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Lot 73: - Santa Ines de Roma, Virgen y Martir (Saint Agnes of Rome, Virgin and Martyr, 291–304 AD)

Est: ₱500,000 PHP - ₱650,000 PHPSold:
Leon GalleryMarch 09, 2024Makati City, Philippines

Item Overview

Description

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED COLLECTOR
Santa Ines de Roma, Virgen y Martir (Saint Agnes of Rome, Virgin and Martyr, 291–304 AD)
17th century
polychromed molave wood (Vitex parviflora)
H: 50" (127 cm) L: 12" (30 cm) W: 19" (48 cm)


PROVENANCE An Augustinian church in Panay island



WRITE UP:
This magnificent and hieratic image of Santa Ines de Roma, virgen y martir, 291–304 AD (Saint Agnes of Rome, virgin and martyr, 291–304 AD), carved in molave hardwood (Vitex parviflora) and polychromed, depicts a young “india” (Filipina) beauty (Santa Ines was only thirteen years old when martyred) with Oriental, Guanyin–like facial features --- heavily– lidded almond–shaped eyes, a fine nose, rosebud lips, cleft chin. She is dressed in “estilo Hebrea” (Hebrew style) with a long, ankle–length tunic and a cape draped around her arms. Santa Ines is shown with the attributes of her traditional iconography: the lamb (agnus), Bible, martyr’s palm, and long hair (miraculously, her hair grew long quickly to cover her naked body as she was dragged through the streets after she was arrested; rendered in well–articulated Filipino “binihon” style); the traditional sword is missing. In a nod to Italian Renaissance depictions from paintings and prints brought by Spanish missionaries, she was carved with a topknot on her head as well as a string of pearls; santo collectors conjecture that the image must have worn a metal or silver tiara of sorts. As was the practice of those days, the image of heavy molave hardwood was hollowed out at its back to lighten it so it could be hoisted to the intended position high up in the retablo altar. The entire statue along with the base --- except for the book with the lamb --- was carved from just one trunk of molave hardwood. Were it not for the fact that it was found in Panay island and most probably crafted there, it could have passed for magnificent statuary from an old Augustinian church in Pampanga or one of the seven churches of Intramuros (Catedral de Manila, San Agustin de Hipona [Agustinos], Santo Domingo de Guzman [Dominicanos], Nuestra Senora de los Angeles [San Francisco de Asis – Franciscanos], San Nicolas de Tolentino [Recoletos], San Ignacio de Loyola [Jesuitas], Nuestra Senora de Lourdes [Capuchinos] ) or those in the arrabales de Manila (Tondo, Binondo, Santa Cruz, Quiapo, Santa Ana). Devotions to Santa Ines de Roma, virgen y martir, were popular during the Spanish colonial period and Ines/Inez/Ynes/Ynez was a popular name for girls. This seventeenth century molave hardwood statue of Santa Ines de Roma, virgen y martir is every bit of the highest quality as those in the San Agustin Museum, Intramuros Administration, Luis Ma Araneta, and Paulino Que and Hetty Kho collections. During the reign of Emperor Diocletian in 304 AD, there was a lovely young girl from a noble Roman family named Agnes. The beautiful Agnes had many young suitors from other rich families, all of whom she turned down with the conviction: “Jesus Christ is my only Spouse.” The offended young men then submitted Agnes’ name as a “Christian” to the Roman authorities, which was a de facto death sentence at that time. Two versions of Agnes’ story: The first related that a rich suitor, Procop, was so frustrated by Agnes that he brought her before his father, The Governor. He entreated Agnes with wonderful gifts if she denied her Christian God but she refused. He had her put in chains but her conviction only increased. She was sent to a brothel but angels protected her. She was finally condemned to death by beheading, but she was only too happy to die for her Christian faith. The second related that the Prefect Sempronius had Agnes arrested, stripped naked, and dragged through the streets of Rome. As she prayed silently during the ordeal, her hair grew quickly to cover her naked body. The men who tried to rape her were all struck blind. The son of Sempronius died immediately but was revived when she prayed for him. The prefect was grateful and inhibited himself from further judging Agnes’ case. Another judge was assigned and Agnes the Christian was summarily sentenced to death by burning at the