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Political Autographs

Whether collected to celebrate a landmark election or symbolize the acceptance of a significant edict, political autographs reflect the dynamic history of international relations and politics. Political autographs for sale on the market today celebrate this variety while also commemorating the careers of some of history's most notable figures.

Political autographs began as a means of signing important documents, but by the 19th century, followers of prominent politicians independently solicited their autographs. By the midpoint of the century, autograph enthusiasts in the United States were so keen on acquiring signatures that they would send letters to the President requesting his autograph.

The demand for autographs was particularly steep for popular... Read more

Items in Political Autographs

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rare ca. 1930 aviation famous aviator lot

May 21, 2018, 7:00 AM EST
Morrisville, PA, USA

$390 (starting bid)

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Signed Copy of Leadership by Rudolph W. Giuliani

May 21, 2018, 6:00 AM PST
Westlake Village, CA, USA

$1 (starting bid)

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SIGNED RICHARD NIXON, TYPED LETTER. AUTOGRAPHED 1

May 22, 2018, 2:00 PM EST
Aston , PA, USA

$60 (1 bid)

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Three autographed letters, Eleanor and Franklin D. Roosevelt

May 22, 2018, 12:00 PM PST
Monrovia, CA, USA

$300 (starting bid)

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Lengthy Bismarck Autograph Letter Signed, Germany's First Chancellor

May 23, 2018, 1:00 PM EST
New York, NY, USA

$500 (2 bids)

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Signed Photograph of Winston Churchill Seated at his Desk

May 23, 2018, 1:00 PM EST
New York, NY, USA

$1,250 (starting bid)

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Original Drawing Signed by the

May 23, 2018, 1:00 PM EST
New York, NY, USA

$100 (starting bid)

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Gough Whitlam 1972 Labour Party Policy Speech Booklet with Autograph

May 24, 2018, 10:30 AM AEST
Sydney, Australia

AUD100 (starting bid)

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GEORGE III: (1738-1820) King of the United Kingdom 1760-1820. A good, early D.S., George R, as King, at the head, one page, large folio, Court at St. James's, 17th December 1760. The manuscript document is addressed to Henry Fox, Paymaster of the Forces, and is a warrant for deducting the subsistence of two men per Company from the Captains in case they do not keep them complete according to the establishment, stating, in part, '….when and as often as there shall appear upon the Muster Rolls of any Company of the said Regiments, any Respit, or Respits of private men, you do not only deduct what the said Respits shall amount unto as usual, but shall also deduct from each Captain who shall have any such Respit on his Company, the Subsistence of Two Men allowed by this Establishment for Recruiting for the Time or Times that any such Respit shall appear as beforementioned….' Countersigned at the foot by Lord North (1732-1792, British Prime Minister 1770-82), Henry Bilson-Legge (1708-1764, English Statesman, Chancellor of the Exchequer 1754-55, 1756-57 & 1757-61) and James Oswald (1715-1769, Scottish Politician, Lord Commissioner of the Treasury, 1760). With a small area of paper loss to the lower left edge, only very slightly affecting a few words of text, and with some light age wear and dust staining to the edges, otherwise about VG  Henry Fox (1705-1774) 1st Baron Holland. British Politician who served as Paymaster of the Forces 1757-65.

May 24, 2018, 1:00 PM BST
Nottingham, United Kingdom

£300 (starting bid)

