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John Wootton Sold at Auction Prices

Hunt painter, Animal painter, Painter, Landscape painter

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    • JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD C. 1682-1764 LONDON) The Earl of Cork and Orrery
      Jul. 06, 2023

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD C. 1682-1764 LONDON) The Earl of Cork and Orrery

      Est: £200,000 - £300,000

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD C. 1682-1764 LONDON) The Earl of Cork and Orrery's horse, Nobby, held by his groom, stables adorned... oil on canvas 63 x 75 in. (160 x 190.5 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1686-1764 LONDON) An Italianate landscape oil on
      Jul. 08, 2022

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1686-1764 LONDON) An Italianate landscape oil on

      Est: £10,000 - £15,000

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1686-1764 LONDON) An Italianate landscape oil on canvas 30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1682-1764 LONDON) A grey racehorse on Newmarket
      Dec. 08, 2021

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1682-1764 LONDON) A grey racehorse on Newmarket

      Est: £30,000 - £50,000

      JOHN WOOTTON (SNITTERFIELD 1682-1764 LONDON) A grey racehorse on Newmarket Heath held by a groom oil on canvas 40 ¼ x 50 ¼ in. (102.2 x 127.6 cm.)

      Christie's
    • ***PLEASE NOTE DESCRIPTION SHOULD READ 'ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764)'*** ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764) A hunting party with horses, hounds and hawks in an extensive landscape Oil on canvas, 70 x 90cm
      Oct. 19, 2021

      ***PLEASE NOTE DESCRIPTION SHOULD READ 'ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764)'*** ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764) A hunting party with horses, hounds and hawks in an extensive landscape Oil on canvas, 70 x 90cm

      Est: €7,000 - €10,000

      ***PLEASE NOTE DESCRIPTION SHOULD READ 'ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764)'*** ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON (BRITISH 1686-1764) A hunting party with horses, hounds and hawks in an extensive landscape Oil on canvas, 70 x 90cm

      Adam's
    • John Wootton (British, c.1682-1764)
      Apr. 21, 2021

      John Wootton (British, c.1682-1764)

      Est: £50,000 - £80,000

      John Wootton (British, c.1682-1764) A Bay Arabian stallion being led by a groom, a hound nearby, with a rider and grey horse watering on the far right signed indistinctly lower centre left 'J W...' oil on canvas 65 x 116cm Footnote: Provenance: Acquired by Algernon Dunn Gardner (1853-1929) from Fores of Piccadilly on 18th July 1913, as of 'The Darley Arabian', Thence by descent Though much later prints after the present painting identify the horse as the Darley Arabian and show the animal as having three white socks and a white blaze, recent cleaning and conservation showed two of the socks to be overpaint and the blaze was reduced to a star and thus in the opinion of David Oldrey, to whom we are grateful for assistance with this catalogue entry, the horse cannot be the great Arab stallion, the Darley Arabian. He proposes as an alternative bloodline that of the Leedes Arabian, which was a bay with a rear left white sock as was his son, Leeds (or Leedes) and thus the present animal which from the clothes of the accompanying figures must date from at least circa 1730, or later, is probably the grandson or great-grandson of the Leeds Arabian.

      Cheffins
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as William, Duke of...
      Dec. 13, 2019

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as William, Duke of...

      Est: £20,000 - £30,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) Portrait of a gentleman, traditionally identified as William, Duke of... oil on canvas 49 x 53 3/8 in. (124.4 x 135.6 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) A chestnut mare, traditionally identified as Mr. Charles Pelham's Brocklesby... oil on canvas 40 1/8 x 49 5/8 in. (102 x 126.1 cm.)
      Jul. 05, 2019

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) A chestnut mare, traditionally identified as Mr. Charles Pelham's Brocklesby... oil on canvas 40 1/8 x 49 5/8 in. (102 x 126.1 cm.)

