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Lot 7: JACOB ISAAC MEIJER DE HAAN (1852-1895) Nature morte: oignons, carotte et pot 13 1/4 x 16 1/4 in (33.7 x 41.3 cm)

Est: $6,000 USD - $8,000 USDSold:
Bonhams 2May 11, 2016New York, NY, US

Item Overview

Description

JACOB ISAAC MEIJER DE HAAN (1852-1895) Nature morte: oignons, carotte et pot 13 1/4 x 16 1/4 in (33.7 x 41.3 cm) , Provenance (Probably) Marie-Jeanne Henry (1859-1945).
Ida Henry, the artist's daughter by Marie-Jeanne Henry (by descent from the above); sale, Hôtel Drouot, Paris, 16 March 1959, lot 167 (Nature morte: oignons, carotte et pot. Peinture à la détrempe sur toile. Haut. 0 m. 32; Larg. 0 m. 40)
Galeria Wildenstein, Buenos Aires.
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1966.
Literature
(Probably) J. Kröger, Meijer de Haan: A Master Revealed, Amsterdam, Paris, and Quimper, 2009, p. 152.
Jelka Kröger has kindly assisted in the cataloguing of this work. Dr. Kröger was curator and co-author of the exhibition catalogue for Meijer de Haan: A Master Revealed at the Jewish Historical Museum of Amsterdam, the Musée d'Orsay, Paris, and the Musée des Beaux Arts, Quimper.
Marie-Jeanne Henry was innkeeper of the auberge known as La Buvette de la Plage at Le Pouldu in Brittany, where Meijer de Haan lodged from October 1889 to October 1890. De Haan had arrived in the isolated Breton coastal village to take painting lessons from Paul Gauguin, in exchange for acting as his secretary and general factotum, while he came into his own as a painter and developed his personal style. In the course of the year the pair decorated the dining room of the auberge, eventually covering the walls with their paintings. The auberge was also a popular haunt of artists such as Maxime Maufra and Paul Sérusier, who came to visit their fellow painters in Brittany. Meijer de Haan and Marie Henry became lovers (some sources suggest that the married Gauguin also pursued 'Marie la Bretonne', also known as 'Marie la Poupée' for her doll-like beauty, but in vain) and she became pregnant around the time that de Haan left Le Pouldu in 1890. He left most of his belongings at the auberge, including many paintings, implying that he perhaps intended only a temporary absence. It is not known whether he knew that Marie was pregnant. De Haan never returned to Le Pouldu, and never acknowledged their daughter, Ida. He died of tuberculosis at Hattem, in the Netherlands, in 1895, at the age of forty-three.

Artist or Maker

Auction Details

Impressionist and Modern Art

by
Bonhams 2
May 11, 2016, 04:00 PM PST

580 Madison Avenue, New York, NY, 10022, US