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Felix de Weldon Sold at Auction Prices

b. 1907 - d. 2003

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        • F.WELDON, "SIR WILLIAM BLACKSTONE," BRONZE BUST.
          Feb. 23, 2024

          F.WELDON, "SIR WILLIAM BLACKSTONE," BRONZE BUST.

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          Felix de Weldon (Austrian-American, 1907-2003). A bronze bust of Sir William Blackstone (English, 1723-1780). Marble stand with plaque. Signed reverse "F. de Wheldon SC 1963." 17" x 16 1/2" x 11".Plaque states bronze was presented by Felix de Weldon in 1965 to Arthur B. Hanson.

          Quinn's Auction Galleries
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS & BUSTS, LOT OF SIX
          Oct. 21, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS & BUSTS, LOT OF SIX

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS & BUSTS, LOT OF SIX, including original plaster maquette fragment bust of General Calixto Garcia Y Iniquesz (CUBAN, 1839-1898), a model for the large equestrian statue that still stands in Havana, unsigned. Third quarter 20th century. 24" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://jeffreysevans.com/buying/shipping-and-pick-up/

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY
          Oct. 21, 2023

          IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY

          Est: $2,000 - $3,000

          IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY, retaining copper-painted surface, signed and dated to reverse "Felix de Weldon sc 1963", mounted on a wooden base. Dated 1963. 18 1/2" HOA (including base). Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (a plaster maquette for this bust is included in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. According to the consignor, the presently offered plaster maquette is an original model used in the creation of the official bronze bust of President John F. Kennedy. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire one of the last living likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/shipping-and-pick-up/

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • Felix de Weldon (American, 1907-2003) Bronze Sculpture
          May. 24, 2023

          Felix de Weldon (American, 1907-2003) Bronze Sculpture

          Est: $800 - $2,000

          Limited edition bronze sculpture modeled as goddess Aphrodite with child and infant. Dress painted to appear as silver. Signed, dated and numbered to base. Fixed to black marble rectangular base. This item has no reserve. Artist: Felix de Weldon Issued: 1990 Dimensions: 9"L x 6.25"W x 23"H Edition Number: 59 of 250 Country of Origin: United States

          Lion and Unicorn
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF GENERAL CALIXTO GARCIA Y INIQUEZ (CUBAN,
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF GENERAL CALIXTO GARCIA Y INIQUEZ (CUBAN,

          Est: $50 - $100

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF GENERAL CALIXTO GARCIA Y INIQUEZ (CUBAN, 1839-1898), a model for the large equestrian statue that still stands in Havana, unsigned. Third quarter 20th century. 24" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE, unidentified sitters. Third Quarter 20th century. One 15". Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF MALAYSIAN PRIME MINISTER TUNKU ABDUL RAHMAN (1903-1990)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF MALAYSIAN PRIME MINISTER TUNKU ABDUL RAHMAN (1903-1990)

          Est: $50 - $100

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF MALAYSIAN PRIME MINISTER TUNKU ABDUL RAHMAN (1903-1990),signed and dated. 1966. 29 1/2" HOA, 16" WOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BUST MOLDS, LOT OF TWO
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BUST MOLDS, LOT OF TWO

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BUST MOLDS, LOT OF TWO, depicting a male figure. Third quarter 20th century. 19" H. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS, LOT OF FIVE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS, LOT OF FIVE

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL MOLDS, LOT OF FIVE, including one depicting Phillip Duke of Edinburgh. Third quarter 20th century. Phillip 13" D. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL COLOSSUS SCULPTURE MOLD
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL COLOSSUS SCULPTURE MOLD

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL COLOSSUS SCULPTURE MOLD, after the Colossus of Rhodes. Third quarter 20th century. Approximately 26" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER BUSTS, LOT OF THREE, including one signed and depicting Felix de Weldon. Third quarter 20th century. One 13" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL GEORGE WASHINGTON SCULPTURE MOLD
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL GEORGE WASHINGTON SCULPTURE MOLD

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL GEORGE WASHINGTON SCULPTURE MOLD, bust-length depiction. Third quarter 20th century. Approximately 24" H. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BRONZE RELIGIOUS WITH MOLD
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BRONZE RELIGIOUS WITH MOLD