      Est: £15,000 - £20,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) A chestnut mare, traditionally identified as Mr. Charles Pelham's Brocklesby Betty, led by a jockey at Newmarket signed 'JWootton' (lower left) oil on canvas 40 1/8 x 49 5/8 in. (102 x 126.1 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON | A wooded classical landscape with figures resting in the foreground and bathing in the river, a town beyond
      Jul. 06, 2017

      JOHN WOOTTON | A wooded classical landscape with figures resting in the foreground and bathing in the river, a town beyond

      Est: £20,000 - £30,000

      oil on canvas, in a George II Kentian gilt wood frame with elaborate carved scallop shell motif

      Sotheby's
    • ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON | Lady O'Brien's horse with jockey up
      Oct. 20, 2015

      ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN WOOTTON | Lady O'Brien's horse with jockey up

      Est: $20,000 - $30,000

      oil on canvas

      Sotheby's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)
      Dec. 03, 2013

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £120,000 - £180,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c.1682-1764 London) Thomas Osborne, 4th Duke of Leeds (1713-1789), on horseback, with a hunting party in an extensive wooded landscape signed and dated 'J. Wootton / fect. 1759' (lower left, on the tree) oil on canvas 60 x 84¼ in. (152.4 x 214 cm.)

      Christie's
    • WOOTTON, JOHN 1678/82 Warwickshire - 1764 London Pyramus und Thisbe. Weite Flusslandschaft im Morgenlicht mit einem antiken Tempel und der Silhouette von Babylon. Im Vordergrund Thisbe, die Ihren sterbenden Geliebten auffindet. Öl auf Leinwand.
      Nov. 15, 2013

      WOOTTON, JOHN 1678/82 Warwickshire - 1764 London Pyramus und Thisbe. Weite Flusslandschaft im Morgenlicht mit einem antiken Tempel und der Silhouette von Babylon. Im Vordergrund Thisbe, die Ihren sterbenden Geliebten auffindet. Öl auf Leinwand.

      Est: €20,000 - €30,000

      WOOTTON, JOHN 1678/82 Warwickshire - 1764 London Pyramus and Thisbe. Vast river landscape in early morning light with an ancient temple and the silhouette of Babylon. In the foreground Thisbe finding her dying beloved. Oil on canvas. Relined. 165 x 203cm. Signed and dated on left of plinth: J. Wootton fec. 1760. Framed. Provenance: Private collection, Rhineland

      Van Ham Kunstauktionen
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)
      Dec. 04, 2012

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £200,000 - £300,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) A Race Meeting at Newmarket signed 'JWootton Fecit' ('JW' linked, lower right) oil on canvas 37 x 58¼ in. (94 x 148 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London)
      Nov. 01, 2012

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £10,000 - £15,000

      An extensive river landscape with figures and a wagon on a track signed and inscribed 'J. Wootton fect.' (lower left) oil on canvas 42 1/2 x 55in (108 x 139.7cm)

      Bonhams
    • ATTRIBUTED  TO  JOHN  WOOTTON
      Jul. 05, 2012

      ATTRIBUTED  TO  JOHN  WOOTTON

      Est: £15,000 - £20,000

      SNITTERFIELD,  WARWICKSHIRE  CIRCA  1678  -  1764  LONDON PORTRAIT  OF  A  GREYHOUND,  CALLED  POMPON inscribed  and  dated  lower  right:  Pompon  1746 oil  on  canvas 101.5  by  127  cm.;  40  by  50  in.

      Sotheby's
    • JOHN  WOOTTON
      Jul. 05, 2012

      JOHN  WOOTTON

      Est: £40,000 - £60,000

      SNITTERFIELD,  WARWICKSHIRE  CIRCA  1678  -  1764  LONDON PORTRAIT  OF  A  GENTLEMAN  ON  HORSEBACK,  PROBABLY  JAMES  DOUGLAS-HAMILTON,  5TH  DUKE  OF  HAMILTON  AND  2ND  DUKE  OF  BRANDON  (1703-1743),  MOUNTED  ON  A  BAY  HUNTER,  WITH  HIS  GROOM  HOLDING  ANOTHER  HORSE  BY  A  CLASSICAL  ARCH,  AND  A  GREYHOUND signed,  centre  right:  J.WOOTTON  /  fecit,  and  indistinctly  inscribed  on  an  old  label,  verso,  which  bears  a  wax  seal  stamped  with  the  Hamilton  crest oil  on  canvas 112  by  105.5  cm.;  44  by  41  1/2    in.

