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Lot 91: LIVINGSTONE (DAVID) Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts, and Photographs

Bonhams

November 12, 2014
London, United Kingdom

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Description

Autograph letter signed ("David Livingstone"), to "My Dear Somerville", forbidding publication in a hostile environment of a note on missionary work ("...I am not at all desirous of being put in print by Padre Dale because the note would of course be considered with his comments & I would have no chance of answering him...") and pointing out furthermore that this note on his "sentiments on the mission question" is so short and fragmentary that it might be misleading; he suggests that "a paper in a late number of Evangelical Christendom" be used instead,4 pages, first and last leaves somewhat faded and time-stained by framing (but still clearly legible), 8vo, "Sunday Morning" [1864-1865]

Notes

LIVINGSTONE DISCUSSES HIS 'SENTIMENTS ON THE MISSIONARY QUESTION'. The paper to which he refers in the second part of the letter appears to be his article 'Missions in Africa and Elsewhere', with its memorable opening: 'During the last half-century the conviction has gradually gained ground in our nation that our race is destined to colonise and Christianise the world'. This was published in the Evangelical Christendom number for October 1863, after Livingstone had set sail for Africa and the Zambezi Expedition. Our note can therefore be dated to the period between Livingstone's return to Britain in July 1864 and his final departure for Africa late in 1865. His correspondent could well be the Free Church minister and missionary Alexander Neil Somerville. Included in the lot is a fragment of another letter by Livingstone together with an autograph letter signed by General Gordon ("CGGordon"), written from the Royal Engineers Brompton Barracks to Mr Stab on 27 June 1860, enquiring after mutual acquaintances in Constantinople and elsewhere, and after Arif Bey. This letter dates from just before he set off for China, where he was to make his name as 'Chinese Gordon' (slightly faded and damp-stained at head).

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