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL BRONZE RELIGIOUS WITH MOLD, bronze bas-relief of the Holy Family. 1979. 8 1/2" H, 2 3/4" x 11". Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF UNITED STATES SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE SAM RA
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF UNITED STATES SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE SAM RA

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF UNITED STATES SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE SAM RAYBURN (1882-1961), unsigned. Circa 1960. 10" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIR HENRY BLACKSTONE (ENGLISH, 1723-1780)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIR HENRY BLACKSTONE (ENGLISH, 1723-1780)

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIR HENRY BLACKSTONE (ENGLISH, 1723-1780), signed to one shoulder, retaining original painted surface. Third quarter 20th century. 17 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN MARSHALL (VIRGINIA, 1755-1835)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN MARSHALL (VIRGINIA, 1755-1835)

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF CHIEF JUSTICE JOHN MARSHALL (VIRGINIA, 1755-1835), signed to one shoulder, retaining original painted surface. Third quarter 20th century. 17 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MODEL OF THE RISEN CHRIST
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MODEL OF THE RISEN CHRIST

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MODEL OF THE RISEN CHRIST, no signature located, retaining old white-painted surface. Together with another plaster model of similar form, unsigned. Two pieces total. Third quarter 20th century. Taller 25" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF A MAN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF A MAN

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF A MAN, signed and dated, subject identified as "E. B. STROUD". Dated 1951. 20 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF UNITED STATES NAVY ADMIRAL RAYMOND AMES SPRUANCE (1886-1969)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF UNITED STATES NAVY ADMIRAL RAYMOND AMES SPRUANCE (1886-1969)

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF UNITED STATES NAVY ADMIRAL RAYMOND AMES SPRUANCE (1886-1969), signed and inscribed. Circa 1950. 21 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Admiral Raymond Ames Spruance (1886-1969) was an important figure during World War II, when he commanded U. S. Naval forces in the Battle of the Philippine Sea as well as the Battle of Midway. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL "HUMANITY" PLASTER MODEL WITH ORIGINAL RUBBER MOLD
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL "HUMANITY" PLASTER MODEL WITH ORIGINAL RUBBER MOLD

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL "HUMANITY" PLASTER MODEL WITH ORIGINAL RUBBER MOLD, with central depiction of Christ, with individual religious scenes. Third quarter 20th century. 16" x 17 1/2".  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799)

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799), unsigned. Third quarter 20th century. 21 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF GEORGE WYTHE (VIRGINIA, 1726-1806)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF GEORGE WYTHE (VIRGINIA, 1726-1806)

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF GEORGE WYTHE (VIRGINIA, 1726-1806), signed to one shoulder, retaining original painted surface. Third quarter 20th century. 18 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE FOR A STATUE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE FOR A STATUE

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PAINTED PLASTER MAQUETTE FOR A STATUE, standing nude male form who appears to be looking out at the horizon while shading his eyes from the sun, signed and dated to base, retaining original painted surface. Together with a stylized crown that poorly fits the figure. Two pieces total. Dated 1966. 24 1/2" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIMON BOLIVAR (1783-1830)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIMON BOLIVAR (1783-1830)

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF SIMON BOLIVAR (1783-1830), subject in military attire wearing a portrait miniature of George Washington, signed to one shoulder, retaining old white-painted surface. Circa 1948. 20 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) PLASTER BUST OF A YOUNG WOMAN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) PLASTER BUST OF A YOUNG WOMAN

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) PLASTER BUST OF A YOUNG WOMAN, signed to one shoulder, retaining natural surface. Mid 20th century. 21" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER LEE, JACKSON, MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUSTS, LOT OF THREE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER LEE, JACKSON, MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUSTS, LOT OF THREE

          Est: $300 - $500

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER LEE, JACKSON, DAVIS MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUSTS, models for a large sculpture, depicting Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee, and Jefferson, possibly after the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial in Georgia. Third quarter 20th century. Davis approximately 31" HOA. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL EISENHOWER JUBILEE BRONZE MEDALLION WITH MODEL
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL EISENHOWER JUBILEE BRONZE MEDALLION WITH MODEL