      Sotheby's
    • John Wootton (1672-1764). Hunting parties in
      Dec. 14, 2011

      John Wootton (1672-1764). Hunting parties in

      Est: £2,000 - £3,000

      John Wootton (1672-1764). Hunting parties in classical landscapes. A pair, oil on canvas. One signed with monogram centre right. Each 34 x 30 cm (13 1/2 x 11 3/4 in) (2)

      Dreweatts 1759
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)
      Dec. 07, 2011

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £40,000 - £60,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwickshire c. 1682-1764 London) A grey racehorse held by a jockey, with a lad holding up a gold cup, at Newmarket signed 'JWootton' ('JW' linked, lower left, on a rock) oil on canvas 40½ x 49¾ in. (102.8 x 126.3 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) An extensive river landscape with figures and a wagon on a track 42 1/2 x 55in (108 x 139.7cm)
      Oct. 26, 2011

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) An extensive river landscape with figures and a wagon on a track 42 1/2 x 55in (108 x 139.7cm)

      Est: $20,000 - $30,000

      An extensive river landscape with figures and a wagon on a track signed and inscribed 'J. Wootton fect.' (lower left) oil on canvas 42 1/2 x 55in (108 x 139.7cm)

      Bonhams
    • John Wootton (British, 1682-1764)
      Oct. 12, 2011

      John Wootton (British, 1682-1764)

      Est: $70,000 - $100,000

      John Wootton (British, 1682-1764) 'Brockelsby Betty' with Jockey up at Newmarket, before her Celebrated Match with Astridge Ball, 7 October 1718. signed with initials 'J.W.' (center right on post) and inscribed 'Brockelsby Bety. __' (center left) oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c. 1682-1764 London)
      Jul. 05, 2011

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £150,000 - £200,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c. 1682-1764 London) Lord Harley's Bloody Shouldered Arabian signed and dated 'JWootton Fecit. 1723' ('JW' linked, lower left) and with inscriptions 'Lord Harley's Bloody Shoulder'd Arabian J.υn Wootton.' (lower centre) and inscribed 'L.υd Harleys Bloody sh.υd Arabian.' (centre right) oil on canvas 40½ x 48½ in. (102.9 x 123.2 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London)
      Apr. 14, 2011

      John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £25,000 - £35,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London) John Shafto of Bavington Hall, and Whitworth Hall, Northumberland, holding a hunter, in a landscape, with a groom and stable beyond signed 'JWootton' (lower right, on the rock) oil on canvas 24 3/8 x 29¾ in. (62 x 75.5 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London)
      Jan. 26, 2011

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London)

      Est: $30,000 - $40,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) A Greyhound in a landscape signed 'J. Wootton. Fecit' (lower right) oil on canvas 34¼ x 52 in. (87 x 132.1 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks c. 1682-1764 London)
      Dec. 16, 2010

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £5,000 - £8,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks c. 1682-1764 London) An Italianate landscape at sunset, with figures and fishermen in the foreground oil on canvas 19 x 26 in. (48.9 x 66 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON
      Jun. 03, 2010

      JOHN WOOTTON

      Est: $40,000 - $60,000

      JOHN WOOTTON 1672 - 1765 A DARK CHESTNUT ARABIAN MARE, GIVEN BY KING LOUIX XIV TO LORD PETRE HELD BY A GROOM IN A LANDSCAPE inscribed ARABIAN MARE given/ by LOUIS 14th to/ LORD PETRE. (upper right) oil on canvas 40 1/2 by 49 1/2 in. 103. by 125.8 cm

      Sotheby's
    • JOHN WOOTTON
      Apr. 23, 2010

      JOHN WOOTTON

      Est: $80,000 - $120,000

      JOHN WOOTTON BRITISH 1672 - 1765 A DARK CHESTNUT ARABIAN MARE, GIVEN BY KING LOUIX XIV TO LORD PETRE HELD BY A GROOM IN A LANDSCAPE inscribed ARABIAN MARE given/ by LOUIS 14th to/ LORD PETRE. (upper right) oil on canvas 40 1/2 by 49 1/2 in. 103. by 125.8 cm

      Sotheby's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks, c. 1682-1764 London)
      Dec. 09, 2009

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks, c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £7,000 - £10,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks, c. 1682-1764 London) An extensive river landscape, with cavaliers embarking on a ferry, sailing boats anchored at the shore beyond oil on canvas 20 1/8 x 27 in. (51.1 x 68.6 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Circle of John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) 41.5 x 36cm
      Nov. 17, 2009

      Circle of John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) 41.5 x 36cm

      Est: £400 - £600

      A gentleman with bay and white horses before a church Oil on canvas 41.5 x 36cm

      Bonhams
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c . 1682-1764 London)
      Jul. 08, 2009