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BRITISH ROYALTY: Prince Adolphus (1774-1850) Duke of Cambridge, son of King George III. A.L.S., Adolphus, two pages, 8vo, Plas Newydd, 15th September 1849, to Thomas B. Horsfall. The Prince states that he has received his correspondent's invitation through Sir Howard Douglas and accepts with pleasure the opportunity to stay at Horsfall's country home, further suggesting the following Tuesday to Friday as a convenient time. In a lengthy postscript the Prince reassures Horsfall that he would be very pleased to make the acquaintance of any other guests his correspondent wishes to invite at the same time. With blank integral leaf, Accompanied by the original envelope hand addressed by the Prince and signed ('Cambridge') by him to the lower left corner. The stamp has been neatly torn away although the red wax seal to the verso is still intact; Prince George (1819-1904) Duke of Cambridge, grandson of King George III and cousin of Queen Victoria. Commander-in-Chief of the Forces 1856-95. A.L.S., George, three pages, 8vo, Kew, 5th September 1855, to Mr. Horsfall. The Prince thanks his correspondent for their kind letter and adds that he has also received one from the Mayor of Liverpool, further proposing 'that you should permit me to dine with you on the Wednesday' ahead of a concert in the evening, and also remarking that the Mayor had been good enough to suggest a quick dinner and that the Prince thinks Horsfall's house can be easily reached; Prince Arthur (1850-1942) Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, son of Queen Victoria. Ink signature ('Arthur') and three additional words in his hand on a slim oblong 12mo card; John Neale Dalton (1839-1931) English Clergyman, Chaplain to Queen Victoria, Canon of Windsor and tutor to the future King George V and his brother Prince Albert Victor. A.L.S., J N Dalton, one page, 8vo, n.p., 29th October 1883, to Mr. Ronald. Dalton enquires if his correspondent can dine with Prince Edward in his rooms on 2nd November at 7.30pm. With blank integral leaf. Some very light overall age wear and minor foxing to Dalton's letter, G to VG, 4          Thomas Berry Horsfall (1805-1878) British Politician, Member of Parliament for Derby 1852 and for Liverpool 1853-65. Lord Mayor of Liverpool 1847-48.   Sir Howard Douglas (1776-1861) British General, Colonial Administrator and Politician, Member of Parliament for Liverpool 1842-47.
BRITISH ROYALTY: Prince Adolphus (1774-1850) Duke of Cambridge, son of King George III. A.L.S., Adolphus, two pages, 8vo, Plas Newydd, 15th September 1849, to Thomas B. Horsfall. The Prince states that he has received his correspondent's invitation through Sir Howard Douglas and accepts with pleasure the opportunity to stay at Horsfall's country home, further suggesting the following Tuesday to Friday as a convenient time. In a lengthy postscript the Prince reassures Horsfall that he would be very pleased to make the acquaintance of any other guests his correspondent wishes to invite at the same time. With blank integral leaf, Accompanied by the original envelope hand addressed by the Prince and signed ('Cambridge') by him to the lower left corner. The stamp has been neatly torn away although the red wax seal to the verso is still intact; Prince George (1819-1904) Duke of Cambridge, grandson of King George III and cousin of Queen Victoria. Commander-in-Chief of the Forces 1856-95. A.L.S., George, three pages, 8vo, Kew, 5th September 1855, to Mr. Horsfall. The Prince thanks his correspondent for their kind letter and adds that he has also received one from the Mayor of Liverpool, further proposing 'that you should permit me to dine with you on the Wednesday' ahead of a concert in the evening, and also remarking that the Mayor had been good enough to suggest a quick dinner and that the Prince thinks Horsfall's house can be easily reached; Prince Arthur (1850-1942) Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, son of Queen Victoria. Ink signature ('Arthur') and three additional words in his hand on a slim oblong 12mo card; John Neale Dalton (1839-1931) English Clergyman, Chaplain to Queen Victoria, Canon of Windsor and tutor to the future King George V and his brother Prince Albert Victor. A.L.S., J N Dalton, one page, 8vo, n.p., 29th October 1883, to Mr. Ronald. Dalton enquires if his correspondent can dine with Prince Edward in his rooms on 2nd November at 7.30pm. With blank integral leaf. Some very light overall age wear and minor foxing to Dalton's letter, G to VG, 4 Thomas Berry Horsfall (1805-1878) British Politician, Member of Parliament for Derby 1852 and for Liverpool 1853-65. Lord Mayor of Liverpool 1847-48. Sir Howard Douglas (1776-1861) British General, Colonial Administrator and Politician, Member of Parliament for Liverpool 1842-47.

