Loading Spinner

Crown Devon

Simon Fielding founded Crown Devon in Stoke-on-Trent in the early 1870s, then named Railway Works. In a matter of a few years, Simon's son Abraham stepped in to help produce a vast range of fashionable products. Though the Crown Devon stamp appeared on a number of patterns from the start of production, it wasn't until 1912 that the company was renamed The Devon Pottery. Today, Crown Devon is a name synonymous with quality within the world of fine porcelain.

Throughout its existence, Crown Devon underwent numerous ups and downs. In 1913, King George V and Queen Mary visited the Devon Pottery, bringing some positive attention to the company. In 1951, a devastating fire took place at the factory, destroying a significant amount of earthenware stock, as well as print shops, show rooms, and offices. It was not until 1957 that rebuilding of the factory was finally complete. In 1976, the company was sold to The Archibald Bathgate Group, but after poor sales, Devon Pottery ceased production in 1982.


Quick Facts

  • In 1964, Crown Devon took over Shorter & Sons Ltd., a rival earthenware manufacturer
  • As part of the war effort, the government placed restrictions on decorative wares during World War II, thereby slowing production for some years
  • An "Orient" Crown Devon vase, circa 1932, sold at Christie's London in February 2000 for $2,779

Recommended Items at Auction

See all items

Sellers Who Sell Crown Devon


DuMouchelles

DuMouchelles