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c . 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £25,000 - £35,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield, Warwicks. c. 1682-1764 London) A dark bay racehorse held by a jockey, with a couple of hounds, by an archway, in a landscape inscribed 'Ditchley.' (lower right) oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton , 1686-1765 Portrait of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond and Lennox and later Duke of Aubigny (1701-1750) oil on canvas, held in a British Baroque carved and gilded frame
      Dec. 04, 2008

      John Wootton , 1686-1765 Portrait of Charles Lennox, 2nd Duke of Richmond and Lennox and later Duke of Aubigny (1701-1750) oil on canvas, held in a British Baroque carved and gilded frame

      Est: £150,000 - £250,000

      with a bay hunter held by a groom with the Charlton hunt hounds signed and dated l.l.; JWootton/ Pinxit/ 1729 oil on canvas, held in a British Baroque carved and gilded frame

      Sotheby's
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield circa 1682-1764 London) An Italianate landscape at dusk
      Dec. 03, 2008

      John Wootton (Snitterfield circa 1682-1764 London) An Italianate landscape at dusk

      Est: £3,000 - £5,000

      An Italianate landscape at dusk with a drover and his cattle amongst the ruins of a temple oil on canvas 39.2 x 52.1cm (15 7/16 x 20 1/2in).

      Bonhams
    • John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London)
      Nov. 20, 2008

      John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London)

      Est: £80,000 - £120,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London) The Leedes Arabian, being led by a groom, in a landscape signed 'JWootton Pinxt' ('JW' linked, lower centre) oil on canvas 41 x 49¾ in. (104½ x 126½ cm.)

      Christie's
    • A hound in a landscape, a hunt beyond
      May. 23, 2008

      A hound in a landscape, a hunt beyond

      Est: £15,000 - £20,000

      Circle of John Wootton (C.1682-1764) A hound in a landscape, a hunt beyond oil on canvas 30 x 35¾ in. (76.2 x 90.8 cm.) in a mid-18th century white-painted and parcel-gilt pierced foliate frame, redecorated, losses to carved foliage

      Christie's
    • Wanton , a bay racehorse with jockey up, at Newmarket
      May. 22, 2008

      Wanton , a bay racehorse with jockey up, at Newmarket

      Est: £60,000 - £90,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield c. 1682-1764 London) Wanton, a bay racehorse with jockey up, at Newmarket signed 'J. Wootton pinxit' and with inscription and date 'WANTON, _ He was got by Bay Bolton. Ano. 1719.' (lower right) oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.) in a fine carved and gilded frame

      Christie's
    • Unkenneling: a study for the painting in the Wootton Hall at Althorp
      Nov. 28, 2007

      Unkenneling: a study for the painting in the Wootton Hall at Althorp

      Est: $50,000 - $80,000

      John Wootton (British, c. 1683-1764) Unkenneling: a study for the painting in the Wootton Hall at Althorp oil on canvas 39 x 49¼ in. (99 x 125 cm.) in a contemporary oakleaf frame

      Christie's
    • The Leedes Arabian, being led by a groom, in a landscape
      Jul. 06, 2007

      The Leedes Arabian, being led by a groom, in a landscape

      Est: £60,000 - £80,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682 -1764 London) The Leedes Arabian, being led by a groom, in a landscape signed 'J.Wootton pinxt' (lower centre-left) oil on canvas 41¼ x 49¾ in. (104.7 x 126.3 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Mr Charles Wilson's Chestnut Arabian, held by a groom, beside a classical building
      Jul. 06, 2007

      Mr Charles Wilson's Chestnut Arabian, held by a groom, beside a classical building

      Est: £40,000 - £60,000

      John Wootton (Snitterfield 1682-1764 London) Mr Charles Wilson's Chestnut Arabian, held by a groom, beside a classical building oil on canvas 40¼ x 49¾ in. (102.3 x 126.4 cm.)