May 24, 2018, 1:00 PM BST
Nottingham, United Kingdom

£80 (starting bid)

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EDWARD, DUKE OF WINDSOR: (1894-1972) King of the United Kingdom January - December 1936. A highly important T.L.S., Edward, two pages, 4to, Boulevard Suchet, Paris, 13th March 1939, to Lord Beaverbrook ('My dear Beaverbrook'), on the Duke's personal monogrammed stationery, marked 'Private and Confidential' and with four holograph additions to the text. The Duke announces 'I feel it both important and urgent to draw your attention to the comments on the Duchess and myself which appeared in the Londoner's Log of yesterday's issue of the ''Sunday Express''' and adds that while he appreciates the general tone of the article, it contained two definite misstatements which 'confuse the whole situation', further explaining 'Knowing that it is not your intention that anything published in your newspapers should create a false impression which could react adversely upon the Duchess and myself, I think that you may wish to dispel the one created in yesterday's Sunday Express, as soon as and in whatever form you judge to be consistent with ''good timing'' and dignity.' The Duke continues 'Of course you know as well as I do, that it is for no other reason than for fear lest the attitude my mother and sister-in-law seem likely to adopt towards my wife may provoke some controversy in England and adverse criticism of them in America, that I have been advised to postpone our projected visit to England this Spring, until after the King and Queen's official journey to Canada and the United States. In accordance with the policy of playing my brother's game, I have agreed to another postponement, but, believe me, for the last time.' He concludes 'I know I need not stress the highly confidential nature of this letter, or the grave danger of the information it contains ever being traced back to me. But as I look upon you as one of our staunchest supportest (sic) I am anxious that you should know the truth.' Together with an enclosure originally accompanied by the letter, being a typescript of the two misstatements contained in The Londoner's Log of the Sunday Express which the Duke refers to in his letter, and with his responses, in full, '1. ''He lives as a refugee in France not because of the laws of England prevent his return, but because he wishes to do so''. While the Duchess and I have received the greatest courtesy in all the countries, especially France, where we have resided since our marriage, I have not lived out of England for over two years by preference. It is true that there exists no law to prevent my returning to my country whenever I wish to do so, but I have remained away out of deference to my brother in order to leave the field clear for him to establish himself on the throne, which it is admitted he has succeeded in doing. 2. ''The Duke has set his own conditions of return. He requires that the Duchess of Windsor shall be accorded the title of Royal Highness, and that she shall be received by both the Queens. Until these requests are granted, the Duke has announced that he will not set foot in England''. I have never made any such announcement nor would I ever set conditions upon my return to England. Regarding the two stipulations I am alledged (sic) to have made, I wish to say firstly, that while naturally the matter of witholding (sic) the title of Royal Highness from the Duchess is an insult which I as her husband and a member of the Royal Family have always resented far more deeply than she has, we have too many other more important interests to worry over such a triviality. Secondly, whatever may be the behaviour of Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth towards the Duchess, it would in no way affect any plans we might make for going to England.' A letter of truly remarkable historical content written in the years following King Edward VIII's abdication and subsequent marriage to Wallis Simpson, and demonstrating that the Duke was under absolutely no illusions as to the attitudes of his mother, Queen Mary, and sister in law,
EDWARD, DUKE OF WINDSOR: (1894-1972) King of the United Kingdom January - December 1936. A highly important T.L.S., Edward, two pages, 4to, Boulevard Suchet, Paris, 13th March 1939, to Lord Beaverbrook ('My dear Beaverbrook'), on the Duke's personal monogrammed stationery, marked 'Private and Confidential' and with four holograph additions to the text. The Duke announces 'I feel it both important and urgent to draw your attention to the comments on the Duchess and myself which appeared in the Londoner's Log of yesterday's issue of the ''Sunday Express''' and adds that while he appreciates the general tone of the article, it contained two definite misstatements which 'confuse the whole situation', further explaining 'Knowing that it is not your intention that anything published in your newspapers should create a false impression which could react adversely upon the Duchess and myself, I think that you may wish to dispel the one created in yesterday's Sunday Express, as soon as and in whatever form you judge to be consistent with ''good timing'' and dignity.' The Duke continues 'Of course you know as well as I do, that it is for no other reason than for fear lest the attitude my mother and sister-in-law seem likely to adopt towards my wife may provoke some controversy in England and adverse criticism of them in America, that I have been advised to postpone our projected visit to England this Spring, until after the King and Queen's official journey to Canada and the United States. In accordance with the policy of playing my brother's game, I have agreed to another postponement, but, believe me, for the last time.' He concludes 'I know I need not stress the highly confidential nature of this letter, or the grave danger of the information it contains ever being traced back to me. But as I look upon you as one of our staunchest supportest (sic) I am anxious that you should know the truth.' Together with an enclosure originally accompanied by the letter, being a typescript of the two misstatements contained in The Londoner's Log of the Sunday Express which the Duke refers to in his letter, and with his responses, in full, '1. ''He lives as a refugee in France not because of the laws of England prevent his return, but because he wishes to do so''. While the Duchess and I have received the greatest courtesy in all the countries, especially France, where we have resided since our marriage, I have not lived out of England for over two years by preference. It is true that there exists no law to prevent my returning to my country whenever I wish to do so, but I have remained away out of deference to my brother in order to leave the field clear for him to establish himself on the throne, which it is admitted he has succeeded in doing. 2. ''The Duke has set his own conditions of return. He requires that the Duchess of Windsor shall be accorded the title of Royal Highness, and that she shall be received by both the Queens. Until these requests are granted, the Duke has announced that he will not set foot in England''. I have never made any such announcement nor would I ever set conditions upon my return to England. Regarding the two stipulations I am alledged (sic) to have made, I wish to say firstly, that while naturally the matter of witholding (sic) the title of Royal Highness from the Duchess is an insult which I as her husband and a member of the Royal Family have always resented far more deeply than she has, we have too many other more important interests to worry over such a triviality. Secondly, whatever may be the behaviour of Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth towards the Duchess, it would in no way affect any plans we might make for going to England.' A letter of truly remarkable historical content written in the years following King Edward VIII's abdication and subsequent marriage to Wallis Simpson, and demonstrating that the Duke was under absolutely no illusions as to the attitudes of his mother, Queen Mary, and sister in law,

