 2013

      GEORGE W. WATERS (American, 1832-1912) Painting

      Est: $1,500 - $2,000

      GEORGE W. WATERS (American, 1832-1912) Landscape, Oil on canvas. Signed lower right. Painting 18" x 22". Frame 25" x 29". In good condition, has been cleaned and has extensive scattered inpainting. From AskArt: "George W. Waters lived and worked in Elmira, New York, for most of his adult life. Inspired by nature's gentle beauty, Waters set out to record the world around him: hills covered in autumn hues; apple trees blossoming in spring; cattle grazing beside a river; ocean waves in moonlight. He traveled throughout the northeast to sketch the river valleys, mountain ranges, and coastlines before returning to his studio in Elmira to paint. Many of his works were done on commission by or sold to private collectors outside the area, some as far away as Wisconsin, and he exhibited his works regularly and with considerable acclaim. Yet, the people of Elmira were always his most supportive public. The city newspapers heralded the activities and achievements of "Elmira's own artist" by reporting visits to his studio to describe works in progress, pronouncing what new paintings were on view where, and welcoming the artist back from his sketching trips. George W. Waters was born on March 31, 1832, in the small New York community of Coventry in Chenango County. (The middle initial "W" is a matter of conjecture. Most sources list "Wattles" but "Wellington" has also been suggested.) He began his artistic career early and in 1850, at the age of eighteen, Waters had one of his paintings was on view at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He attended the Franklin-Delaware Literary Institute and later taught there. In the course of his teaching, Waters met Sarah Sherman Betts and the two were married in November 1856. In pursuit of his artistic vocation, George and Sarah Waters moved to New York City but Waters quickly tired of city life and desired to be closer to the natural subjects he loved so well. Though he maintained a studio in New York City for many years, in 1861 George and Sarah moved to the small but thriving city of Elmira, where they settled and raised a family: Mabel, born 1862; Jean, born 1865; Charles, born 1869; and George Jr., born 1877. In 1869, Waters was named the first director of the art department of Elmira College. In 1903, at the age of 71, Waters retired from Elmira College. He continued to paint until his death on July 23, 1912 in Elmira, New York."

      Myers Fine Art
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912, American)
      Mar. 17, 2013

      GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912, American)

      Est: $600 - $1,000

      "Castle By Moonlight", oil on canvas, 15" x 11"

      Black Rock Galleries
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Moonlit Harbor. Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r. Oil on board, 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 in., framed. Condition: M
      Jul. 18, 2012

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Moonlit Harbor. Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r. Oil on board, 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 in., framed. Condition: M

      Est: $1,000 - $1,500

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912) Moonlit Harbor. Signed "G.W. Waters" l.r. Oil on board, 7 1/2 x 10 1/2 in., framed. Condition: Mild surface grime.

      Skinner
    • GEORGE WATERS (American. 1832-1912)
      Jan. 16, 2012

      GEORGE WATERS (American. 1832-1912)

      Est: $1,200 - $1,400

      "The Old River Mill". Indistinctly signed and dated 1885 l/r. Oil on Board. Measuring 25 1/2" by 13 1/2". Framed. (Cond: good, no inpainting apparent under u.v. light)

      Auction Gallery of the Palm Beaches
    • George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 Boaters on a Lake, the Adirondacks
      Nov. 17, 2011

      George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 Boaters on a Lake, the Adirondacks

      Est: $2,000 - $3,000

      George W. Waters American, 1832-1912 Boaters on a Lake, the Adirondacks Signed G W Waters (ll) Oil on canvas 14 x 19 inches Private collection, New York since the 1900s By descent in the family to the present owner C 

      Doyle New York
    • GEORGE WATERS, American 1832-1912, "The Old River
      Sep. 27, 2011

      GEORGE WATERS, American 1832-1912, "The Old River

      Est: $1,200 - $1,500

      GEORGE WATERS, American 1832-1912, "The Old River Mill" oil on board 25 ½" x 13 ½", signed and dated 1885, framed.

      Bill Hood & Sons Arts & Antiques Auctions
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912): Autumn Landscape with Old Mill
      Aug. 13, 2011

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912): Autumn Landscape with Old Mill

      Est: $800 - $1,200

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912): Autumn Landscape with Old Mill Oil on artistboard, signed and dated '85. 25 1/2 x 13 1/2 in.

      STAIR
    • George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912): Autumn Landscape with Old Mill
      Jun. 10, 2011

      George W. Waters (American, 1832-1912): Autumn Landscape with Old Mill

      Est: $1,500 - $3,000

      Oil on artist's board, signed and dated '85; 25 1/2 x 13 1/2 in.

      STAIR
    • GEORGE W. WATERS
      Apr. 08, 2011

      GEORGE W. WATERS

      Est: $5,000 - $7,000

      GEORGE W. WATERS 1832-1912 RIVER LANDSCAPE AT DAYBREAK signed George W. Waters and dated 1865, l.r. oil on canvas 22 by 30 1/4 in. (55.9 by 77 cm.)

      Sotheby's
    • GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912): AUTUMN LANDSCAPE WITH OLD MILL
      Mar. 19, 2011

      GEORGE W. WATERS (1832-1912): AUTUMN LANDSCAPE WITH OLD MILL

      Est: $3,000 - $5,000

      Oil on artistsboard, 25 1/2 x 13 1/2 in., signed and dated '85.

      STAIR
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