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL EISENHOWER JUBILEE BRONZE MEDALLION WITH MODEL, one example signed and dated. Dated 1978. One 10" D.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST FRAGMENT OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST FRAGMENT OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST FRAGMENT OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN, no signature located, retaining natural surface. Circa 1963. 20" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. The present plaster maquette bust fragment is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire a rare likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN, a model used in the creation of the bronze statue commissioned by the Greek government, no signature located, retaining white-painted surface. Circa 1963. 33 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. The present plaster maquette is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present maquette on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire a rare likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT HARRY S. TRUMAN

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT Harry S. Truman, signed and inscribed verso, retaining natural surface. Circa 1948. 21 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (the present lot is an original maquette of this bust), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire a rare likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL, comprising George Washington, King George, and Iwo Jima postage stamp. Third quarter 20th century. George Washington. Iwo Jima 4" x 2 1/2". Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, GILT-BRONZE PRESENTATION MEDALLION
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, GILT-BRONZE PRESENTATION MEDALLION

          Est: $100 - $200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, GILT-BRONZE PRESENTATION MEDALLION, an achievement award given by the Deafness Research Foundation, marked at edge for maker "MEDALLIC ART CO. / NY. / GOLD PLATE", retaining original undisturbed surface. Mid 20th century. 5" D.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.   

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE REPLICA OF THE RED CROSS MEMORIAL
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE REPLICA OF THE RED CROSS MEMORIAL

          Est: $200 - $300

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE REPLICA OF THE RED CROSS MEMORIAL, signed to base, retaining rich patina, affixed to a marble plinth. Third quarter 20th century. 6" HOA, 6" x 4" base.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PLAQUE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PLAQUE

          Est: $300 - $500

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PLAQUE, probably aerospace related, the design being highly similar to those associated with Project Mercury iconography from the 1960's, signed and dated, retaining a richly patinated surface. Together with a smaller example of the same form, retaining silvered surface and affixed to a marble backing. Two pieces total. Larger example dated 1979. Larger example 9 3/4" D. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BUST OF SOCRATES
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BUST OF SOCRATES

          Est: $300 - $500

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BUST OF SOCRATES, signed and dated, retaining rich patina, affixed to a marble plinth. Dated 1979. 12" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE AEROSPACE AWARD WITH ORIGINAL MOLD
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE AEROSPACE AWARD WITH ORIGINAL MOLD

          Est: $400 - $600

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), BRONZE AEROSPACE AWARD WITH ORIGINAL MOLD, the General Thomas D. White United States Air Force Space Trophy, signed and dated to reverse with inscription "TROPHY PRESENTED BY / THOMAS W. McKNEW / WASHINGTON, D.C.", retaining original gilt surface. Together with the original rubber mold used in the creation of this award. Two pieces total. Dated 1961. Award 11" x 8".  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF REVOLUTIONARY WAR PLAQUE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF REVOLUTIONARY WAR PLAQUE

          Est: $400 - $600

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF REVOLUTIONARY WAR PLAQUE, depicting three officers, probably Washington, Lafayette, and Von Steuben, signed lower right, retaining rich patina. Third quarter 20th century. 12" H, 13 3/4" W.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

          Est: $500 - $800

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, seated figure, signed and dated to reverse with presentation inscription '"to Charles Wood" in the casting, retaining richly patinated surface. Dated 1974. 13 1/2" HOA, 11" x 13 1/2" base.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.   

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE FIGURE OF A UNITED STATES MARINE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE FIGURE OF A UNITED STATES MARINE

          Est: $500 - $800

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE FIGURE OF A UNITED STATES MARINE, signed and dated, titled "Champion of Freedom" on applied plaque, retaining rich patina, affixed to a marble plinth. Dated 1987. 14" HOA, 12 1/2" x 7 1/2" base.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PATRIOTIC PLAQUE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PATRIOTIC PLAQUE

          Est: $600 - $900

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE BAS-RELIEF PATRIOTIC PLAQUE, titled "SPIRIT OF '76", after Archibald Willard (American, 1836-1918), signed lower right, retaining rich patina. Circa 1976. 15" H, 16" W.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF PRESIDENT JAMES MONROE
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF PRESIDENT JAMES MONROE