May 24, 2018, 1:00 PM BST
Nottingham, United Kingdom

£6,000 (starting bid)

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HOARE SAMUEL: (1880-1959) British Politician, First Lord of the Admiralty 1936-37 and Home Secretary 1937-39. Important and historical A.L.S., Sam, two pages, 4to, Admiralty House, 10th December n.y. (1936), to Lord Beaverbrook ('Dear Max'), marked Personal. Written on the day that King Edward VIII signed the Instrument of Abdication, Hoare announces 'I have not telephoned or come round today or yesterday as I was, on your advice, sitting back in the final acts of this tragic farce' and continues 'It was clear to me yesterday that the denouement was inevitable. I tried my best to the end to make renunciation possible, but the King would not move an inch. To what depths can folly descend!' Hoare further states 'In any case I am glad and grateful that another crisis brought us together again. It is almost a year to a day since my resignation. The first friendly word from outside came from you. I never forget these things nor shall I forget our talks of the last fortnight, and your manifest wish to help me in my career.' A letter of interesting content written on a pivotal day in the history of the British monarchy. One neat tear to the right edge of a central fold, only very slightly affecting one word of text, otherwise VG  Max Aitken (1879-1964) 1st Baron Beaverbrook. Anglo-Canadian Business Tycoon, Politician & Writer, owner of the Daily Express and London Evening Standard newspapers.  In June 1936 Hoare became First Lord of the Admiralty and in November 1936 he was (with Duff Cooper, the then Secretary of State for War) sought out by Edward VIII to provide independent advice and counsel on the King's constitutional problems. Initially the King attempted to convert him into a champion of his cause hoping that Hoare would speak up in defence of his right to marry when the matter came up for formal discussion in the Cabinet. In the King's memoirs A King's Story (1951) he recounted this first meeting, ''But I failed to win him as an advocate. He was sympathetic; but he also was acutely conscious of the political realities. Mr. Baldwin, he warned me, was in command of the situation: the senior Ministers were solidly with him on this issue. If I were to press my marriage project on the Cabinet I should meet a stone wall of opposition. I saw Mr. Duff Cooper at the Palace later the same day.....He was as encouraging and optimistic as Sam Hoare had been pessimistic and discouraging.''  Hoare's second meeting with the King took place at the end of November, about which the King wrote, ''At this juncture, the scene shifted momentarily to Stornoway House where Max Beaverbrook, ever since his return from America, had worked feverishly to rally support for me in whatever quarters it might be found.....Mr. Baldwin was aware of what Max Beaverbrook was up to; and no doubt hoping to check the forces beginning to rally round my cause, he despatched Sir Samuel Hoare on Sunday, the 29th, to explain the attitude of the Government towards the King. The message which the First Lord of the Admiralty bore was ominous indeed. It was that the Ministers stood with Mr. Baldwin---''no breach exists: there is no light or leaning in the King's direction.'' Then the First Lord fired his second salvo. ''The publicity,'' he said, ''is about to break.'' Many Ministers, he added, were restless and dissatisfied over the failure of the Press to publish facts of a crisis already the talk of the rest of the world. He stressed Mr. Baldwin's desire that the Press, like the Cabinet, should form an unbroken front against the proposed marriage. It was an undisguised invitation for Max Beaverbrook to change sides. His answer was: ''I have already taken the King's shilling, I am a King's man.'' On 4th December the King learned of an earlier meeting between Beaverbrook and Hoare, of which he commented ''So the day had not been all debits as far as I was concerned. From Stornoway House Max Beaverbrook, sensing the favourable upsurge in public opinion, had steadily hammered