      Christie's
    • A break in the woods; and The quarry in sight
      May. 15, 2007

      A break in the woods; and The quarry in sight

      Est: £2,000 - £4,000

      Circle of John Wootton (1686-1765) A break in the woods; and The quarry in sight oil on canvas 20½ x 28 in. (52.1 x 71.1 cm.) a pair (2)

      Christie's
    • Sheep in a landscape
      Mar. 28, 2007

      Sheep in a landscape

      Est: £1,500 - £2,000

      Circle of John Wootton (1678-1764) Sheep in a landscape oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • After John Wootton (BRITISH, 1686-1765)
      Dec. 20, 2006

      After John Wootton (BRITISH, 1686-1765)

      Est: €8,000 - €10,000

      The Warren Hill, Newmarket initialed 'J.W. pinx' (lower right) oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Circle of John Wootton (1678-1764)
      Dec. 19, 2006

      Circle of John Wootton (1678-1764)

      Est: £3,000 - £5,000

      Sheep in a landscape oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON
      Nov. 30, 2006

      JOHN WOOTTON

      Est: $300,000 - $500,000

      PROPERTY FROM THE WILLIAM M. HACKMAN TRUST BRITISH, 1686-1765 THE PRINCE OF WALES AT A RACE MEETING ON NEWMARKET HEATH measurements 37 by 58 1/2 in. alternate measurements 94 by 148.6 cm signed J. Wootton/ Fecit (lower right) oil on canvas PROVENANCE By descent in the family of the Duke of Norfolk Oscar Johnson Leggatt's Gallery, London, by 1957 Mr Chistopher Bibby, in 1960 EXHIBITED London, Rutland Gallery, Paintings by John Wootton, circa 1677-1765, November 13-December 13, 1964, no. 1, illustrated LITERATURE Illustrated London News, November 9, 1963, vol. 243, p. 779 (as collection of the Duke of Norfolk) NOTE James I established Newmarket in 1605 as the earliest center for racing in England, and cemented the royal connection by building a hunting lodge there. The first race on the heath took place between horses owned by Lord Salisbury and the Marquess of Buckingham in 1622, the prize being one hundred pounds, a princely sum at the time. Charles I officially opened Newmarket Racecourse in 1636, and the royal patronage of the track has continued to the present day, in part due to its relative proximity to the royal residence at Sandringham. The lure of royal and aristocratic patronage drew John Wootton to Newmarket as early as 1714, where his depictions of the great gatherings at the heath brought him success as well as commissions. The present work depicts the Prince of Wales, seen mounted near the lower right corner of the composition, accompanied by a group of courtiers and liveried attendants, observing the start of the race. The work can be dated to 1716, the year in which another version of this subject was painted for Edward Harley (recorded in a bill dated November 10, 1716). Another version of the work was known from the Collection of Lord Woolavington. The early races at Newmarket were customarily quite long: at least four miles and as long as eight. The stamina required emphasized impeccable breeding, and the celebrated horses of the day came to dominate the proceedings. The series of heats and eliminations that were typical elevated the importance of the rubbing house where horses were prepared for the next leg. By the close of the race, mounted spectators such as those seen in the present work would ride alongside the throng, encouraging participants. For the next fifty years, Wootton, who has been described as the "Father of British Horse Portraiture," was considered the aristocracy's favorite sporting artist. Wootton enjoyed the patronage of Queen Anne, King George I and his son George II (seen as the Prince of Wales in the present painting) and the Dukes of Beaufort, Devonshire, Richmond and Marlborough; The Earl of Egmont of Althrop even referred to him in his diary as "the best horse painter in England" (Sally Mitchell, The Dictionary of British Equestrian Artists, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1984, p. 469). Wootton studied under the Flemish battle painter, Jan Wyck, transforming his crowded, panoramic battle scenes into equally hard-fought battles of the Turf. Beyond these panoramic landscapes, inspired both by Jan Wyck and Jan Siberechts, Wootton is also renowned for his near life-size depictions of the famous racehorses of his time, including the three illustrious Arabian progenitors of today's thoroughbred lines, the Byerly Turk, the Godolphin Arabian and the Darley Arabian.

      Sotheby's
    • JOHN WOOTTON
      Nov. 30, 2006

      JOHN WOOTTON

      Est: $8,000 - $12,000

      PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION, PENNSYLVANIA BRITISH, 1686-1765 A HORSE AND HIS GROOM measurements 13 by 10 in. alternate measurements 33 by 25.4 cm signed J Wootton (lower left) oil on canvas PROVENANCE Purchased by the present owner's father in London (by 1950)

      Sotheby's
    • FOLLOWER OF JOHN WOOTTON 1683-1764
      Jun. 07, 2006

      FOLLOWER OF JOHN WOOTTON 1683-1764

      Est: £8,000 - £12,000

      DUCK SHOOTING; FOX HUNTING DUCK SHOOTING; FOX HUNTING measurements note each 70 by 90 cm., 27½ by 35½ in. a pair, both oil on canvas Quantity: 2

      Sotheby's
    • Follower of John Wootton
      Jun. 06, 2006

      Follower of John Wootton

      Est: $1,000 - $1,500

      Marc Anthony Leading Chalkstone on the Beacon Course with signature 'JWootton' (lower right); inscribed 'MARC ANTHONY leading CHALKSTONE on the Beacon Course' (lower center) oil on canvas 40 x 50 in. (101.6 x 127 cm.)