stake. However, the wood would not burn and the few flames drifted away from her. The exasperated executioner then decapitated her; other accounts said he stabbed her at the throat. Her blood poured to the ground and the other condemned Christians soaked it up with their clothes. Agnes was buried by the Via Nomentana in Rome. A few days after her execution, a close friend named Emerentiana (daughter of Agnes’ wet nurse and the latter’s contemporary) was found praying by her grave. She refused to leave the place and castigated the people for killing Agnes, after which she was stoned to death. She also became a saint. Constantina, daughter of Constantine I, was healed of leprosy after praying at Agnes’ tomb. So many others were healed as well. Many miracles were happening during her lifetime and more after her martyrdom. Saint Agnes of Rome, virgin and martyr, is a patron of purity, chastity, girls, virgins, victims of sexual abuse, and gardeners. Her feast day is commemorated every 21 January. This pair of elegant female angels bearing torcheres (actually carved flames as candleholders) are in contrapposto poses and have beautiful faces, graceful hands and feet, draped Roman tunics, detailed wings, and cumulus cloud bases. The style of carving observed in their faces, hands, feet, hair, wings, tunics, and cloud bases date them squarely to the 1880s as actual dated productions from that time are very similar to them in design and execution. The original century and a half patina of the pair has been conserved. The media of baticuling softwood has preserved them from termites as the taste of the wood is unpalatable to them. Were it not for the fact that they were found in Panay island and most probably crafted there, they would have passed for beautiful statuary from an old Franciscan church in Laguna or productions of a master sculptor from the Gremio de Escultores in Santa Cruz, Manila. During the Swinging Sixties, following the era’s stylesetters architect Luis Maria Araneta (“Luis”/“Louie”), couturier Ramon Oswalds Valera (“Ramoning”), heiresses Consuelo Paterno Madrigal (“Chito”), Imelda de la Paz Ongsiako– Cojuangco (“Meldy”), Lourdes Tiaoqui Hidalgo–Tinio (“Lulu”), Maria Luisa Paterno Madrigal–Vazquez (“Ising”) and their high society clique, it ironically became the mode to display all sorts of antique angels and torcheres in one’s house --- specially a big pair like this in the living room or entrance hall --- during that time of relentless political and sexual liberation. At the turn of the twentieth century (1890–1910), it became the fashion in Philippine Roman Catholic churches to have a pair of angels bearing torcheres on pedestals flanking the main altar. That was decades before the misinterpreted reforms of the Second Vatican Council in 1965, and the priest still faced the altar, not the congregation, so the pair of angels like sentinels guarding God’s throne, really served their purpose in the liturgy. That practice actually had precedents: from the seventeenth to the eighteenth century, tabernacles in Las Islas Filipinas were flanked on both sides by three small kneeling angels bearing single candles, set on the three levels of the “gradillas” (tiers) of the main altar. The Angelic Hierarchy according to Saint Thomas Aquinas OP in his “Summa Theologiae”: Highest Hierarchy – Seraphim (six–winged beings who fly around God’s throne praising “Holy, holy, holy!”), Cherubim (four –winged beings with four faces --- human, lion, ox, eagle), Thrones/Ophanim (all wheels); Second Hierarchy – Dominions/Lordships (govern the movement of the heavens), Virtues (spirits of motion who control the elements, govern nature, assist with miracles), Powers/Authorities (power over evil forces, power over men); Lowest Hierarchy: Principalities/Rulers (guide and protect nations, peoples, institutions), Archangels (God’s messengers), Angels/Guardian Angels (assist people). After Aquinas, it all gets even more complicated because one discovers that only the Angels called Malakim are in human form like the Archangels Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael. The rest are not in human form and are all wings, all eyes, all wheels, all fire, all clouds, all wings and eyes, all eyes and wheels, all wheels and fire, all fire and clouds, etc. Had the late nineteenth century Filipino sculptors who crafted this pair of elegant angels known that, they would have certainly been confused.