HOARE SAMUEL: (1880-1959) British Politician, First Lord of the Admiralty 1936-37 and Home Secretary 1937-39. Important and historical A.L.S., Sam, two pages, 4to, Admiralty House, 10th December n.y. (1936), to Lord Beaverbrook ('Dear Max'), marked Personal. Written on the day that King Edward VIII signed the Instrument of Abdication, Hoare announces 'I have not telephoned or come round today or yesterday as I was, on your advice, sitting back in the final acts of this tragic farce' and continues 'It was clear to me yesterday that the denouement was inevitable. I tried my best to the end to make renunciation possible, but the King would not move an inch. To what depths can folly descend!' Hoare further states 'In any case I am glad and grateful that another crisis brought us together again. It is almost a year to a day since my resignation. The first friendly word from outside came from you. I never forget these things nor shall I forget our talks of the last fortnight, and your manifest wish to help me in my career.' A letter of interesting content written on a pivotal day in the history of the British monarchy. One neat tear to the right edge of a central fold, only very slightly affecting one word of text, otherwise VG Max Aitken (1879-1964) 1st Baron Beaverbrook. Anglo-Canadian Business Tycoon, Politician & Writer, owner of the Daily Express and London Evening Standard newspapers. In June 1936 Hoare became First Lord of the Admiralty and in November 1936 he was (with Duff Cooper, the then Secretary of State for War) sought out by Edward VIII to provide independent advice and counsel on the King's constitutional problems. Initially the King attempted to convert him into a champion of his cause hoping that Hoare would speak up in defence of his right to marry when the matter came up for formal discussion in the Cabinet. In the King's memoirs A King's Story (1951) he recounted this first meeting, ''But I failed to win him as an advocate. He was sympathetic; but he also was acutely conscious of the political realities. Mr. Baldwin, he warned me, was in command of the situation: the senior Ministers were solidly with him on this issue. If I were to press my marriage project on the Cabinet I should meet a stone wall of opposition. I saw Mr. Duff Cooper at the Palace later the same day.....He was as encouraging and optimistic as Sam Hoare had been pessimistic and discouraging.'' Hoare's second meeting with the King took place at the end of November, about which the King wrote, ''At this juncture, the scene shifted momentarily to Stornoway House where Max Beaverbrook, ever since his return from America, had worked feverishly to rally support for me in whatever quarters it might be found.....Mr. Baldwin was aware of what Max Beaverbrook was up to; and no doubt hoping to check the forces beginning to rally round my cause, he despatched Sir Samuel Hoare on Sunday, the 29th, to explain the attitude of the Government towards the King. The message which the First Lord of the Admiralty bore was ominous indeed. It was that the Ministers stood with Mr. Baldwin---''no breach exists: there is no light or leaning in the King's direction.'' Then the First Lord fired his second salvo. ''The publicity,'' he said, ''is about to break.'' Many Ministers, he added, were restless and dissatisfied over the failure of the Press to publish facts of a crisis already the talk of the rest of the world. He stressed Mr. Baldwin's desire that the Press, like the Cabinet, should form an unbroken front against the proposed marriage. It was an undisguised invitation for Max Beaverbrook to change sides. His answer was: ''I have already taken the King's shilling, I am a King's man.'' On 4th December the King learned of an earlier meeting between Beaverbrook and Hoare, of which he commented ''So the day had not been all debits as far as I was concerned. From Stornoway House Max Beaverbrook, sensing the favourable upsurge in public opinion, had steadily hammered