      Christie's
    • Attributed to John Wootton (1686-1765)
      May. 24, 2006

      Attributed to John Wootton (1686-1765)

      Est: £4,000 - £6,000

      Peasants with sheep and cattle in an extensive river landscape oil on canvas 36 x 51 in. (91.5 x 129.5 cm.)

      Christie's
    • John Wootton (c.1683-1764)
      May. 19, 2006

      John Wootton (c.1683-1764)

      Est: £25,000 - £35,000

      Portrait of Charles Spencer, 3rd Duke of Marlborough (1706-1758), and Elizabeth, Duchess of Marlborough, with a hunting party, in a capriccio landscape, including a mounted urn and a statue of the Farnese Flora signed 'JWootton/Fecit' (on masonry, lower right) oil on canvas 22 1/2 x 27 1/4 in. (57.2 x 69.2 cm.)

      Christie's
    • JOHN WOOTTON
      Apr. 25, 2006

      JOHN WOOTTON

      Est: $400,000 - $600,000

      PROPERTY FROM A NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION BRITISH, 1686-1765 LORD ORRERY'S HORSE, NOBBY, HELD BY HIS GROOM 52 by 74 in. 132 by 188 cm signed J Wootton and dated 1752 (lower right); inscribed The Earl of Orrery's Horse Called Nobby / Drawn from the Life / 1752 (on the reverse) oil on canvas PROVENANCE Thomas Agnew and Sons, London Sale: Christie's, London, March 19, 1954, lot 93 Cevat Collection Eyre and Hobhouse Ltd., London Sale: Sotheby's Parke Bernet, New York, January 21, 1982, lot 66, illustrated Hyde Park Antiques LITERATURE Sir Ellis Waterhouse, The Dictionary of British 18th Century Painters, 1981, p. 423, illustrated NOTE This majestic portrait of Nobby contains all the hallmarks of a successful commission by England's premier painter of thoroughbred horses in the mid-eighteenth century, John Wootton. Nobby was owned by John Boyle, the Fifth Earl of Orrery, who also assumed the title of the Earl of Cork in 1753. The Boyles were an illustrious family, cousins to the Earls of Suffolk, Earls of Middlesex and Earls of Devonshire. Lord John's father was Charles, the Earl of Orrery, and perhaps the culmination of his long political career occurred in 1713, when he served as Envoy Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht, which ended the war of Spanish Succession. Lord John's other known passion, aside from his horses, was for literature. A friend to the main literary luminaries of the day, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope and Samuel Johnson, Lord John published a translation of the letters of Pliny the Younger in 1751, among other works. A distinguished patron such as John, Earl of Cork was the ideal client for John Wootton. The artist's ability to convey the grandeur of his equine subjects' noble bearing corresponded with their owner's sense of familial importance. In fact, as almost all thoroughbred horses in England descended from just four Arabians, Wootton's portrayal of Nobby highlights the importance of pure bloodlines, whether among the great families of the British Aristocracy or in the thoroughbred horses they delighted in owning and riding. This idea is underscored here by the presence of the prominent coat of arms seen above the pediment at upper right. The coat of arms consists of a heraldic representation of the first marriage of John Boyle, 5th Earl of Orrery, to Henrietta, daughter of George Hamilton, Earl of Orkney. A coat of arms in this form would have been in use from 1731 (when Lord John succeeded to the earldom) until his second marriage in 1738. The shield represents the marital arms of Lord John and his first wife in combination: those of the Boyle family appear on the left-hand side, and on the right are the arms of the Hamiltons, Earls of Orkney. The supporters similarly combine the heraldry of the two families, the one on the left being a lion, the dexter supporter used by the Earl of Orrery, and the stag, the sinister supporter of the Earls of Orkney. Supporters were often combined this way in the 18th century, when a peer married the daughter of another peer. The Earls' arms would only have been marshalled in this fashion up to 1738. This might suggest that the present work, painted some years later, depicts an actual architectural feature of the building represented, rather than a fanciful display of arms. If it were otherwise, one would expect to see a marital coat of arms incorporating the arms of the Earl's second wife. John Wootton's soft Italianate landscapes for backgrounds, painted in the manner of Poussin or Claude, were a large part of what made his large canvases so chic and sought after, though they were derided as too traditional by contemporaries such as John Constable. Wootton's style dictated that on the whole, the horse should be placed at the composition's center, his beautiful lines shown to best advantage. Wootton's other trademark was to magnify the horses' stature. As explained by John Fairley: "the literal truth, particularly the size of the horses, may have been exaggerated by Wootton, though the boy grooms who make the horses seem colossi were often of miniscule stature; there are records of grooms riding at 3 ½ stone. But the purpose of Wootton's portraits was not to give a precise anatomical record, but rather to convey the triumphal glory of these early champions...so that they seem to have stepped down from Mount Olympus" (John Fairley, Great Racehorses in Art, Oxford, 1894, p. 48). Nobby certainly takes on the aspect of a champion in the present work, and the bright colors worn by his groom serve to highlight his fiery eyes, upturned, alert ears, and the lustrous pure black color of his coat.

