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Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald Art for Sale and Sold Prices

Painter, b. 1900 - d. 1948

Born in Montgomery, Alabama, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was an American painter, writer, dancer and an icon of the 1920s Jazz Age. Widely considered to be the first American flapper, she began taking painting lessons at age 25, pulling from Modernist and Surrealist influences to create absurd, fantastical images. Although Fitzgerald wasn't well known as an artist during her time, her work has since been documented in books and displayed in museums.

About Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald



  • Name: Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald

  • Alias: Zelda Fitzgerald

  • Profession: Painter, writer, dancer, b. 1900 - d. 1948

  • Nationality: American


Biography


Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born in Alabama into a prominent family in 1900. After graduating from Sidney Lanier High School in 1918, she traveled to Paris in the 1920s to study ballet. Although she's best remembered as a writer and dancer, she produced well over 100 illustrations and paintings throughout the 1930s and 1940s.

Most of her work was inspired by Modernism and Surrealism, featuring absurd, exaggerated renditions of humans, animals and flowers that reflected her passion for fairy tales, dance and beauty. She also painted cityscapes of New York and Paris using mostly watercolors.

Despite her connection to the art world and friendship with painter Romaine Brooks, Fitzgerald spent most of her time in literary circles due to her marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerald. Most of her paintings have unfortunately been lost or destroyed, but the Montgomery Museum of Art features a permanent collection of her work.

Fitzgerald passed away in 1948 in a fire at Highland Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina.

Related Styles



Highlights and Achievements



  • Wrote a heavily autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, published in 1932.

  • In 1934, Fitzgerald held a solo exhibition of paintings at the Frances G. Mumm Gallery in New York City.


Read Full Artist Biography

About Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald

Painter, b. 1900 - d. 1948

Alias

Zelda Fitzgerald

Biography

Born in Montgomery, Alabama, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was an American painter, writer, dancer and an icon of the 1920s Jazz Age. Widely considered to be the first American flapper, she began taking painting lessons at age 25, pulling from Modernist and Surrealist influences to create absurd, fantastical images. Although Fitzgerald wasn't well known as an artist during her time, her work has since been documented in books and displayed in museums.

About Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald



  • Name: Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald

  • Alias: Zelda Fitzgerald

  • Profession: Painter, writer, dancer, b. 1900 - d. 1948

  • Nationality: American


Biography


Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald was born in Alabama into a prominent family in 1900. After graduating from Sidney Lanier High School in 1918, she traveled to Paris in the 1920s to study ballet. Although she's best remembered as a writer and dancer, she produced well over 100 illustrations and paintings throughout the 1930s and 1940s.

Most of her work was inspired by Modernism and Surrealism, featuring absurd, exaggerated renditions of humans, animals and flowers that reflected her passion for fairy tales, dance and beauty. She also painted cityscapes of New York and Paris using mostly watercolors.

Despite her connection to the art world and friendship with painter Romaine Brooks, Fitzgerald spent most of her time in literary circles due to her marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerald. Most of her paintings have unfortunately been lost or destroyed, but the Montgomery Museum of Art features a permanent collection of her work.

Fitzgerald passed away in 1948 in a fire at Highland Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina.

Related Styles



Highlights and Achievements



  • Wrote a heavily autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, published in 1932.

  • In 1934, Fitzgerald held a solo exhibition of paintings at the Frances G. Mumm Gallery in New York City.