May 24, 2018, 1:00 PM BST
Nottingham, United Kingdom

£2,000 (starting bid)

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BRITISH PRIME MINISTERS: J. Ramsay MacDonald (1866-1937) British Prime Minister 1924, 1929-35. T.L.S., J. Ramsay MacDonald, one page, 4to, 10 Downing Street, Whitehall, 1st September 1931, to R. C. Morrison M.P., on the printed stationery of the Prime Minister. MacDonald thanks his correspondent for their letter and continues 'I would like some time to have a word with you', further remarking 'I am sorry that you cannot continue with us, but quite understand. I have pressed nobody - indeed, I have done the opposite, but I know how bitter the fight is probably going to be and there will be a great many seats lost.' MacDonald concludes by expressing his appreciation of Morrison's work and regrets that he did not see as much of him as he would have liked to, in a holograph postscript also remarking 'Of course you will readily see that a member of an Opposition cannot be a P.P.S. to the head of the Government'. A letter of interesting content and association. Some light foxing and minor age wear. Together with Andrew Bonar Law (1858-1923) British Prime Minister 1922-23. Vintage signed postcard photograph of Law in a head and shoulders pose. Signed in fountain pen ink with his name alone to the lower white border. G to VG, 2  Robert Morrison (1881-1953) 1st Baron Morrison. British Politician who served as Parliamentary Private Secretary to J. Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 (when Leader of the Opposition) and again when MacDonald became Prime Minister. Morrison lost his seat of Tottenham North in the 1931 General Election but regained it in 1935.
BRITISH PRIME MINISTERS: J. Ramsay MacDonald (1866-1937) British Prime Minister 1924, 1929-35. T.L.S., J. Ramsay MacDonald, one page, 4to, 10 Downing Street, Whitehall, 1st September 1931, to R. C. Morrison M.P., on the printed stationery of the Prime Minister. MacDonald thanks his correspondent for their letter and continues 'I would like some time to have a word with you', further remarking 'I am sorry that you cannot continue with us, but quite understand. I have pressed nobody - indeed, I have done the opposite, but I know how bitter the fight is probably going to be and there will be a great many seats lost.' MacDonald concludes by expressing his appreciation of Morrison's work and regrets that he did not see as much of him as he would have liked to, in a holograph postscript also remarking 'Of course you will readily see that a member of an Opposition cannot be a P.P.S. to the head of the Government'. A letter of interesting content and association. Some light foxing and minor age wear. Together with Andrew Bonar Law (1858-1923) British Prime Minister 1922-23. Vintage signed postcard photograph of Law in a head and shoulders pose. Signed in fountain pen ink with his name alone to the lower white border. G to VG, 2 Robert Morrison (1881-1953) 1st Baron Morrison. British Politician who served as Parliamentary Private Secretary to J. Ramsay MacDonald in 1924 (when Leader of the Opposition) and again when MacDonald became Prime Minister. Morrison lost his seat of Tottenham North in the 1931 General Election but regained it in 1935.