          Est: $800 - $1,200

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF PRESIDENT JAMES MONROE, signed and dated to base, retaining rich patina. Mid 20th century. 30 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF ELEUTHERE IRENEE DUPONT (FRENCH-AMERICAN, 1771-1834)
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF ELEUTHERE IRENEE DUPONT (FRENCH-AMERICAN, 1771-1834)

          Est: $1,000 - $2,000

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE SCULPTURE OF ELEUTHERE IRENEE DUPONT (1771-1834), signed and dated to base, retaining rich patina. Dated 1958. 30 1/2" HOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present.  Eleuthere Irenee DuPont (1771-1834) was a French chemist who immigrated to the United States in 1800 and established a gunpowder manufacturing enterprise on the banks of Brandywine Creek in Delaware, which become the nucleus of the DuPont corporate empire. Shipping Note: IN-HOUSE SHIPPING IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS LOT. Please contact our local UPS store [email protected] for information on shipping or see our website for a list of third-party shippers https://www.jeffreysevans.com/buying/pick-up-and-delivery.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • RARE FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE JOHN GLENN AEROSPACE MEDAL WITH SIGNED LETTER
          Apr. 22, 2023

          RARE FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE JOHN GLENN AEROSPACE MEDAL WITH SIGNED LETTER

          Est: $8,000 - $12,000

          RARE FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) BRONZE JOHN GLENN AEROSPACE MEDAL WITH SIGNED LETTER, signed in mold, retaining original burnished gilt surface, commemorating Glenn's successful orbital of Feb. 20, 1962. Together with a photo of the presentation ceremony where Glenn receives his gold version of the present medal, and a 2003 three-page, hand-written note on United States Senate letterhead from then-Senator Glenn to the recently widowed Mrs. De Weldon, which describes, in part, that Glenn had "several sessions with [De Weldon] in the studio - which was as new an experience for me as the space flight had been." Three pieces total. Medal 1962. Medal 7" D. Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (an original plaster maquette of this bust is in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the early 1960's, he was also commissioned by the Greek government to create a large public bronze statue of President Harry S. Truman in recognition of his support for the Greece under the Truman Doctrine. A plaster maquette in the current sale is likely an original model used in the execution of that statue, which still stands in Athens today. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." An original plaster maquette of this bust is included in the current sale. Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. 

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY

          Est: $300 - $500

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY, retaining natural surface. Circa 1963. 15" HOA, 7 3/4" WOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (a plaster maquette for this bust is included in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Captitol Building. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. According to the consignor, the presently offered plaster maquette fragments is one of the original models used in the creation of the official bronze bust of President John F. Kennedy. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire one of the last living likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY
          Apr. 22, 2023

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY

          Est: $300 - $500

          FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003), ATTRIBUTED, ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE FRAGMENT BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY, retaining silver-painted surface. Circa 1963. 13 1/2" HOA, 9" WOA.  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (a plaster maquette for this bust is included in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. According to the consignor, the presently offered plaster maquette fragments is one of the original models used in the creation of the official bronze bust of President John F. Kennedy. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire one of the last living likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY
          Apr. 22, 2023

          IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY

          Est: $8,000 - $12,000

          IMPORTANT FELIX WEHLS DE WELDON (AUSTRIAN-AMERICAN, 1907-2003) ORIGINAL PLASTER MAQUETTE BUST OF PRESIDENT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY, retaining copper-painted surface, signed and dated to reverse "Felix de Weldon sc 1963", mounted on a wooden base. Dated 1963. 18 1/2" HOA (including base).  Catalogue Note: Felix Wehls de Weldon (1907-2003) was one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. Over the course of his distinguished career, he produced more than 1,200 sculptures, examples of which are displayed on every continent, including Antarctica. Specializing in large scale public monuments, De Weldon is perhaps best known for the Marine Corps Memorial near Arlington Cemetery, which depicts the iconic photographic image of Marines raising the American flag on Iwo Jima. In addition to working on grand public projects, De Weldon also accepted commissions for individual busts and medallions, working with many of the most influential figures of the mid 20th century, including Sam Rayburn, John Glenn, and Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson. Born in Vienna, Austria, De Weldon showed artistic promise at an early age when he drew critical acclaim for a bronze bust he created as a teenager. After receiving degrees in both art and architecture from the University of Vienna, De Weldon traveled through France, Spain, and Italy while working and studying, and eventually settled down in London, where he opened a studio. In England, De Weldon quickly established himself among the country's political elite as a premier portrait sculptor, taking on commissions from members of the Royal Family, including George V. In 1937, De Weldon traveled to North America, where he completed a bust of Canadian Prime Minister MacKenzie King before crossing into the United States and embarking on an epic road-trip that took the artist through 44 of 48 states. According to a 1963 interview with the Truman Library, it was during this period that De Weldon, drawn to what he called the nation's "tremendous vitality", decided to settle in the United States permanently. With the outbreak of World War II, De Weldon enlisted in the United States Navy, where he served, primarily, as an official artist, often working on private commissions for portrait busts of various admirals and other leading figures in the military. At the conclusion of the war in 1945, De Weldon was selected to design and erect a public monument depicting the scene in Joe Rosenthal's famous war-time photograph from the fighting on Iwo Jima, which captures four Marines struggling to raise an American flag on the battlefield of Mount Suribachi. Once completed, the 200-ton bronze monument, known as the Marine Corps Memorial, was immediately received with public acclaim and now resides near Arlington Cemetery. Now firmly ensconced as the leading sculptor among Washington's elite, de Weldon was commissioned to create a portrait bust of President Truman following the 1948 election (a plaster maquette for this bust is included in the current sale), and the artist's national and international reputation continued to grow rapidly as a result. Over the next fifteen years, De Weldon worked feverishly on public monuments and private commissions, all while serving on the United States Commission of Fine Art, which oversaw such monumental projects under the Truman Administration as the renovation of the White House and the Capitol Building. In the spring of 1963, Jacqueline Kennedy asked De Weldon to create a bronze portrait bust of her husband, and De Weldon complied, visiting the White House on two separate occasions for sittings with President Kennedy. As the bust was nearing completion, the President was tragically assassinated, and it would be several months before Mrs. Kennedy would return to the task of overseeing the production of her martyred husband's sculptural likeness. According to the consignor, the presently offered plaster maquette is an original model used in the creation of the official bronze bust of President John F. Kennedy. So taken with De Weldon's work, Mrs. Kennedy wrote to the artist in June of 1964 expressing her admiration: "I do want to tell you how pleased I am with your bust of the President, and when it is placed in the Library, I know it will serve as a constant reminder of the President and all he means to our country." Over the next three decades, De Weldon traveled the world working on large-scale projects, from Malaysia to Greece. Flush with success, the artist acquired the historic Beacon Rock estate, a palatial Gilded Age compound in Newport, Rhode Island, which he began to fill with Continental antiques and art, particularly fine Old Master paintings, all while maintaining a studio in Washington, DC. Eventually, years of financial mismanagement lead to bankruptcy, and De Weldon lost most of his property, including many of his own works. The present group of objects from the De Weldon estate were retrieved from the artist's studio in Washington, DC in the aftermath of that bankruptcy and brought to Virginia, where they have remained to the present. The appearance of the present bust on the open market represents a rare opportunity to acquire one of the last living likenesses of an iconic figure crafted by a significant 20th-century American sculptor.

          Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates
        • Felix de Weldon, Bronze Bust of David
          Feb. 05, 2023

          Felix de Weldon, Bronze Bust of David

          Est: $850 - $1,500

          Felix de Weldon, patinated verdigris bronze bust of Michelangelo's "David", with certificate, 17" H. Provenance: Leicester, Vermont collection.

          Kaminski Auctions
        • Felix de Weldon ''Christ'' Bronze Sculpture
          Dec. 15, 2022

          Felix de Weldon ''Christ'' Bronze Sculpture

          Est: $500 - $1,000

          Felix de Weldon (1907-2003 American) ''Christ'' Bronze Sculpture 19''x6''. Composition of floating christ with cross. No visible signature. Excellent condition.

          MBA Seattle Auction LLC
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