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    • JOHN WOOTTON 1683-1764
      Nov. 24, 2005

      JOHN WOOTTON 1683-1764

      Est: £250,000 - £350,000

      PROPERTY FROM GODOLPHIN HOUSE THE GREAT STALLION, THE GODOLPHIN ARABIAN, IN AN ARCHITECTURAL LANDSCAPE HELD BY A GROOM measurements note 100 by 125 cm., 39 1/4 by 49 1/4 in. signed l.l.:I.Wootton / Fecit. / 1731. oil on canvas PROVENANCE Probably commissioned from the artist by Francis Godolphin, 2nd Earl of Godolphin (1678-1766); By descent to Mary, his daughter, who married Thomas Osborne, 4th Duke of Leeds (1713-1789); Probably by descent to George Godolphin Osborne, 10th Duke of Leeds, by whom sold in the early twentieth century; With Leggatt, from whom acquired by the family of the present owners in 1957 NOTE There never was a horse so well entitled to get racers as the Godolphin Arabian; for whoever has seen this horse must remember that his shoulders were deeper, and lay further into his back, than those of any horse yet seen. Behind the shoulders, there was but a very small space ere the muscles of his loins rose exceedingly high, broad and expanded, which were inserted into his quarters with great strength and power than in any horse I believe ever yet seen of his dimensions, viz fifteen hands high. (quoted by Charles Prior, The Royal Studs of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, together with a reproduction of the Second Earl of Godolphin's Stud-book, and sundry other papers relating to the Thoroughbred Horse, 1935, p.135) These words were written by the eighteenth-century veterinary surgeon, William Osmer, and they capture the unique qualities which allowed the Godolphin Arabian to become the stallion at the head of thoroughbred breeding in the eighteenth century, and ancestor of many of the greatest thoroughbreds in the history of racing. Eastern horses had been imported to England since the middle ages when crosses of Arabian and Barb horses were acquired from Italy and Spain. James I, who was passionate about hunting and kept a lodge for that purpose in Newmarket, acquired the Markham Arabian in 1617, and by the Civil War the Royal Studs, established by Henry VIII, were the finest in the country. After the Civil War this bloodstock had dispersed. This coincided with the re-establishment of Newmarket as a centre for racing by Charles II, who saw it as an ideal venue for a racecourse. The enthusiasm of Charles II undoubtedly gave racing the imprimatur of a high-society pursuit, and this in turn led to the development of the thoroughbred. It is difficult to overstate the importance of the three great stallions brought to England between 1689 and 1730. The Byerley Turk was the first of these, who was also painted by Wootton and whose portrait was sold in these rooms on 9th July 1997 (fig.1). He was followed by the Darley Arabian, foaled in 1700 and brought from Aleppo by Thomas Darley (fig.2), and finally the Godolphin Arabian was brought to England. Each of these stallions founded enduring bloodlines from which by the male line, all modern thoroughbreds in the world descend. Collectively they have become known as the Pillars of the Stud Book. The facts concerning the origins of the Godolphin Arabian are scarce. He was said to have been presented as tribute to the King Louis XV of France by the Bey of Tunis in 1730. Vicomte de Manty describes the Arabian stallions in the king's possession, and singles out one in particular called 'Shami' whose description corresponds with what we know of the Godolphin Arabian. The Vicomte describes him as~ ~.a bay-brown with reddish mottles and a very little white on the hind feet, of beautiful conformation exquisitely proportioned with large hocks well let down, with legs of iron and unequalled lightness of forehand -- a horse of incomparable beauty whose only flaw was being headstrong. His forehead was broad, eyes large and full, sharply cut ears, large distended nostrils, a head full of fire and character though more masculine than pretty. He had a long and beautifully curved neck and throat and a haughty, rather wild appearance~An essentially strong stallion type, his quarters