May 24, 2018, 1:00 PM BST
Nottingham, United Kingdom

£100 (starting bid)

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Herbert Hoover Signed Letter Display PSA Certified

May 24, 2018, 6:00 AM PST
Westlake Village, CA, USA

$1 (starting bid)

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Signed Copy of Standing Firm by Dan Quayle

May 24, 2018, 6:00 AM PST
Westlake Village, CA, USA

$1 (starting bid)

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Ed Martin - Gov. Penn.

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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[NORTH CAROLINA] Josiah Bailey (1873-1946) Senator

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$15 (starting bid)

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Baron Stowell (1745-1836) English judge and jurist

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$25 (starting bid)

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George Read - American Consul Malaga Spain 1844 Letter

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$25 (starting bid)

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Signed By Two Prominent Vermonters 1811

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$100 (starting bid)

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Eli May Saulsbury (1817-1893) U.S. Senator from Delaware

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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Confederate John Perkins, Jr. (1819-1885) Louisiana

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$70 (starting bid)

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[UNITED NATIONS] Charles M. Lichenstein (1926-2002)

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$35 (starting bid)

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1816 New Hampshire - Jos. Doe

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$25 (starting bid)

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Benjamin Greene (1764-1837) American politician from Maine

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$50 (starting bid)

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Josiah Bailey (1873-1946) Senator from North Carolina

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$25 (starting bid)

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Sir William Amcotts-Ingilby, 2nd Baronet (1783-1854)

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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1st Baron Carrington FRS FSA (1752-1838), was a British banker

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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Sir John Aubrey, 3rd Baronet (1680-1743)

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$50 (starting bid)

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[MARYLAND] Henry W. Davis (1817-1865)

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$5 (starting bid)

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Herbert H. Lehman (1878-1963) Gov. of New York

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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Charles Richard Fox (1796-1873)  British army general

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$10 (starting bid)

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Gov. of Mass. Alexander H. Rice

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$25 (starting bid)

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Matthew Hale Carpenter (1824-1881) Wisconsin senator

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$5 (starting bid)

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Angus Cameron (1826-1897) Wisconsin Senator

May 24, 2018, 11:15 AM EST
Wells, ME, USA

$5 (starting bid)

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William H. Taft Signed Cut Display PSA Certified

May 25, 2018, 6:00 AM PST
Westlake Village, CA, USA

$6 (2 bids)

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Gerald R. Ford Signed Letter Display PSA Certified

May 25, 2018, 6:00 AM PST
Westlake Village, CA, USA

$1 (starting bid)

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BARACK OBAMA SIGNED AUTOGRAPHED BASEBALL CERTIFIED AAA COA

May 25, 2018, 1:00 PM EST
Mayfield, OH, USA

$30 (starting bid)

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GEORGE W BUSH FORMER POTUS SIGNED AUTOGRAPHED BASEBALL CERTIFIED AAA COA

May 25, 2018, 1:00 PM EST
Mayfield, OH, USA

$98 (starting bid)

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