Payment & Shipping

Payment

Accepted forms of payment: COD (cash on delivery), MasterCard, Money Order / Cashiers Check, Personal Check, Visa, Wire Transfer

Shipping

Auction house will help to arrange shipment at buyer's expense.

Auction Details

The Asian Cultural Council Auction 2024

by
Leon Gallery
March 09, 2024, 02:00 PM PST

Eurovilla 1, Rufino corner Legazpi Streets, Legazpi Village, Makati City, PH

Terms

Buyer's Premium

25.16%

Bidding Increments

From:To:Increment:
₱0₱9,999₱1,000
₱10,000₱19,999₱2,000
₱20,000₱59,999₱5,000
₱60,000₱199,999₱10,000
₱200,000₱399,999₱20,000
₱400,000₱799,999₱50,000
₱800,000₱1,999,999₱100,000
₱2,000,000₱4,999,999₱200,000
₱5,000,000₱9,999,999₱500,000
₱10,000,000+₱1,000,000

Terms & Conditions

The following are the terms and conditions that Leon Gallery has set for the auction. Kindly read carefully.

Leon Gallery, all the participants of the event, processes, and transactions shall be guided accordingly by these rules:

GENERAL:

a. Each item (lot) in this catalog is offered for sale dependent on the terms exhibited below.

b. All lots are numbered according to the catalog unless otherwise stated by the auctioneer.

c. Transferring, selling, assigning of lots to anyone other than the bidder that won prior to the removal of the lot from the gallery is not allowed. Only the winning bidder has the authority to remove the lot from the gallery.

d. All items sold do not have any warranty. Leon Gallery is not and will not be liable for any unfortunate circumstances that can happen to the lot after it has been transferred to the winning bidder.

e. All participants must agree to be bound by the terms that have been set by Leon Gallery.

BIDDING:

a. Bidders are required to complete and sign registration forms. Participants shall be asked to present a valid government-issued identification card (passport, driver's license, etc.) upon registration.

b. Before the auction proper, each buyer will be given an assigned buyer's number. The highest bidder of a specific lot shall be the buyer of the lot.

c. The auctioneer shall announce the winning bid and the corresponding buyer's number of the bidder. Failure of the winning bidder to object at the time of the announcement shall be considered as an acknowledgment of the bid and purchase. The buyer is legally liable to purchase the lot or pay the difference if the host must re-offer and sell it for a reduced price.

d. The buyer's premium shall be 25.16%

e. The auctioneer shall be in charge of supervising the bidding and shall be the sole arbiter of any disputes. Leon Gallery reserves the right to withdraw property at any time before the sale and reject a bid from any bidder.

f. Absentee bids are allowed in this auction. They are permitted to bid until fifteen (15) minutes prior to the start of the auction for all the items in the auction. Absentee bids for later lots may continue to be accepted according to announcements or signs posted on the office window. A deposit may be requested on absentee bids over Two Hundred Thousand Pesos (Php 200,000) or at the discretion of the auctioneer. The auctioneer will be responsible of bidding the absentee bid in opposition to the floor bidders. In case a tie occurs, the earlier bid wins the lot. Leon Gallery will not be liable for any failed absentee bid. The absentee bidders may contact the gallery after the auction to know if they won the lot.

PAYMENT:

a. The balance of the invoice must be paid in full and merchandise picked up within three (3) days from the date of the sale. One week after the auction, left items may be moved to an off-site facility for pick-up. A storage fee will be charged if merchandise is left longer than two (2) weeks of One Hundred Pesos (Php 100) per lot per day. If the property is left longer than four (4) weeks, it will be considered abandoned. We are not responsible for shipping, but if packing and handling of purchased lots will be done by us, it is done at the entire risk of the purchaser. A refundable deposit may be required.

b. Cash, cashier's check, wire transfer, personal check (items may be held until the check clears). If any legal action is commenced to enforce these Conditions of Sale, the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorney's fees and costs. Time is of the essence.

Payments shall be wired to:

Account Name: Leon Gallery
Account Number: 2166008845
Address: G/F Corinthian Plaza, 121 Paseo de Roxas, Legazpi Village, Makati City, Philippines
Swift Code: MBTCPHMM

LITIGATION:

In case if litigation between Leon Gallery and the buyer, the parties must submit to the Law Courts of Makati.

Shipping Terms

Auction house will help to arrange shipment at buyer's expense.

Payment

a. The balance of the invoice must be paid in full and merchandise picked up within three (3) days from the date of the sale. One week after the auction, left items may be moved to an off-site facility for pick-up. A storage fee will be charged if merchandise is left longer than two (2) weeks of One Hundred Pesos (Php 100) per lot per day. If the property is left longer than four (4) weeks, it will be considered abandoned. We are not responsible for shipping, but if packing and handling of purchased lots will be done by us, it is done at the entire risk of the purchaser. A refundable deposit may be required.

b. Cash, cashier's check, wire transfer, personal check (items may be held until the check clears). If any legal action is commenced to enforce these Conditions of Sale, the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorney's fees and costs. Time is of the essence.

Payments shall be wired to:

Account Name: Leon Gallery
Account Number: 2166008845
Address: G/F Corinthian Plaza, 121 Paseo de Roxas, Legazpi Village, Makati City, Philippines
Swift Code: MBTCPHMM