and croup broad in spite of being half starved, tail carried in true Arab style. (quoted by Lady Wentworth, Thoroughbred Racing Stock and its Ancestors -- The Authentic Origin of Pure Blood, 1938, pp.222-23). This description tallies closely with the entry in Lord Godolphin's stud-book where he is described as "a brown bay, the off hind foot white, and a little white on ye inside corner of ye near Hind Hoof~He dyed ye 25th off Decr, 1753, He was 14 Hands, one Inch & half, without shoes" (Prior, op. cit., p.163). It is highly probable that both descriptions refer to the same horse. This fine stallion was acquired by Edward Coke, who was the younger brother of the Earl of Leicester. Edward Coke put him to stud on his newly acquired estate at Longford Hall, Derbyshire. Edward Coke died in 1733 and in his will he left many of his racehorses to his friend, Francis, 2nd Earl of Godolphin, where it acquired the name the Godolphin Arabian. Although formal ownership only passed to Lord Godolphin 1733, it is possible that the racehorses may have been on his estate since as early as 1730 when the present work was painted. This makes it likely that the present portrait was commissioned by Lord Godolphin. The racehorse died in 1753 at the approximate age of twenty-nine. He was buried underneath a gateway at the stable and a stone slab was placed over his grave with an inscription noting who lay beneath. The gravesite still remains inside the archway of the stable block within the building complex. The Godolphin Arabian never raced, but spent his life as a stallion, first at Longford Hall, and then at Gogmagog. He was the sire of Lath, who was owned by the Duke of Devonshire and who was considered the outstanding racehorse of his day. He later sired Regulus, out of Grey Robinson by Bald Galloway, who belonged to Lord Chedworth and who was undefeated during his racing career. The most important son of the Godolphin Arabian, however, was Cade. Cade was Lath's brother, and although inferior as a runner, was far superior as a sire. It is through Cade that the male line continues down to the present day through his son, Matchem. Other important sons of the Godolphin Arabian included Babraham, Dormouse and Bajazet, all of whom remained undefeated runners. His most important grandson, however, was without doubt, Whistlejacket, who was later immortalised by Stubbs. The present magnificent painting of the Godolphin Arabian encapsulates a new form of sporting art. In the early part of the eighteenth century John Wootton followed in the traditions of his teacher, Jan Wyck, as well as of other old master painters such as Jacques Courtois and Dirk Maas, who specialised in hunting and battle scenes. However, with the increasing interest in the Turf, Wootton became renowned for his portrayals of racing scenes at Newmarket. It was a short step from this to pure horse portraiture and in 1726 Wootton painted the Hampton Court Chestnut Arabian for George I (The Royal Collection). Such royal patronage was indicative of the changing favour of sporting art, and by 1744 Wootton had painted a series of sporting paintings for the Duke of Beaufort, the Earl of Arundel and the Marquess of Bath, at Badminton, Althorp and Longleat respectively. Wootton was careful to combine a standardised compositional respresentation of the ideal Arabian form, with the unique markings and characteristics which set each stallion apart. Another version of the present composition is documented as hanging at Crabbet Park, and unsurprisingly for such a famous horse, a number of copies of the composition also exist. It is likely, however, that the present painting, is the prime version. The painting passed from the 2nd Earl of Godolphin to his daughter, Mary, who married Thomas, 4th Duke of Leeds. The painting remained in the possession of the Dukes of Leeds until it was sold at some point in the early twentieth century. The painting was later acquired in 1957 by the owners of Godolphin House (fig.1), which, fittingly for the provenance of this marvellous painting, was one of the former homes of the Leeds family.

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